Planet X Town Hall

Socrates & R.R. Book - PERMACULTURE, and methods for gathering food and water => All Seed Topics Here => Topic started by: enlightenme on July 28, 2011, 07:28:03 AM

Title: Seeds to bring
Post by: enlightenme on July 28, 2011, 07:28:03 AM
Well, as you all probably know, I'm not real computer savy, so this information may be here in some form and I just didn't see it.  I was trying to decide what type of seeds I would pick up to throw in with my gotta have takealong stuff, just to have atleast some sort of a start if all else fails. And what would be the simplest, easy to grow in most climates.  I can remember those first few years on the farm putting in huge truck patch gardens with no experience or knowledge whatsoever, was challenging  and well to say the least it took a few years to kindof figure it out (and that was with all the resources of the current world available). I wouldn't say I actually became an expert, but anyway I decided to make a list of some of the easiest to grow that I'm going to pick up while the stock is probably still available this year (ofcourse making sure it's the good old-fashioned kind not that new Monsanto, or whatever that junk is) I'm going to make sure to get several kinds of Squash, Zucchini, beans (preferably bush not pole), tomatoes, and peppers. Also, onions (though those are really hard to grow from seeds instead of sets), beets and carrots (root vegies can be really challenging in my experience anyway unless the soil is just perfect), lettuce and spinach for fast grow, cucumbers  (great for pickling for later), corn (though you gotta put in a pretty big area, atleast double rowed if I remember correctly), peas and broccoli.  I think that's going to be my total short list.  Any other gardeners out there with additional suggestions/comments?? It's been awhile, I'm sure I've probably missed some pretty obvious ones that would make really great candidates for the gotta bring category.....
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: bk on July 28, 2011, 09:25:04 AM
Do not forget Herbs, Basil, Oregano, Parsley you can use to season food or mix into a salad.

  Also on the root crops Radish, Turnips, Beets you can harvest the greens of the plants to mix with salads as well. Just harvest a few leaves from each plant so it keeps growing.

  Have plenty of Bean, alfalfa for sprouts in this case it could be from Monsanto since it would not be used to save seeds, but quick short term nutrition.

  Hope this helps, Bob 
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: augonit on July 28, 2011, 12:10:57 PM
I would strongly recommend having seeds of stuff you like to eat now.  There's no reason to carry cabbage seeds, for instance, if you hate cabbage.  Most things really are easy to grow, but it takes time.  Especially from seeds.  So factor that into your plans.  I'm planning on planting fruit trees, however, if that becomes unfeasible, I already know where orchards are in my area.  My concern is where to find nut trees!  I'd have to go into the forests.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: Thehumbleman1 on July 28, 2011, 02:11:47 PM
New to the board.

Good subject, seeds.

I have some as well, herbs have medicinal properties as well as alot of fruits and veggies, no suprise I'm sure here.  Point being is keep your "favorites" but if I may suggest also fast germinating and high production types, I'm working on the assumption of nomad thinking, so radishes for example germinate fast and are a small durable plant.  Cilantro goes to seed fast, another nice one to keep.  Dark zucchini is a high production durable plant, doesn't need deep soil.  Can be in pots and portable as well.

Here's a good tomato tip I learned by forgetting the science and just got to know the plant, ironic lol.  Those little buds that some call "suckers" that grow in between the branch and stem, most people say cut off the "sucker".  Well I did the opposite, I cut off the branch instead and now my tomatoes look like shrubs, those buds turn into fruit producing trunks.  One plant right now is 30 inches high but has 44 fruit with more still coming(has 4 trunks producing, 2 more growing).  The suprise is pleasent to say the least. 

Been a guest for awhile, got some nice tips here, hope this helps as well
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: Yowbarb on April 02, 2012, 10:05:17 AM
Well, as you all probably know, I'm not real computer savy, so this information may be here in some form and I just didn't see it.  I was trying to decide what type of seeds I would pick up to throw in with my gotta have takealong stuff, just to have atleast some sort of a start if all else fails. And what would be the simplest, easy to grow in most climates.  I can remember those first few years on the farm putting in huge truck patch gardens with no experience or knowledge whatsoever, was challenging  and well to say the least it took a few years to kindof figure it out (and that was with all the resources of the current world available). I wouldn't say I actually became an expert, but anyway I decided to make a list of some of the easiest to grow that I'm going to pick up while the stock is probably still available this year (ofcourse making sure it's the good old-fashioned kind not that new Monsanto, or whatever that junk is) I'm going to make sure to get several kinds of Squash, Zucchini, beans (preferably bush not pole), tomatoes, and peppers. Also, onions (though those are really hard to grow from seeds instead of sets), beets and carrots (root vegies can be really challenging in my experience anyway unless the soil is just perfect), lettuce and spinach for fast grow, cucumbers  (great for pickling for later), corn (though you gotta put in a pretty big area, atleast double rowed if I remember correctly), peas and broccoli.  I think that's going to be my total short list.  Any other gardeners out there with additional suggestions/comments?? It's been awhile, I'm sure I've probably missed some pretty obvious ones that would make really great candidates for the gotta bring category.....

