Being In It for the Species The Kolbrin Bible Complete Danjeon Breathing System 
Surviving the Planet X Tribulation

Author Topic: Oldest living trees and plants in the world  (Read 153 times)

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 33286
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Oldest living trees and plants in the world
« on: July 07, 2019, 01:35:17 PM »
Here's one:

Posted on Facebook, by deMilked"

"Oldest Tree In The World Was Found In Sweden And Is 9,500-Year-Old
'Old Tjikko,' named after professor Leif Kullman’s Siberian husky, is 9,500 years old. This Spruce, growing merrily in Sweden, was located by Kullman in 2004 and the age of its root network was determined via carbon-14 dating."


Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 33286
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Oldest living trees and plants in the world
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2019, 01:39:43 PM »
The tree posted, previous post, Old Tjikko

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Tjikko

Old Tjikko is a 9,561-year-old Norway Spruce, located on Fulufjället Mountain of Dalarna province in Sweden. Old Tjikko originally gained fame as the "world's oldest tree."[1] Old Tjikko is, however, a clonal tree that has regenerated new trunks, branches and roots over millennia rather than an individual tree of great age. Old Tjikko is recognized as the oldest living Picea abies and the third oldest known clonal tree.

The age of the tree was determined by carbon dating of genetically matched plant material collected from under the tree, as dendrochronology would cause damage. The trunk itself is estimated to be only a few hundred years old, but the plant has survived for much longer due to a process known as layering (when a branch comes in contact with the ground, it sprouts a new root), or vegetative cloning (when the trunk dies but the root system is still alive, it may sprout a new trunk).



R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7728
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Oldest living trees and plants in the world
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2019, 04:35:05 AM »
Amazing.  What's been an eye-opener for me recently was learning that a number of species can be encouraged to propagate by layering - species that you normally wouldn't think of in terms of multiple trunks, such as the dwarf tart cherry trees.  One comment that I read about those is that training food producing trees in a layering (or bushing) habit in the North might be useful in preventing their untimely death in an especially difficult cold snap.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2019, 04:53:06 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3735
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: Oldest living trees and plants in the world
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2019, 08:29:18 PM »
Amazing.  What's been an eye-opener for me recently was learning that a number of species can be encouraged to propagate by layering - species that you normally wouldn't think of in terms of multiple trunks, such as the dwarf tart cherry trees.  One comment that I read about those is that training food producing trees in a layering (or bushing) habit in the North might be useful in preventing their untimely death in an especially difficult cold snap.
The layering reminds me of coppicing of trees to produce many smaller branches, to replace the main trunks.  Some coppice trees to get material for "recaning" chairs, made of hickory for example.  Others use a form of coppicing as another way to feed livestock, whereas they get leaves, twigs, and small branches-- an especially good way to feed animals during extreme drought or other conditions where hay is not available or has no quality.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 33286
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Oldest living trees and plants in the world
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2019, 12:18:18 AM »
Amazing.  What's been an eye-opener for me recently was learning that a number of species can be encouraged to propagate by layering - species that you normally wouldn't think of in terms of multiple trunks, such as the dwarf tart cherry trees.  One comment that I read about those is that training food producing trees in a layering (or bushing) habit in the North might be useful in preventing their untimely death in an especially difficult cold snap.

R.R. great ideas, I didn't know trees could be trained in doing that. Wow that could make all the difference in the survival of some species.
Sounds like a good topic in the Permaculture area!

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 33286
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Oldest living trees and plants in the world
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2019, 12:18:54 AM »
Amazing.  What's been an eye-opener for me recently was learning that a number of species can be encouraged to propagate by layering - species that you normally wouldn't think of in terms of multiple trunks, such as the dwarf tart cherry trees.  One comment that I read about those is that training food producing trees in a layering (or bushing) habit in the North might be useful in preventing their untimely death in an especially difficult cold snap.
The layering reminds me of coppicing of trees to produce many smaller branches, to replace the main trunks.  Some coppice trees to get material for "recaning" chairs, made of hickory for example.  Others use a form of coppicing as another way to feed livestock, whereas they get leaves, twigs, and small branches-- an especially good way to feed animals during extreme drought or other conditions where hay is not available or has no quality.

i always learn so much from your posts, ilinda. :)

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7728
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Oldest living trees and plants in the world
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2019, 03:18:57 PM »

Diagram of what Ilinda means by coppicing

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3735
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: Oldest living trees and plants in the world
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2019, 08:05:53 PM »
Amazing.  What's been an eye-opener for me recently was learning that a number of species can be encouraged to propagate by layering - species that you normally wouldn't think of in terms of multiple trunks, such as the dwarf tart cherry trees.  One comment that I read about those is that training food producing trees in a layering (or bushing) habit in the North might be useful in preventing their untimely death in an especially difficult cold snap.
The layering reminds me of coppicing of trees to produce many smaller branches, to replace the main trunks.  Some coppice trees to get material for "recaning" chairs, made of hickory for example.  Others use a form of coppicing as another way to feed livestock, whereas they get leaves, twigs, and small branches-- an especially good way to feed animals during extreme drought or other conditions where hay is not available or has no quality.

i always learn so much from your posts, ilinda. :)
Heck, I'm probably just restating what some here have already posted.  LOL

 

Surviving the Planet X Tribulation: A Faith-Based Leadership Guide

Radio Free Earth: Community Preparedness and Two Way Radios

BUY NOW

In a post-global disaster world, predators and tyrants will have the best two-way radios, and they'll use them to surveil you at a comfortable distance.

What will you have? Signal flares and red bandannas?

If so, when you least expect it, the predators and tyrants will come to take a spoil and they will torture, rape, and kill without mercy.

This is why Radio Free Earth authors Marshall Masters and Duane W. Brayton have an urgent message for everyone with a serious interest in preparedness. That being, analog RF (radio frequency) is the heartbeat of freedom. Accept no substitutes.

Watch our free videos to learn how to stay safe and free with an affordable strategy for two way communication, both near and far.

Welcome to Radio
Free Earth

Why Radio
Free Earth

Post-Disaster
Communications

Citizens Band Radios
for Survival

BUY NOW