Planet X Town Hall

ilinda - SURVIVAL HEALTH => Survival Recipes of the World => Topic started by: noproblemo2 on April 18, 2011, 01:50:05 PM

Title: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: noproblemo2 on April 18, 2011, 01:50:05 PM
Knowing how to replace the staples in the kitchen in some other way than a trip to the store is an important prepper skill. One of those things is bread. The first step is taking the time to learn to bake, which unfortunately is becoming a lost art in and of itself. The second step is to learn how to obtain the components of bread, such as flour, water, and yeast.

If you are ready to go beyond the basic sourdough starter, try these yeast procurement methods for all new flavors and textures in your baking.

Feeding the Starter

Whether you are talking about a standard sourdough starter, or one of those listed below, you will see many recipes talking about “feeding” the starter. This means adding 1 cup flour and 1 cup water to the mix so that the yeast can keep growing. You will need to feed the starter daily if it is at room temperature, or weekly if it is in the fridge. If you don’t bake bread that day, you will also need to toss out one cup of the starter so that the ratios stay the same. This is an important step—and can be a great motivator to bake regularly so that none of your hard work goes to waste! Yeast starters are one thing you will not want to throw in the compost pile, as the bacteria can grow out of control and give you a very unpleasant result.

Grape Starter

Grapes, along with many other types of fruits (including apples, oranges, and grapefruit, to name some examples), contain natural yeast spores in the skin or peel of the fruit.

For grapes, stem them (do not wash them, as this will wash off the yeast that you are trying to grow), crush by hand, and place in a container covered with cheesecloth. Leave undisturbed for three days. You should start to see the liquid bubble, indicating that the yeast is growing. Strain the liquid (which now contains the yeast), and stir in 1 cup of whole wheat flour.

Leave your grape starter at room temperature for 24 hours. Save only one cup of the mixture, then add another cup of flour and a cup of water. Do the same thing for another day or two. You should have a very bubbly starter at this point. After this, just keep feeding it so you will always have some ready for your next loaf of bread.

As you experiment with different fruits (and even tomatoes!) you will find that each kind of starter has a bit of a different flavor. Find which ones you like best. Just remember, you need to use homegrown or wild fruits, since the store-bought ones will be covered with pesticides, wax, and who knows what else—probably not much yeast left to be found there. And don’t wash it off before starting.

Potato Starter

It is amazing the things that we throw away that are more useful than we know. In this case, that water you boiled potatoes in for dinner is one of the fastest ways to make a starter for your bread. Simply take a cup and a half of the potato water, add a tablespoon of sugar, and stir in flour until stiff. Cover and leave overnight in a warm place. If it is nice and bubbly the next morning it is ready to use. If not—start over.

Alternatively, if you do not usually boil your potatoes, or just want to try something different, cheat a little. Use one packet of store bought yeast (1 tablespoon), mix with a cup of water, a half-cup of sugar, and three tablespoons of instant potato flakes. Let it stand for 24 hours, then put it in the fridge. Feed every four days, but instead of the usual flour and water combo, use the same amounts of sugar, potato flakes, and water that you used to create the starter.

Drying Your Yeast for Storage

One practical challenge with creating and using your own yeast is storing and transporting it. We see this in one very practical example, when Israel left Egypt in a hurry during the Exodus, and did not have time for their bread to rise. Jews to this day commemorate God’s deliverance by abstaining from products with leavening during Passover.

If you want to be able to bake bread the instant you arrive at your bug-out location (if you ever need to take your own personal Exodus), then you will want to dry some yeast for use later.

Take any of your starters, spread very thin on a cookie sheet or baking stone, then dehydrate as you would anything else. If you live in a hot and dry climate, you may just be able to cover it with a cheese cloth and place in the sun. Otherwise, put on the lowest temp in your oven and dry it that way. Once the yeast is dry (not cooked, if it cooks the active yeast will be killed and rendered useless), you can crumble it and store in an air tight container. Just like store-bought yeast, it will last longer in the fridge or freezer.

Play around with amounts you use in recipes once the yeast is ready, as the potency of homemade yeast will be a little different than the store-bought version and you will probably need more of it for the same amount of bread (typically about a cup of starter in place of 1 packet of yeast, if using wet starter. If you’re using dry yeast, try just doubling the amount to start).

