Win-Win Survival Communities The Kolbrin Bible Complete Danjeon Breathing System Radio Free Earth

Author Topic: Miscellaneous threats to survival  (Read 134827 times)

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #390 on: June 14, 2019, 04:16:03 PM »
ilinda and R.R. great posts, will come back to, soon...

Temporarily changing the subject back to Pit bull fatal attacks, which I sometimes post here in this Topic. Jimfarmers News post from the other day included a current fatal attack, not sure what breed that was who killed his owner who was probably having a seizure.

Story here goes back awhile, a different story, England in 2016, The Journal. This particular tragedy was caused by a pit bull, who had been raised by the victim since a small pup. Not likely the pit was abused, the victim was a well-liked happy go lucky smiling young man. A different breed might have got help, not killed him when he was at his most vulnerable.  Keep that in mind when having pets who could help you or kill you or your kids during turbulent times. You all know my opinion, this breed should be outlawed.


Young man killed by his own dog as he suffered an epileptic seizure

Trigger was then taken to a local vet to be put down.

https://www.thejournal.ie/man-killed-by-own-dog-2527572-Jan2016/

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #391 on: July 30, 2019, 09:56:16 AM »
This video was on CNN. A pit bull attacked a six year old boy, knocking him to the sidewalk outside his home. The pit bit him in a few places including the back of his head which required staples. There was a long driveway between the sidewalk and his front porch, but the surveillance camera on the porch caught the attack.
A 16 year-old neighbor ran to help get the pit bull off the boy. He managed to get the dog off the little boy, then the pit chased the 16 year old, knocking him to the ground and biting his hand. The 16 year old managed to get up and run home. The whole thing caught on the camera. The mother of the 6 year old boy is very grateful, without help the attack might have been fatal, since the boy had bites to the back of his head and was bleeding a lot.
Link to the video:


https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/24/us/pit-bull-attack-texas-trnd/

A teenager rescued a 6-year-old neighbor from a dog attack, and it was all caught on camera
By Sophie Sherry and Christina Zdanowicz, CNN   Updated 4:48 PM ET, Wed July 24, 2019

Neighbor jumps into action when dog attacks 6-year-old 01:23
(CNN)Grant Brown was heading out for the day on Sunday when he heard screams from down the street. He looked up to see a dog attacking 6-year-old Mason Lindeman, who was been playing outside his Conroe, Texas, home.

The 19-year-old sprang into action, running straight toward the pit bull.
"I was just focused on how I could get the dog away from the kid," Brown said Wednesday.
His heroic actions were all captured on video.
As Brown got closer, the dog jumped off Mason and started chasing him instead. This gave the boy the chance to run to safety.
Jill Lindeman, Mason's mother, said she had stepped inside for a few moments when the attack occurred.
"I opened the door and see my son standing there with blood covering his head, neck and arms," Lindeman said. "I checked him over very quickly and realized it was a cut to the back of his head."
She rushed him to a hospital, where he given four staples in the back of his head.
The dog continued to chase Brown, he said, eventually jumping on top of him, as well. It bit him just before his father arrived and scared the dog away.

Brown now has a 1-inch bite mark and several puncture wounds on his hand.
Brown's mother, Crystal Waddel, saw the whole thing and said she saw pure terror in her son's eyes as he ran from the dog.
"I'm really really proud of him for just taking action to help the young kid," she said Wednesday.
Brown doesn't know Mason personally, and even though he was scared, he knew that he had to help.
As a big brother himself, Brown hopes someone would do the same for his younger siblings.
A neighbor was able to track the dog's owner. Lindeman said they are working with those owners to address the situation.
The dog was taken by animal control, and its owner was cited, according to CNN affiliate KPRC.

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #392 on: August 23, 2019, 03:22:36 PM »
Yowbarb Note: One week prior to his daughter being killed by three
pit bulls, the father got in an argument with his neighbor. The argument was about the neighbor's inadequate fencing of the three pit bulls, fencing that did not keep the pits on the property.  The neighbor went to the store and left his three pit bulls in his yard which had a broken fence. Also the garage door was open to the alley, where the little girl was playing. The three pits mauled the girl to death.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/23/us/dogs-mauling-owner-charged/index.html

The owner of dogs that mauled a 9-year-old girl to death charged with murder
By Theresa Waldrop and Carma Hassan, CNN

Updated 4:29 PM ET, Fri August 23, 2019

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #393 on: August 23, 2019, 03:26:07 PM »
I hate to say it, but maybe this will serve as a stronger warning to pit bull owners to keep their animals under their constant control, or choose a different breed...

ilinda

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #394 on: August 23, 2019, 05:46:23 PM »
Amen.

