Planet X Town Hall

ilinda - SURVIVAL HEALTH => Alternative Medicine - Herbs, Foods and Methods => Topic started by: Yowbarb on April 08, 2010, 08:20:57 PM

Title: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on April 08, 2010, 08:20:57 PM
from Answers.com
http://www.answers.com/topic/shiitake-mushroom-1 (http://www.answers.com/topic/shiitake-mushroom-1)
Shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) is a fungus native to Japan, China, and Korea. Although these mushrooms are cultivated worldwide as of 2004, Japan is still the largest producer of shiitake mushrooms, producing 80% of the total supply. Used in Asian cuisine for over 2,000 years, cultivation of shiitake began almost 700 years ago in Japan. The Japanese consider the shiitake not only a flavorful food but also "the elixir of life." During the Ming Dynasty (1368
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Linda on May 03, 2010, 04:21:13 PM
Iodine rich sea vegetables. Most people are iodine deficient due to depleted soils, sea vegetables can help.

Neptune's Garden - Vegetables of the Sea


Most folks don't think of turning to the Earth's oceans for vegetables, yet there is a vast source of nutritious food available there that is just now reaching the mainstream diet in the United States - sea vegetables. Sea vegetables, or seaweed are marine algae which are abundant all over the world. You know, those big long things you see washed up on the coast that look like rubber and make great jumpropes when they're still moist. They, and the many other varieties, are among the most ancient life forms on earth and probably were the first life to exist. In many parts of the world, they have been harvested and eaten since long before land-based agriculture. They can be eaten fresh, but most often are granulated or dried and reconstituted while cooking other foods. They add a delicious variation to almost any dish, from rice to stir-fry to soup to popcorn.

Health Benefits of Seaweed
Sea vegetables are virtually fat-free, low calorie and one of the richest sources of minerals in the vegetable kingdom as they have ready access to the abundance of minerals found in the ocean. Nourishment is acquired across the sea vegeable's entire surface through the gentle wave action of underwater currents. Sea water & human blood contain many of the same minerals in very similar concentrations.
Sea vegetables contain high amounts of calcium and phosphorous and are extremely high in magnesium, iron, iodine and sodium. For example, 1/4 cup of cooked hijiki contains over half the calcium found in a cup of milk and more iron than in an egg, important concerns for vegans, those who refrain from eating any animal-based products. They also contain vitamins A, B1, C and E, as well as protein and carbohydrates.

One of seaweed's most prominent health benefits is its ability to remove radioactive strontium and other heavy metals from our bodies. Whole brown seaweeds (not granulated) such as kelp contain alginic acid which binds with the toxins in the intestines rendering them indigestible and carries them out of the system.


Types of Seaweed
Brown Algae
Arame - A Japanese sea vegetable, with a mild flavor, arame is dried and cut into thin strands, it can be added to soups or served as a vegetable side dish.

Hijiki - Found primarily in the Far East, contains the most calcium of any of the sea vegetables, 1400mg/100gr dry weight (compared to milk with 100mg/100gr.) In its natural state it is very tough; after harvesting it is dried, steamed and dried some more. When cooked, it rehydrates and expands about five times its dry volume.

Kelp - This sea vegetable grows mainly in the north along the Pacific and Atlantic coastlines. The name kelp is European in origin and originally referred to the ash derived from burning brown algae, which was used to produce soap and glass. Most often dried and sold whole, granulated or powdered. It can be sprinkled on foods as a condiment, or whole kelp adds a nice touch to salads or it can be used as a wrap for a variety of fillings.

Kombu - Kombu can be used for soup stock or added to the bottom of a pot of rice or vegetables to help them keep from sticking; added to a pot of beans, kombu helps them cook faster and renders them more digestible due to the high mineral content.

Wakame & Alaria - These seaweeds are similar in characteristics but differ in their habitats. Wakame is collected in the cold waters off the island of Hokaido, Japan and alaria is harvested in North America. Wakame is a good source of protein, iron, calcium, sodium & other minerals and vitamins. Alaria is high in vitamin K and the B-vitamins as well as the minerals iodine and bromine.

Red Algae
Agar-Agar - This is a versatile, tasty gel that will set at room temperature. Its been used for centuries in the home as a mild laxative and as a basic ingredient in a Japanese dessert, kanten. Agar-agar is rich in iodine and trace elements.

Irish Moss - Irish Moss is most often used dried in relishes, breads, soups or fritters. Many people snack on this dried dulse straight out of the bag.

Nori - Unlike other sea vegetables that are collected wild, Japanese nori is cultivated. In Ireland, it is known as sloke and in Scotland and Wales as laver. Gaelic people have long made flat breads from flour and nori, known as laver bread. Its most prominent use is as the wrapping for sushi, although it can be cut into strips, lightly toasted and used as a garnish as well. It is exceptionally high in vitamin A and protein.


http://www.efn.org/~sundance/Seaweed.html (http://www.efn.org/~sundance/Seaweed.html)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on May 04, 2010, 11:19:33 AM
Linda thanks, these sea vegetables and also fresh water dulse are so valuable to people's health.
Good items to stock up on. The dried Nori might keep for awhile if packaged well.
Most of my kids liked the Nori. I would let them have squares of it, thin sheets and they would chew on them.
I think it was you?  posted about some macrobiotic goodies -anyway they would get a few "yinnies" macrobiotic chewable candy or a maple honey bear treat (from health food store) once twice  a mo. Blender drinks had a bit of honey, carob or maple or malt syrup. I was pretty good about no regular refined sugar for a long time,,, need to get back to that. Kids were no sickly... one did have some seasonal allergies but mainly fine.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Linda on May 04, 2010, 12:57:02 PM
You know Barb you can get dulse flakes to put on food, I don't know how long they can be kept for. I'll have to check on that. Also how long you can keep the nori sheets, they are dehydrated so maybe they have a long shelf life if kept totally dry.

My girlfriend eats those nori sheets all the time, she likes the salty taste. I do like sushi, and actually plan on having that tomorrow for lunch with my son. We are going shopping at the local green houses to get plants for our gardens so we always have lunch together. The Mom and son time!

Linda
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on May 04, 2010, 11:40:26 PM
You know Barb you can get dulse flakes to put on food, I don't know how long they can be kept for. I'll have to check on that. Also how long you can keep the nori sheets, they are dehydrated so maybe they have a long shelf life if kept totally dry.

My girlfriend eats those nori sheets all the time, she likes the salty taste. I do like sushi, and actually plan on having that tomorrow for lunch with my son. We are going shopping at the local green houses to get plants for our gardens so we always have lunch together. The Mom and son time!

Linda

Dulse flakes sound good. Used to give my kids Dr. Bronners corn chips made with kelp.
Nori a few times a week. A spoonful of half kelp half honey was a remedy we had too.
Once I lived in Koreatown and they had this wonderful seasoned nori. Some were tamari flavored some had some sweet hot pepper but easy to eat. Just great. My son's friend and wife and little boy stayed with us. I brought home some flavored nori. Asked his mom if he could have some she and I didn''t know if he would like it. He gobbled it down and asked me for it a lot. I brought some every time I went by the market. Money was tight so we didn;t stock up on anything but we picked up a lot of staples at the korean store. Some of it very economical.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Linda on May 05, 2010, 04:06:24 AM
Little kids are so funny, it makes you wonder if they are actually craving something they need in their body.

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on May 05, 2010, 06:35:29 AM
Little kids are so funny, it makes you wonder if they are actually craving something they need in their body.

It may have been a mineral deficiency of the little boy. I suppose it's better to chew on nori than on the edge of the window sill or the pencils etc.  ;) He was doing pretty good staying there with me - When I was a kid I was always chewing on stuff sort of drove Mom nuts. Signs of mineral deficiencies in fingernails etc. Anyway when I found stuff like seaweed and algae I knew this was something needed...
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on June 13, 2010, 10:48:07 AM
I just found a tidbit of info  - never knew about this.
From Wikipedia,
"There is also evidence that common foods may have some protective ability against sunburn if taken for a period before the exposure.[27] Beta-carotene and lycopene, chemicals found in tomatoes and other fruit, have been found to increase the skin's ability to resist the effects of UV light. In a 2007 study:
After about 10
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: 1969quartz0 on July 20, 2010, 09:56:22 AM
 I hope this info. helps



 Apples
 Protects your heart
 Prevents constipation
 Blocks diarrhea
 Improves lung capacity
 Cushions joints
 
Apricots
 Combats cancer
 Controls blood pressure
 Saves your eyesight
 Shields against Alzheimer's
 Slows aging process
 
Artichokes
 Aids digestion
 Lowers cholesterol
 Protects your heart
 Stabilizes blood sugar
 Guards against liver disease
 
Avocados
 Battles diabetes
 Lowers cholesterol
 Helps stops strokes
 Controls blood pressure
 Smoothes skin
 
Bananas
 Protects your heart
 Quiets a cough
 Strengthens bones
 Controls blood pressure
 Blocks diarrhea
 
Beans
 Prevents constipation
 Helps hemorrhoids
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats cancer
 Stabilizes blood sugar
 
Beets
 Controls blood pressure
 Combats cancer
 Strengthens bones
 Protects your heart
 Aids weight loss
 
Blueberries
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Stabilizes blood sugar
 Boosts memory
 Prevents constipation
 
Broccoli
 Strengthens bones
 Saves eyesight
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Controls blood pressure
 
Cabbage
 Combats cancer
 Prevents constipation
 Promotes weight loss
 Protects your heart
 Helps haemorrhoids
 
Cantaloupe
 Saves eyesight
 Controls blood pressure
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats cancer
 Supports immune system
 
Carrots
 Saves eyesight
 Protects your heart
 Prevents constipation
 Combats cancer
 Promotes weight loss
 
Cauliflower
 Protects against Prostate Cancer
 Combats Breast Cancer
 Strengthens bones
 Banishes bruises
 Guards against heart disease
 
Cherries
 Protects your heart
 Combats Cancer
 Ends insomnia
 Slows aging process
 Shields against Alzheimer's
 
Chestnuts
 Promotes weight loss
 Protects your heart
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats Cancer
 Controls blood pressure
 
Chili peppers
 Aids digestion
 Soothes sore throat
 Clears sinuses
 Combats Cancer
 Boosts immune system
 
Figs
 Promotes weight loss
 Helps stops strokes
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats Cancer
 Controls blood pressure
 
Fish
 Protects your heart
 Boosts memory
 Protects your heart
 Combats Cancer
 Supports immune system
 
Flax
 Aids digestion
 Battles diabetes
 Protects your heart
 Improves mental health
 Boosts immune system
 
Garlic
 Lowers cholesterol
 Controls blood pressure
 Combats cancer
 Kills bacteria
 Fights fungus
 
Grapefruit
 Protects against heart attacks
 Promotes Weight loss
 Helps stops strokes
 Combats Prostate Cancer
 Lowers cholesterol
 
Grapes
 Saves eyesight
 Conquers kidney stones
 Combats cancer
 Enhances blood flow
 Protects your heart
 
Green tea
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Helps stops strokes
 Promotes Weight loss
 Kills bacteria
 
Honey
 Heals wounds
 Aids digestion
 Guards against ulcers
 Increases energy
 Fights allergies
 
Lemons
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Controls blood pressure
 Smoothes skin
 Stops scurvy
 
Limes
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Controls blood pressure
 Smoothes skin
 Stops scurvy
 
Mangoes
 Combats cancer
 Boosts memory
 Regulates thyroid
 Aids digestion
 Shields against Alzheimer's
 
Mushrooms
 Controls blood pressure
 Lowers cholesterol
 Kills bacteria
 Combats cancer
 Strengthens bones
 
Oats
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats cancer
 Battles diabetes
 Prevents constipation
 Smoothes skin
 
