Planet X Town Hall

Linda - SURVIVAL HEALTH => SURVIVALIST HEAL THYSELF => Topic started by: Jimfarmer on June 04, 2011, 07:34:21 AM

Title: Pain control
Post by: Jimfarmer on June 04, 2011, 07:34:21 AM
Poppy plants for pain control
This from http://secretsofurbansurvival.com/962/survival-pain-relief-after-a-disaster/ (http://secretsofurbansurvival.com/962/survival-pain-relief-after-a-disaster/)

[start extract]
if you do grow poppies that produce opium, don’t harvest any of the opium. You will lose all your possessions and go to really, REALLY bad federal prison if you attempt to harvest opium when there are functioning law enforcement entities, but in a Mad Max scenario, a renewable supply of pain medication could save a lot of lives. (Really…don’t screw around with this.)

The seeds themselves are cheap, legal, and you probably actually eat them a few times a month (think ‘poppy seed bread’) and you can buy them MANY places, including local nurseries, and Amazon.com. You want to search for one particular variety, called “Papaver somniferum.” There are SEVERAL really pretty color options within that variety.

Here are the varieties that are available on Amazon > Papaver Somniferum <
[http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fs%3Fie%3DUTF8%26ref_%3Dnb_sb_ss_i_2_24%26field-keywords%3Dpapaver%2520somniferum%2520seeds%26url%3Dsearch-alias%253Daps%26sprefix%3Dpapaver%2520somniferum%2520seeds%23&tag=surviveinplac-20&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=390957 (http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fs%3Fie%3DUTF8%26ref_%3Dnb_sb_ss_i_2_24%26field-keywords%3Dpapaver%2520somniferum%2520seeds%26url%3Dsearch-alias%253Daps%26sprefix%3Dpapaver%2520somniferum%2520seeds%23&tag=surviveinplac-20&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=390957)]

As you can probably imagine, a LOT of the literature surrounding poppies come from the “drug culture”, “hippie culture”, and “far-out culture.” That being said, one book that you might want to get is, “Opium for the Masses.” You can find it on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1932595465/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=surviveinplac-20 (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1932595465/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=surviveinplac-20)
[end extract]

Title: Re: Pain control
Post by: mjoy on June 04, 2011, 07:53:16 AM
 :)
Oh, I just L-O-V-E poppy seeds!! If you take them for pain control, then take them with some warm milk!  It will mellow you out.
On the subject of pain control and a worst-case-scenerio of Planet X, then I highly recommend learning self-hypnosis.  Do it now, while all is semi quiet.  Self hypnosis can stop bleeding,asap and reduce inflammation. It is the great way to control pain.  And it is very self empowering.
Bye for now,
mjoy
Title: Re: Pain control
Post by: Jimfarmer on June 04, 2011, 08:22:23 AM
"On the subject of pain control and a worst-case-scenerio of Planet X, then I highly recommend learning self-hypnosis.  Do it now, while all is semi quiet.  Self hypnosis can stop bleeding,asap and reduce inflammation. It is the great way to control pain.  And it is very self empowering."

Absolutely!!  Also, "energy healing" techniques such as Reiki or Quantum Touch.  (I do QT, and it works)
Title: Re: Pain control
Post by: mjoy on June 04, 2011, 08:34:50 AM
 ;)
I love healing modalities with the word, "quantum" in them, don't you? (quantum=The smallest amount of a physical quantity that can exist independently, especially a discrete quantity of electromagnetic radiation).

I learned, this year, Quantum Entrainment (http://www.quantumentrainment.com/)
Bye for now,
mjoy
Title: Re: Pain control
Post by: augonit on June 04, 2011, 01:54:42 PM
Caffiene is a natural pain control.  It's even in some perscription medicines.
Title: Re: Pain control
Post by: Jimfarmer on June 04, 2011, 06:50:57 PM
"I love healing modalities with the word, 'quantum' in them".
Well, to me it seems a bit presumptuous, but I suppose that the idea is that the effect is non-physical, or at least non-Newtonian, or perhaps at the deepest level.  I suspect that the person(s) who choose such names are non-technical types.
Title: alcohol
Post by: Socrates on September 09, 2017, 09:12:53 AM
Prelude...
I am actually in pain as i write this. In fact, i just took a plier to my own mouth to pull out bits of tooth that an incompetent dentist had left there. How do i get through this? Alcohol...
I'm sure i'm getting known as the 'alcoholic survivalist', but screw that. As i have argued before, long-lived cultures throughout the world and history have been known for their brews. I say that ain't coincidence.

