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Author Topic: hiking / bug out gear  (Read 2001 times)

Socrates

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hiking / bug out gear
« on: October 19, 2018, 01:12:40 AM »
Found this great source for ultra light gear.

I'm interested in ultralight gear for a number of reasons:
- if you're bugging out and on the move, you need to maintain speed and not get worn down by the weight of what you're carrying
- you're more likely to keep a light and smallish bug out bag with you
- ultra light means more space and weight for other important items
- i consider a tent a primary item and only ultralights offer acceptable size and weight
- i'm outfitting a MOLLE belt above which i'm thinking a small backpack; this is because i've experienced that packs during warm weather are a disaster. They both wear down the shoulders and get very uncomfortable. A small/light pack can be carried over either shoulder [i.e. alternatively] if your back gets hot or tired; the heavy gear can then be carried directly on the hips by way of the MOLLE belt.
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ilinda

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Re: hiking / bug out gear
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2018, 10:02:34 AM »
Those tents have come such a long way, some weighing in ounces, rather than pounds!  Looks like a good tent selection, especially when you click on one or another and see how much larger they might be, as pictures can be deceiving.

One was 100" long for the tall sleeper.

Yowbarb

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Re: hiking / bug out gear
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2018, 07:01:22 PM »
Found this great source for ultra light gear.

I'm interested in ultralight gear for a number of reasons:
- if you're bugging out and on the move, you need to maintain speed and not get worn down by the weight of what you're carrying
- you're more likely to keep a light and smallish bug out bag with you
- ultra light means more space and weight for other important items
- i consider a tent a primary item and only ultralights offer acceptable size and weight
- i'm outfitting a MOLLE belt above which i'm thinking a small backpack; this is because i've experienced that packs during warm weather are a disaster. They both wear down the shoulders and get very uncomfortable. A small/light pack can be carried over either shoulder [i.e. alternatively] if your back gets hot or tired; the heavy gear can then be carried directly on the hips by way of the MOLLE belt.


Socrates, great idea for a new Topic,
good stuff,
Barb T.

Socrates

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18 lbs bug out bag
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2018, 08:35:25 AM »
This ex green beret shares what's in his 18 lbs bug out bag and why.
This is a very detailed vid and i think this man sounds as common sense and knowledgeable as he does experienced/wise.

I have been spending a lot of time watching youtube vids on tent/tarp/bivy options and ground covering/matrasses [a 3rd big one would be sleeping bag/covers]. My main interest is weight since [like the man above] i believe it is a big deal.
Mind you, i'm planning on having heavier redundancies. For instance, i have my Cold Steel

... but then i'd also like to get a Fivejoy multitool, which is smaller and lighter but good quality:


After all...
2 = 1, 1 = NONE

Some larger items might also be buried somewhere, or covered in concrete, for that matter. Who knows, some kind of FEMA-like organisation may steal all i have and i'll be sent on my way, lucky to keep my shoes... It would then be great to have a cache of all necessary items for survival and homesteading lying around somewhere.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2018, 11:24:01 AM by Socrates »
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R.R. Book

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Re: hiking / bug out gear
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2018, 05:19:36 AM »
Quote
Who knows, some kind of FEMA-like organisation may steal all i have and i'll be sent on my way, lucky to keep my shoes...

Hopefully any major blackout that affects you and us will also affect them... :-X

Socrates

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shelter/ground cover/sleeping bag
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2018, 11:36:34 AM »
I believe these are the big 3, in more ways than one. Too big or heavy a shelter/tarp/mattress and your backpack really gets to be a pain in the butt. So i've been scouring the internet in search of good options. Today i think i finally ran into the tent i've been looking for:
the Zpacks Plexamid.

At under a lb [422 grams] it has it all:
- enough height to sit up straight in
- 2 walls
- bathtub bottom covering
Going at $ 550 it ain't cheap, but then few great items are.

I was looking at getting myself a good tarp [some folks are doing amazing things with tarps, folding them into tents and everything; tarp origami] and getting a nice bivy for underneath, but the above Zpacks tent is even lighter than that kind of setup would be (and probably easier, roomier and smaller to pack up).

Still researching other gear options. So many to choose from. Will keep you posted.
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R.R. Book

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Re: hiking / bug out gear
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2018, 11:59:06 AM »
That is a nice looking tent Soc!

Quote
tarp origami

  :)

Socrates

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tent vs hammock vs bivy
« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2018, 10:39:12 AM »
Tent vs Hammock
In the above vid Backpacking with a Hammock lists a bunch of pros and cons related to hammocks and tents.