Olive oil
 Protects your heart
 Promotes Weight loss
 Combats cancer
 Battles diabetes
 Smoothes skin
 
Onions
 Reduce risk of heart attack
 Combats cancer
 Kills bacteria
 Lowers cholesterol
 Fights fungus
 
Oranges
 Supports immune systems
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Straightens respiration
 
 
 
Peaches
 Prevents constipation
 Combats cancer
 Helps stops strokes
 Aids digestion
 Helps haemorrhoids
 
Peanuts
 Protects against heart disease
 Promotes Weight loss
 Combats Prostate Cancer
 Lowers cholesterol
 Aggravates
Diverticulitis
 
Pineapple
 Strengthens bones
 Relieves colds
 Aids digestion
 Dissolves warts
 Blocks diarrhoea
 
Prunes
 Slows aging process
 Prevents constipation
 Boosts memory
 Lowers cholesterol
 Protects against heart disease
 
Rice
 Protects your heart
 Battles diabetes
 Conquers kidney stones
 Combats cancer
 Helps stops strokes
 
Strawberries
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Boosts memory
 Calms stress
 
 
 
Sweet potatoes
 Saves your eyesight
 Lifts mood
 Combats cancer
 Strengthens bones
 
 
 
Tomatoes
 Protects prostate
 Combats cancer
 Lowers cholesterol
 Protects your heart
 
 
 
Walnuts
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats cancer
 Boosts memory
 Lifts mood
 Protects against heart disease
 
Water
 Promotes Weight loss
 Combats cancer
 Conquers kidney stones
 Smoothes skin
 
 
 
Watermelon
 Protects prostate
 Promotes Weight loss
 Lowers cholesterol
 Helps stops strokes
 Controls blood pressure
 
Wheat germ
 Combats Colon Cancer
 Prevents constipation
 Lowers cholesterol
 Helps stops strokes
 Improves digestion
 
Wheat bran
 Combats Colon Cancer
 Prevents constipation
 Lowers cholesterol
 Helps stops strokes
 Improves digestion
 
Yogurt
 Guards against ulcers
 Strengthens bones
 Lowers cholesterol
 Supports immune systems
 Aids digestion
 
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 21, 2010, 06:40:22 AM
Nathan, wow what a great list!
Thanks   8)
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Linda on July 21, 2010, 12:44:08 PM
That is a great handy list to have, thanks Nathan.

Linda
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 25, 2010, 06:56:45 AM
Pineapple apparently has so many health benefits it might be worthwhile to have a green house
full of them, somewhere on the bugout property. It would be tricky to protect them and keep them going but maybe there's a way.
Here's an article I found  on the World's Healthiest Foods site. Someone close to me had recommended
a pineapple cleanse at least a few times per month.
Here it is:  http://whfoods.org/ (http://whfoods.org/)  World's Healthiest Foods site
http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34

Pineapple  
Pineapples have exceptional juiciness and a vibrant tropical flavor that balances the tastes of sweet and tart. They are second only to bananas as America's favorite tropical fruit. Although the season for pineapple runs from March through June, they are available year-round in local markets.
.....................................
 
Health Benefits............................. http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#healthbenefits (http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#healthbenefits)
Description.....................................http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#descr (http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#descr)
History............................... ...........http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#historyuse (http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#historyuse)
How to Select and Store............... http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#purchasequalities (http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#purchasequalities)
How to Enjoy.................................http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#howtouse (http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#howtouse)
Individual Concerns........................http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#safetyissues (http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#safetyissues)
In Depth Nutritional Profile...http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=nutrientprofile&dbid=27. (http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=nutrientprofile&dbid=27.)
References
Health Benefits

Potential Anti-Inflammatory and Digestive Benefits

Bromelain is a complex mixture of substances that can be extracted from the stem and core fruit of the pineapple. Among dozens of components known to exist in this crude extract, the best studied components are a group of protein-digesting enzymes (called cysteine proteinases). Originally, researchers believed that these enzymes provided the key health benefits found in bromelain, a popular dietary supplement containing these pineapple extracts. In addition, researchers believed that these benefits were primarily limited to help with digestion in the intestinal tract. However, further studies have shown that bromelain has a wide variety of health benefits, and that many of these benefits may not be related to the different enzymes found in this extract. Excessive inflammation, excessive coagulation of the blood, and certain types of tumor growth may all be reduced by therapeutic doses of bromelain when taken as a dietary supplement. Studies are not available, however, to show these same potential benefits in relationship to normal intake of pineapple within a normal meal plan.

Bromelain extracts can be obtained from both the fruit core and stems of pineapple. Potentially important chemical differences appear to exist between extracts obtained from the stem versus the core fruit. However, the practical relevance of these differences is not presently understood. Most of the laboratory research on bromelain has been conducted using stem-based extracts, however.

Although healthcare practitioners have reported improved digestion in their patients with an increase in pineapple as their "fruit of choice" within a meal plan, we haven't seen published studies that document specific changes in digestion following consumption of the fruit (versus supplementation with the purified extract. However, we suspect that the core fruit will eventually turn out to show some unique health-supportive properties, including possible digestion-related and anti-inflammatory benefits.

Antioxidant Protection and Immune Support

Vitamin C is the body's primary water-soluble antioxidant, defending all aqueous areas of the body against free radicals that attack and damage normal cells. Free radicals have been shown to promote the artery plaque build-up of atherosclerosis and diabetic heart disease, cause the airway spasm that leads to asthma attacks, damage the cells of the colon so they become colon cancer cells, and contribute to the joint pain and disability seen in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This would explain why diets rich in vitamin C have been shown to be useful for preventing or reducing the severity of all of these conditions. In addition, vitamin C is vital for the proper function of the immune system, making it a nutrient to turn to for the prevention of recurrent ear infections, colds, and flu.

Manganese and Thiamin (Vitamin B1) for Energy Production and Antioxidant Defenses

Pineapple is an excellent source the trace mineral manganese, which is an essential cofactor in a number of enzymes important in energy production and antioxidant defenses. For example, the key oxidative enzyme superoxide dismutase, which disarms free radicals produced within the mitochondria (the energy production factories within our cells), requires manganese. Just one cup of fresh pineapple supplies 128.0% of the DV for this very important trace mineral. In addition to manganese, pineapple is a good source of thiamin, a B vitamin that acts as a cofactor in enzymatic reactions central to energy production.

Protection against Macular Degeneration

Your mother may have told you carrots would keep your eyes bright as a child, but as an adult, it looks like fruit is even more important for keeping your sight. Data reported in a study published in the Archives of Ophthalmology indicates that eating 3 or more servings of fruit per day may lower your risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), the primary cause of vision loss in older adults, by 36%, compared to persons who consume less than 1.5 servings of fruit daily.

In this study, which involved over 110,000 women and men, researchers evaluated the effect of study participants' consumption of fruits; vegetables; the antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E; and carotenoids on the development of early ARMD or neovascular ARMD, a more severe form of the illness associated with vision loss. While, surprisingly, intakes of vegetables, antioxidant vitamins and carotenoids were not strongly related to incidence of either form of ARMD, fruit intake was definitely protective against the severe form of this vision-destroying disease. Three servings of fruit may sound like a lot to eat each day, but pineapple can help you reach this goal. Add fresh pineapple to your morning smoothie, lunch time yogurt, any fruit and most vegetable salads. For example, try adding chunks of pineapple to your next coleslaw or carrot salad.

Description

Pineapple, Ananas comosus, belongs to the Bromeliaceae family, from which one of its most important health-promoting compounds, the enzyme bromelain, was named. The Spanish name for pineapple, pina, and the root of its English name, reflects the fruit's visual similarity to the pinecone.

Pineapples are actually not just one fruit but a composite of many flowers whose individual fruitlets fuse together around a central core. Each fruitlet can be identified by an "eye," the rough spiny marking on the pineapple's surface.

Pineapples have a wide cylindrical shape, a scaly green, brown or yellow skin and a regal crown of spiny, blue-green leaves. The fibrous flesh of pineapple is yellow in color and has a vibrant tropical flavor that balances the tastes of sweet and tart. The area closer to the base of the fruit has more sugar content and therefore a sweeter taste and more tender texture.

History

Although thought to have originated in South America, pineapples were first discovered by Europeans in 1493 on the Caribbean island that came to be known as Guadalupe. When Columbus and other discovers brought pineapples back to Europe, attempts were made to cultivate the sweet, prized fruit until it was realized that the fruit's need for a tropical climate inhibited its ability to flourish in this region. By the end of the 16th century, Portuguese and Spanish explorers introduced pineapples into many of their Asian, African and South Pacific colonies, countries in which the pineapple is still being grown today.

Since pineapples are very perishable, and modes of transportation to bring them stateside from the Caribbean Islands were relatively slow centuries ago, fresh pineapples were a rarity that became coveted by the early American colonists. While glazed, sugar-coated pineapples were a luxurious treat, it was the fresh pineapple itself that became the sought after true symbol of prestige and social class. In fact, the pineapple, because of its rarity and expense, was such a status item in those times that all a party hostess had to do was to display the fruit as part of a decorative centerpiece, and she would be awarded more than just a modicum of social awe and recognition.

In the 18th century, pineapples began to be cultivated in Hawaii, the only state in the U.S. in which they are still grown. In addition to Hawaii, other countries that commercially grow pineapples include Thailand, the Philippines, China, Brazil and Mexico.

How to Select and Store

Look for pineapples that are heavy for their size. While larger pineapples will have a greater proportion of edible flesh, there is usually no difference in quality between a small and large size pineapple. Pineapples should be free of soft spots, bruises and darkened "eyes," all of which may indicate that the pineapple is past its prime. Pineapple stops ripening as soon as it is picked, so choose fruit with a fragrant sweet smell at the stem end. Avoid pineapple that smells musty, sour or fermented.

For the most antioxidants, choose fully ripened pineapple:

Research conducted at the University of Innsbruck in Austria suggests that as fruits fully ripen, almost to the point of spoilage, their antioxidant levels actually increase.

Key to the process is the change in color that occurs as fruits ripen, a similar process to that seen in the fall when leaves turn from green to red to yellow to brown- a color change caused by the breakdown and disappearance of chlorophyll, which gives leaves and fruits their green color.

Until now, no one really knew what happened to chlorophyll during this process, but lead researcher, Bernard Kr
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Ed Douglas on July 25, 2010, 07:08:32 AM
And it tastes good, too.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 26, 2010, 02:50:16 AM
And it tastes good, too.

Yes!
You know I realize it may not even be possible for many people to stock up on, grow, consume pineapple as part of the their survival camp and as part of the aftertimes. I just feel it is worth the effort.
It seems to be one of those foods engineered and put here for people to heal themselves. The canned pineapple would have some benefits but it would have lost some of its nutrients.
If not possible to get much of it in the stored goods, bromelain capsules would give a lot of those benefits.
In fact the bromelain is mainly in the stem of the pineapple which is not eaten. The stem is used to make the bromelain capsules. Well more later on this... I am not sure how a group could get the bromelain out of the stem... will see if there is some method. Eating the fruit and also getting the nutrients out of the stem and also having lots of bromelain tablets would be the best thing.
All The Best,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 26, 2010, 02:59:21 AM
A Note: You will need to shop around and experiment to find the pineapple which does not "bite" the tongue. There are some differences from one pineapple to another...Just a little more or repeating what the bromelain does, Yowbarb
...
The World's Healthiest Foods
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34 (http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34)

Bromelain is a complex mixture of substances that can be extracted from the stem and core fruit of the pineapple. Among dozens of components known to exist in this crude extract, the best studied components are a group of protein-digesting enzymes (called cysteine proteinases). Originally, researchers believed that these enzymes provided the key health benefits found in bromelain, a popular dietary supplement containing these pineapple extracts. In addition, researchers believed that these benefits were primarily limited to help with digestion in the intestinal tract. However, further studies have shown that bromelain has a wide variety of health benefits, and that many of these benefits may not be related to the different enzymes found in this extract. Excessive inflammation, excessive coagulation of the blood, and certain types of tumor growth may all be reduced by therapeutic doses of bromelain when taken as a dietary supplement. Studies are not available, however, to show these same potential benefits in relationship to normal intake of pineapple within a normal meal plan.