Enlightenme I appreciate your starting this topic.
Maybe we could concoct an alphabetized seed list here...People could splice a item in, copy paste...keep it going like we did in the survival list board...
All The Best,
Yowabarb
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: Yowbarb on April 02, 2012, 10:12:44 AM
Best deal I have found anywhere...
(COSTCO)
Food For Health™ Emergency Garden Seeds23 Jumbo Seed Packets Produces 1 Acre Garden,
5 Year Shelf Life
Item # 472432
RatedOverall Rating: 4.5 out of 5   Rating Snapshot (50 reviews)
  $49.99
Shipping & Handling included


Rodfergie the link was making the page go too wide so I posted the item itself,
in your post, so it would all fit better here. PHOTO added.
Thanks for the good idea,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: JKB on May 03, 2012, 12:48:20 PM
Hello all, just found this last night in the new Sportsmans Guide magazine.  I ordered five...  Only $22 for one.
 
http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/25-pc-emergency-seed-kit.aspx?a=967182 (http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/25-pc-emergency-seed-kit.aspx?a=967182)
 
 
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: enlightenme on May 04, 2012, 04:03:18 AM
Thanks for that info JKB!  I actually ordered my survival seeds through Amazon, which is available from Veganseeds.  I got a great deal, one pkg was for $39.99 the other smaller one for $22.85.  I actually used some from the smaller package this year to try them out, and so far so good.  Excellent quality, packaged well and even had instructions for the novice.  I posted it somewhere else here, not sure where though! 
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: bk on May 17, 2012, 07:07:58 PM
Try to let some of your crops go to seed so you can practice harvesting the seeds.

I'm in the process of harvesting lettuce, spinach, and radish seeds that I planted months ago.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: steedy on May 18, 2012, 09:08:44 AM
I've been saving seeds for a couple years now.  I run into the problem of people thinking I'm pretty sloppy as a gardener when I let things go to seed.  But, I just think they have no idea, no matter how much I try to explain.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: enlightenme on May 18, 2012, 06:00:17 PM
Try to let some of your crops go to seed so you can practice harvesting the seeds.

I'm in the process of harvesting lettuce, spinach, and radish seeds that I planted months ago.


BK, Great idea!  Not something I ever felt the need to do before, but certainly a very important skill to acquire at this time.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: bk on January 17, 2014, 09:01:40 PM
Just some current info on bulk seeds.

Non-GMO Garden Seeds 2-gallon Bucket by Food for Health $89.99

Features:
100% Heirloom, Non-Hybrid, Non-GMO seeds.  2 Acre Garden Bucket, Net Weight: 5 lbs 13 oz


http://www.costco.com/Non-GMO-Garden-Seeds-2-gallon-Bucket-by-Food-for-Health.product.100018599.html

Food For Health™ Emergency Garden Seeds, 23 Jumbo Seed Packets $49.99

Features:
Delivered in Discreet Packaging, 100% Non-Hybrid Seeds, Net Weight:  2 lbs 2 oz


http://www.costco.com/.product.11500413.html?cm_sp=RichRelevance-_-itempageVerticalRight-_-CategorySiloedViewCP&cm_vc=itempageVerticalRight|CategorySiloedViewCP
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: Yowbarb on January 23, 2014, 11:17:18 PM
Bob E. those look like a pretty good deal.
 :)
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: Kyirrie on January 24, 2014, 05:08:20 AM
Well, as you all probably know, I'm not real computer savy, so this information may be here in some form and I just didn't see it.  I was trying to decide what type of seeds I would pick up to throw in with my gotta have takealong stuff, just to have atleast some sort of a start if all else fails. And what would be the simplest, easy to grow in most climates.  I can remember those first few years on the farm putting in huge truck patch gardens with no experience or knowledge whatsoever, was challenging  and well to say the least it took a few years to kindof figure it out (and that was with all the resources of the current world available). I wouldn't say I actually became an expert, but anyway I decided to make a list of some of the easiest to grow that I'm going to pick up while the stock is probably still available this year (ofcourse making sure it's the good old-fashioned kind not that new Monsanto, or whatever that junk is) I'm going to make sure to get several kinds of Squash, Zucchini, beans (preferably bush not pole), tomatoes, and peppers. Also, onions (though those are really hard to grow from seeds instead of sets), beets and carrots (root vegies can be really challenging in my experience anyway unless the soil is just perfect), lettuce and spinach for fast grow, cucumbers  (great for pickling for later), corn (though you gotta put in a pretty big area, atleast double rowed if I remember correctly), peas and broccoli.  I think that's going to be my total short list.  Any other gardeners out there with additional suggestions/comments?? It's been awhile, I'm sure I've probably missed some pretty obvious ones that would make really great candidates for the gotta bring category.....
Hi Enlightenme,
I think probably the best way to go looking for seeds that aren't GMO Monsanto and all that, is when you do a search, Search "Heirloom vegetables", these are the old varieties and usually have a lot more flavour. Once you get some of these growing, then you can save the seeds yourself and stockpile them. I've got a pile of them myself, some I have sourced from growers on Ebay, and they don't cost an arm and a leg  :)
How are things going over in the states. I have heard things about some people not being allowed to grow their own veges etc... is this true?
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: Aldwyn on January 24, 2014, 06:34:10 AM
The most important thing about seeds is to have something that you want to eat.  That makes the work growing much easier.  Now that being said...

Kale is a hearty green leafy vegetable that is easy to grow and tolerates quite a bit.  It can handle cold pretty well (mine is still growing here in the dead of winter unprotected in Oklahoma).
The best part of Kale is the nutritional value of it. 

I would say that squash is easy (and it is but the squash bugs will be a problem).  You have to rotate the places you put squash though because it will drain the soil of nutrients. 

Tomatoes are not as easy as you think... I have always had them grow well until I moved to where I am and now for three years in a row I have had no yield to speak of. 

Kyirrie is right that heirloom seeds are the most important fact, so you can save seed.  Last year I saved most of my crops for seed to have somewhat of a stockpile of seed. 