My 2 cents... are based on
1: my personal experience, i.e. especially in semi-arid regions
2: an post-apocalyptic scenario in which there ARE no trees to which one might attach a hammock
Actually, most American and UK survivalists are busy in the woods. They're dealing with getting food there, sleeping there, dealing with wildlife there, etc.
As far as i'm concerned, the kind of scenario in which 99.9999% of humanity gets killed does not allow for forests to keep standing. Hell, if things were that easy, i'm sure we could not trace all human genetics today back to 33 surviving female lines...
Megagales, megatsunamis and megaquakes, yet limited catastrophe enthousiasts would have us all believe that forests will be fine. Yeah, right...
So give me a tent over a shelter that requires trees to function.

In Tent vs Bivy Darwin on the Trail debates the minimalist bivy [plus tarp] vs tent.
I was on the fence about this one until i learned about the less-than-a-lb cuben fiber tent out there (in which one can sit upright and has a bathtub bottom).
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Socrates

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camping trowel
« Reply #8 on: November 02, 2018, 11:17:11 AM »
Darwin on-the-trail: Necessary or Nonsense?





Ya gotta be able to dig. If you've ever been in the wild you know this to be a fact.
Why did Zach Fowler win Alone season 3? Well, for one, he took a shovel with him. And though i love my Cold Steel shovel [that i have thanks to Zach Fowler], it is really heavy [which is one of the reasons it makes a great defensive weapon...] and maybe not something to take with you on a long hike. Well, if you did, you wouldn't need the trowel...
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Socrates

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bugoutbag / backpack / EDC bag
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2018, 02:41:14 PM »
I think i just had a eureka moment  :D
- i'm outfitting a MOLLE belt above which i'm thinking a small backpack; this is because i've experienced that packs during warm weather are a disaster. They both wear down the shoulders and get very uncomfortable. A small/light pack can be carried over either shoulder [i.e. alternatively] if your back gets hot or tired; the heavy gear can then be carried directly on the hips by way of the MOLLE belt.
I've been looking into bags and i believe i've run into a wonderful option [one that i'd never considered before]: the sling bag.


When hiking and climbing, it's great when a bag can be moved around a bit. And there are really only 4 options:
- on the back
- over one shoulder
- on the front
- in your hand
Now this Hazard 4 sling bag hits 3 out of 4 well, whereas traditional backpacks only do the back well and the other 3 poorly:
- the straps are not made to rest over one shoulder
- too bulky to ride comfortably at the front/chest area
- too heavy and big to carry in one hand [as it will touch the ground]
But there's more...

- The Holmes can ride higher or lower on the back or to the front, giving you a chance to let certain muscles rest or areas of the body to cool down/dry out
- It slides easily to the front [why it's also called Messenger] so you can access it's contents without having to take it off
- It comes off in a second
- The fact that it can be adjusted to be worn in so many positions means that you can get it out of the way when forced to navigate difficult terrain [i.e. like when climbing]


I think i'd like to put my most bulky but lightweight gear [sleeping bag, tent, mattress, etc.] in the 20 L bag and leave heavy things like tools on my MOLLE hip belt.
This bag is made from first rate materials and has MOLLE options all over as well.
The alternative to a pack like this one is a larger and heavier bag that wears down the same muscles all day and gets your back all sweaty (and therefore potentially too hot or cold), one i've had uncomfortably hanging on one shoulder in turns (because it's pretty uncomfortable), hanging on my chest [also uncomfortable since the straps are not made for this] or even in my hand [which only works for a short time because it's too heavy for this].


One caveat: such a bag demands truly minimalist gear, like the ones i've mentioned in previous posts in this thread. Larger tents, mattresses, sleeping bags, etc. would not work; there just isn't enough room. But then, like i said, experience has taught me that one doesn't have a choice; in order to be able to walk all day, day after day, one's pack needs to be much smaller than most people consider normal. Like, yeah i've walked up a mountain all day with a heavy pack, but then i needed 3 days to recuperate from that! In a true SHTF situation, one will likely neither have time nor opportunity to recuperate if one overexerts oneself. So travel light, smart and properly outfitted.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2018, 03:11:06 PM by Socrates »
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Socrates

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hiking / bug out; what NOT to bring
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2018, 11:40:10 PM »
Great vid here from a guy who started hiking in '13 and talks about his evolution of gear since then.
Yeah, better to learn from people like this than to reinvent the wheel and unnecessarily make the same mistakes. We can tweek the contents of a bag according to our SHTF expectations but for the most part, the kind of things hikers on long trips learn also apply to TEOTWAWKI situations.
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Socrates

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the importance of a proper bug-out-bag
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2018, 11:37:44 PM »
My interest of late has been directed at creating a good bug-out-bag. It didn't used to be.
What changed?
This vid maybe explains it; i love Simon Sinek but especially this Evan character made a point that hit home for me:
'Your greatest pains determine your passions'. As he explains, his own failures and miseries in becoming a successful entrepreneur motivated him to helping people out in achieving success. So how does this relate to me and why should you care?