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #395 on: November 17, 2019, 10:22:22 AM »
I hate to say it, but maybe this will serve as a stronger warning to pit bull owners to keep their animals under their constant control, or choose a different breed...

Thanks for your replies on this, RR and ilinda.
Yes, for sure people who have pits need to have foolproof fences. Problem is that often fails. Will tell why later in this post...
I knew nothing about pits until the mid 1980s.
In 1985 I found a beautiful half-grown light colored female dog running loose, I took her in and couldn't find an owner so meanwhile took care of her. We named her "Daisy". I had a small fenced patio with a sliding glass door leading into the master bedroom and sometimes kept her out there with food and water, temps were mild.
One night, a moonlit night, I entered the master bedroom hadn't turned on the light in the room yet. I glanced out at Daisy. I was completely relaxed and not expecting anything. I was astounded to see the expression on her face. She gave me a look and (forgive it, I know it sounds far fetched, read the thought she was sending out.) What I totally "got" from Daisy was, "I like you lady, but if I am in the mood I could rip your throat out."  I thought, whoah!!  As I said, I was not aware of the pit bull breed at that time and had no prior prejudices against Daisy.

Soon after that night, a neighbor across the street, young woman with husband and son, told me, "You have a Pit Bull there."  I said, oh I have not heard of that, didn't know about what kind of dog, and I explained the deal, that she was wandering loose. I told her I would not have her long. The neighbor gal, Kay was emphatic. She told me a story:
One of Kay's closest friends had lived in the same house for many years, I will call her Cindy. Cindy had lived next door to a pit bull. For YEARS. I think there was friendly interaction, and she thought no problem. One day Cindy was catching some sun in her back yard and suddenly the next-door pit jumped a 6 foot fence and attacked her, tearing a piece of muscle off the bone of her leg.
She had to walk with a cane after that.
The story my neighbor Kay told me really surprised me. I was almost 45, had lived in a lot of places, never heard of anything beyond a regular dog bite, requiring a few stitches and maybe rabies shots. In 1985, I had never heard of any crippling dog attacks, let alone fatal ones.

I didn't keep Daisy long, she didn't cause us a problem, as I said not fully grown. I got her a home on a ranch... as I said, had not heard of fatal pit bull attacks,
Years later, at this point, I don't know how people can continue to go out and get pit bulls for their households.
There have been just thousands of fatal attacks by pit bulls, as we all know. Anyone who reads this topic or googles it or pays any attention at all, will know that.
I do understand in their mind, their pet is a safe, loving animal. If you read discussions online and various posts, so many people say, "it's all how you raise the pit."

Have narrowly avoided getting bit by one, walking in a rural neighborhood 1990s,  and personally know someone who killed one with a machete. My friend was a half Cherokee gal partly raised in an orphanage then a a TX farm. Tough. My friend saw a pit bull running after a little 4 yr old boy on a tricycle. the boy was riding fast through alleyways, when he realized the dog was being threatening  he was terrified, riding as fast as he could, My friend spotted this. She had a sharp machete in her truck and took it out. As the pit bull ran past the alleyway entrance, fast on the heels of the boy, she rose the machete and cut the pit in half. The boy was unharmed and went home.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2019, 10:41:32 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #396 on: November 17, 2019, 10:34:11 AM »
One day in that same area (Vista, CA mid 1980s) I was walking my foundling dog, KIX.
She wasn't even pooping on the grass, nothing, we were walking, minding our own business. (Kix not a pit, she looked part lab, gentle dog.)
Totally calm, walking along then a pit bull busts out a screen door (it must not have been latched all the way and it just pushed it open, ran out the door straight at us. Before I could do anything, in seconds the pit bull tore a deep piece of flesh off the side of my dog, about four inches square. The owner came out to get the dog back in. I got the owners phone number and told him he would be paying the vet bill. Kix had surgery to repair the wound, and thankfully was OK and the pit owner did make good on his promise to pay the bill.
I noticed his reaction he was pretty unemotional about the fact his dog had attacked the other dog like that. Like he kinda knew it could happen and he did not care that much.


ilinda

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #397 on: November 17, 2019, 06:51:42 PM »
About two days ago I accidentally happened on a youtube video, not about dogs or pit bulls, but part of the story went like this:

The guy narrating told about how he had a very friendly and loving pit bull for some years, and he swore it was nothing like the reputation that pit bulls carry.  Well, then they started their family.  One day when their first born was still young, maybe 1 or 2 yrs. old, the pit bull suddenly without warning attacked their little child, daughter I think, and fortunately mom was there and was able to get the daughter to safety.