I have had no trouble growing and 'not being allowed' but I do not live in a city.  The only real government in my area is the county and as long as I don't bother anyone I am left to do as I wish.  Those in the cities might need to make sure they are using 'flower beds' to grow vegetables.  A privacy fence might allow city dwellers more of an opportunity to practice their farming.  Just remember it is not as simple as put the seed in the ground and wait.  It is a skill that must be honed just like any other.
Aldwyn
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: enlightenme on March 12, 2014, 07:13:20 PM
Well, as you all probably know, I'm not real computer savy, so this information may be here in some form and I just didn't see it.  I was trying to decide what type of seeds I would pick up to throw in with my gotta have takealong stuff, just to have atleast some sort of a start if all else fails. And what would be the simplest, easy to grow in most climates.  I can remember those first few years on the farm putting in huge truck patch gardens with no experience or knowledge whatsoever, was challenging  and well to say the least it took a few years to kindof figure it out (and that was with all the resources of the current world available). I wouldn't say I actually became an expert, but anyway I decided to make a list of some of the easiest to grow that I'm going to pick up while the stock is probably still available this year (ofcourse making sure it's the good old-fashioned kind not that new Monsanto, or whatever that junk is) I'm going to make sure to get several kinds of Squash, Zucchini, beans (preferably bush not pole), tomatoes, and peppers. Also, onions (though those are really hard to grow from seeds instead of sets), beets and carrots (root vegies can be really challenging in my experience anyway unless the soil is just perfect), lettuce and spinach for fast grow, cucumbers  (great for pickling for later), corn (though you gotta put in a pretty big area, atleast double rowed if I remember correctly), peas and broccoli.  I think that's going to be my total short list.  Any other gardeners out there with additional suggestions/comments?? It's been awhile, I'm sure I've probably missed some pretty obvious ones that would make really great candidates for the gotta bring category.....
Hi Enlightenme,
I think probably the best way to go looking for seeds that aren't GMO Monsanto and all that, is when you do a search, Search "Heirloom vegetables", these are the old varieties and usually have a lot more flavour. Once you get some of these growing, then you can save the seeds yourself and stockpile them. I've got a pile of them myself, some I have sourced from growers on Ebay, and they don't cost an arm and a leg  :)
How are things going over in the states. I have heard things about some people not being allowed to grow their own veges etc... is this true?

First, so sorry for this belated reply to your post!  Thankfully I can report that I have heard of no such thing.  That would just be terrible!  There better not be anything like that, I'm sure there would be a major revolt!!  ;) ;D  The state that I live in, Pennsylvania is a very large farming area too, so I know the farmers around here would never put up with that nonsense!
Mary
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: steedy on April 14, 2014, 09:52:34 AM
It only makes sense to have seeds of things you like to eat, and are able to grow in your area.  Also, it's a good idea to learn how to collect and save your own seeds too, not just because it's cheaper than having to buy new seeds every year, but also to save the seeds from the best producing plants.  That's how farmers have been doing it for years before the big hybrid companies, like Monsanto for instance, have told them to stop saving seeds.

There is a very easy method for saving tomato seeds and that is to cut your tomato in half and rub it onto a paper towel.  Let it dry and you can plant those seeds next year.

Other seeds, like pepper or beans, are very easy to save.  Let them dry before you store them in an airtight container.  I've used canning jars and even baggies for this.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: Jimfarmer on April 14, 2014, 02:52:12 PM
Quote
are able to grow in your area

Both before and after the pole shift.  Many regions will have a different climate afterwards.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: enlightenme on April 14, 2014, 02:59:23 PM
Quote
are able to grow in your area

Both before and after the pole shift.  Many regions will have a different climate afterwards.

Excellent point Jim!
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: steedy on April 14, 2014, 04:03:23 PM
When do you expect the pole shift?
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: Jimfarmer on April 14, 2014, 08:33:35 PM
When do you expect the pole shift?

My own personal wild guess is December of 2015.
My confidence in that prediction is low.

Now that so many predictions have been made over a period of many years, including even by Edgar Cayce, all of which have proven to be wrong, no source that I know of is making any more statements about timing other than to say "soon".  One popular reply to that is "Deja Poo - we have heard that crap before".
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: steedy on April 15, 2014, 04:04:28 PM
I'm not concerned at all about a pole shift, mostly because ifwe get one, it won't be in my lifetime.  I'm more concerned about overall economic collapse.  Even if it's just your own personal collapse, or regional, but I think it'll be more global actually.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: Yowbarb on April 15, 2014, 04:13:22 PM
When do you expect the pole shift?

See theory at Marshall's new Topic:
https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=5508.msg79547#msg79547

Cut to the Chase - cttcRadio.com / Planet X Flyby Distance to Earth and Pole Shift — Carles Esquerda

« on: April 13, 2014, 08:49:40 PM »

Planet X Flyby Distance to Earth and Pole Shift — Carles Esquerda, Alcione Association

In this, his second appearance on Cut to the Chase, Carles Esquerda, Director of the Alcione Association shares with us the closest distance Planet X will come to the Earth and the consequences of that, namely a devastating pole shift. This comes from Carlos Muñoz Ferrada, a professional Chilean Astronomer and a contemporary of V.M. Rabolu.

Carles also offers a unique insight into how people around the globe are taking an interest in Planet X, which according to him is a red-tailed planet, five times the size of Jupiter. At Yowusa.com we refer to Hercolubus as the smaller sister sun to our own Sol, a brown dwarf at the core of of what we refer to as the Planet X System.

http://yowusa.com
http://cttcradio.com   http://yowusa.com/radio/

http://yowusa.com/radio/index.shtml#now
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: steedy on April 16, 2014, 06:35:23 AM
Sorry about the italics. I didn't mean to put them in there.   :-[
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: enlightenme on April 16, 2014, 07:37:12 AM
Sorry about the italics. I didn't mean to put them in there.   :-[

No problem!  ;D
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: Yowbarb on September 07, 2018, 06:07:40 AM
https://www.offthegridnews.com/survival-gardening-2/20-must-have-seeds-to-store-for-a-crisis/

20 Must-Have Seeds To Store For A Crisis

Written by: Susan Patterson  Survival Gardening

[Excerpt from article]
Here’s a short list of the survival seeds you should have:

1. Radish

This hot little veggie may not be everybody’s favorite, but this root vegetable tops the list for being the fastest growing. It has a sowing-to-harvest time of just 20-30 days. You plant it today, and harvest it before the month is over. You can have a continuous harvest if you keep sowing the seeds every few days until the end of growing season.