What you lose in time, you may find you make up for in flavor and fun. There is nothing quite like the smell of fresh baked bread to make you feel at home.
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: 1969quartz0 on April 18, 2011, 06:30:01 PM
Make your own yeast.

http://www.survival-cooking.com/2009/11/how-to-make-yeast-for-bread.html

Lamb said...
Have you ever tried using potato water to make yeast? Get a potato from your garden or buy a potato from your local ORGANIC grocer (pesticide/herbicide treated ones will not work as well and may hurt you). DO NOT WASH POTATO! If it has dirt on it, wipe it as clean as you can with a dry dishtowel. Cut potato in half, put it in a large mug or bowl and pour 2 cups of warm (not hot!) water over it.
Let set up to two days...you'll see bubbles or a kind of froth on the top of the water. Fish that potato out and add it to the compost heap. Add 1/4 cup of flour and one teaspoon of sugar or honey to the potato water and stir gently.Let set overnight -- there's your starter for many good loaves of bread! Use one cup of starter for two loaves of bread. Add 1 cup of warm water, 1/2 cup flour and a teaspoon of sugar/honey to replenish your starter each time you use some. I keep mine in a small stoneware crock in a cool dark corner of my pantry.
November 14, 2009 6:48 PM
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: noproblemo2 on April 18, 2011, 06:48:51 PM
Great idea on the potatoes, Thanks Nathan.
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: Mjoy on April 19, 2011, 03:17:06 AM
Thank you for the great ideas.  I do not like sourdough.  I know it is suppose to be good for you, but it does not suit me.  It seems to make yeast is as "easy" as sourdough.  I will try it and let you know.
Bye for now,
Mary
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: Montanabarb on June 04, 2011, 10:38:50 AM
Yesterday, I made delicious bread, in my nearly new bread machine that I bought at the local second hand store for ten bucks, using Fleschmann's yeast that has been in my freezer for fourteen years (in an unopened jar, expiration date 1997.)  The loaf looks and tastes like English Muffin bread.  Another case for "Don't believe expiration dates. Corporate America has another agenda. Use your common sense."  Yeast might last indefinitely. I tested it by putting it (warmed to room temperature) in my bread machine with the honey, oil and warm water. Within ten minutes it was bubbling half an inch high, so I knew it was fine.
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: noproblemo2 on June 04, 2011, 10:48:52 AM
Yesterday, I made delicious bread, in my nearly new bread machine that I bought at the local second hand store for ten bucks, using Fleschmann's yeast that has been in my freezer for fourteen years (in an unopened jar, expiration date 1997.)  The loaf looks and tastes like English Muffin bread.  Another case for "Don't believe expiration dates. Corporate America has another agenda. Use your common sense."  Yeast might last indefinitely. I tested it by putting it (warmed to room temperature) in my bread machine with the honey, oil and warm water. Within ten minutes it was bubbling half an inch high, so I knew it was fine.
WOW, that is really good to know, Thanks.....
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: augonit on June 04, 2011, 01:51:38 PM
I'm glad someone finally put this yeast info out there.  I asked about it months ago!
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: steedy on April 18, 2014, 01:03:39 PM
Do these yeasts, like the dried potato one, work just as well as the dried stuff you get at the store?  Are they sourdoughs?  If so, does anyone know of how to make our own dried yeast that isn't a sourdough?  Thanks.
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: Yowbarb on April 18, 2014, 03:06:35 PM
Do these yeasts, like the dried potato one, work just as well as the dried stuff you get at the store?  Are they sourdoughs?  If so, does anyone know of how to make our own dried yeast that isn't a sourdough?  Thanks.

I think it is covered in the opening post of the topic, posted by noproblemo long ago...sorry not an expert yet.
Here is a link for capturing wild yeast. It is sourdough though...will post more info asap.

http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/21946/what-is-the-best-way-to-catch-wild-yeast-for-sourdough
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: Endtimesgal_2012 on April 18, 2014, 06:10:08 PM
Steedy, so good to see that you are interested in these kinds of things.  If I was younger like you, I sure would do things a lot differently than I have.  Sounds to me like you are making some wise choices.  Wish I would have known about Planet X while I was young so I could have learned some of these skills then and planned my future better.
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: steedy on April 19, 2014, 01:59:18 PM
I'm not that young!
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: probe64322 on April 19, 2014, 10:26:55 PM
http://www.offthegridnews.com/2012/09/26/prepper-baking-101-making-your-own-yeast/

http://readynutrition.com/resources/survival-food-series-3-ways-to-naturally-make-yeast_02032011/

P.
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: Yowbarb on April 20, 2014, 01:21:36 AM
http://www.offthegridnews.com/2012/09/26/prepper-baking-101-making-your-own-yeast/

http://readynutrition.com/resources/survival-food-series-3-ways-to-naturally-make-yeast_02032011/

P.