He continued that although he never dreamed anything like that would happen with such a soft-hearted pit bull, he said it tore him apart to have the dog euthanized, but he knew it had to happen, because sending the dog to another household would/could mean the same thing would happen again.

There is a pit bull on our road who runs free and even comes to our place about 4-5 miles away, and although Pudd'nhead is very friendly, I still don't trust him and wish his owners would keep him home.

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #398 on: November 17, 2019, 10:31:43 PM »
About two days ago I accidentally happened on a youtube video, not about dogs or pit bulls, but part of the story went like this:

The guy narrating told about how he had a very friendly and loving pit bull for some years, and he swore it was nothing like the reputation that pit bulls carry.  Well, then they started their family.  One day when their first born was still young, maybe 1 or 2 yrs. old, the pit bull suddenly without warning attacked their little child, daughter I think, and fortunately mom was there and was able to get the daughter to safety.

He continued that although he never dreamed anything like that would happen with such a soft-hearted pit bull, he said it tore him apart to have the dog euthanized, but he knew it had to happen, because sending the dog to another household would/could mean the same thing would happen again.

There is a pit bull on our road who runs free and even comes to our place about 4-5 miles away, and although Pudd'nhead is very friendly, I still don't trust him and wish his owners would keep him home.

ilinda, that is so good that the little baby was saved. Thanks for sharing the story.
There are a lot of people who just don't believe their dog would do such a thing.
Blessings...

ilinda

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #399 on: November 18, 2019, 02:52:07 PM »
I hate to say it, but maybe this will serve as a stronger warning to pit bull owners to keep their animals under their constant control, or choose a different breed...

I knew nothing about pits until the mid 1980s.
In 1985 I found a beautiful half-grown light colored female dog running loose, I took her in and couldn't find an owner so meanwhile took care of her. We named her "Daisy". I had a small fenced patio with a sliding glass door leading into the master bedroom and sometimes kept her out there with food and water, temps were mild.
One night, a moonlit night, I entered the master bedroom hadn't turned on the light in the room yet. I glanced out at Daisy. I was completely relaxed and not expecting anything. I was astounded to see the expression on her face. She gave me a look and (forgive it, I know it sounds far fetched, read the thought she was sending out.) What I totally "got" from Daisy was, "I like you lady, but if I am in the mood I could rip your throat out."  I thought, whoah!!  As I said, I was not aware of the pit bull breed at that time and had no prior prejudices against Daisy.

Fascinating bit of intuition regarding your "knowing" what pit bull was thinking.   It may have saved your life by causing you to get rid of it.

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #400 on: November 18, 2019, 11:19:44 PM »

I hate to say it, but maybe this will serve as a stronger warning to pit bull owners to keep their animals under their constant control, or choose a different breed...

I knew nothing about pits until the mid 1980s.
In 1985 I found a beautiful half-grown light colored female dog running loose, I took her in and couldn't find an owner so meanwhile took care of her. We named her "Daisy". I had a small fenced patio with a sliding glass door leading into the master bedroom and sometimes kept her out there with food and water, temps were mild.
One night, a moonlit night, I entered the master bedroom hadn't turned on the light in the room yet. I glanced out at Daisy. I was completely relaxed and not expecting anything. I was astounded to see the expression on her face. She gave me a look and (forgive it, I know it sounds far fetched, read the thought she was sending out.) What I totally "got" from Daisy was, "I like you lady, but if I am in the mood I could rip your throat out."  I thought, whoah!!  As I said, I was not aware of the pit bull breed at that time and had no prior prejudices against Daisy.

Fascinating bit of intuition regarding your "knowing" what pit bull was thinking.   It may have saved your life by causing you to get rid of it.

That is quite possible... blew my mind at the time since I knew nothing about pits of fatal dog attacks in those days...

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #401 on: December 15, 2019, 09:09:14 AM »
Yowbarb Note: Re pits, pit mixes and other big aggressive dogs. Just saw this posted on Quora.

https://www.quora.com/What-goes-through-a-police-officers-mind-when-he-shoots-someones-dog

What goes through a police officer's mind when he shoots someone's dog?
http://www.inquisitr.com/1320906/sean-kendall-cop-killed-my-dog/
This question previously had details. They are now in a comment.

26 Answers

Paul Harding, Deputy Sheriff since 2000, Commercial Pilot
Answered Apr 8, 2016 ·
Upvoted by John Buginas, SF/SPCA Academy for Dog Trainers, Instructor, 2006-2009. CTC 2005. and Bruce Farmer, 39 yrs as a front- line, supervisor, manager and instructor in Federal law enfor
Well, I can't speak for all police officers, but I can tell you what went through my mind the time I shot someone's dog.