Bromelain extracts can be obtained from both the fruit core and stems of pineapple. Potentially important chemical differences appear to exist between extracts obtained from the stem versus the core fruit. However, the practical relevance of these differences is not presently understood. Most of the laboratory research on bromelain has been conducted using stem-based extracts, however.

Although healthcare practitioners have reported improved digestion in their patients with an increase in pineapple as their "fruit of choice" within a meal plan, we haven't seen published studies that document specific changes in digestion following consumption of the fruit (versus supplementation with the purified extract. However, we suspect that the core fruit will eventually turn out to show some unique health-supportive properties, including possible digestion-related and anti-inflammatory benefits.

Antioxidant Protection and Immune Support

Vitamin C is the body's primary water-soluble antioxidant, defending all aqueous areas of the body against free radicals that attack and damage normal cells. Free radicals have been shown to promote the artery plaque build-up of atherosclerosis and diabetic heart disease, cause the airway spasm that leads to asthma attacks, damage the cells of the colon so they become colon cancer cells, and contribute to the joint pain and disability seen in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This would explain why diets rich in vitamin C have been shown to be useful for preventing or reducing the severity of all of these conditions. In addition, vitamin C is vital for the proper function of the immune system, making it a nutrient to turn to for the prevention of recurrent ear infections, colds, and flu.

Manganese and Thiamin (Vitamin B1) for Energy Production and Antioxidant Defenses

Pineapple is an excellent source the trace mineral manganese, which is an essential cofactor in a number of enzymes important in energy production and antioxidant defenses. For example, the key oxidative enzyme superoxide dismutase, which disarms free radicals produced within the mitochondria (the energy production factories within our cells), requires manganese. Just one cup of fresh pineapple supplies 128.0% of the DV for this very important trace mineral. In addition to manganese, pineapple is a good source of thiamin, a B vitamin that acts as a cofactor in enzymatic reactions central to energy production.

Protection against Macular Degeneration

Your mother may have told you carrots would keep your eyes bright as a child, but as an adult, it looks like fruit is even more important for keeping your sight. Data reported in a study published in the Archives of Ophthalmology indicates that eating 3 or more servings of fruit per day may lower your risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), the primary cause of vision loss in older adults, by 36%, compared to persons who consume less than 1.5 servings of fruit daily.

In this study, which involved over 110,000 women and men, researchers evaluated the effect of study participants' consumption of fruits; vegetables; the antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E; and carotenoids on the development of early ARMD or neovascular ARMD, a more severe form of the illness associated with vision loss. While, surprisingly, intakes of vegetables, antioxidant vitamins and carotenoids were not strongly related to incidence of either form of ARMD, fruit intake was definitely protective against the severe form of this vision-destroying disease. Three servings of fruit may sound like a lot to eat each day, but pineapple can help you reach this goal. Add fresh pineapple to your morning smoothie, lunch time yogurt, any fruit and most vegetable salads. For example, try adding chunks of pineapple to your next coleslaw or carrot salad.

Description

Pineapple, Ananas comosus, belongs to the Bromeliaceae family, from which one of its most important health-promoting compounds, the enzyme bromelain, was named. The Spanish name for pineapple, pina, and the root of its English name, reflects the fruit's visual similarity to the pinecone.

Pineapples are actually not just one fruit but a composite of many flowers whose individual fruitlets fuse together around a central core. Each fruitlet can be identified by an "eye," the rough spiny marking on the pineapple's surface.

Pineapples have a wide cylindrical shape, a scaly green, brown or yellow skin and a regal crown of spiny, blue-green leaves. The fibrous flesh of pineapple is yellow in color and has a vibrant tropical flavor that balances the tastes of sweet and tart. The area closer to the base of the fruit has more sugar content and therefore a sweeter taste and more tender texture.

............................................................................................
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on August 16, 2010, 01:19:51 AM
Noproblemo, and Ed,
awesome! Will check out those sources.
Ed I was just noticing the dried fruit at COSTCO recently - what great stuff for people to add to the survival supplies.
BTW, my daughter made a great batch of ripe pineapple juice with pulp in the vitamix today for brunch. Funny it seemed to konk me out but then I had then more energy than usual....
For a time, bone and joint pain was gone... time for more!
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Ed Douglas on August 16, 2010, 10:32:44 AM
Think about it. How many sick Hawaiians do we know?
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on August 19, 2010, 11:53:33 AM
Hi All,    RE Cardiovascular benefits of high cacao chocolate in small amountsI didn't know about the cardiovascular benefits of high cacao chocolate until my elderly mother passed away and I was reading some of her health mailings. She made it to ninety without a nursing home, and she used to tell me, "women need chocolate," with a smile. 
After she had passed suddenly peacefully and after the Memorial, was in her room. I saw a lot of nutritional materials which was not surprising.  I opened up a news letter from Dr. Weil naturopath in Arizona.

Weil's nutritional letter said that the 70 percent or more high cacao chocolate a small piece, is good for the heart. Article said if you take more than the little smidgin, it is no longer a medicine. Taken in small amounts it is a powerful medicine.

True story: One of my daughters in her mid thirties, measured her bp in a grocery store. It was getting high (for first time we knew of) she didn't want to get on drugs so I made her try something. For five days I gave her ONE piece of 75% cacao chocolate. I think it was a special Dove kind. I didn't let her have any more than that. After the five days was up her bp had dropped back down to the safe range. She looked and felt better, too.

So here is an article in Science Daily about the benefits, with the caution that if too much is taken the health benefits are lost, also that Swedish chocolate is way better. Even so, the new American brands marked 70% or higher are probably very good.
Enjoy, a smidgin.
Yowbarb
...

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100817161110.htm (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100817161110.htm)

Science News
Moderate Chocolate Consumption Linked to Lower Risks of Heart Failure, Study Finds
ScienceDaily (Aug. 17, 2010) — Middle-aged and elderly Swedish women who regularly ate a small amount of chocolate had lower risks of heart failure risks, in a study reported in Circulation: Heart Failure, a journal of the American Heart Association.
________________________________________
Reference
    Oily fish
    Cacao
    Cocoa
    Polyphenol antioxidant
The nine-year study, conducted among 31,823 middle-aged and elderly Swedish women, looked at the relationship of the amount of high-quality chocolate the women ate, compared to their risk for heart failure. The quality of chocolate consumed by the women had a higher density cocoa content somewhat like dark chocolate by American standards. In this study, researchers found:
    Women who ate an average of one to two servings of the high-quality chocolate per week had a 32 percent lower risk of developing heart failure.
    Those who had one to three servings per month had a 26 percent lower risk.
    Those who consumed at least one serving daily or more didn't appear to benefit from a protective effect against heart failure.
The lack of a protective effect among women eating chocolate every day is probably due to the additional calories gained from eating chocolate instead of more nutritious foods, said Murrray Mittleman, M.D., Dr.P.H., lead researcher of the study.
"You can't ignore that chocolate is a relatively calorie-dense food and large amounts of habitual consumption is going to raise your risks for weight gain," said Mittleman, director of the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Harvard Medical School's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. "But if you're going to have a treat, dark chocolate is probably a good choice, as long as it's in moderation."
High concentration of compounds called "flavonoids" in chocolate may lower blood pressure, among other benefits, according to mostly short-term studies. However, this is the first study to show long-term outcomes related specifically to heart failure, which can result from ongoing untreated high blood pressure.
In the observational study, researchers analyzed self-reported food-frequency questionnaire responses from participants 48-to-83-years-old in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Combining the results with data from national Swedish hospitalization and death registries between 1998 through 2006, the researchers used multiple forms of statistical modeling to reach their conclusions on heart failure and chocolate consumption.

Mittleman said differences in chocolate quality affect the study's implications for Americans. Higher cocoa content is associated with greater heart benefits. In Sweden, even milk chocolate has a higher cocoa concentration than dark chocolate sold in the United States.
Although 90 percent of all chocolate eaten across Sweden during the study period was milk chocolate, it contained about 30 percent cocoa solids. U.S. standards only require 15 percent cocoa solids to qualify as dark chocolate. So, by comparison, American chocolate may have fewer heart benefits and more calories and fat per equivalent amounts of cocoa content compared to the chocolate eaten by the Swedish women in the study.
Also, the average serving size for Swedish women in the study ranged from 19 grams among those 62 and older, to 30 grams among those 61 and younger. In contrast, the standard American portion size is 20 grams.
"Those tempted to use these data as their rationale for eating large amounts of chocolate or engaging in more frequent chocolate consumption are not interpreting this study appropriately," said Linda Van Horn, Ph.D., R.D., immediate past chair of the American Heart Association Nutrition Committee and professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "This is not an 'eat all you want' take-home message, rather it's that eating a little dark chocolate can be healthful, as long as other adverse behaviors do not occur, such as weight gain or excessive intake of non-nutrient dense 'empty' calories."
Heart failure occurs among about 1 percent of Americans over age 65. A condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to the rest of the body, heart failure rates are increasing as our aging population grows.
"Anything that helps to decrease heart failure is an important issue worth examining," Mittleman said.

Co-authors are Elizabeth Mostofsky, M.P.H.; Emily Levitan, Sc.D.; and Alicja Wolk, Dr.Med.Sci. Author disclosures and funding support are on the manuscript.

……………………………………………………………………
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 19, 2010, 01:23:14 PM
Now this is one I have NO problems in trying, the only problem I see is eting more than I should...  ;D
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on August 19, 2010, 02:52:52 PM
Now this is one I have NO problems in trying, the only problem I see is eting more than I should...  ;D

Hehe that is the tricky part!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Alfred Williams on August 19, 2010, 04:50:43 PM
No one is a bigger chocoholic as me. So I need a more pure chocolate. Very worth a search Mmmm{{:>)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 19, 2010, 04:52:38 PM
No one is a bigger chocoholic as me. So I need a more pure chocolate. Very worth a search Mmmm{{:>)
Be sure and post your results, I'll buy it !!!!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on August 20, 2010, 03:02:57 PM
No one is a bigger chocoholic as me. So I need a more pure chocolate. Very worth a search Mmmm{{:>)

Definitely a good idea to find a good source. "The good stuff," heh heh.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Linda on August 20, 2010, 04:27:25 PM
The problem is Ed, I don't know any :P LOL  But it could also be the coconut they eat as well as the pineapple. Coconut has many redeeming qualities one of which is the lauric acid which is anti viral.

Benefits of coconut oil

The health benefits of coconut oil  include hair care, skin care, stress relief, maintaining cholesterol levels, weight loss, increased immunity, proper digestion and metabolism, relief from kidney problems, heart diseases, high blood pressure, diabetes, HIV and cancer, dental care, and bone strength. These benefits of coconut oil  can be attributed to the presence of lauric acid, capric acid and caprylic acid, and its properties such as antimicrobial, antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial, soothing, etc.

How is Lauric Acid Used by our body?
The human body converts lauric acid into monolaurin which is claimed to help in dealing with viruses and bacteria causing diseases such as herpes, influenza, cytomegalovirus, and even HIV. It helps in fighting harmful bacteria such as listeria monocytogenes and heliobacter pylori, and harmful protozoa such as giardia lamblia. As a result of these various health benefits of coconut oil, though its exact mechanism of action was unknown, it has been extensively used in Ayurveda, the traditional Indian medicinal system.