I had a molar problem and Thursday [it is now Saterday late afternoon] i had said molar extracted. However, i am still resorting to pain medication. (And you should know, i hate 'the medical paradigm' and all they stand for and produce; so for me to go there, is a pretty big thing for me...)
To make a long story short, i have not slept well these last days and it's getting in the way of everyday life; i have pretty physical work that demands certain things of my mind and body; sh*t has been getting real...

Now, to put a bright side on such sad news, i have learned a number of things; for one, i have learned that alcohol is a GREAT pain killer. Who knew?
Enter cowboys...
Aren't 'cowboys' and 'whisky' almost synonymous? So why the hell were cowboys so obsessive about drinking whiskey? Didn't they have better things to do?
I believe the historical data on whiskey [and other liquors] may be very culturally-determined and in fact far from realistic truth...

If you're a 'cowboy', out on 'the plains' and suffering from pain, what do you do? No pharmacies, no 'medicine men', no nothin'; all ya got is yer whiskey; enter my world...
It turns out that strong liquor is a wonderful lubricant that allows sleep when there would otherwise be none and social contact when you'd otherwise just be in yer own lonely world of suffering...
Basics / survival; we're talking Maslow's Pyramid (http://timvandevall.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Maslows-Hierarchy-of-Needs.jpg).


I have lately not been able to sleep save i down a 2 pint [500ml] can of 12% beer [hey, it could be wine, but that's just so much more expensive]. Am i happy with this situation? I am in survival mode... [but still able to type.]
As long as i don't get 'nauseated' (http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-nau1.htm), i'm good.
Getting back to basics, what about 'cowboys'? Was whiskey an 'obsession' to them or a part of their everyday reality? [i.e. dealing with all manner of pains, toothaches and what have you?]
There are no pharmacies for hundreds of miles around, there are no Advils to be had... What do you do?
I'll tell you: grab a pint of good mead...
Title: Re: Pain control
Post by: R.R. Book on September 09, 2017, 11:18:52 AM
Socrates,

I'm so sorry that you've had an extra-bad week, and hope that the pain passes soon.  I had impacted wisdom teeth extracted at age 19, and am still having fragments of bone surface to the gums from time to time  :(

The Bible itself calls for wine to be used medicinally in a few passages :)

P.S. Hope you're not dealing with a dry socket - if so, might need to pack it with gauze soaked in oil of cloves until it fills in.
Title: Re: alcohol
Post by: ilinda on September 09, 2017, 05:40:35 PM
Prelude...
I am actually in pain as i write this. In fact, i just took a plier to my own mouth to pull out bits of tooth that an incompetent dentist had left there. How do i get through this? Alcohol...
I'm sure i'm getting known as the 'alcoholic survivalist', but screw that. As i have argued before, long-lived cultures throughout the world and history have been known for their brews. I say that ain't coincidence.

I had a molar problem and Thursday [it is now Saterday late afternoon] i had said molar extracted. However, i am still resorting to pain medication. (And you should know, i hate 'the medical paradigm' and all they stand for and produce; so for me to go there, is a pretty big thing for me...)
Sorry to hear you're in such pain and having to resort to using your stash of survivalist alcohol so early on.  Here's a little true story, and also quite funny.

Several years I had an incredible toothache, something I don't ever recall happening in my entire life.  It was the weekend, and it was also late at night.  After not being able to sleep, I got up around 3 AM and got on the internet, and began surfing through all the "emergency toothache remedies" links.  There were quite a few, and I'd watch one, then finding no relief, go to another, and another.  Still no relief.

The pain seemed unbearable, but there I sat staring at the computer screen, hoping to find relief.  Then I clicked on the next link, and suddenly was taken to a scene, which appeared to be a live video recording of either a town hall meeting, or city/county council meeting--that type of thing that is usually dry.  There seemed to be some confrontation arising early on in this meeting, when one guy got up and was blaming people for something serious, then suddenly the blame guy pulled out a gun and began threatening to kill the supposed perpetrator.  The Presiding council member convinced the would-be shooter to shoot him instead of his original target, and soon the gun was fired in the direction of someone, but very shortly the video ended, and it then became obvious that this entire scene was placed there for anyone experiencing severe pain following the link, would view the video.

I did, and to my total shock, by the end of the video, my tooth/gun pain had totally disappeared!  I could hardly believe it.  I realized then and there that the mind is incredibly powerful and in my state of mind, I was unable, on my own at that point in time, to hypnotize myself out of pain, but the riveting nature of the video completely took my attention away from the tooth/gum long enough to focus on something as shocking as a near-murder. 

