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Author Topic: The Great Depression of the early 20th Century  (Read 731 times)

R.R. Book

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The Great Depression of the early 20th Century
« on: August 06, 2019, 02:46:32 PM »
This topic aims to be very broad, covering the following as a suggestion:

*Warning signs of the impending collapse

*How different segments of society were affected (I.e. farmers)

*Differences between then and now

*Innovative means of survival

*Stories from our own ancestors and other survivors

*How the media covered each phase

*Historic photos, films

*Lessons learned: What would they have done differently?

Please add stories from your own family, as well as any other material that might be worth sharing...

« Last Edit: August 07, 2019, 05:19:54 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: The Great Depression of the early 20th Century
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2019, 03:08:18 PM »
Here's a 12 minute film titled "Survival Lessons from the Great Depression:"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SH3PUBkWYQ

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They would take the rubber from tires and use it to resole shoes...



« Last Edit: August 06, 2019, 03:36:59 PM by R.R. Book »

MadMax

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Re: The Great Depression of the early 20th Century
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2019, 03:39:11 PM »
Good article on this subject on Zerohedge, well worth taking the time to read/comprehend where we are headed ..

"Heading Towards A Waterfall" - Fourth Turning Economics

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-08-05/heading-towards-waterfall-fourth-turning-
Economics

    “In retrospect, the spark might seem as ominous as a financial crash, as ordinary as a national election, or as trivial as a Tea Party. The catalyst will unfold according to a basic Crisis dynamic that underlies all of these scenarios: An initial spark will trigger a chain reaction of unyielding responses and further emergencies. The core elements of these scenarios (debt, civic decay, global disorder) will matter more than the details, which the catalyst will juxtapose and connect in some unknowable way. If foreign societies are also entering a Fourth Turning, this could accelerate the chain reaction. At home and abroad, these events will reflect the tearing of the civic fabric at points of extreme vulnerability – problem areas where America will have neglected, denied, or delayed needed action.” – The Fourth Turning – Strauss & Howe


The quote above captures the current Fourth Turning perfectly, even though it was written more than a decade before the 2008 financial tsunami struck. With global debt now exceeding $250 trillion, up 60% since the Crisis began, and $13 trillion of sovereign debt with negative yields, it is clear to all rational thinking individuals the next financial crisis will make 2008 look like a walk in the park. We are approaching the eleventh anniversary of this crisis period, with possibly a decade to go before a resolution.

As I was thinking about what confluence of economic factors might ignite the next bloody phase of this Fourth Turning, I realized economic factors have been the underlying cause of all four Crisis periods in American history.

All safe deposit boxes in banks or financial institutions have been sealed… and may only be opened in the presence of an agent of the I.R.S.” – President F.D. Roosevelt, 1933

In Part Two of this article I’ll ponder how the coming years will play out, based upon the dynamics of Fourth Turnings.

*  *  *
The corrupt establishment will do anything to suppress sites like the Burning Platform from revealing the truth.
"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

R.R. Book

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Re: The Great Depression of the early 20th Century
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2019, 04:19:32 PM »
The Fourth Turning is one of the most important books that I've ever read Max -

A student of Strauss & Howe's named James Goulding wrote an even darker American prophecy based upon S & H's work titled Winter is Coming, available only electronically: 

https://www.amazon.com/Winter-Coming-James-Goulding-ebook/dp/B004DUMXO4
« Last Edit: August 07, 2019, 05:18:19 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: The Great Depression of the early 20th Century
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2019, 06:12:36 PM »
Here's an interview of a woman who grew up on a farm in a large family during the Great Depression, titled "Farm Life During the Great Depression:"

« Last Edit: August 25, 2019, 06:48:16 PM by R.R. Book »

Jimfarmer

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Re: The Great Depression of the early 20th Century
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2019, 11:38:53 PM »
The Fourth Turning is one of the most important books that I've ever read Max -

A student of Strauss & Howe's named James Goulding wrote an even darker American prophecy based upon S & H's work titled Winter is Coming, available only electronically: 

https://www.amazon.com/Winter-Coming-James-Goulding-ebook/dp/B004DUMXO4

Interesting, I wish I had time to read it/them.  However, all forecasts based on "business as usual" are now void because of overriding  heteroclites  1) the emancipation of Earth and Humanity, 2) Nibiru flyby, 3) Grand Solar Minimum, and 4) Ascension.

(I found  "heteroclite" in the online thesaurus: a person or thing that deviates from the ordinary rule or form.)

R.R. Book

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Re: The Great Depression of the early 20th Century
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2019, 06:21:40 PM »
Great vocabulary word Jim!

Will give a brief explanation of The Fourth Turning and Winter is Coming:

Throughout American history, there have been definable personality traits of entire generations which impact society for better or worse, and these generational patterns follow a cycle which shifts about every 20 years as each new generation is born and older ones age forward.  Four groups tend to exist at any given time: the prophets, the nomads, the heroes, and the artists.

Meanwhile, about once every human lifespan, a crisis emerges affecting all of society.  How that crisis arises and is resolved depends upon which generational cohort is in power at the moment.

This book and James Goulding's follow-up fit very well into Tribulation and Ascension studies.  S & H predicted well in advance of the GSM/Nibiru flyby/SHTF that an unknown crisis would emerge when the Baby Boomers reached senior adulthood.  Goulding took the prophecy even further, predicting in advance that the Baby Boomers would destroy every social institution that they aged into power over, creating the social side of the Great Tribulation (though he may not use that Biblical language specifically). 