2. Broccoli

Broccoli is nutrient-rich and gets ready in about three months. It is compact and can be planted one per every square foot. After harvesting the main head, you’ll get smaller heads from every side shoot, prolonging the harvest.

3. Onions

Onions are a kitchen essential; people usually grow them from onion sets, but they can be grown from seeds if you have four months of growing season. Or, grow the seedlings indoors and transplant them when all danger of frost is over. You can harvest some spring onions and onion leaves along the way. They are good companion plants for carrots.

Order your Heirloom Solutions seed catalog!

4. Lettuce

They’ll be ready to harvest in about 50 days, but if you select the loose-leaf varieties, leaves can be picked as soon as they become big enough.

5. Kale

Kale will take about two months to be ready for picking, but it grows well in all kinds of soils and is nutritious and versatile. Think of snacking on kale chips within two months of planting the seeds. You can have them from spring to fall with staggered plantings.

6. Tomatoes


This easy vegetable is one we cannot do without. There’s no excuse for not growing your own tomatoes; you can find a wide variety to grow in any USDA zone from two to 10. Take your pick from current, cherry or beefsteak varieties. If space is limited, you can stake them and grow them as a vertical crop. Excess crop, as there surely will be, can be sundried or processed into sauce.

7. Peppers

Grow some sweet peppers and some hot ones if you like. They can transform any bland dish into something special. There’s endless variety to choose from in a variety of rainbow colors. They take about two to three months to bear fruit, and they grow well in warmer months. Those with short growing seasons should sow early varieties indoors and transplant them into the garden when it is warm.

8. Spinach

Spinach may not give you iron arms, but it is an excellent source of iron and vitamins. It can be cooked into almost any dish. If you plant in early spring, plants will keep you in tasty leaves all through summer, starting from about 50 days of planting.

9. Cabbage

This cool weather crop gives you a substantial harvest from each plant. You can have a continuous supply by planting every two weeks, and have both early and late varieties, to extend the growing season. Surplus of winter crop will keep for five to six months in cool storage. Some can be turned into sauerkraut, too.

10. Corn

Corn is one cereal crop that meets the economy of space criteria. Standing tall and lean, each plant will give you at least two ears of corn. The trio of beans, squash and corn, together called “three sisters,” is still a great idea for a survival gardener.

11. Carrots

This cool-weather crop should be part of survival gardens because it can give you continuous yield with staggered planting and it can be harvested from under the snow cover in winter. Carrots grow well in USDA zones 4-10, but planting times vary. Each planting will give edible roots within two and a half to three months.

12. Beets

This cool season vegetable is favored for its ability to survive frost. Multiple plants can be grown just a few inches apart. It will take about two months from sowing to be ready for harvest, and will slightly pop out of the soil when it’s ready to pick.

13. Swiss chard


This is a fast-growing relative of the beet, grown for the tasty leaves. They become ready within two months of planting, and can give continuous harvest from the same plant as the outer leaves are used up. Grow in USDA zones 2-11.

14. Pumpkin

How can this crop, known for helping the early settlers survive in the new country, be excluded from the survival seed list? Even though they take about three to four months to mature, the crop is substantial and stores well. Pumpkins can be used in sweet and savory dishes, and offer a wide variety of vitamins and minerals in addition to carbohydrates. The seeds are excellent source of beneficial fatty acids, too.

15. Beans

These warm season vegetables come in so many varieties for the survival gardener to choose from. Bush beans give you yield in about two months of planting, while pole beans take longer, but give substantial harvest over a longer period. They are excellent companion plants. Using corn as their stalk will provide support for these climbers – and the beans will enrich the soil by fixing nitrogen. The young pods contribute to your vegetable dish, while the mature ones give you protein-rich beans which can be cooked fresh or stored for later use when dried.

16. Peas

What can be more delightful than eating peas straight off the plant, whether it is snap peas, snow peas or the good old English peas? Pick them within two months of planting and freeze or dry the excess harvest. Being cool season crops, snow peas can be grown in winter and spring.

17. Soy


Soy gets a bad rap these days, but that should be reserved for processed soy products. The soy bean is a highly nutritious food crop that can be a star in a survival garden. The Chinese were known to tide over famines on the strength of their soybean stock. They can be cooked in the pod as edamame, and the mature dry beans can give you protein-rich flour and soy milk to be used for a variety of dishes. It’s rich in carbohydrates, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and vitamins, besides being one of the few vegetable sources of complete protein.

18. Peanuts

Not exactly a nut, but this protein and fat-rich legume is an asset. They can be planted two to a foot and harvested in four months. They provide excellent harvest in the warmer Southern states, but early varieties can be cultivated in the Northern areas, too.

19. Sunflower

This is another native crop; it can be grown in Zones 7 to 11. They are low-maintenance and grow in poor soil as long as they get their share of sun. The large seed heads of each plant will give substantial quantity of tasty seeds. They can act as a support to other plants, too, and who can resist their cheery face?

20 Eggplant


It is an easily grown prolific vegetable that gives staggered harvest. It is versatile and can be used in stews, baked and grilled dishes or simply sautéed. Suitable for growing in Zones 4-10

Harvest seeds and store in a cool and dry location so that you can enjoy fresh garden veggies year after year — and be prepared for anything that may come!
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: ilinda on September 07, 2018, 09:19:29 AM
https://www.offthegridnews.com/survival-gardening-2/20-must-have-seeds-to-store-for-a-crisis/

20 Must-Have Seeds To Store For A Crisis

Written by: Susan Patterson  Survival Gardening

[Excerpt from article]
Here’s a short list of the survival seeds you should have:

1. Radish

This hot little veggie may not be everybody’s favorite, but this root vegetable tops the list for being the fastest growing. It has a sowing-to-harvest time of just 20-30 days. You plant it today, and harvest it before the month is over. You can have a continuous harvest if you keep sowing the seeds every few days until the end of growing season.