And the best part, is the stuff never goes rancid, so a great thing for long term storage.

Linda
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 20, 2010, 04:34:18 PM
So one can store coconuts indefinetly? If so then would be a source of liquid.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Linda on August 20, 2010, 04:40:04 PM
So one can store coconuts indefinetly? If so then would be a source of liquid.

Coconut oil can be stored indefinitely don't know how long you can store a coconut. :)

Linda
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Jimfarmer on August 20, 2010, 07:14:09 PM
Hi Linda,
You said "don't know how long you can store a coconut'.
my wife, who is from Fiji, says about one month.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 20, 2010, 07:43:14 PM
Thanks, will x that off my list...........
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on August 23, 2010, 10:17:50 AM
http://www.aromaweb.com/articles/diffu.asp (http://www.aromaweb.com/articles/diffu.asp)  ESSENTIAL OIL DIFFUSION, methods


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methicillin-resistant_Staphylococcus_aureus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methicillin-resistant_Staphylococcus_aureus) MRSA infection

very hard to treat there are some standard hygiene and medical methods listed on page.
On the page also a holistic solution:
Essential oil diffusion
An in vitro study on the inhibition of MRSA by essential oil diffusion found that 72 of 91 investigated essential oils exhibited zones of inhibition in soy agar plates streaked with MRSA (strain ATCC 700699). The most effective being lemongrass oil (Cymbopogon flexuosus), lemon myrtle oil (Backhousia citriodora), mountain savory oil (Satureja montana), cinnamon oil (Cinnamomum verum), and melissa oil (Melissa officinalis) essential oils. Of these, lemongrass essential oil was the most effective, completely inhibiting all MRSA colony growth.[36]
Tea tree oil also kills all MRSA strains that have been tested.[
 ………………………………………..
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Jimfarmer on August 23, 2010, 11:08:32 AM
"Thieves Blend" is another general-purpose antibiotic.

During the black plague in Europe, a team of scavengers raided houses where everyone had died, taking jewels, gold from mouths, etc.; but they never got sick.  They went to England to carry on their "trade", and their presence came to the attention of the king.  He had them brought in, and he "convinced" them to reveal the secret of their immunity.  Well, they were from a family of apothecaries,  and they doused themselves with a particular blend of essential oils before getting to work.  That blend became known as Thieves Blend.  The story and the recipe still exists in the records of the royal family in England.  A few Internet sites sell it, but I don't have a link at the moment.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on August 23, 2010, 11:32:05 AM
Jim this is awesome!!
That name, Thieves Blend  sounds familiar to me...
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on August 23, 2010, 11:35:06 AM
"Thieves Blend" is another general-purpose antibiotic.

During the black plague in Europe, a team of scavengers raided houses where everyone had died, taking jewels, gold from mouths, etc.; but they never got sick.  They went to England to carry on their "trade", and their presence came to the attention of the king.  He had them brought in, and he "convinced" them to reveal the secret of their immunity.  Well, they were from a family of apothecaries,  and they doused themselves with a particular blend of essential oils before getting to work.  That blend became known as Thieves Blend.  The story and the recipe still exists in the records of the royal family in England.  A few Internet sites sell it, but I don't have a link at the moment.

Jim I did a mamma  search and got a page of results... often it says thieves oil or thieves oil instead of blend... will see if I can find something - a decent source of it - and post... If you find better sources, please post when you get a sec... Yowbarb
http://www.mamma.com/result.php?type=web&q=Thieves+Blend&j_q=&l= (http://www.mamma.com/result.php?type=web&q=Thieves+Blend&j_q=&l=)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on August 23, 2010, 11:39:59 AM
Jim Farmer just brought this to the attention of the Board:  Thieves Blend.
I had vaguely remembered the name, but not really familiar with it. I did a mamasearch and
found lot sof sites and info - WOW!!
Looks like this is another item to add to the survival medicine cabinet!
Thieves Blend deserves its own topic so here you go...
Yowbarb

http://www.mamma.com/result.php?type=web&q=Thieves+Blend&j_q=&l= (http://www.mamma.com/result.php?type=web&q=Thieves+Blend&j_q=&l=)  mamma meta search
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on August 23, 2010, 11:48:36 AM
I would say it is worth a try. Apparently from searching so far - the source of it is one company (can't be true) and the company is Young Living Essential Oils. I bet if someone was to do a search in the UK they would have more info and more sources.
Possibly a person could make essential oils of the main ingredients listed... also probably worthwhile to stock a few of the Young Living Essential Oil bottles of this ...
Yowbarb

http://www.squidoo.com/thievesessentialoil (http://www.squidoo.com/thievesessentialoil) 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thieves_oil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thieves_oil)   Wikipedia Thieves oil

Thieves oil is a mixture of several essential oils that it is claimed have antimicrobial properties[1]. It may contain oils of cinnamon, lemon, eucalyptus, clove and rosemary.

The Utah, US-based multi-level marketing business that has primarily popularized the blend, Young Living Essential Oils, claims that the recipe dates back to 15th Century Europe, where it was used by four thieves who stole from the dead bodies of those who had died from the Bubonic Plague, yet never contracted the infection themselves.[2] However, the story about the origin of thieves oil is difficult to authenticate from sources beyond Gary Young himself, the owner of the company[3], and the business has been accused of quackery[4][5]. Young Living owns the trademark to the name "Thieves Oil" and claims it is a proprietary blend.

[edit] References
1.^ O'Connor, Anahad (7 September 2009). "Really? The Claim: Cinnamon Oil Kills Bacteria". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/08/health/08real.html. (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/08/health/08real.html.) Retrieved 11 September 2009.
2.^ "Secret of Thieves" website, which links directly to the Young Living website for purchases
3.^ YOUNG LIVING TRAINING CD #73, 'The Power of Thieves', Gary Young, ND
4.^ Barrett M.D., Stephen (6 June, 2006). "A Critical Look at Gary Young, Young Living Essential Oils, and Raindrop Therapy". http://www.quackwatch.org/11Ind/young.html. (http://www.quackwatch.org/11Ind/young.html.) "Gary Young is an uneducated huckster with a track record of arrests for health fraud. He has repeatedly inflated and falsified his education, credentials, and experiences. His inability to recognize the limits of his knowledge and training contributed to the death of his own child."
5.^ "The Secret of Thieves". The Whole Child. Lawrence D. Rosen, MD. 8 September 2009. http://www.thewholechild.us/integrative_/2009/09/the-secret-of-thieves.html. (http://www.thewholechild.us/integrative_/2009/09/the-secret-of-thieves.html.) Retrieved 11 September 2009. "I repeatedly tried to get a historical reference for the thieves story (and other stories the Young Living organization disseminates) from YL distributors with no avail. If you have a close connection to the organization, maybe you will succeed. Otherwise one needs to assume that these are just stories - good for business but without historical evidence."   
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on August 23, 2010, 11:57:06 AM
"Thieves Blend" is another general-purpose antibiotic.

During the black plague in Europe, a team of scavengers raided houses where everyone had died, taking jewels, gold from mouths, etc.; but they never got sick.  They went to England to carry on their "trade", and their presence came to the attention of the king.  He had them brought in, and he "convinced" them to reveal the secret of their immunity.  Well, they were from a family of apothecaries,  and they doused themselves with a particular blend of essential oils before getting to work.  That blend became known as Thieves Blend.  The story and the recipe still exists in the records of the royal family in England.  A few Internet sites sell it, but I don't have a link at the moment.

Looks like this is the main site and the main source. Will post it here, but I did just start Thieves Blend as its own topic,
Yowbarb

http://www.secretofthieves.com/index.cfm (http://www.secretofthieves.com/index.cfm)

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on August 23, 2010, 11:58:39 AM
http://www.secretofthieves.com/index.cfm (http://www.secretofthieves.com/index.cfm)    Secret of Thieves site, Thieves oil for sale in many different forms. For internal use, also for hygiene and cleaning products, more...

A little pricer perhaps. Probably a good idea to keep some on hand as a real last resort.
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on September 15, 2010, 12:01:33 PM
Scuse it this topic is already started but darned if I can find it.
Here is a re start.
Note: Stinging nettles need to be young and tender or they can be hard on the kidneys. Need to protect hands and arms really well when harvesting. A worthwhile wild plant to cultivate in the aftertimes. A multitude of medicinal uses.
Update: I forgot to mention, Mjoy posted recipes for stinging nettle  tea and soup.
Topic is noproblemo2's Survival Recipes. 
- Yowbarb
...

http://www.naturessecretlarder.co.uk/images/2/d3f6c87young-nettle-jpg.jpg (http://www.naturessecretlarder.co.uk/images/2/d3f6c87young-nettle-jpg.jpg)

(http://www.naturessecretlarder.co.uk/images/2/d3f6c87young-nettle-jpg.jpg)

...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle#Medicinal_uses (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle#Medicinal_uses)   Stinging Nettle, medicinal uses

As Old English Stiðe, nettle is one of the nine plants invoked in the pagan Anglo-Saxon Nine Herbs Charm, recorded in the 10th century. Nettle is believed to be a galactagogue[2] and a clinical trial has shown that the juice is diuretic in patients with congestive heart failure[citation needed].

Urtication, or flogging with nettles, is the process of deliberately applying stinging nettles to the skin in order to provoke inflammation. An agent thus used is known as a rubefacient (something that causes redness). This is done as a folk remedy for rheumatism, providing temporary relief from pain.[citation needed] The counter-irritant action to which this is often attributed can be preserved by the preparation of an alcoholic tincture which can be applied as part of a topical preparation, but not as an infusion, which drastically reduces the irritant action.

Extracts can be used to treat arthritis, anemia, hay fever, kidney problems, and pain.[citation needed]

Nettle leaf is a herb that has a long tradition of use as an adjuvant remedy in the treatment of arthritis in Germany. Nettle leaf extract contains active compounds that reduce TNF-α and other inflammatory cytokines.[3][4] It has been demonstrated that nettle leaf lowers TNF-α levels by potently inhibiting the genetic transcription factor that activates TNF-α and IL-1B in the synovial tissue that lines the joint.[5]

Nettle is used in hair shampoos to control dandruff and is said to make hair more glossy, which is why some farmers include a handful of nettles with cattle feed.[6] It is also thought nettles can ease eczema.

Nettle root extracts have been extensively studied in human clinical trials as a treatment for symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). These extracts have been shown to help relieve symptoms compared to placebo both by themselves and when combined with other herbal medicines.[7]

Because it contains 3,4-divanillyltetrahydrofuran, certain extracts of the nettle are used by bodybuilders in an effort to increase free testosterone by occupying sex-hormone binding globulin[8]

Fresh nettle is used in folk remedies to stop bleeding because of its high Vitamin K content. Meanwhile, in dry U. dioica, the Vitamin K is practically non-existent and so is used as a blood thinner.

An extract from the nettle root (Urtica dioica) is used to alleviate symptoms of benign prostate enlargement. Nettle leaf extract, on the other hand, is what has been shown to reduce the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-B1.

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on October 27, 2010, 01:24:30 PM
This is from BajaSusan. I appreciate this. Posting it also in the Native American Topic.
- Yowbarb

Quote from: BajaSusan on October 23, 2010, 12:06:03 pm
Natural Herbal Remedies
http://www.manataka.org (http://www.manataka.org)

For thousands of years this sacred site was known as Ma-na-ta-ka® (Place of Peace). Elders of many nations from the four corners of Turtle Island made long pilgrimages to this magnificent place to perform ceremonies and share the gift of the curative waters called No-wa-sa-lon (Breath of Healing). They received other special gifts like healing stones, healing clay and healing herbs to enhance their journey through life.