The pain did not return for about 12 hours, and after the weekend I did find relief.  The point I wanted to make though is that sometimes the pain is so unbearable that the sufferer cannot "think straight enough" to do self-hypnosis, but that there are other ways to be "hypnotized out of the pain".
Title: Re: Pain control
Post by: R.R. Book on September 09, 2017, 07:04:03 PM
That's an amazing story Ilinda!  Might also want to take colloidal silver to prevent an abscess, as well as hopefully preventing mitral valve cardiac damage from migratory strep bacteria naturally occurring in the mouth.  Our dentist recommends holding it in the mouth and then expelling it, so as not to kill off gut flora.  However, gut flora can be replaced, but you'd need to consume raw cabbage to replace one of the oddball strains, oxalobacter formigenes. :)
Title: MMS
Post by: Socrates on September 12, 2017, 10:03:07 AM
My standard protocols involve MMS because i have it... [a few year's supply]
Unfortunately, as much as i appreciate the benefits of cs [colloidal silver], it does not work with MMS :((

Am taking 2 to 3 drops of MMS 2-hourly at the moment, rinsing with coconut oil at similar frequencies.
An unfortunate circumstance of the past 10 days of suffering is that i've become an alcoholic... No; seriously; am getting deathly ill if i don't consume my alcoholic calories...
Anyhoo... [as if the impending TEOTWAWKI weren't enough] i'm also dealing with inflamed gums, pain and nausea induced by withdrawal symptoms [from counting on copious amounts of alcohol to dull pain].

You have been updated...  :D
[laugh or die]
Oh, btw, i still have hope. During all of these trials i've only called in sick one morning. 'Life' goes on. On to 'the backside' [god willing].
Title: Re: MMS
Post by: ilinda on September 12, 2017, 04:14:11 PM
My standard protocols involve MMS because i have it... [a few year's supply]
Unfortunately, as much as i appreciate the benefits of cs [colloidal silver], it does not work with MMS :((

Am taking 2 to 3 drops of MMS 2-hourly at the moment, rinsing with coconut oil at similar frequencies.
An unfortunate circumstance of the past 10 days of suffering is that i've become an alcoholic... No; seriously; am getting deathly ill if i don't consume my alcoholic calories...
Anyhoo... [as if the impending TEOTWAWKI weren't enough] i'm also dealing with inflamed gums, pain and nausea induced by withdrawal symptoms [from counting on copious amounts of alcohol to dull pain].

You have been updated...  :D
[laugh or die]

Oh, btw, i still have hope. During all of these trials i've only called in sick one morning. 'Life' goes on. On to 'the backside' [god willing].
We are all empathizing/sympathizing with you Socrates, and do understand your suffering.  However things will get better.

OK, cutting to the chase, I'm reading a book, and was planning to give all a nice review when finished, but figure it's now or never.  The book, and some stuff referred to in it may be of help.  The book is The Genie in Your Genes by Dawson Church, Ph.D., and it's the best book I've seen on epigenetics.  It's blowing my mind, but probably all of us who have discussed epigenetics, taking control of your life, etc., realize that deep down, we probably all know this stuff, but seeing it all neatly compiled in book form is wonderful. 

One of the topics covered in the book is "energy psychology" (EP) and other forms of energy healing.  There are so many that I won't bother to list them, one of them being tapping or EFT.  EFT has become quite widely used and in fact has undergone so many RCT (Randomized Controlled Trials) that M.D. physicians are now allowed to take courses in EFT and receive CME's (Continuing Medical Education) credits approved by the AMA (American Medical Association).  That says we've come a long way.

So, if you can find EFT on line somewhere, it may be worth trying as you can do it at home, and it takes so little time.  It is based on science--the fact of acupuncture/-pressure points being channels leading to the entire meridian pathway, etc.  Anyway, I will find the exact link that may be the "mother ship" of EFT links and post that one, but in the meantime you might find one that works.  In a nutshell, the tapping is done ON acupuncture/acupressure points, and while the tapping is occurring, the "tapper" recites certain statements that, together with the stimulation of the points, has been shown to help alleviate the situation.

Wishing you well, Socrates.  We need your valuable input!  Godspeed!  Get Well!  Salud!
Title: Re: tapping
Post by: Socrates on September 12, 2017, 11:05:42 PM
Thank you, Ilinda.

It's good to be reminded of options like tapping. There are so many options (as you say) that even very good ones can be forgotten (even when one could really use them).
Does the book also cover the techniques or just mention them as options?
Title: Re: tapping
Post by: ilinda on September 13, 2017, 05:10:32 PM
Thank you, Ilinda.

It's good to be reminded of options like tapping. There are so many options (as you say) that even very good ones can be forgotten (even when one could really use them).
Does the book also cover the techniques or just mention them as options?
It generalizes about techniques, for example in discussing tapping, probably because the book isn't meant to be a "how-to" in tapping or any of the techniques.   Earlier in the book was discussed several aspects of the acupuncture/-pressure meridians and their points, and it was discussed about how electrical resistance is extremely low on/at the points, thus allowing energy to be channeled through them (I'm saying it in a non-scientific way).  But it gives enough information to inform the reader that HELP can be found in tapping/EFT and many other energy modalities.