I was called to a small town in my county in reference to three dogs which were running loose, attacking other peoples' leashed pets, and destroying property. I got there before animal control and located the dogs, which were staying together. Two of them looked like pit bull /boxer mixes, and the third was a big, light-colored lab mix. I don't really have any equipment for catching dogs, especially three big ones, so I just sort of followed them around town in my car to make sure they didn't cause too much trouble before animal control could get there.

As I followed them down a street, a lady opened her front door and started yelling to me and pointing to the house across the street. That's where the dogs belonged. The dogs ran onto her porch. She closed the storm door and they started jumping and biting at it.

This was getting too dangerous. Those dogs were crazy, and someone was going to get hurt. Now, I'm a dog person. A dog lover. I get along just fine with dogs, and I can usually even come to an arrangement with the grouchy ones. So, I grabbed my metal clipboard to use as a shield and got out of my car, headed toward the dogs' house. They were having none of that.

I was almost able to back them down. Like I said, I love dogs, and I know the tricks, but three dogs in an aggressive pack mentality were more than I could handle by myself. They started playing that adorable doggie game where they take turns lunging at you, getting a little closer each time, two of them trying to circle behind you while another gets your attention.

I had a Taser with one shot. Three dogs. I had pepper spray, but the dogs were too close and too aggressive to count on it. My biggest regret is that I didn't just spray them as soon as they were in range, but by the time I realized I was in serious trouble, it was too late for pepper spray.

I drew my gun and backed toward my squad car. This gave me a bit more confidence, which the dogs apparently sensed, because they backed off a little. Before I got back to my car though, they were right on top of me. I made sure I was oriented so that if I had to shoot I would be pointing in the safest possible direction. When one of the dogs finally lunged so close that I was sure he would get me, I fired. I was pointing my gun down at a fairly steep angle, because that's how close the dog was.

This was supposed to be about what went through my mind. Well, at the moment I decided to pull the trigger, it was something like "I gave you every chance in the world, but you keep coming, so f*ck you." (sorry for the language, but that's what I thought)

The dog I shot went down hard, bleeding all over my front fender. The other two dogs ran off. The shot finally got the attention of the dogs' owners.

Of course, the first person to come sprinting out of the house was a little girl, maybe 12 years old. She was screaming and crying and looking at me like the biggest monster she had ever seen. I have no doubt that those three dogs, who would have had a great time playing tug o war with my corpse,  were as gentle as kittens with "their" little girl. Dogs are amazing like that. So, there was absolutely nothing I could say to her. At that point, what was going through my mind was "Screw this. I'm just going to hand this little girl my badge and go home."

I've had to arrest parents in front of their screaming kids. I've had to pry screaming toddlers from the arms of their crying, meth-addicted mothers and hand them over to DCFS. This was bad in a whole new way. It sucked.

Eventually Dad came out. I was pretty sure he was going to hit me. I was already making up my mind that I'd give him a warning on the Aggravated Battery charge as long as I was able to subdue him fairly easily, but his wife came out and calmed him down before it came to that.

Somehow the dog lived despite the fact that I had shot it right in the center of the head with a .45. There was no exit wound. When a pit bull lunges at you from that close, all you can see is head. Dad ran the dog to the vet, and I heard it was alive and doing very well weeks later. I really have no idea how that could be. I distinctly remember a perfectly round, half inch hole pumping blood out of that dog's head.

The family made a formal complaint on me, of course. Fortunately, that lady from across the street gave me a glowing review. She said she couldn't figure out why I didn't shoot the dogs sooner.

It turns out that I also had a backup officer who I didn't know about until after the shot. He pulled up behind me and saw the whole thing, but stayed in his car the whole time. I guess he's smarter than me. He made a good witness on my behalf at least.

I felt like absolute crap for a couple weeks. I won't whine about the details. It was mostly that little girl and the fact that I really am one of those people who just can't resist playing with every dog he sees. I wanted so badly to visit that family and explain things to the little girl, but of course that wouldn't have been appropriate. Dad wanted my ass, and showing up at his house on a social call would have been seen as a provocation.

Anyhow, that's what went through this cop's mind when he shot someone's  dog.
310.5k views · View Upvoters · View Sharers
You upvoted this    6.1K upvotes



ilinda

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #402 on: December 16, 2019, 09:40:48 AM »
Amazing how some dog owners think it's OK for their dog to attack and try to kill someone.  And to make matters worse, they impriint on their children that it's fine for powerful dogs to run loose, and even form packs (the most dangerous condition) and then the next generation of humans grows up having no consideration for others.  Their only consideration seems to be "what's in this for me?"