Read the fascinating and true saga of Manataka® and see how hundreds of tribes, Spanish Conquistadors, two American Presidents, Mayan and Lakota spiritual leaders, and the Rainbow Woman all played a role in the exciting "Story of Manataka".

The Manataka America Indian Council® exists to preserve and protect this sacred place. Welcome to our village! Please come into our lodge and enjoy the gifts we have for you

http://www.manataka.org/Contents%20Page.html (http://www.manataka.org/Contents%20Page.html)   Manataka Feature Index

...
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on November 18, 2010, 05:34:10 AM
Yerba Santa   is a good substance to have around, and stockpile for the Aftertimes.
If a person can no longer get ahold of antibiotics ot other meds, this definitely helps. !
...
Yerba santa or hierba santa meaning mean "sacred herb" in Spanish
- Wikipedia
...
Yowbarb notes continued: It used to be the only remedy in Mexico for hundreds perhaps thousands of years, for respiratory
ailments. Yerba Santa was, and is, used for colds, flu, asthma, bronchitis and pneumonia. More uses too,
which will be covered in the next post, article.
I personally know it is a very effective herb ....

It used to be available at health foods stores in the See-Lect Tea displays.
The stores had a display of herbs from A to Z.  Well, actually Yerba Santa was probably the last one, Y.
Some images. Not plugging any particular place to buy it.
Pretty sure it is not in stores, and needs to be ordered. Here is one place easy to remember and find: Amazon
http://picclick.com/Amazon/Health-Personal-Care/    Amazon, Health and personal care.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31Khd9Nty4L.jpg)  Amazon, Herb Pharm brand, extract.

My Bro used to buy it in Tucson, brought up from Mexico.
I just simmer the loose leaf in a pot, and have some. Needed more in the wintertime.
Just pour a small cupful and the leaves will settle.  It definitely tastes like medicine and it definitely is.
A person would need to research on how much to give from a dropper to kids... will find something on it, and post here.
A few images and a link or two below.
Another randomly selected place to order Yerba Santa and other bulk herbs:  Frontier http://www.frontiercoop.com/    http://www.frontiercoop.com/prodlist.php?ct=hchhaz       

(http://www.frontiercoop.com/images/aboutus.jpg)

(http://i01.i.aliimg.com/photo/v0/106917329/Yerba_Santa_Leaves.jpg)

...
Will post this entire article, next post, Yowbarb
Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine

Yerba santa
by Katherine Y. Kim | Apr 06, 2001
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_g2603/is_0007/ai_2603000745/
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on November 18, 2010, 06:33:26 AM
Here is the article I promised. Scroll down a paragraph for the uses.
Yerba Santa, sacred herb, or holy herb has many uses and is primarily known for its help to the respiratory system.
I know for a fact it even helps a person breathe better if taken during an acute asthma attack. The person still needs to seek medical treatment but on the way should be drinking Yerba Santa.  Also, if kept around at the first sign of trouble it can calm down the bronchiai tubes and prevemt further trouble. As I said in my previous post, Yerba Santa needs to be added to the survival lists and stored away for the Aftertime. 
This could be spaced better, but I just want to get this info out there. Please consider getting some for your survival medicine cabinet, if not for you, then for someone in your group in future times.
- Yowbarb
...

Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine

Yerba santa   by Katherine Y. Kim | Apr 06, 2001 |

Yerba santa (Eriodictyon glutinosum and Eriodictyon californicum) is a short evergreen shrub that grows in dry, hilly areas of California and Northern Mexico. The plant, part of the Hydrophyllaceae family, grows in clusters and is approximately 3 ft (1 m) in height. The smooth stem and thick yellow leaves are covered with a resin, and the plant has blue flowers that cluster together in groups of six to 10. The leaves are 2-5 in (5-12 cm) long. The plant contains chrysocriol, eridonel, eriodictyol, formic acid, glucose, glycerides of fatty acids, homoeriodictyol, resin, tannic acids, tannins, volatile oil, and zanthoeridol. The leaves should be gathered in the spring and early summer.

Yerba santa, which literally means sacred herb in Spanish, has been used for centuries for a variety of illnesses, such as bronchitis , colds, coughs, diarrhea, and stomachaches. The Spanish came to know of its medicinal value through Native Americans, who either smoked or made infusions of yerba santa. The herb, also known as bear's weed, consumptive's weed, gum bush, and mountain balm, is still primarily used for respiratory congestion, either from acute asthma, colds, or coughs. Yerba santa has also been found effective for a number of symptoms, including gastrointestinal disorders and fatigue. When used externally for bruises , mosquito bites, or sprains, yerba santa can be applied as a poultice. The herb also used as a tonic to cleanse the blood, tone the nervous system, stimulates the mind, and controls the appetite. It is also believed to enhance the action of other herbs when used in combination. It has a sweet, slightly bitter taste.

Yerba santa is best known for its use in respiratory conditions, especially when there is a lot of mucous stuck in the body. It is considered one of the best decongestants, working as an expectorant by breaking up thick mucus and facilitating its expulsion from the body. For acute colds and coughs with upper respiratory and sinus congestion, yerba santa is extremely helpful. As a muscle relaxant, yerba santa works well for asthmatics as it dilates the bronchial tubes and allows air to flow more easily into the lungs. For asthma, yerba santa is often smoked in a pipe, for instance.
At the onset of a cold, especially when there is a cough or bronchial irritation, yerba santa can eradicate or at least alleviate the symptoms.
As a sialagogue, a substance that promotes salivation, yerba santa helps digestion. The excess saliva production helps the digestive process and can alleviate digestive problems.
Because yerba santa is a stimulant, it reduces fatigue and curbs the appetite.
A poultice of yerba santa should be applied to bruises, insect bites, sprains, and wounds.
For a yerba santa infusion, take 1 tbsp of the fresh or dried leaves to 1 c of boiling water and let it steep for 10 minutes. If a tincture is taken, then one dose should be from 10-30 drops, taken four times a day. If dried leaves are used, then the tincture is best with an alcohol base.
Yerba santa should not be taken by women who are pregnant or nursing. It is also an herb that should not be used by people who are suffering from chronic gastrointestinal disorders. As a stimulant, it should also be used sparingly by those who have sleep disorders or bouts of insomnia.
As a stimulant, yerba santa may cause sleeplessness and contribute to a lack of appetite.
When it is taken internally, as an infusion, tincture, or in capsule form, be aware that yerba santa can affect the how iron and other minerals are absorbed into the body. Those who tend to be iron deficient may want to supplement their diets with iron while taking yerba santa. It is best to consult with a physician or other health practitioner before attempting to self-medicate.

•   Ritchason, Jack. The Little Herb Encyclopedia. Woodland Health Books, 1995.
•   Tierra, Michael. The Way of Herbs. Pocket Books, 1980.
•   Grieve, Mrs. M. A Modern Herbal. http://www.botanical.com.
•   Herbal Dave Homepage. http://www.herbaldave.com.
•   InfoStructure. http://www.mind.net.
•   Thrive Online. http://www.thriveonline.com.
Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine. Gale Group, 2001.



Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on November 18, 2010, 06:58:43 AM
It is known that Yerba Santa helps a lot with the respiratory system, and has other uses.
There are/were other uses, not so commonly known. 
This tidbit on Yerba Santa is from the Frontier site, below.
- Yowbarb

http://www.frontiercoop.com/prodlist.php?ct=hchhaz   Frontier Herb list A to Z

"Yerba Santa Leaf - Eriodictyon californicum
Sometimes referred to as Mountain Balm, this herb was widely prized by Native Americans for its ability to ward off negativity and
provide protection. The leaves were often carried by individuals to boost their spiritual strength."

http://www.healthyvillage.com/product_images/th_11-8235C.jpg

(http://www.healthyvillage.com/product_images/th_11-8235C.jpg)


(http://www.smmtc.org/plantpix/pix_Yerba_Santa_09.JPG)


Yerba Santa
The Chumash Indians used yerba santa for cuts, scrapes and lung conditions and to produce saliva. Plant extracts of the yerba santa are used in cosmetics because of flavones that work as a free-radical antioxidant. According to Wellness.com, more testing is needed before results can be determined on the effectiveness of yerba santa against pulmonary ailments.
http://www.nativeremedies.com/indexC.shtml
Official Website. Safe Remedies. Heal your Body the Natural Way.


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/114620-native-american-health-remedies/#ixzz15e6Vq7SR
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: noproblemo2 on November 18, 2010, 07:20:29 AM
Wise idea to get these plants in soon. Also a book on Natural healing will come in handy.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on December 01, 2010, 12:17:40 AM
Wise idea to get these plants in soon. Also a book on Natural healing will come in handy.

That's right...
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on December 13, 2010, 05:35:11 PM
In case anyone is wondering, I just merged three of my Topics about beneficial healing foods and
herbs into this main one.
Stay healthy,

Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Jimfarmer on January 25, 2011, 07:36:38 AM
This just in by e-mail from http://www.kaliana.com/chicorysitandlisten (http://www.kaliana.com/chicorysitandlisten):

[start quote]
Chicory is the best beverage to sit with when you need to decide on what to do next. It can help you in deciding the best timing to move. Deep, internal, quiet and cleansing, chicory says ‘Come sit with me.’ This is the role of chicory. It takes you deep inside yourself to help you find respite. It helps slow you down to reflect. In this way, chicory can help you release anger – in the same way you might count to 10 before you speak. Chicory takes you deep so that you have time to see how you truly feel, and speak with clarity about what you truly want – without attacking others. This clever herb helps to cleanse negativity from your soul and your cells, so that a brighter, clearer, more positive you steps forth.

Both the ancient Egyptians and Romans valued this herb for supporting the liver (the organ where anger is stored), assisting the gall bladder (where resentment is stored), and cleansing the blood. Chicory brought forth life sustaining properties from the Nile river for thousands of years, bringing strength to the populations that revered it. These cultured populations valued art, wisdom, and their souls. For growth in these areas, the ability to go deep within was essential. Cleansing away impurities was critical for evolution and expansion of their civilizations.

Chicory supported their evolution both emotionally and physically. While closely related to lettuce and dandelion, it is actually a member of the sunflower family – which is why it can help you go deep and reveal a more positive disposition. You can consume the greens, or brew tea from the roots. The greens are low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol. In addition they are a very good source of fiber, Vitamins A, C, iron, folate, calcium, potassium, copper and manganese. Chicory also contains insulin, which can help regulate blood sugar levels.

Chicory root provides nutrients, and also contains a high amount of an important soluble fiber called inulin. Inulin cannot be digested by the small intestine, so instead the bacteria in the large intestine break down the fibers through fermentation. This fermentation process increases the absorption of calcium and other important nutrients, while promoting the growth of intestinal good bacteria. Chicory supports deep internal health, and deep emotional strength.
[end quote]
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 25, 2011, 08:36:37 PM
Jim this is really good data on chicory, I appreciate your post.
Chicory really does have that effect!
It's been a long while since I sat down and had a leisurely cup of chicory tea drink at a health food
restaurant. A person used to be able to do that, back in the day.
- Yowbarb

(http://www.buzzle.com/img/articleImages/426565-21630-53.jpg)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Alfred Williams on January 26, 2011, 06:28:15 AM
Oh my old memories of New Orleans. I have been a dozen times but it has been seven since my last. Makes me want to get a bag of chock full of nots. Have not used that in a few years but I must get some. Thanks for the information :){{:>)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 26, 2011, 07:49:09 AM
Oh my old memories of New Orleans. I have been a dozen times but it has been seven since my last. Makes me want to get a bag of chock full of nots. Have not used that in a few years but I must get some. Thanks for the information :){{:>)

Ah, New Orleans. For me it was "the other end of Sunset" in Hollywood back in the 1970s.  ;)

I know what U mean. I was on'off coffee for many many years during my childbearing and etc. years...