2. Broccoli

Broccoli is nutrient-rich and gets ready in about three months. It is compact and can be planted one per every square foot. After harvesting the main head, you’ll get smaller heads from every side shoot, prolonging the harvest.

3. Onions

Onions are a kitchen essential; people usually grow them from onion sets, but they can be grown from seeds if you have four months of growing season. Or, grow the seedlings indoors and transplant them when all danger of frost is over. You can harvest some spring onions and onion leaves along the way. They are good companion plants for carrots.

Order your Heirloom Solutions seed catalog!

4. Lettuce

They’ll be ready to harvest in about 50 days, but if you select the loose-leaf varieties, leaves can be picked as soon as they become big enough.

5. Kale

Kale will take about two months to be ready for picking, but it grows well in all kinds of soils and is nutritious and versatile. Think of snacking on kale chips within two months of planting the seeds. You can have them from spring to fall with staggered plantings.

6. Tomatoes


This easy vegetable is one we cannot do without. There’s no excuse for not growing your own tomatoes; you can find a wide variety to grow in any USDA zone from two to 10. Take your pick from current, cherry or beefsteak varieties. If space is limited, you can stake them and grow them as a vertical crop. Excess crop, as there surely will be, can be sundried or processed into sauce.

7. Peppers

Grow some sweet peppers and some hot ones if you like. They can transform any bland dish into something special. There’s endless variety to choose from in a variety of rainbow colors. They take about two to three months to bear fruit, and they grow well in warmer months. Those with short growing seasons should sow early varieties indoors and transplant them into the garden when it is warm.

8. Spinach

Spinach may not give you iron arms, but it is an excellent source of iron and vitamins. It can be cooked into almost any dish. If you plant in early spring, plants will keep you in tasty leaves all through summer, starting from about 50 days of planting.

9. Cabbage

This cool weather crop gives you a substantial harvest from each plant. You can have a continuous supply by planting every two weeks, and have both early and late varieties, to extend the growing season. Surplus of winter crop will keep for five to six months in cool storage. Some can be turned into sauerkraut, too.

10. Corn

Corn is one cereal crop that meets the economy of space criteria. Standing tall and lean, each plant will give you at least two ears of corn. The trio of beans, squash and corn, together called “three sisters,” is still a great idea for a survival gardener.

11. Carrots

This cool-weather crop should be part of survival gardens because it can give you continuous yield with staggered planting and it can be harvested from under the snow cover in winter. Carrots grow well in USDA zones 4-10, but planting times vary. Each planting will give edible roots within two and a half to three months.

12. Beets

This cool season vegetable is favored for its ability to survive frost. Multiple plants can be grown just a few inches apart. It will take about two months from sowing to be ready for harvest, and will slightly pop out of the soil when it’s ready to pick.

13. Swiss chard


This is a fast-growing relative of the beet, grown for the tasty leaves. They become ready within two months of planting, and can give continuous harvest from the same plant as the outer leaves are used up. Grow in USDA zones 2-11.

14. Pumpkin

How can this crop, known for helping the early settlers survive in the new country, be excluded from the survival seed list? Even though they take about three to four months to mature, the crop is substantial and stores well. Pumpkins can be used in sweet and savory dishes, and offer a wide variety of vitamins and minerals in addition to carbohydrates. The seeds are excellent source of beneficial fatty acids, too.

15. Beans

These warm season vegetables come in so many varieties for the survival gardener to choose from. Bush beans give you yield in about two months of planting, while pole beans take longer, but give substantial harvest over a longer period. They are excellent companion plants. Using corn as their stalk will provide support for these climbers – and the beans will enrich the soil by fixing nitrogen. The young pods contribute to your vegetable dish, while the mature ones give you protein-rich beans which can be cooked fresh or stored for later use when dried.

16. Peas

What can be more delightful than eating peas straight off the plant, whether it is snap peas, snow peas or the good old English peas? Pick them within two months of planting and freeze or dry the excess harvest. Being cool season crops, snow peas can be grown in winter and spring.

17. Soy


Soy gets a bad rap these days, but that should be reserved for processed soy products. The soy bean is a highly nutritious food crop that can be a star in a survival garden. The Chinese were known to tide over famines on the strength of their soybean stock. They can be cooked in the pod as edamame, and the mature dry beans can give you protein-rich flour and soy milk to be used for a variety of dishes. It’s rich in carbohydrates, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and vitamins, besides being one of the few vegetable sources of complete protein.

18. Peanuts

Not exactly a nut, but this protein and fat-rich legume is an asset. They can be planted two to a foot and harvested in four months. They provide excellent harvest in the warmer Southern states, but early varieties can be cultivated in the Northern areas, too.

19. Sunflower

This is another native crop; it can be grown in Zones 7 to 11. They are low-maintenance and grow in poor soil as long as they get their share of sun. The large seed heads of each plant will give substantial quantity of tasty seeds. They can act as a support to other plants, too, and who can resist their cheery face?

20 Eggplant


It is an easily grown prolific vegetable that gives staggered harvest. It is versatile and can be used in stews, baked and grilled dishes or simply sautéed. Suitable for growing in Zones 4-10

Harvest seeds and store in a cool and dry location so that you can enjoy fresh garden veggies year after year — and be prepared for anything that may come!
Looks rather helpful, although I'll add a few stray comments.  If one is really pressed for space, or has a totally brown thumb, they could possibly forget the spinach, kale, Swiss Chard, broccoli, and cabbage, and count on growing the wild Lamb's Quarter for greens. 

We've never had a garden where they didn't volunteer.  Every fall or very late summer, I pick up the old plants whose seeds are now ready to fall where they will volunteer next year, and I just toss them where I want them--large piles of old, dead-looking plants.  It works every time.  Plus there will be volunteers in other spots as well, often more than you really want.  Lamb's Quarter is little work, with no seed to carefully save in messy envelopes, and is highly nutritious as well as tasty.