Thanks, Probe!
 ;D
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: R.R. Book on September 02, 2019, 05:02:17 PM
Really impressive video from Leah of Oppenheimer Ranch Project on how to use naturally occurring yeast on gooseberries or grapes to start sourdough:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKsOXpBSQDo

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/fN-xmuRm9lydQYyIYmnXNbXAfoaTQPwn-S1NwDeNuz09rCS2fSs3wXDB-iNzivOHW2H4YA=s113)
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: ilinda on September 03, 2019, 02:11:48 PM
It is impressive.  She worked so hard to make that very informative video and makes it look somewhat easy.  Near the end she mentions wild yeast being in the air, and that is the lead-in to my method of starting a sourdough culture.

The only two ingredients in my starter are spelt flour (or some other ancient grain flour), and "potato water", which is simply the cooled water poured off from boiled potatoes.

Add the potato water to the flour, stirring well until evenly mixed.  You should have a "slurry" and if it's more like a doughball, you need more liquid, in which case, add a bit more potato water.  If it's too watery, add more freshly ground flour.

Now all you need to do is stir daily or 2X daily, and keep covered, but not tightly, as you want wild yeasts to colonize the flour-in-potato-water mix.  If you do this in midsummer and kitchen is warm, be on the lookout for fruit flies, etc., as everything seems to like this.

In a few days to a week, you'll see the same changes she notes in the video, bubbles and more bubbles, an indication that CO2 bubbles are being produced as a result of fermentation.

Thanks for posting this video, as not everyone has access to all fruits and veggies, including potatoes, and the video is priceless.
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: R.R. Book on September 03, 2019, 04:35:23 PM
Ilinda, I'd like to try your version too.  Do you use the ancient grains flour in the same proportion as wheat flour would be called for in recipes?

How do you suggest covering the bowl to exclude fruit flies but still attract wild yeast?

Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: ilinda on September 04, 2019, 07:03:35 PM
In this warm weather, I use tupperwear with a lid that seals well.  As long as it's opened several times a day for stirring, it works.

I use either spelt or Kamut, and occasionally einkorn, as hubby sometimes grinds the grain for me, which means Kamut or einkorn.  But I always choose spelt.

I don't measure anything but always put in several cups of flour in the tupperwear.  Then add cooled-to-room-temperature potato-cooking water and stir well.  Then several times a day, carefully remove tight-fitting Tupperwear lid, stir well, moving the bubbles around which will soon be forming, then carefully and tightly re-cover the Tupperwear container.  You will know if the mix is too runny, then add more flour, and if too thick and doughy, add more potato water.  If you're totally out of potato water, and have no more potatoes to cook, water will suffice, but I always "feed" my starter with potato water, as opposed to water, in spite of fact that most people recommend feeding the starter with more flour and water.  But I add more flour and potato water.

As soon as you see lots and lots of bubbles, you know you now have your own "sourdough starter".  It's that simple.  And yes, at this time of year fruit flies will be hovering nearby, so caution is the word.

I'm not sure how it all works, but I even think in the process of the potato water cooling, it is already attracting wild yeasts.  I haven't had to start a brand new batch for a long time, but it's easy.

Also, there is a book, Wild Fermentation by Sandor Ellix Katz and he covers a lot of this stuff.  If I've forgotten any detail, just yell!
Title: Re: Make your Own Yeast
Post by: R.R. Book on September 05, 2019, 09:12:52 AM
Posting thumbnail:

(https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0077/0759/0720/products/wild-fermentation-2-01-3_700x.JPG?v=1554226584)

I found a free .pdf here:

https://archive.org/details/WildFermentationSandorEllixKatz/page/n14