Had almost forgotton what a friend coffee substitutes were. They always had chicory in them.
Cafic, Pionier and Pero were my faves...
Thanks Jim and also Alfred for the reminder on chicory.

Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 28, 2011, 07:34:57 AM
Jim Farmer mentioned in one of his posts that olives leaves have a powerful ability to kill germs.
Quoting the whole post now and the site he referred to, in this post.
Next post will have a complete article on olive leaf.
- Yowbarb
...
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,1496.0.html
Re: Food
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2010, 09:03:20 am »
From http://community.wddty.com/blogs/health_from_your_garden/archive/2010/12/09/Olive-days-of-yore.aspx

[start quote]
Olive days of yore

I have just finished hand-harvesting our olives and those of our friends - some 800 kilos in all were gathered up. It was four long days of satisfying exercise on sunny wintery days for four 60- and 70-year-olds. There were no motorized tree shakers to reduce our labours, and no help from the sons of our Spanish friends.

Lunch was cooked over a wood fire with an exchange of views about what has been lost in traditional ways and farming in the past ten years.  We were surrounded by abandoned olive, almond, and orange groves. Ten years ago we would have been surrounded by large family groups, with grandparents, parents and children enjoying and benefiting from the exercise, the sense of community and the health-giving qualities of the extra virgin, cold-pressed olive oil produced on the village or family olive mill and press. Most presses have now disappeared and those villagers that do still harvest olives have to travel to large factory mills up to 50 kilometres away where their olives are mixed with those of others. Luckily, our friends have invested in a small home mill and press so our own olives are producing olive oil as pure as you can get.

Our olive trees have been fertilized only with sheep manure and sprayed against insects and fungi with natural ecological sprays.  We don’t use chemical products as do most commercial olive farms.

Perhaps we spend a full day a week growing and processing our ecological products, but we don’t need to visit supermarkets and we spend less money. One thing not on our shopping list is the typical medications for the over-50s.

© Clodagh and Richard Handscombe
Holistic gardeners and authors living in Spain for 25 years. Details of their books etc will be found on
www.gardeninginspain.com. December 2010.
Published 09 December 2010 12:01 by Bryan Hubbard
Comments
     
Antoine said:

Since olive leaves are known to kill micro-organisms, you might consider the use of olive leave tea...
Just a thought
[end quote]
________________________________________
...
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 28, 2011, 07:39:25 AM
This article is from Health Answers UK.
- Yowbarb
====================================================================

http://www.health-answers.co.uk/olive_leaf.htm

Olive Leaf Extract (Olea europaea)

The crushed leaves of the olive tree, or teas made from them, have been used to fight wound infection and for a number of other medical purposes for thousands of years by mediterranean and middle-eastern peoples. In the early nineteenth century, it was recorded that a tea brewed from olive leaves was effective against malaria, but it is only relatively recently that the range of infective agents and other conditions that olive leaf extracts have been shown to be effective against has begun to grow steadily.

The active ingredients of olive leaf extract have been identified as oleuropein and elenolic acid, although a number of other, possibly synergistic, phytochemicals such as hydroxytyrosol, and tyrosolare also present. In the body, enzymes convert oleuropein to a specific form of elenolic acid called d-elenolic acid (the ‘right handed’ version of two possible ‘mirror-image’ molecules) which is the main compound responsible for the effectiveness of olive leaf extract.  It should also be noted that the ’left-handed’ version of elenolic acid (laevo- or l-elenolic acid) and its synthetic salts such as calcium elenolate do not have the same effects in the body as the natural ‘dextro’ form derived from oleuropein, because they quickly become attached to amino acids in the blood and are inactivated.

It is now known that oleuropein has very strong antiseptic, anti-protozoan, anti-fungal and anti-viral properties, is an antioxidant more powerful than most other herbal antioxidants or even vitamin E, can protect LDL (good) cholesterol, directly stimulates the immune system and may even have anti-cancer properties. These properties continue to be investigated and it is likely that oleuropein will soon be recognised as one of the most valuable resources available from the plant kingdom.

Powerful natural antibiotic

Oleuropein has been confirmed as an effective treatment and preventive for malaria and other protozoan diseases, can control fungal infections such as Candida albicans, and can even help prevent the onset of colds, flu, and a range of other viral infections including HIV/AIDS. However as antibiotic resistance continues to grow around the world, its greatest value may be in the fact that it is effective in the control of many diseases where allopathic antibiotic treatment is failing. Research conducted in Hungary has shown positive results in combating a huge range of infections including pneumonia, bronchitis, tonsillitis, pharyngitis, stomatitis, stomach ulcer (caused by Helicobacter pylori), pulpitis, leukoplakia, herpes, ‘hospital staph’ and others.

There is growing evidence that some generalised disorders such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome are caused or aggravated by long-term infections such as Candida albicans overgrowth, or the chronic presence of other inimical organisms. Because it has such ‘broad-spectrum’ antibiotic properties, olive leaf extract is showing great promise in treating this type of ‘unwellness’ where there is no single readily identifiable cause.

Note: Individuals who begin taking olive leaf extract to eliminate Candida or other unwanted pathogens may experience a ‘Herxheimer reaction’ (die-off symptoms), for a few days as toxins are released by dying yeast cells and excreted by the body, and dose should be temporarily adjusted downward if this is severe.

Immune supporter and ‘adaptogen’

Olive leaf extract’s anti-oxidant properties (it has been shown to be more powerful than green tea, grape seed and pine seed extracts, and vitamins C and E) prevent oxidation of cholesterol so that LDL (good) cholesterol is not converted to LDL (bad) cholesterol, it stimulates production of phagocytes (germ-killing white blood cells), increases blood flow in the coronary artery, normalises blood pressure and may help prevent hardening of the arteries.

Toxicity

Years of safe use and extensive research show that olive leaf extract has no toxic or other adverse side effects, even in very high doses.

A word of caution

Because of its immense potential for treating such a wide range of ailments, including many that are no longer treatable by allopathic antibiotics, there is a great deal of competition between manufacturers and suppliers, and the facts may occasionally suffer. Whether leaves used for extraction are fresh or dried, the use of different subspecies of olive, or differing extraction processes result in different levels of activity.
Also, the search by manufacturers for a patentable version of the natural extract means that synthetic compounds such as d-calcium elonate may be touted as being equal or superior to the natural product (the opposite is true).

The simple bottom line when comparing different products is to look for a preparation containing at least 20% natural oleuropein standardised using the Merck method.
The analysis should also confirm that the synergistic polyphenols and bioflavonoids that naturally accompany oleuropein make up the balance of the analysis - in other words that is a fully natural extract.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: gingerkane on April 04, 2011, 05:46:56 PM
I would say it is worth a try. Apparently from searching so far - the source of it is one company (can't be true) and the company is Young Living Essential Oils. I bet if someone was to do a search in the UK they would have more info and more sources.
Possibly a person could make essential oils of the main ingredients listed... also probably worthwhile to stock a few of the Young Living Essential Oil bottles of this ...
Yowbarb

http://www.squidoo.com/thievesessentialoil (http://www.squidoo.com/thievesessentialoil) 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thieves_oil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thieves_oil)   Wikipedia Thieves oil

Thieves oil is a mixture of several essential oils that it is claimed have antimicrobial properties[1]. It may contain oils of cinnamon, lemon, eucalyptus, clove and rosemary.

The Utah, US-based multi-level marketing business that has primarily popularized the blend, Young Living Essential Oils, claims that the recipe dates back to 15th Century Europe, where it was used by four thieves who stole from the dead bodies of those who had died from the Bubonic Plague, yet never contracted the infection themselves.[2] However, the story about the origin of thieves oil is difficult to authenticate from sources beyond Gary Young himself, the owner of the company[3], and the business has been accused of quackery[4][5]. Young Living owns the trademark to the name "Thieves Oil" and claims it is a proprietary blend.

[edit] References
1.^ O'Connor, Anahad (7 September 2009). "Really? The Claim: Cinnamon Oil Kills Bacteria". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/08/health/08real.html. (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/08/health/08real.html.) Retrieved 11 September 2009.
2.^ "Secret of Thieves" website, which links directly to the Young Living website for purchases
3.^ YOUNG LIVING TRAINING CD #73, 'The Power of Thieves', Gary Young, ND
4.^ Barrett M.D., Stephen (6 June, 2006). "A Critical Look at Gary Young, Young Living Essential Oils, and Raindrop Therapy". http://www.quackwatch.org/11Ind/young.html. (http://www.quackwatch.org/11Ind/young.html.) "Gary Young is an uneducated huckster with a track record of arrests for health fraud. He has repeatedly inflated and falsified his education, credentials, and experiences. His inability to recognize the limits of his knowledge and training contributed to the death of his own child."
5.^ "The Secret of Thieves". The Whole Child. Lawrence D. Rosen, MD. 8 September 2009. http://www.thewholechild.us/integrative_/2009/09/the-secret-of-thieves.html. (http://www.thewholechild.us/integrative_/2009/09/the-secret-of-thieves.html.) Retrieved 11 September 2009. "I repeatedly tried to get a historical reference for the thieves story (and other stories the Young Living organization disseminates) from YL distributors with no avail. If you have a close connection to the organization, maybe you will succeed. Otherwise one needs to assume that these are just stories - good for business but without historical evidence."
Hi! Im happy to tell you 'a thieves blend' can be made right now with so many different oils. Clove oil was used by the royal Austrailian army for wounds and is quite affordable as far as eo's price go.  Clove/tea tree/ cinnamon/ effective at KILLING MRSA! Don't be fool into thinking you need some special propritary blend.  Essential oils and blending may seem like a large undertaking to a layperson but with a few bottles you have on hand medicine for so much. Also, we should learn methods of distillation and extraction of plant matter for when the oils run out.  There is a method of putting the plant matter in oil for a week, removing the plant matter, adding new plant matter, and repeat until the oil has taken on the aroma of the plant you are using.  Lavender grows well and spreads fast, so does peppermint, calendula. Any  book from Valerie Ann Woodward on Aromatherapy is a good guide book. Also, author Kurt Schaubelt.  Use caution when ordering from young living as I have heard from clients the oils are not of highest quality and they are a pyramid company, which doesn't seem to fit quite well with the natural healer set.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: noproblemo2 on April 05, 2011, 08:45:56 AM
Thanks gingerkane, good info to know.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on April 11, 2011, 05:00:24 PM
From BajaSusan
in this Topic Re: Materials to stash for makeshift buildings in "The Aftertime"
« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2010, 09:06:03 AM »

Natural Herbal Remedies
http://www.manataka.org
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: bk on April 19, 2011, 07:18:21 PM
Medicinal value

Cinnamon

In medicine it acts like other volatile oils and once had a reputation as a cure for colds. It has also been used to treat diarrhea and other problems of the digestive system. Cinnamon is high in antioxidant activity. The essential oil of cinnamon also has antimicrobial properties, which can aid in the preservation of certain foods.
Cinnamon could have some pharmacological effects in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance. The plant material used in the study was mostly from Chinese cinnamon (see Chinese cinnamon's medicinal uses). Recent studies in phytochemistry have indicated that cinnamtannin B1 isolated from C. verum bears possible therapeutic effect on type 2 diabetes, with the exception of the postmenopausal patients studied on C. Cassia. Cinnamon has traditionally been used to treat toothache and fight bad breath and its regular use is believed to stave off common cold and aid digestion.
Pharmacological experiments suggest that the cinnamon-derived dietary factor cinnamic aldehyde (cinnamaldehyde) activates the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response in human epithelial colon cells and may therefore represent an experimental chemopreventive dietary factor targeting colorectal carcinogenesis.Recent research documents anti-melanoma activity of cinnamic aldehyde observed in cell culture and a mouse model of human melanoma.
Regularly drinking tea made from the bark of Sri Lanka cinnamon could be beneficial to oxidative stress related illness in humans, as the plant part contains significant antioxidant potential.

