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Author Topic: Comparing small batteries  (Read 263 times)

R.R. Book

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Comparing small batteries
« on: December 27, 2018, 07:32:47 AM »
Do you ever feel like a deer in the headlights when shopping for smaller batteries?

This You-Tuber performed a quasi-scientific test comparing price vs. performance of 6 common brands of AA batteries, controlling for some confounding variables by rotating the batteries across hand-held fans in four different trials.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWAjgZmnoZo

Here are his results (hours:minutes) for all four rounds:
Duracell Quantum ($6.99) 1. 6:16 2. 7:21 3. 7:15 4. 6:41
Energizer Ultimate Lithium ($6.29) 1. 8:03 2. 6:31 3. 7:23 4. 6:44
Duracell ($3.99) 1. 5:58 2. 6:05 3. 5:07 4. 5:32
CVS Brand ($4.99) 1. 4:13 2. 4:45 3. 4:45 4. 3:57
Sunbeam High Drain ($1.00) 1. 4:01 2. 3:56 3. 4:19 4. 4:35
Panasonic ($1.00) 1. 2:59 2. 2:27 3. 2:22 4. 2:25

Given that numerous lithium battery fires have been reported in the news, and that they can be especially difficult to quench, I was impressed that the Quantum batteries outperformed them, though at a higher cost.  Quantums might be ideal for hard-to-reach devices such as smoke detectors.

One option, which I have done here, is to place unused lithium batteries in a metal trash can with lid and have a generous container of baking soda on hand either in or near the can, as baking soda is one of the few means of dousing a lithium fire.

I still prefer the rechargeable metal hydride AA batteries, though they are expensive initially.  In an extended power outage, a long-life non-rechargeable might be a more convenient option, though, and it would be interesting to compare the NiMH batteries up against the others for duration in another test. 

Has anyone on Town Hall done their own independent experiments, or do you have a favorite brand/type of battery?

« Last Edit: December 27, 2018, 03:53:12 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: Comparing small batteries
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2018, 07:49:05 AM »
More about different battery chemistries here:

http://lygte-info.dk/info/ComparisonOfAABatteryChemistry%20UK.html

R.R. Book

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Re: Comparing small batteries
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2018, 07:57:18 AM »
« Last Edit: December 27, 2018, 09:58:39 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Comparing small batteries
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2018, 06:34:49 PM »
Do you ever feel like a deer in the headlights when shopping for smaller batteries?

This You-Tuber performed a quasi-scientific test comparing price vs. performance of 6 common brands of AA batteries, controlling for some confounding variables by rotating the batteries across hand-held fans in four different trials.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWAjgZmnoZo

Here are his results (hours:minutes) for all four rounds:
Duracell Quantum ($6.99) 1. 6:16 2. 7:21 3. 7:15 4. 6:41
Energizer Ultimate Lithium ($6.29) 1. 8:03 2. 6:31 3. 7:23 4. 6:44
Duracell ($3.99) 1. 5:58 2. 6:05 3. 5:07 4. 5:32
CVS Brand ($4.99) 1. 4:13 2. 4:45 3. 4:45 4. 3:57
Sunbeam High Drain ($1.00) 1. 4:01 2. 3:56 3. 4:19 4. 4:35
Panasonic ($1.00) 1. 2:59 2. 2:27 3. 2:22 4. 2:25

Given that numerous lithium battery fires have been reported in the news, and that they can be especially difficult to quench, I was impressed that the Quantum batteries outperformed them, though at a higher cost.  Quantums might be ideal for hard-to-reach devices such as smoke detectors.

One option, which I have done here, is to place unused lithium batteries in a metal trash can with lid and have a generous container of baking soda on hand either in or near the can, as baking soda is one of the few means of dousing a lithium fire.

I still prefer the rechargeable metal hydride AA batteries, though they are expensive initially.  In an extended power outage, a long-life non-rechargeable might be a more convenient option, though, and it would be interesting to compare the NiMH batteries up against the others for duration in another test. 

Has anyone on Town Hall done their own independent experiments, or do you have a favorite brand/type of battery?


That Sunbeam High Drain looks to be a good deal.  For that price, you may be getting more bang for your buck.  You get almost as much service out of the $1 battery as you do from the $5 CVS battery.

R.R. Book

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Re: Comparing small batteries
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2018, 06:47:36 PM »
I think that might be the brand sold at Dollar Tree maybe?

 

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