Hopefully the cop will reassess the situation and realize maybe he taught the girl something the parents didn't but should have, and that is, "how are my actions affecting others?"


Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #403 on: December 20, 2019, 03:18:36 PM »
Amazing how some dog owners think it's OK for their dog to attack and try to kill someone.  And to make matters worse, they impriint on their children that it's fine for powerful dogs to run loose, and even form packs (the most dangerous condition) and then the next generation of humans grows up having no consideration for others.  Their only consideration seems to be "what's in this for me?"

Hopefully the cop will reassess the situation and realize maybe he taught the girl something the parents didn't but should have, and that is, "how are my actions affecting others?"

ilinda - interesting and I feel true, comments. Parents teach their children their doggie is just fine, and ("a dog senses what kind of person someone is, that 's why they bit him," etc.) I have heard that nonsense a lot, myself. 

Fact is, there are a lot of not-trained, poorly-trained dogs with an obviously aggressive genetic background. Anyone googling pit bulls should know by now they are capable of biting, killing someone.
I know of at least two situations in the news where a person had a seizure or something go wrong and lying there helpless - and the pit bull he lovingly raised from a pup KILLS him.
But this just doesn't stop people from buying them.

In this cop's story, RE# the little girl, I do not think she learned anything in the incident. All she knew was, a cop almost killed her doggie and now the whole family is mad at the "bad cop". That's all she will be told and that's all she will take away from the incident. This is understandable she would feel this way... If, however someday she gets to speak with the woman across the street (the woman who had to run back into her house and slam the screen door shut - only to have the door front door attacked and bit on by the pits). Then the little girl might learn about a different viewpoint on her doggies, she might learn some kind of useful information about why that happened the way it did.

Well, it looks like pits and other aggressive breeds are here to stay and in the event of a cataclysm they will be running amok hurting people on top of all the other problems.
Shoot on sight if they approach you. I've had them sneakily approach from half a block away, then suddenly come up and show teeth, like 3 feet away, right up on me.. They are sneaky.  (More on how I avoided getting bit, another post.)

(I think) the Zetas did predict worse animal behavior as PX approached... Jimfarmer's SOTT postings have a lot of animal attack stories... So dogs need to be well trained and people need to be aware of their surroundings and protect themselves from all  animals, domestic types or wildlife, even deer...
« Last Edit: December 20, 2019, 06:20:35 PM by Yowbarb »

Socrates

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 999
  • Karma: +15/-0
  • literally, I've seen the end in a vision; DEADLY!
    • TEOMCROTE
Re: feral dogs
« Reply #404 on: December 21, 2019, 01:32:23 AM »
in the event of a cataclysm they will be running amok hurting people on top of all the other problems.
Depends on the severity of the cataclysm, i'm guessing:
- limited cataclysm: hungry people will be EATING (their) dogs and hunting down strays
- more severe cataclysm: feral dogs will prefer to eat all the corpses out there, rather than confront people able to defend themselves; one should be wary but i think in most cases, the situation shouldn't get too bad
- (closer to) stone age inducing event: a. if a few dogs survive, they will pose a serious threat after they've hunted down all prey and corpses are no longer edible. However, there shouldn't be too many of them; on the other hand, they will of course start breeding as soon as bitches come in season [every 6 months, so not all bitches right away]. This is a good time to have your own dogs and ferals will find easier prey; b., worst case scenario, if there are any ferals at all, the chance you run into them is small; nuclear winter will also dwindle their numbers. In fact, if you'd like your decendants to enjoy having dogs, you'd better save at least two [or one pregnant bitch] yourself, for once that DNA's gone, it'll be millennia before it comes back, if ever.

Ill-mannered dogs are like barbarians: they're a problem in barbaric societies like our own. I'm more worried about the damage cats do...  ;D
survival database
location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

 

Home Study System

Home Study System
Save 30%

BUY NOW

The ideal win-win survival community library reference system offers a broad range of valuable survival skills and knowledge. Ideal those in preparedness, it provides in-depth knowledge about how to form communities and operate two-way communications.

For human needs, it also includes a low-impact energy self-healing art and an essential role for seniors in survival communities.

A special note for those of you living outside the United States, we optimized this system for the lowest possible Priority Mail costs.

4 Paperbacks and 6 DVDs

Win-Win Survival Communities Signed

Radio Free Earth Color (Color Editon) Signed

Complete Danjeon Breathing System w/6 DVDs

Survival Wellness Advocacy and the BIG WIN

BUY NOW