Another reason for dispensing with Swiss Chard is that it is in the same genus as beets and will readily cross-pollinate with them.  The pollen for them is so tiny that even screening either of them off will not prevent pollen from the other wafting inside and pollinating your prized plants.  I'd cringe if Swiss Chard pollinated my beets planted the following spring for seed!

And soy is cringeworthy due to its potential to have already been pollinated by GM soy which seems to be everywhere.

Peas are a wonderful crop but here in MO, my harvest was always so tiny that at the end of the season I might have one or two small freezer bags, and that's after early planting, carefully tending, etc.  I think they need more cool weather than MO.

Carrots are another crop that, although delicious and nutritious, just don't do well here unless you're in a more sandy region.  In this clay, they seem to have one growth spurt, growing from tiny to very small, and that's about all they do in this clay.

Last but not least eggplant is something I've tried to grow but found it to be extremely difficult.  Flea beetles will destroy the leaves, leaving a lace-like meshwork of former-leaves, that take most of the summer to recover.  Then it loves heat, and on and on.  I wish someone could tell me how to grow it.  None of my friends has luck either.  Only one gardening friend, 95 year old Bill, told me when he does grow it, he always leaves it in a pot, has it covered from flea beetles for all of spring and early summer, and it will not survive in the ground. 

Well, those seeds that I've eliminated are probably only relevant to the climate and conditions in Missouri, so maybe for many others, the list would be perfect. 

My own favorites for this locale would be:
beets
parsnips
sweet potatoes
Purple Peruvian potatoes
Yamiken winter squash
lettuce
collards
peanuts
Trail of Tears bean
Christmas lima
Baby Pam pumpkin
radish
peppers (sweet and hot, separated widely)
tomatoes
corns (many)
shallots (instead of onion--no seeds to save)
garlic
asparagus

Thanks for posting this listing, as it is food for thought as wel all live in very distinct regions with unique climate and growth conditions, and now is the time for pondering which seeds, bulbs, roots, rhizones, etc., you would need to save.  Now is the time, brothers and sisters, and this listing has given me the push I need.
Title: ancient and strong cereal seeds
Post by: Socrates on October 16, 2018, 12:16:14 AM
Youtuber Ice Age Farmer (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kC7av0hAoS4) offered links to ancientcerealgrains.org (http://www.ancientcerealgrains.org/seedandliteraturecatalog1.html) and such.

At the present time, the Kusa Seed organization does not ship seed to addresses outside of the United States. Foreign seed orders must provide a United States ship-to address (the address of a friend or acquaintance in the United States who can receive packages for you; someone able to assume the responsibility of forwarding the package(s) to you).
Yeah, so i might be PM'ing you requesting you forward me some seeds...
This stuff sounds too awesome to ignore!
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: R.R. Book on October 16, 2018, 03:02:04 AM
Happy to help Soc!  :)
Title: Re: ancient cereals
Post by: Socrates on October 16, 2018, 07:13:09 AM
Looking through their catalogue (http://www.ancientcerealgrains.org/pdf/SeedCAtalog-index10-17.pdf), i'm thinking that i'm doing both of their Everything You Got options. It'll run me near $ 300 but who can put a price on such (genetic) information?

Next year; am tapped out this year but come halfway through 2019 i should be in excess of funds for this kind of stuff. God knows i'll be refreshing my seed collection entirely next year anyway (as i have not had the kind of refrigerating setup necessary to keep what seeds i have been ordering for decades).

Hopefully da sh!t don't hit da fan b4 then...  ;)
And thanks, Lori; hope to be taking advantage of your help in a year or so.  :-*
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: R.R. Book on October 16, 2018, 09:05:25 AM
Well, the books look every bit as interesting as the seeds!

Have had some luck in the past getting older seeds to sprout by soaking them in warmish water, sometimes for several days.  There's a film online about a guy who finds old seeds from 100 years ago or something like that, and manages to sprout them after a bit of coddling.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: ilinda on October 16, 2018, 07:31:46 PM
One of the corn varieties I grew this year is a real winner.  It is supposedly a sweet corn, but the ancient sweet corns are slightly sweet, but not densely sugar sweet as are modern-day hybrids.  Plus, I plan to use this variety more for its dried seed kernels to be cooked as hominy, for flour for flatbreads, cornbreads, etc.

It is Red Guariji'o.  I cannot figure out how to put the accent over the second "i" with this keyboard, so I put an apostrophe in there.  This variety is so fertile, that while the cobs are drying on a table, one of the ears has kernels that have begun to germinate--right on the cob!  I have never seen this in my life, and there was no moisture trapped anywhere in the cobs, and only one cob has germinating occurring. 

I may pull those kernels off and plant them for an experiment, but really want the rest of the kernels to just sit there and dry!  BTW, we did eat four ears as sweet corn and it is very satisfactory as an ancient "sweet corn".   The seeds are from last year's crop, which grew from seeds ordered from Native Seeds Search in Arizona.

Notice in the closeup, those short white protrusions--they are the growing tips, just as one would see protruding from the ground after having planted corn in the spring.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: R.R. Book on October 17, 2018, 04:21:27 AM
I have never heard of that variety before.  What a beauty!
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: ilinda on October 18, 2018, 11:57:27 AM
Native Seed Search in Arizona has many varieties of corn and other crops that have been grown for millenia by Natives of the desert Southwest.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: ilinda on October 18, 2018, 12:02:21 PM
The year 2018 will be remembered on this farm as the first year we harvested chestnuts.  Only one tree produced, but two flowered, which I understand is necessary for pollinization.  I have been planting a number of different types of chestnuts over the years, starting almost 20 years ago, so this is exciting, even though the harvest is meager.  It's OK.  They are mature trees now, and are said to produce every year, once mature.