There is another book I've read several times that has a LOT about the microarchitecture of the entire acupuncture meridian system.  The book is Vibrational Medicine, IIRC, author being Richard Gerber, M.D.  There are at least two editions, and here's link: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/133-8652039-4931901?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=books+by+Richard+Gerber+M.D.

BTW, for years whenever I'd suddenly become ill with yet another respiratory infection, I'd suddenly forget what herbs to take.  There are so many good ones, and I'd be so sick that I couldn't think straight enough to discipline myself and figure it all out.  So, the last time I was really ill I made a list of all the things I needed to do for respiratory illness:  olive leaf/leaves, oregano essential oil, garlic vapors breathed before bedtime, decoction of mullein leaves if cough is productive, and as much sunshine as possible, and if none available, cod liver oil in multiple doses.  For nighttime, dry cough, hops tincture before bed.  And plenty of REST.  The body cannot heal while it's being forced to hoe a row of beets!

I will find that one website about tapping and post asap.
Title: Re: Poppies
Post by: Socrates on September 14, 2017, 11:38:33 AM
The link to an article on poppies (http://www.secretsofurbansurvival.com/962/survival-pain-relief-after-a-disaster/) gives us an amazing argument:
In war and in survival situations, pain occurs frequently. Pain control is something that you need to address when you’re preparing for short, medium, and long term disruptions in the supply chain and/or breakdowns in civil order.
It’s not just a matter of getting rid of pain for the sake of comfort. Excessive pain can cause shock. Excessive pain can prevent sleep and recovery. Excessive pain causes the body to burn excess hormones, brain chemicals, and blood sugar.


I.E. imagine you're a cowboy with an absessed tooth... You're likely to be in pain for years on end!
This is where ignorance shows it's ugly face; could this not have been prevented somehow?
Remember Grumpy of the 7 Dwarves? I'm sure he just had an absessed tooth or something...  :-\

Modern culture looks down on things like chemicals that ease pain, when in all previous ages such things were about survival i.e. a matter of life and death.
As survivalists we need to approach such matters maturely and not culturally.

That's all i'm sayin'. I am myself now downing ibuprofen every 2 hours because of an infection in my gum that won't go away; it's causing lack of sleep, systemic stress and general discomfort [that has also led to alcoholism in my effort to combat it].
Now, imagine dealing with such things without access to things like ibuprofen...
Verily... poppy seeds could be life savers in such circumstances.
Title: Re: Pain control
Post by: R.R. Book on September 14, 2017, 12:27:33 PM
Hi Soc,

Although Ibuprofen is a complex carb with innocuous metabolites that bypass the liver, (unlike the hairy Tylenol molecule), the challenge as you probably know is getting it safely past the upper GI tract.  Seems that this challenge might be intensified in the presence of alcohol?  Perhaps best to keep it short-term, use the gel-cap rather than solid pill, and protect your stomach with a mastic gum capsule at each dose, plus solid food.  Mastic gum is an indispensable prep, because it is effective in treating and preventing stomach ulcers.

And to add to your list of the negative effects of pain, there is shortening of telomeres.

P.S. A chronic infection in the gums needs to be addressed by stronger measures than you have been using.  Silver would knock it right out, as it produces a straight kill and leaves no vestiges to mutate.  Vitamin C at at least a gram per day per bowel tolerance will expedite gum healing.  Gelatine will work both with C to heal the gums via collagen production, and help protect your stomach from the Ibuprofen-alcohol combination.  A liver that is busy breaking down ethanol cannot spare healing molecules such as glutathione, cysteine and alpha-lipoic acid.  Perhaps try very short breaks while healing and supplementing?

PPS: Unless you're supplementing with a high dose of the B vitamins to replenish what is being destroyed, the vicious sleep-disruption cycle may continue.  Can add magnesium to bowel tolerance and 3mg melatonin for deeper sleep, taken with lecithin.
Title: Re: Pain control
Post by: Yowbarb on September 14, 2017, 02:02:42 PM
Hi Soc,

Although Ibuprofen is a complex carb with innocuous metabolites that bypass the liver, (unlike the hairy Tylenol molecule), the challenge as you probably know is getting it safely past the upper GI tract.  Seems that this challenge might be intensified in the presence of alcohol?  Perhaps best to keep it short-term, use the gel-cap rather than solid pill, and protect your stomach with a mastic gum capsule at each dose, plus solid food.  Mastic gum is an indispensable prep, because it is effective in treating and preventing stomach ulcers.