The older Boomers were predicted to move from being a self-absorbed generation to taking on the mantel of the Prophets in their old age, which is a dangerous office for this particular cohort to occupy, as they are foretold to misuse the role in a schizophrenic switch from being the libertines of the 1960's to holding a moral yardstick up against the rest of society at the same time as the unnamed Crisis begins to emerge.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2019, 06:51:15 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: The Great Depression of the early 20th Century
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2019, 07:19:05 PM »
Both books sound appealing!

Jimfarmer

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Re: The Great Depression of the early 20th Century
« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2019, 10:16:04 PM »
Quote
Will give a brief explanation of The Fourth Turning and Winter is Coming:

Much appreciated, thanks.

R.R. Book

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Re: The Great Depression of the early 20th Century
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2019, 11:24:47 AM »
Grand Valley State University in Michigan produced this interview of elders who had experienced the Great Depression:


Highlights:

*Everyone in the community had their own garden

*Folks traveled to town once a week, every Saturday night, to sell their excess produce and go shopping.

*Children, if they had been good during the week, might be given a dime to spend in town prior to the Depression.  A dime would buy a large chocolate bar or two ice cream cones at that time.  Then when the economy collapsed, the children either received less spending money or none at all.

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In those days, the family life was better than it is today.  Well the families were closer together in those days.  They had to depend on each other, and they paid more attention to each other.

*Children were encouraged to eat everything offered to them at each meal, not wasting any scrap.

*The local doctor or dentist might have been considered wealthy compared with other members of the community.

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We heated with wood in the kitchen.


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We had a furnace, but I remember that we had to turn off all of the heat in the bedrooms and just come in the living room.  We just had one heat register, and we had to take turns getting dressed on that register in the morning.  My brother would boot me off of it when it was his turn.

*A popular Northern remedy for colds was Antiphlogistine (similar to Vicks), made in Canada, which still exists under the name A535 (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RUB_A535 and https://ruba535.ca/ )

*They would also take sulfur orally in the form of a drop of laundry bluing, which contained copper sulfate, when doctoring a cold. (Wikipedia considers it to be toxic, but then in another article says that tropical locations still use it to treat internal parasites.)


*Cinnamon patches were placed on the chest for a cold.  Some used mustard instead.

*Cod liver oil was taken for vitamin D

*Traveling salesmen would periodically come to town with patent remedies.  They might give all the children a stick of chewing gum.

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We didn't emphasize having a lot of "stuff" in order to keep up with the Joneses.  Just be yourself and don't worry about what people think.

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We didn't have a lot of things, because a lot of it wasn't available.  Some people have a lot of things now, and they're not really happy.

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I know my Dad lent money to people out of work from time to time if he had it.

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I can't find myself being bitter about the Depression.  We didn't give our parents a bad time when we wished we could have done this or that.  We were content.

My grandparents' home town continued the Depression-Era tradition of gathering together in the park like this each Independence Day, with a long contiguous stretch of picnic tables offering up dozens of hand-cranked ice cream freezers with each family's own unique home-made ice cream for everyone in the community to sample.  This friendly tradition seemed to die out with the advent of the 1970's.  My elderly neighbor also remembers only having ice cream once a year on their family homestead in the Shenandoahs, as they had no refrigeration.  Photo courtesy of the film producers.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2019, 04:04:00 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: The Great Depression of the early 20th Century
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2019, 12:54:30 PM »
Here's a film titled "The Great Depression in Pennsylvania:"


Highlights:

*The Great Depression did not happen all at once.  It reached its worst by the summer of 1932.
(Question: Didn't is happen in waves, rather than having only one peak?)

*Rural areas fared better than cities, though everyone felt the effects.

Quote
No person was left untouched.

*Each community had an "overseer of the poor" who would issue vouchers to grocery stores to cover expenses in allowing the needy to have a limited amount of groceries. 

*In the first few years of the Depression, 9,000 banks closed and depositors lost nearly 3 billion dollars collectively.  Even children's savings accounts were wiped out.

*Employment ramifications could range from reduced hours and wages to complete loss of jobs.  Men at the prime of their careers might have worked half-weeks for an extended period of time, if at all.

*The more-stable utility companies were also affected.  Employees' hours were first cut by Bell Telephone from 40 hours per week to 36, and then later to 32 hours.


*Hitch-hiking was legal back then

*People sold off their belongings to pay bills

*Extended families moved in together, and young married couples often lived with the parents of either the bride or the groom

*Families were larger then.

Quote
I was probably 30 or 35 years old before I could
eat a whole banana without having to share it.
 

*Families within a neighborhood sometimes would each contribute an item to a group dinner: one might put in a ham bone, another might give beans from the garden, etc. and they could come up with a large enough meal to share that way.

*Less development back then meant more available logs for heating.


*Before food stamps, Burpee seed packets were handed out.  Half of a family's yard might be dedicated to food gardening, even in town.

*People who had no land would plant a garden on someone else's property.  The grower and the property owner would each get half of the harvest to keep.


*Institutions which offered relief included churches, the Salvation Army and the YMCA.

*While not all the young men who wanted a job with the Pennsylvania Railroad got one, many young men would hop (trespass) on a freight train and head West in search of employment.  (There's a good homeschool lesson available on-line BTW about the symbols which hoboes would leave for one another to indicate where to go for food, etc.).  Anyone doing this had to jump on the train while it was in motion, in order to dodge railroad security.  Anyone getting caught might spend a short time in jail.  One older gentleman noted that he had seen the insides of jails all across the country that way.

« Last Edit: December 07, 2019, 01:25:42 PM by R.R. Book »

 

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