A week from now it'll be 3 years ago exactly that i was kicked out into the street by police and wife. Out of the blue i get a phone call from the police that (after 6 years living where i was) i was to vacate the premises immediately. I was not told why, i was not offered enough time to gather my things. Worst of all, i was immediately in shock because i was actually being told that i was losing my son [which really hit home since i'd already lost my daughter through similar State interventions].
I gathered a few things and left the house. No car. No money. Just a few things i'd collected and remembered to grab, things i'd bought previously, prepping...
I learned the hard way just how UNprepared i was.

I almost died in the following weeks. Literally. Okay, for one, i didn't have a tent with me. Bloody fatal mistake. But in general i did not have a bug-out-bag READY and in retrospect even if i had had one ready back then, it would not have been a good one, i.e. prepared for many worst-case scenarios.
This passion of mine today stems from that traumatic experience 3 years ago; i don't ever want to go through something like that again and by that i mean, being so (unnecessarily) vulnerable and unprepared.


You should care because if you're anything like where i was 3 years ago, you're hoping and thinking you're fine because you even friggin' have a bug-out-bag, right?!
I mean, hardly anyone has a bug-out-bag so you're doing well, right?
And my point here and now is: No, not right; that's placing the bar far too low. Just because you have a bug-out-bag means next to nothing. What you need is a bug-out-bag that will do what a bug-out-bag needs to do. And most bug-out-bags are probably based on wishful thinking and counting on all kinds of things to go right for it to have any use at all.

The biggest problems people face are these:
- it can't be over 20 lbs
- you need the proper equipment [tent, mattress, sleeping bag, water filtration, etc. etc.]
- good quality light-weight equipment is usually expensive

Please allow me to be blunt: a bug-out-bag that ways you down so you become exhausted and slow should not even be called a "bug-out-bag" since it depends on all kinds of things like you having a car (at your disposal), cars working, roads working, government allowing you to drive, etc. etc. etc. All kinds of things could throw a wrench in a strategy that demands that most things stay the same. But since we're talking worst-case scenarios when we're talking bug-out-bags, that's not realistic.
When TSHTF there might not be good roads, government might become your worst enemy and try to stop you from moving, there may not be any gasoline, etc. etc. etc.
And that is the eventuality you are preparing against.

So to put together a bug-out-bag that has the right to be called a "bug-out-bag", you need to look to what thru-hikers and such put in their bags; these people go out on the trail for months at a time. But to be clear: they are generally trained and chances are you are not. And that means you're going to need every edge you can get, for the pack the trained thru-hiker carries and is comfortable with, will probably end up being at least a little uncomfortable for you. Now compare that with a 50 lbs bag [i.e. as opposed to the proper 20 lbs one] on your untrained back... Instead of making 20 miles a day, you'll probably end up making as many miles per week!


You may have your life on your back just as i had 3 years ago. No mercy, no help, no money to buy your way out of trouble. You may be in shock. That's no stretch of the imagination since we're talking about preparing for the 'end of the world'; chances are you will lose loved ones too stubborn to prepare or react reasonably [let alone listen to you]. And hard choices are bad enough but when you don't have the time to process, even the best of us won't have all of our mental capacities at our disposal. You must be ready to function even though you can't think (straight) anymore. It's that or die...

So forget 'lame' bug-out-bags that weigh 50 lbs, full of food and water, etc. etc. If that's your 'bug-out-bag', then you don't really have one and you might as well be honest with yourself that that's the case. At least from that point of honesty you might then perhaps reconsider your priorities (and start working on putting together a proper bug-out-bag).
What 'prepper' doesn't have a proper bug-out-bag? Just sayin'.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2018, 12:05:54 AM by Socrates »
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R.R. Book

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Re: hiking / bug out gear
« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2018, 05:26:35 AM »
Regarding the abrupt summary expulsion from your home:

Sounds like the work of Dragon Lady (M-in-L)?

You've inspired me to work on a bug out bag this week!

Socrates

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Re: hiking / bug out gear
« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2018, 09:14:55 AM »
Sounds like the work of Dragon Lady (M-in-L)?
Truly, i believe i have been under attack all of my life. Every great change i have ever attempted led to some kind of disaster coming out of nowhere. I mean, i know that sounds paranoid, but i have good reason to believe it's true [also coming from certain sources i trust].

You've inspired me to work on a bug out bag this week!
:D
At any rate, i've given you an idea about a great tent to get (which took me weeks of research to find). Btw, i think the best 2-person version is the Duplex. Is also Cuben fiber.
[You know what they say: "Buy smart and do it right the first time"...  ;)]
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R.R. Book

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Re: hiking / bug out gear
« Reply #14 on: November 10, 2018, 10:07:54 AM »
Quote
Truly, i believe i have been under attack all of my life. Every great change i have ever attempted led to some kind of disaster coming out of nowhere.

Sounds typical of the Matthew 24 description of the Elect.  Supposedly it gets better...

 

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