And to add to your list of the negative effects of pain, there is shortening of telomeres.

P.S. A chronic infection in the gums needs to be addressed by stronger measures than you have been using.  Silver would knock it right out, as it produces a straight kill and leaves no vestiges to mutate.  Vitamin C at at least a gram per day per bowel tolerance will expedite gum healing.  Gelatine will work both with C to heal the gums via collagen production, and help protect your stomach from the Ibuprofen-alcohol combination.  A liver that is busy breaking down ethanol cannot spare healing molecules such as glutathione, cysteine and alpha-lipoic acid.  Perhaps try very short breaks while healing and supplementing?

PPS: Unless you're supplementing with a high dose of the B vitamins to replenish what is being destroyed, the vicious sleep-disruption cycle may continue.  Can add magnesium to bowel tolerance and 3mg melatonin for deeper sleep, taken with lecithin.
What awesome posts! Useful info, thank you!
:)
Title: Re: Pain control
Post by: ilinda on September 14, 2017, 05:43:09 PM
Hi Soc,

Although Ibuprofen is a complex carb with innocuous metabolites that bypass the liver, (unlike the hairy Tylenol molecule), the challenge as you probably know is getting it safely past the upper GI tract.  Seems that this challenge might be intensified in the presence of alcohol?  Perhaps best to keep it short-term, use the gel-cap rather than solid pill, and protect your stomach with a mastic gum capsule at each dose, plus solid food.  Mastic gum is an indispensable prep, because it is effective in treating and preventing stomach ulcers.

And to add to your list of the negative effects of pain, there is shortening of telomeres.

P.S. A chronic infection in the gums needs to be addressed by stronger measures than you have been using.  Silver would knock it right out, as it produces a straight kill and leaves no vestiges to mutate.  Vitamin C at at least a gram per day per bowel tolerance will expedite gum healing.  Gelatine will work both with C to heal the gums via collagen production, and help protect your stomach from the Ibuprofen-alcohol combination.  A liver that is busy breaking down ethanol cannot spare healing molecules such as glutathione, cysteine and alpha-lipoic acid.  Perhaps try very short breaks while healing and supplementing?

PPS: Unless you're supplementing with a high dose of the B vitamins to replenish what is being destroyed, the vicious sleep-disruption cycle may continue.  Can add magnesium to bowel tolerance and 3mg melatonin for deeper sleep, taken with lecithin.
RR, are you sure you're not a naturopath?  LOL.  Maybe you are, and that's pretty cool.  Lots of good information for our ailing friend.
Title: Re: Poppies
Post by: ilinda on September 14, 2017, 05:48:32 PM
The link to an article on poppies (http://www.secretsofurbansurvival.com/962/survival-pain-relief-after-a-disaster/) gives us an amazing argument:
In war and in survival situations, pain occurs frequently. Pain control is something that you need to address when you’re preparing for short, medium, and long term disruptions in the supply chain and/or breakdowns in civil order.
It’s not just a matter of getting rid of pain for the sake of comfort. Excessive pain can cause shock. Excessive pain can prevent sleep and recovery. Excessive pain causes the body to burn excess hormones, brain chemicals, and blood sugar.


I.E. imagine you're a cowboy with an absessed tooth... You're likely to be in pain for years on end!
This is where ignorance shows it's ugly face; could this not have been prevented somehow?
Remember Grumpy of the 7 Dwarves? I'm sure he just had an absessed tooth or something...  :-\

Modern culture looks down on things like chemicals that ease pain, when in all previous ages such things were about survival i.e. a matter of life and death.
As survivalists we need to approach such matters maturely and not culturally.

That's all i'm sayin'. I am myself now downing ibuprofen every 2 hours because of an infection in my gum that won't go away; it's causing lack of sleep, systemic stress and general discomfort [that has also led to alcoholism in my effort to combat it].
Now, imagine dealing with such things without access to things like ibuprofen...
Verily... poppy seeds could be life savers in such circumstances.
I erred in my previous post.  In Dawson Church's book,The Genie in Your Genes, he does have a "how-to" do EFT in Appendix 1.  However there's more information on two websites: www.DawsonGift.com  and www.EFTUniverse.com and hopefully there will be something there to help you.

Am still working my way through the book, nearly done, and found this tidbit:
"I make a point of never tapping for the pain itself, but only for the emotional component.  I wanted to make the point that much of what we perceive as physical pain is really emotional stress."  (page 238).

That ...Universe website has more than 5,000 case histories by EFT users, and it states that they train thousands of practitioners each year.

Good luck!
Title: update
Post by: Socrates on October 11, 2017, 03:13:15 AM
The inflamation and pain finally went away a few weeks ago and i am feeling much better. Thanks to y'all for your support.
What finally helped get the inflamtion down, i'm not sure; was it the clay, the bath in ice cold water or just time?
Or was it all 3...?