The wonderful thing about chestnuts is that they are excellent food for herbivore livestock, and also nutritious for humans.  Think of the words of that song...."Roasting chestnuts by the fire....."
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: R.R. Book on October 18, 2018, 02:19:38 PM
Do you roast and eat them yourself also, or feed them to the goats?

Would love a photo!
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: ilinda on October 19, 2018, 09:55:55 AM
This is the chestnut photo I forgot yesterday. 

When production is higher as trees mature, goats will get many, but for now with so few, they are reserved for the humans here.  Someone showed me how to roast them a few years ago and it looks easy:  make an "X" incision on outer skin, then put on cookie sheet in oven on not-too-high temperature, but that is what I cannot recall.  Maybe 325 deg. F? 

When I roast peanuts, I use lower, around 275 or lower, to prevent burning.  Maybe chestnuts are a bit hardier and resistant to scorching?  I just found this on  youtube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJjk5759oSg
In this video she says 450 deg. F/230 deg. C and only for 5-10 minutes.  But after peeling them, then put them in oven a second time.  This is not the only method, but a good start.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: R.R. Book on October 19, 2018, 11:29:41 AM
Lovely!  This is putting me in the mood for the holidays... :)
Title: Re: ancient and strong cereal seeds
Post by: Socrates on October 28, 2018, 11:54:29 AM
At the present time, the Kusa Seed organization does not ship seed to addresses outside of the United States. Foreign seed orders must provide a United States ship-to address (the address of a friend or acquaintance in the United States who can receive packages for you; someone able to assume the responsibility of forwarding the package(s) to you).
And by the way! I was listening to a podcast and someone mentioned My US.com (https://www.myus.com/), a website that allows one to ship purchases to that they then forward abroad. Amazing, no?
I wish i would've heard about this option years ago, but whatever.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: R.R. Book on October 28, 2018, 11:56:42 AM
Looks like that page is down, but if such a service exists, I can think of numerous locations in the U.K. that breed permaculture crop varieties that we can't get here...
Title: Re: chestnuts
Post by: Socrates on October 28, 2018, 11:59:42 AM
I've eaten them raw and roasted [in Paris there are guys roasting them on the sidewalk]. Raw is fine, roasted is great. This is a wonderful long term food. Too bad it takes 20 years before the harvests start, but then isn't that just the sad story about our age, i.e. that trees have been pushed aside in favor of 'agriculture'?
I always have a few as 'seeds' but i'm wondering how to keep them or how long they'll keep.
Title: Re: myus.com
Post by: Socrates on October 28, 2018, 12:06:12 PM
Looks like that page is down, but if such a service exists, I can think of numerous locations in the U.K. that breed permaculture crop varieties that we can't get here...
Link works for me...  ::)
Of course i've been mainly trying to supply through UK options, but in the end there are unique options all over the world and sometimes there's only one source to be found, no matter how big the internet is. For instance, i was looking for grass seed mixes and ultimately only Cotswold (https://www.cotswoldseeds.com/) could supply seeds for foggage farming [i.e. various types of grass seed together].
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: R.R. Book on September 06, 2019, 02:03:24 PM
Revisiting Soc's topic of ancient grains mentioned earlier on this thread, I was cleaning out my desktop folders and came across this brief note to myself tucked away several years ago, distinguishing the ancient grains and presumably from the Lost Crops of the Incas book:

Whole grains:

•   Quinoa is a complete protein.
•   Teff is gluten-free, and high in fiber.
•   Amaranth is high in iron.
•   Farro has twice the fiber and protein of whole wheat.
•   Millet is high in manganese, magnesium and phosphorus.

(https://proxy.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Fcravelocal.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2012%2F09%2FFreekeh-grain-label-WSJ-400x266.jpg&f=1&nofb=1)
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: ilinda on September 06, 2019, 02:06:01 PM
Revisiting Soc's topic of ancient grains mentioned earlier on this thread, I was cleaning out my desktop folders and came across this brief note to myself tucked away several years ago, distinguishing the ancient grains and presumably from the Lost Crops of the Incas book:

Whole grains:

•   Quinoa is a complete protein.
•   Teff is gluten-free, and high in fiber.
•   Amaranth is high in iron.
•   Farro has twice the fiber and protein of whole wheat.
•   Millet is high in manganese, magnesium and phosphorus.

Good list!  With several of those, who needs modern-day wheat?  Who needs modern-day wheat anyway?  We ate quinoa for years and then discovered red quinoa and black quinoa.  The red variety is our favorite, but so far haven't found any lately.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: R.R. Book on September 06, 2019, 05:01:01 PM
Is the difference due to flavor?
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: Jimfarmer on September 06, 2019, 10:33:18 PM
Quote
Who needs modern-day wheat anyway?

I recently found coconut flour at Walmart.  Haven't tried baking with it yet.  It has no gluten, so i'll add some chia seeds and/or metamucil for binder.  Any suggestions?
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: ilinda on September 07, 2019, 03:07:16 PM
Quote
Who needs modern-day wheat anyway?

I recently found coconut flour at Walmart.  Haven't tried baking with it yet.  It has no gluten, so i'll add some chia seeds and/or metamucil for binder.  Any suggestions?
If you try baking with coconut flour, and get not too successful results, think about making flatbreads which can be heated in a cast iron skillet.  When I make spelt flatbreads, which are just spelt dourdough and spelt flour, rolled out and flattened very thin, I cook them in an unoiled cast iron skillet until done on both sides.  Experimenting will tell you how high the heat, and when to flip them.

It seems coconut flour, chia, and ?metamucil? fashioned into flatbreads might be very interesting, plus tasty, as coconut has a natural sweetness.  Keep us posted.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: ilinda on September 07, 2019, 03:08:52 PM
Is the difference due to flavor?
Yes, the red not only tastes better, but seems more filling.  I/we always feel fuller after having eaten red quinoa, and remembering having eaten the "white" (beige) quinoa and feeling sort of empty.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: R.R. Book on September 08, 2019, 05:36:26 AM
Good to know.