Clove

Cloves are used in Indian Ayurvedic medicine, Chinese medicine, and western herbalism and dentistry, where the essential oil is used as an anodyne (painkiller) for dental emergencies. Cloves are used as a carminative, to increase hydrochloric acid in the stomach and to improve peristalsis. Cloves are also said to be a natural anthelmintic. The essential oil is used in aromatherapy when stimulation and warming are needed, especially for digestive problems. Topical application over the stomach or abdomen are said to warm the digestive tract. The use of a clove in toothache is also said to decrease pain. It also helps to decrease infection in the teeth due to its antiseptic properties. Clove oil, applied to a cavity in a decayed tooth, also relieves toothache.

Eucalyptus

The cineole-based oil is used as component in pharmaceutical preparations to relieve the symptoms of influenza and colds, in products like cough sweets, lozenges, ointments and inhalants. Eucalyptus oil has antibacterial effects on pathogenic bacteria in the respiratory tract. Inhaled eucalyptus oil vapor is a decongestant and treatment for bronchitis. Cineole controls airway mucus hypersecretion and asthma via anti-inflammatory cytokine inhibition Eucalyptus oil also stimulates immune system response by affects on the phagocytic ability of human monocyte derived macrophages.
Eucalyptus oil also has anti-inflammatory and analgesic qualities as a topically applied liniment ingredient.
Eucalyptus oil is also used in personal hygiene products for antimicrobial properties in dental care and soaps. It can also be applied to wounds to prevent infection.

Now you can see why the thieves did not get sick and this is just 3 of the oils listed. Use this link to get a complete list as well as how to mix them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_essential_oils

Believe me they work I have been mixing my own for over 10 years.

Just look at the active ingredients on Vicks vapor rub
Camphor, eucalyptus, menthol all essential oils mixed in petroleum jelly
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on October 07, 2011, 09:13:28 PM
http://www.non-hybrid-seeds.com/sp/medicinal-herb-pack.html (http://www.non-hybrid-seeds.com/sp/medicinal-herb-pack.html)    Non -Hybrid Seeds Medicinal Herb Pack

Details

Angelica Angelica archangelica
Angelica has a long tradition of use as a general tonic herb for women, children, and the elderly. It is said to strengthen the heart and provide an antidote against general debility. According to legend, Angelica was revealed in a dream by an angel to cure the plague. All parts of the plant were believed effective against evil spirits, and Angelica was held in such esteem that it was called 'The Root of the Holy Ghost.' In America it was used by the Iroquois and other tribes in ceremonial medicine, and in traditional lore an infusion of smashed roots was used as wash to remove ghosts from the house.

NOTE The fresh root of Angelica is not edible, said to be poisonous. Do not use while pregnant or breastfeeding without consulting your doctor.

Boneset Eupatorium perfoliatum
Boneset gets its name from its ability to "break bone fever." Used by North American Indians for stomach problems, colds, and fevers, in addition to arthritis and rheumatic ailments. Boneset has also been used to treat influenza, and is said to alleviate pain and reduce fever associated with such imbalance.  European settlers used it as a cure-all. Boneset’s odor is weak, but its taste is extremely bitter.

NOTE Boneset is toxic in high doses.

Calendula Calendula officinalis
The flower petals of the Calendula plant have been used for medicinal purposes since at least the 12th century. Native to Mediterranean countries, Calendula is now cultivated across the globe.  Calendula is typically added to salves and other topical preparations and has been shown to speed the healing of wounds, where it appears to have anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antibacterial effects.

Chamomile Matricaria recutita
It is said that the Egyptians dedicated Chamomile to their sun god and valued it over all other herbs for its healing qualities. Due to its sedative and relaxing properties Chamomile was an ingredient in some love potions of the middle ages. Chamomile flowers are used in alternative medicine as an anodyne, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, nervine, stomachic, tonic, and vasodilator. The anti-inflammatory properties make it good for rheumatism, arthritis, and other painful swellings.

Echinacea Echinaceae purpurea
Echinacea has been used in North America for more than 400 years to treat infections and wounds, and as a general "cure-all." Today, people use Echinacea to shorten the duration of the common cold and flu and reduce symptoms, such as sore throat (pharyngitis), cough, and fever. Many herbalists also recommend echinacea to help boost the immune system and help the body fight infections. Echinacea is well known for its anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-inflammatory properties.

Feverfew  Chrysanthemum parthenium
Feverfew was first introduced to North America by European settlers in the 17th century, and has long been used to treat headaches and inflammation.  Especially renowned as a treatment for migraines, Feverfew has also been used for menstrual problems such as cramping and irregularity. It can also be taken for problems such as joint pain and rheumatism.

NOTE Feverfew should not be used during pregnancy because of the stimulant action on the womb. The fresh leaves may cause mouth ulcers in sensitive people.

Mullein Verbascum olympicum
The Greeks, Romans, British and Native Americans have all used Mullein to treat a number of respiratory conditions, from a mild cough to bronchitis and asthma. The dried stalks of Mullein have also been used as torches. The flowers can be used to create bright yellow or green dyes, which were used by the ancient Romans to color hair, according to "Healing Teas" by Marie Nadine Antol. Greek mythology holds that Ulysses carried Mullein to protect himself from the evil Circe. For these purposes the leaves can be smoked or used to prepare tea.

NOTE Mullein causes allergic reactions in a small population.

Nettle  Urtica dioica
In medieval Europe Stinging nettle  was used as a diuretic (to rid the body of excess water) and to treat joint pain. Stinging nettle has been used for hundreds of years to treat painful muscles and joints, eczema, arthritis, gout, and anemia. Today, many people use it to treat urinary problems during the early stages of an enlarged prostate, for urinary tract infections, for hay fever, or in compresses or creams for treating joint pain, sprains and strains, tendonitis, and insect bites.

NOTE Do not use while pregnant or breastfeeding without consulting your doctor. Stinging nettle should never be applied to an open wound. Be careful when handling the nettle plant because touching it can cause an allergic rash. Occasional side effects include mild stomach upset, fluid retention, and hives or rash (mainly from topical use).

Pleurisy Root Asclepias tuberosa
Some Native American legends tell of the roots being used as a body wash for lifting and running strength. Also used as a drug in chant lotion, and as a ceremonial emetic. Asclepias tuberosa has a long history of use as a valuable alternative medicine and is one of the most important of the indigenous American species. Butterfly Weed is used internally in the treatment of diarrhea, dysentery, chronic rheumatism, and as an expectorant. It has a specific action on the lungs, making it a valuable medicinal herb in all chest complaints and in the treatment of many lung diseases.

Skullcap Scutellaria lateriflora
Skullcap was well known among the Cherokee and other Native American healers as a strong emmenagogue and female medicinal herb. Today Skullcap is recognized as a powerful medicinal herb, used in alternative medicine as an anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, slightly astringent, emmenagogue, febrifuge, nervine, sedative and tonic.

NOTE Should be used with some caution since in overdose it causes giddiness, stupor, confusion and twitching. Skullcap has been linked to liver damage, though it is suspected that the source of damage was actually from Germander being substituted for Skullcap. Use in moderation and avoid if you have liver problems.

Spikenard Aralia racemosa
Spikenard was a popular herb among American Indians, who gathered its pleasantly scented roots for a variety of medicinal uses. Herbalists record that the Cherokees drank Spikenard tea for backache and that the Shawnees used it to treat gas pains, coughs, asthma, and chest pains. Other tribes gave the tea to women in labor to make childbirth swifter and less painful. The Micmacs reportedly applied a salve of spikenard to cuts and wounds, while the Ojibwas used the root in a poultice for healing broken bones. Early settlers used the juice from the dark purple berries and oil from the seeds.  Medical practitioners in the 19th century prescribed the root to treat gout, rheumatism, syphilis, and other diseases in which it was deemed necessary to "purify the blood." More recently, Spikenard has gained popularity as an adaptogen, sharing many common properties with its close relative American Ginseng.

Tobacco Nicotiana rustica
Nicotiana rustica is also known as Sacred Tobacco, Mapacho, Aztec tobacco and a host of other names. It originated in Mexico but was widely cultivated throughout the Americas by native peoples for ceremonial purposes.  Mapacho is considered very sacred by Amazonian shamans and is employed alone or in combination with other plants in shamanic practices. Some shamans drink the juice of tobacco leaves alone as a source of visions. Mapacho is used extensively in healing practices and is considered a medicine, not a health hazard, when used properly. The Tukanoan peoples of the Vaupés often rub a decoction of the leaves briskly over sprains and bruises. Amongst the Witotos and Boras, fresh leaves are crushed and poulticed over boils and infected wounds. Tikuna men mix the crushed leaves with the oil from palms to rub into the hair to prevent balding. The Jivaros take tobacco juice therapeutically for indisposition, chills and snake bites. In many tribes tobacco snuff may be employed medicinally for a variety of ills, particularly to treat pulmonary ailments.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on October 08, 2011, 05:07:06 AM
Yowbarb Note:
I posted a Topic, CACTUS Recipes - in Survival Recipes of the World.
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?board=107.0 (http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?board=107.0)
recipes of nopalitos and also the prickly pear fruit.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nopalito (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nopalito)
Nopalitos is a dish made with diced nopales. They are sold fresh, bottled, or canned and less often dried.
They have a light, slightly tart flavor, and a crisp, mucilaginous texture.
Nopalitos are often eaten with eggs as a breakfast and in salads and soups as lunch and dinner meals.

Nopalitos are low carbohydrate and may help in the treatment of diabetes.[1]
[edit] References

    ^ Use Of The Latin Food Staple Nopales: The Prickly Pear Cactus

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on October 08, 2011, 06:05:20 AM
the point is: Nopalitos are low carbohydrate and may help in the treatment of diabetes.[1]



Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on October 12, 2011, 07:33:59 AM
Ehow article on the nopal cactus,
Yowbarb
...
http://www.ehow.com/about_5422329_nopal-cactus-health-benefits.html (http://www.ehow.com/about_5422329_nopal-cactus-health-benefits.html)

Nopal Cactus Health Benefits
The Nopal cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica), also known as "prickly pear," is a plant native to the mountains of Mexico. It has been used since ancient times as both a food and as a medicine for its health benefits. The Aztecs considered the cactus, which derives some of its properties from the volcanic soil in which it grows, as a food fit for royalty and a fortifying substance for warriors. A powdered form of Nopal has become popular in modern times as a treatment for a variety of metabolic, digestive and heart problems.

Stabilizes Blood sugar

Nopal cactus contains a large amount of slowly-digestible fiber and tends to slow down the digestion of foods when it is taken just before or with a meal. The cactus has the effect of lowering the Glycemic Index (a measure of how quickly a food raises blood sugar levels) of any foods it is eaten with. Clinical testing has shown that people with high morning blood-sugar levels who ate Nopal cactus for breakfast subsequently had lower or normal blood- sugar levels.

Lowers Cholesterol

The fiber and sterols in Nopal bind with a bile salt in the intestines, which helps limit the amount of blood fats (cholesterol and triglycerides) absorbed by the body, thereby lowering blood cholesterol levels.
   
Scrubs Blood Vessels

Plaques are areas of inflammation that form on the walls of the blood vessels, where they trap blood fats that can harden or even block the arteries. Nopal cactus sterols, along with its polyphenols and glycoproteins, serve as antioxidants that help reduce inflammation and keep plaques from forming.
       