Anyway, am also on the mend with the whole alcoholic issue; it seems that when one goes all alcohol dietary wise, that the body revolts [i hardly ate or drank other than my beers for a whole week]. What did i know, right? [Shoot, i just even started drinking the stuff at all at age 26 and never got into regular consumption until fairly recently; i've been focused on healthfoods and dietary tactics since adolescence].
True alcoholics apparently [interestingly enough, similar to cancer...] have traumatic issues that keep them from healing. Now, far be it for me to say i've no problems [...], but i'm not feeling sorry for myself, which appears to be a big thing with alcoholics. Hence, recuperation for me is mainly a physical matter and one that is progressing steadily. Thank god.
Title: Re: update
Post by: Yowbarb on October 11, 2017, 10:50:20 PM
The inflamation and pain finally went away a few weeks ago and i am feeling much better. Thanks to y'all for your support.
What finally helped get the inflamtion down, i'm not sure; was it the clay, the bath in ice cold water or just time?
Or was it all 3...?

Anyway, am also on the mend with the whole alcoholic issue; it seems that when one goes all alcohol dietary wise, that the body revolts [i hardly ate or drank other than my beers for a whole week]. What did i know, right? [Shoot, i just even started drinking the stuff at all at age 26 and never got into regular consumption until fairly recently; i've been focused on healthfoods and dietary tactics since adolescence].
True alcoholics apparently [interestingly enough, similar to cancer...] have traumatic issues that keep them from healing. Now, far be it for me to say i've no problems [...], but i'm not feeling sorry for myself, which appears to be a big thing with alcoholics. Hence, recuperation for me is mainly a physical matter and one that is progressing steadily. Thank god.
Socrates, I'm glad to hear you are out of pain. Thanks for sharing your story.
Question: What kind of clay?
Title: Re: Pain control
Post by: Yowbarb on October 11, 2017, 10:51:33 PM
Hi Soc,

Although Ibuprofen is a complex carb with innocuous metabolites that bypass the liver, (unlike the hairy Tylenol molecule), the challenge as you probably know is getting it safely past the upper GI tract.  Seems that this challenge might be intensified in the presence of alcohol?  Perhaps best to keep it short-term, use the gel-cap rather than solid pill, and protect your stomach with a mastic gum capsule at each dose, plus solid food.  Mastic gum is an indispensable prep, because it is effective in treating and preventing stomach ulcers.

And to add to your list of the negative effects of pain, there is shortening of telomeres.

P.S. A chronic infection in the gums needs to be addressed by stronger measures than you have been using.  Silver would knock it right out, as it produces a straight kill and leaves no vestiges to mutate.  Vitamin C at at least a gram per day per bowel tolerance will expedite gum healing.  Gelatine will work both with C to heal the gums via collagen production, and help protect your stomach from the Ibuprofen-alcohol combination.  A liver that is busy breaking down ethanol cannot spare healing molecules such as glutathione, cysteine and alpha-lipoic acid.  Perhaps try very short breaks while healing and supplementing?

PPS: Unless you're supplementing with a high dose of the B vitamins to replenish what is being destroyed, the vicious sleep-disruption cycle may continue.  Can add magnesium to bowel tolerance and 3mg melatonin for deeper sleep, taken with lecithin.
RR thanks for sharing your knowledge!
:)
Title: Re: clay
Post by: Socrates on October 12, 2017, 09:47:48 AM
Question: What kind of clay?
Just the clay they happened to stock at the local healthfood store. I'm not sure it matters with clay, but i have certainly not looked into the matter much. All i know is that clay can help with detox [and a few theories on how it works].
Title: Re: clay
Post by: Yowbarb on October 12, 2017, 01:25:46 PM
Question: What kind of clay?
Just the clay they happened to stock at the local healthfood store. I'm not sure it matters with clay, but i have certainly not looked into the matter much. All i know is that clay can help with detox [and a few theories on how it works].

Thanks, Socrates. :)
Title: Re: update
Post by: ilinda on October 13, 2017, 06:53:07 PM
The inflamation and pain finally went away a few weeks ago and i am feeling much better. Thanks to y'all for your support.
What finally helped get the inflamtion down, i'm not sure; was it the clay, the bath in ice cold water or just time?
Or was it all 3...?