Re: Jim's question about coconut flour, and your subsequent answer Ilinda, am gathering that coconut flour may be oilier and heavier than bread flour?

I wonder if it still contains phytochemicals monolaurin and capryllic acid when ground into flour?  If so, then it could be an asset even if more difficult to work with...

I wonder what the shelf-life is compared with unbleached wheat flour (as opposed to whole wheat, which has a short lifespan)?
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: ilinda on September 08, 2019, 02:52:39 PM
Good to know.

Re: Jim's question about coconut flour, and your subsequent answer Ilinda, am gathering that coconut flour may be oilier and heavier than bread flour?

I wonder if it still contains phytochemicals monolaurin and capryllic acid when ground into flour?  If so, then it could be an asset even if more difficult to work with...

I wonder what the shelf-life is compared with unbleached wheat flour (as opposed to whole wheat, which has a short lifespan)?
A year or two ago I bought a couple of different brands of coconut flour and have never really been sure of how to use them.  The one in my lap is unopened and is "Nutiva organic superfood gluten-free" and according to the nutrition facts label, serving size is 2 TBsp. and in each serving are: 2 g fat, 11g carbohydrates, and 4 g protein.

When I tried to use it as flour, my recollection is that it kept "demanding" more and more liquid--or something like that.  The memory of that left me feeling it was leading me by a rope and I didn't know where we were going, and wasn't sure what to add next.  I was experimenting, but never quite had an experience like that with wheat flour or spelt flour, etc. 

There is a recipe on this Nutiva bag for coconut blueberry chia muffins.  Ingredients called for are: coconut flour, baking soda, sea salt, raw honey, coconut milk, eggs, coconut oil, vanilla extract, chia seeds, and blueberries.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: R.R. Book on September 08, 2019, 04:00:43 PM
They sound awesome!
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: Jimfarmer on September 15, 2019, 11:12:03 PM
Quote
It seems coconut flour, chia, and ?metamucil? fashioned into flatbreads might be very interesting, plus tasty, as coconut has a natural sweetness.  Keep us posted.

It didn't work.  Made pudding instead of pastry.

I'll look for better recipes.
Title: essentials
Post by: Socrates on March 23, 2020, 11:07:23 AM
love this vid, love this guy: If i had to pick ONLY three crops for a survival garden (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CVSIa9606Y)
So, a bit of a guessing game watching this [short] vid.  Is it 3 sisters? Will my favorite make the cut?
Amazingly, it seems my experience with RESEARCH connects with this kind of folks' experience. He's saying:
- beans
- butternut squash
- potatoes
But he mentions he's tormented 'cause there's also sweet potatoes and sunflowers.
As as survivalist, constantly thinking about the few things i should have on me at all times, this list is close to my heart.
So, from the above vid, it's clearly never about 3 things and should be at least about 6 things, i.e.:
- beans, butternut squash, potatoes
- sweet potatoes
- sun flowers
- corn

But then, in the spirit of SHTF preps that take into account that nothing might come back...:
- hemp
- cotton
- bamboo
- (and after reading Born to Run, i'll add chia seeds)
and animals...:
- islandic chickens
- Flemish giants [rabbits]
- honey bees
- silk worms
- kune kune pigs
- Ouessant sheep
- muscovy ducks
People, what am i leaving out? What did i forget?
Then, in a 'perfect' world, one would like to get some donkeys, dogs and miniature zebu [cows].
Fit all that in yer survival cave and let the 'new world' begin!
'nuff said. I think this is my plan and recipe for this year...


Seeds will survive. Some animals will survive [though some barely; think of cheetah's, all of which originated from a single parent].
Bees? There were no honey bees in the Americas until Europeans introduced them...
Silk worms? None until Asians introduced them...
Special breeds [dogs, sheep, cattle, etc.]? Forget about it.
DNA is about INFORMATION; that's books as well as livestock.
You know, right, that 30 domesticated animals come from the Anunnaki homeground? That aside from llamas and a few others, just about all animals we husband stem from this one region [Mesopotamia]?
In other words, You want it? You bring it along...
Chihuahuas?
Bacteria that form your favorite cheese?
The wool that makes up your blanket, coat or mattress?

Just look at the world today. I see them react to this coronavirus madness and think: amatures...
I've had 4 gallons of milk in storage for years. I've had 50 kg of rice for years! Loads of tins of sardines...
My problem is that i've yet to arrange my right survival LOCATION but clearly the entire world seems oblivious to the fact that TS might HTF at any given moment.
When November comes, i'm heading toward the south of Spain, god willing. With my books, my seeds and my livestock. If i see a huge celestial body or a Blue Kachina, i will take what i have and head inside the nearest (large) cave [obviously where i've set up shop].
That's that. Where else would one feel safe to live?
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: ilinda on March 23, 2020, 06:14:27 PM
Quote
It sounds as if you've been devoting a lot of thought to your plans, and they do come across as interestiing, intriguing, and adventuresome.

I have no idea if you've "left anything out" but here I've been pondering, besides Icelandic chickens, geese.  Geese eat grass and that would really save a lot of work of weed whacking.  Plus geese (I think) don't eat frogs, bugs, etc., so they would not bother our frogs and toads, or honeybees, etc.  Are there any downsides to geese, if one is looking for grass-mowing?

In your journey in November, will you be able to avoid crowds?  Just today I saw (and will post later tonight) an article about how bad the CoVid19 is in Spain, that sick patients are lying on the floor in the hospital halls, and waiting for beds.  As long as you avoid any cities, you will probably be OK.  Are you backpacking?  Will the new love in your life be sharing the cave?  Do you know if anyone else has their eyes on "your" cave? 

As November approaches, please keep us posted.
Title: Re: Seeds to bring
Post by: R.R. Book on March 23, 2020, 06:36:57 PM
Some grim stories of Spain in the news at the moment...take good care of yourself!