Anyway, am also on the mend with the whole alcoholic issue; it seems that when one goes all alcohol dietary wise, that the body revolts [i hardly ate or drank other than my beers for a whole week]. What did i know, right? [Shoot, i just even started drinking the stuff at all at age 26 and never got into regular consumption until fairly recently; i've been focused on healthfoods and dietary tactics since adolescence].
True alcoholics apparently [interestingly enough, similar to cancer...] have traumatic issues that keep them from healing. Now, far be it for me to say i've no problems [...], but i'm not feeling sorry for myself, which appears to be a big thing with alcoholics. Hence, recuperation for me is mainly a physical matter and one that is progressing steadily. Thank god.
Socrates, I'm glad to hear you are out of pain. Thanks for sharing your story.
Question: What kind of clay?
Yes, we are glad to hear you have weathered the bad dental issue, and do you think this may have been a wake up call?  Shortly after you had your tooth issue, I had a dental issue of my own, although without the pain you experienced.  Still, I felt it was a wake up call to take care of any lingering dental issues that are serious enough that an ordinary person could probably not handle it alone in the future, without serious dental help.

When these things happen, I wonder how much that book, What To Do When There Is No Dentist,  would help.  (The title is that or similar).
Title: Re: no dentist
Post by: Socrates on October 13, 2017, 07:21:58 PM
When these things happen, I wonder how much that book, What To Do When There Is No Dentist,  would help.
I myself fear such things are both more about prevention and fairly complicated to actually do. For instance, this Doug Simons explains what to do with an abcessed tooth or molar, but he brings in spices, cactus leaves and other items that i certainly don't have [nor will anyone not near a desert, as far as the cactus is concerned].
Perhaps if one has been applying such techniques for years already, it may be a very different story.
I agree, it's something to have in mind. I had the molar extracted (though one dentist said it could still serve me for a few more years) because i didn't wish to be stuck with such an issue WTSHTF, but i indeed have another dental issue i would like to take care of asap (for the same reason).

Ah, if i had but known what i know now even only 10 years ago...  :-\
Title: Re: no dentist
Post by: ilinda on October 18, 2017, 04:44:22 PM
When these things happen, I wonder how much that book, What To Do When There Is No Dentist,  would help.
I myself fear such things are both more about prevention and fairly complicated to actually do. For instance, this Doug Simons explains what to do with an abcessed tooth or molar, but he brings in spices, cactus leaves and other items that i certainly don't have [nor will anyone not near a desert, as far as the cactus is concerned].
Perhaps if one has been applying such techniques for years already, it may be a very different story.
I agree, it's something to have in mind. I had the molar extracted (though one dentist said it could still serve me for a few more years) because i didn't wish to be stuck with such an issue WTSHTF, but i indeed have another dental issue i would like to take care of asap (for the same reason).

Ah, if i had but known what i know now even only 10 years ago...  :-\
Not trying to diss Doug Simons, but I bought his video about caring for our own teeth/mouth without using a dentist, and there are some serious gaps in information, although I think he has good intentions.  Maybe it was his first video.

One issue in particular involves the wooden tools, handmade by him I guess, but he never mentions the type of wood, and how exactly did he make them?  How long did it take?  The end of one I recall was as smooth as a baby's butt, as it sort of resembled a wood chisel.  But he never mentioned whether he hand-sanded them, or used power tools, etc., etc.

I made one, which incidentally never achieved the polished look of his "dental chisel", and I stopped using it soon as it began getting rather funky, as I guess after each use, it must be cleaned thoroughly in vinegar, or ??  It appeared he would periodically tuck one of his tooth tools behind his ear! 

I did take a course years ago taught by Dr. Walter Lewis and Dr. Memory-Elvin Lewis, entitled Medical Botany.  In that course they discussed many many interesting things, probably all of interest to this PXTH crowd.  One item was the "chewing sticks" that were/are used in some primitive cultures in parts of Africa.  They had both been in Africa a number of times, learning a lot about the natural ways to heal and help attain or maintain good health.  I was totally fascinated by the chewing sticks, as they are sticks or stems from certain trees (IIRC dogwood here in U.S. would be a good one), that are whittled on one end, and it is the whittled end that is chewed on much of the day, maybe off and on all day long.  I have more faith in a chewing stick than the things Doug Simons discussed, as the chewing stick required less work, and can be discarded easily without having to fret over the hours of labor to create that polished and sharply tapering end.

Also, the thing that really stuck in my mind about the chewing sticks is that both doctors who co-taught the course commented on how white the Natives teeth were, and that they just did not have cavities as we do in developed countries.  Of course MacDonald and all the rest had probably not reached the interior at that time.  Hate to think of how deeply the junk food industry has tentacled itself into third world countries now.  I think it's time to experiment with a dogwood branch.
Title: Re: teeth sticks
Post by: Socrates on October 18, 2017, 11:15:42 PM
the wooden tools, handmade by him I guess, but he never mentions the type of wood, and how exactly did he make them?  How long did it take?  The end of one I recall was as smooth as a baby's butt, as it sort of resembled a wood chisel.  But he never mentioned whether he hand-sanded them, or used power tools, etc., etc.

I made one, which incidentally never achieved the polished look of his "dental chisel", and I stopped using it soon as it began getting rather funky, as I guess after each use, it must be cleaned thoroughly in vinegar, or?
As a 'writer', i'm aware of how things get read into what you're trying to say. And whether one is writing or speaking [/blogging/whatever], time is always an issue, for that last thing ya want is to bore your audience...
Having said that, i think Doug Simons didn't elaborate on the wooden utensils because it just doesn't matter. I myself have just been using tooth picks and i'm quite happy with the results. And the great thing about tooth picks is that you discard them after maybe one minute's use [then ya go on to the next one].
Toothpicks come out of a factory but if you're 'out in the woods' i imagine you just go out and find an appropriate twig or other. It's not rocket science... and i don't think one should read too much into it.

Thinking of the toothpicks, i discard them after a couple of minutes and the next one i use is sterile; god knows i'm not thinking of cleaning or sterilizing them so i can use them again. And i imagine that if you're out in the woods and picking wood for cleaning your teeth with, you're not looking for a 'tool', as much as you're looking for an 'instrument' that you'll be using only once... [semantics]


In India they use neem (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azadirachta_indican), in northern Africa it's miswak (http://www.miswakstick.com/); all over the world twigs (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teeth_cleaning_twig) have been used for oral hygiene. But what does one notice foremost? It's about a single twig [as part of a bunch] for use. In other words, one uses the twig for a while, then discards it and goes on to the next twig.
I personally use some 4 or 5 toothpicks when cleaning my teeth after a meal. You'll know when your toothpick is 'used up' because it frays. And some toothpicks are hardier than others, and some batches of toothpicks include those that are hardier than others...
In the end, your teeth [and other regions within your mouth, i.e. in between teeth as well as cavities] feel 'polished' and very different from how they felt before. Marjory Wildcraft says this technique has whitened her teeth to the point that after using this technique for 2 years, people actually comment on how white and healthy her teeth look.
Title: Re: teeth sticks
Post by: ilinda on January 27, 2018, 04:52:07 PM
the wooden tools, handmade by him I guess, but he never mentions the type of wood, and how exactly did he make them?  How long did it take?  The end of one I recall was as smooth as a baby's butt, as it sort of resembled a wood chisel.  But he never mentioned whether he hand-sanded them, or used power tools, etc., etc.

I made one, which incidentally never achieved the polished look of his "dental chisel", and I stopped using it soon as it began getting rather funky, as I guess after each use, it must be cleaned thoroughly in vinegar, or?
As a 'writer', i'm aware of how things get read into what you're trying to say. And whether one is writing or speaking [/blogging/whatever], time is always an issue, for that last thing ya want is to bore your audience...
Having said that, i think Doug Simons didn't elaborate on the wooden utensils because it just doesn't matter. I myself have just been using tooth picks and i'm quite happy with the results. And the great thing about tooth picks is that you discard them after maybe one minute's use [then ya go on to the next one].
Toothpicks come out of a factory but if you're 'out in the woods' i imagine you just go out and find an appropriate twig or other. It's not rocket science... and i don't think one should read too much into it.

Thinking of the toothpicks, i discard them after a couple of minutes and the next one i use is sterile; god knows i'm not thinking of cleaning or sterilizing them so i can use them again. And i imagine that if you're out in the woods and picking wood for cleaning your teeth with, you're not looking for a 'tool', as much as you're looking for an 'instrument' that you'll be using only once... [semantics]


In India they use neem (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azadirachta_indican), in northern Africa it's miswak (http://www.miswakstick.com/); all over the world twigs (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teeth_cleaning_twig) have been used for oral hygiene. But what does one notice foremost? It's about a single twig [as part of a bunch] for use. In other words, one uses the twig for a while, then discards it and goes on to the next twig.
I personally use some 4 or 5 toothpicks when cleaning my teeth after a meal. You'll know when your toothpick is 'used up' because it frays. And some toothpicks are hardier than others, and some batches of toothpicks include those that are hardier than others...
In the end, your teeth [and other regions within your mouth, i.e. in between teeth as well as cavities] feel 'polished' and very different from how they felt before. Marjory Wildcraft says this technique has whitened her teeth to the point that after using this technique for 2 years, people actually comment on how white and healthy her teeth look.
Are you saying Marjory Wildcraft uses the toothpick technique, like the one you use?  I'd love to find a technique to whiten my teeth naturally, as the bottom teeth aren't as white as top ones, and I never drink coffee or tea, and cannot figure it out.  But hubby says the high-iron content of our water is doing the same thing to our teeth that it does to our fixtures--stains them.   Yikes.