Sweeps the Colon

The insoluble plant fibers in Nopal cactus provide dietary roughage, which make it easier to maintain bowel regularity. Nopal also contains soluble plant fiber, which helps absorb toxins, including carcinogens, as it sweeps the colon clean.
   
Soothes the Stomach

Nopal contains a high amount of mucilage, which helps balance the pH of the stomach and soothes the stomach lining. Tests have shown that Nopal stimulates the healing of stomach ulcers and reduces stomach inflammation.
   
Protects the Liver

Because Nopal contains antioxidant flavonoids, it helps neutralize free radicals before they can overtax the liver. It also helps absorb toxins, decreasing the liver's load. By supporting the liver, it frees that organ to balance bodily functions, including the immune system.

Hangovers and Obesity

Nopal is sometimes used to help counteract the effects of alcohol consumption. It helps rehydrate the body, soothes the stomach, and improves liver function, thereby preventing the headache, stomach ache and toxic "morning after" feeling. When taken before meals, Nopal's roughage can help create a sensation of fullness that may help prevent overeating and helps stabilize the blood sugar, to ward off hunger. Nopal cactus also contributes calcium and valuable amino acids and other nutrients.

 Nopalea Juice by Trivitabuynopaljuice.com

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References

Oro Verde Export:    http://www.nopalexport.com/healthbenefits.htm (http://www.nopalexport.com/healthbenefits.htm)
Suite 101 article by George Daleiden:   
http://george-daleiden.suite101.com/antioxidant-nopal-cactus-reduces-inflammation-a128517 (http://george-daleiden.suite101.com/antioxidant-nopal-cactus-reduces-inflammation-a128517)

Resources

Medicinal Plants of the Desert, Michael Moore, 1990

Prickly Pear Cactus Medicine, Ran Knishinsky, 2004

Photo Credit XHUANX;

Read Next:
How to Grow Nopal   http://www.ehow.com/how_5572715_grow-nopal.html (http://www.ehow.com/how_5572715_grow-nopal.html)

Nopal Cactus Health Benefits | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5422329_nopal-cactus-health-benefits.html#ixzz1aZpOF4jd (http://www.ehow.com/about_5422329_nopal-cactus-health-benefits.html#ixzz1aZpOF4jd)

..............................................................
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on October 12, 2011, 07:41:19 AM
Two books on medicinal plants of the desert and how to prepare them,
Yowbarb
=============================================================
Medicinal Plants of the Desert and Canyon West: A Guide to Identifying, Preparing, and Using Traditional Medicinal Plants Found in the Deserts and Canyons of the West and Southwest [Paperback]

Michael Moore (Author), Mimi Kamp (Illustrator), Nora Ryerson (Illustrator)

Amazon link:
http://www.amazon.com/Medicinal-Plants-Desert-Canyon-West/dp/0890131821/ref=pd_sim_b_3 (http://www.amazon.com/Medicinal-Plants-Desert-Canyon-West/dp/0890131821/ref=pd_sim_b_3)
........
ALSO:

Prickly Pear Cactus Medicine: Treatments for Diabetes, Cholesterol, and the Immune System [Paperback]
Ran Knishinsky (Author)

Amazon link:

http://www.amazon.com/Prickly-Pear-Cactus-Medicine-Cholesterol/dp/0892811498/ref=sr_1_40?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1252965108&sr=1-40 (http://www.amazon.com/Prickly-Pear-Cactus-Medicine-Cholesterol/dp/0892811498/ref=sr_1_40?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1252965108&sr=1-40)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on October 25, 2011, 11:14:19 AM
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NAH/is_3_29/ai_54189564/ (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NAH/is_3_29/ai_54189564/) 
Aduki Beans
by Winifred Yu

THESE BEANS PROMOTE REGULAR BOWEL MOVEMENTS AND STRENGTHEN THE KIDNEYS.
WHAT THEY ARE Aduki beans are small, reddish-brown beans with a white ridge along one edge. Cooked, they have a sweet, nutty flavor. They originated in China but are also popular in Japan.
NUTRITIONAL VALUE Adukis are one of the highest protein and lowest fat varieties of bean. They contain high levels of potassium and fiber, as well as B vitamins such as thiamin, niacin, and riboflavin, and minerals such as iron, zinc, and manganese.
HEALING CLAIMS Aduki beans promote regular bowel movements, are a good source of energy, and help lower cholesterol. They may have a role in preventing breast cancer.
TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE CLAIMS According to traditional Chinese medicine, aduki beans benefit bladder and reproductive functions and the kidneys, and are therefore used to treat problems such as urinary dysfunction and bladder infections. And because ancient Chinese folk wisdom says that the kidneys govern the emotion of fear, the aduki bean is considered a source of courage that helps people meet challenges bravely.
HOW THEY WORK Aduki beans are rich in soluble fiber, which speeds up the elimination of waste from the body, promoting regular bowel movements and preventing the body from absorbing harmful substances. Soluble fiber has also been shown to reduce levels of LDL cholesterol (the "bad" cholesterol) in the blood.
Some experts credit the presence of phytoestrogens in aduki beans with helping to prevent breast cancer. These weak estrogens block receptor sites that would otherwise be filled by stronger estrogens. In women, the phytoestrogens fool the body into believing it is still producing real estrogen, says Erika Schwartz, M.D., co-author of Natural Energy (G P Putnam's Sons, 1999).
EVIDENCE A study published in the Journal of Lipid Research in June 1997 showed that eating legumes appears to lower bad forms of cholesterol. Proof of the aduki bean's other health benefits come from centuries of anecdotes. Wendy Esko, a macrobiotic cooking instructor and counselor at the Kushi Institute in Becket, Mass., says the beans have a diuretic effect and strengthen the kidneys.
Bibliography for: "Aduki Beans"
Winifred Yu "Aduki Beans". Natural Health. FindArticles.com. 25 Oct, 2011.
COPYRIGHT 1999 Weider Publications
COPYRIGHT 2008 Gale, Cengage Learning
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NAH/is_3_29/ai_54189564/ (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NAH/is_3_29/ai_54189564/) 
...
Knowing Food  http://www.knowingfood.com/nutri/adkinfo.html (http://www.knowingfood.com/nutri/adkinfo.html)
Adzuki Bean:
Health Benefits and Nutrition Information

Health Benefits and Nutrition Information provided by nutritionist Lucy Kelly Nutritional Therapist, Southampton, England.
Adzuki beans are a good source of magnesium, potassium, iron, zinc copper, manganese and B vitamins. As a high-potassium, low-sodium food they can help reduce blood pressure and act as a natural diuretic. When combined with grains, beans supply high quality protein, which provides a healthy alternative to meat or other animal protein.

Like most beans, adzuki beans are rich in soluble fibre. This type of fibre provides bulk to the stool and binds to toxins and cholesterol aiding in their elimination from the body.

In Japan adzuki beans are known for their healing properties and are used to support kidney and bladder function. Gillian McKeith is a huge fan of the adzuki bean and refers to it as the 'weight loss' bean as it low in calories and fat but high in nutrients.
Adzuki beans, 1 cup (230g) (cooked, boiled)

•  Calories: 294
•  Protein: 17.3g
•  Carbohydrate: 57g
•  Total Fat: 0.23g
•  Fiber: 16.8g
•  Iron 4.6mg, Magnesium 119.6mg, Potassium 1223mg, Zinc 4.0mg, Folic acid 278mcg.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on October 25, 2011, 01:03:58 PM
Nathan, this is an interesting list. I wonder if it is based upon oriental medicine.
- Yowbarb

I hope this info. helps

 Apples
 Protects your heart
 Prevents constipation
 Blocks diarrhea
 Improves lung capacity
 Cushions joints
 
Apricots
 Combats cancer
 Controls blood pressure
 Saves your eyesight
 Shields against Alzheimer's
 Slows aging process
 
Artichokes
 Aids digestion
 Lowers cholesterol
 Protects your heart
 Stabilizes blood sugar
 Guards against liver disease
 
Avocados
 Battles diabetes
 Lowers cholesterol
 Helps stops strokes
 Controls blood pressure
 Smoothes skin
 
Bananas
 Protects your heart
 Quiets a cough
 Strengthens bones
 Controls blood pressure
 Blocks diarrhea
 
Beans
 Prevents constipation
 Helps hemorrhoids
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats cancer
 Stabilizes blood sugar
 
Beets
 Controls blood pressure
 Combats cancer
 Strengthens bones
 Protects your heart
 Aids weight loss
 
Blueberries
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Stabilizes blood sugar
 Boosts memory
 Prevents constipation
 
Broccoli
 Strengthens bones
 Saves eyesight
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Controls blood pressure
 
Cabbage
 Combats cancer
 Prevents constipation
 Promotes weight loss
 Protects your heart
 Helps haemorrhoids
 
Cantaloupe
 Saves eyesight
 Controls blood pressure
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats cancer
 Supports immune system
 
Carrots
 Saves eyesight
 Protects your heart
 Prevents constipation
 Combats cancer
 Promotes weight loss
 
Cauliflower
 Protects against Prostate Cancer
 Combats Breast Cancer
 Strengthens bones
 Banishes bruises
 Guards against heart disease
 
Cherries
 Protects your heart
 Combats Cancer
 Ends insomnia
 Slows aging process
 Shields against Alzheimer's
 
Chestnuts
 Promotes weight loss
 Protects your heart
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats Cancer
 Controls blood pressure
 
Chili peppers
 Aids digestion
 Soothes sore throat
 Clears sinuses
 Combats Cancer
 Boosts immune system
 
Figs
 Promotes weight loss
 Helps stops strokes
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats Cancer
 Controls blood pressure
 
Fish
 Protects your heart
 Boosts memory
 Protects your heart
 Combats Cancer
 Supports immune system
 
Flax
 Aids digestion
 Battles diabetes
 Protects your heart
 Improves mental health
 Boosts immune system
 
Garlic
 Lowers cholesterol
 Controls blood pressure
 Combats cancer
 Kills bacteria
 Fights fungus
 
Grapefruit
 Protects against heart attacks
 Promotes Weight loss
 Helps stops strokes
 Combats Prostate Cancer
 Lowers cholesterol
 
Grapes
 Saves eyesight
 Conquers kidney stones
 Combats cancer
 Enhances blood flow
 Protects your heart
 
Green tea
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Helps stops strokes
 Promotes Weight loss
 Kills bacteria
 
Honey
 Heals wounds
 Aids digestion
 Guards against ulcers
 Increases energy
 Fights allergies
 
Lemons
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Controls blood pressure
 Smoothes skin
 Stops scurvy
 
Limes
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Controls blood pressure
 Smoothes skin
 Stops scurvy
 
Mangoes
 Combats cancer
 Boosts memory
 Regulates thyroid
 Aids digestion
 Shields against Alzheimer's
 
Mushrooms
 Controls blood pressure
 Lowers cholesterol
 Kills bacteria
 Combats cancer
 Strengthens bones
 
Oats
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats cancer
 Battles diabetes
 Prevents constipation
 Smoothes skin
 
Olive oil
 Protects your heart
 Promotes Weight loss
 Combats cancer
 Battles diabetes
 Smoothes skin
 
Onions
 Reduce risk of heart attack
 Combats cancer
 Kills bacteria
 Lowers cholesterol
 Fights fungus
 
Oranges
 Supports immune systems
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Straightens respiration
 
Peaches
 Prevents constipation
 Combats cancer
 Helps stops strokes
 Aids digestion
 Helps haemorrhoids
 
Peanuts
 Protects against heart disease
 Promotes Weight loss
 Combats Prostate Cancer
 Lowers cholesterol
 Aggravates
Diverticulitis
 
Pineapple
 Strengthens bones
 Relieves colds
 Aids digestion
 Dissolves warts
 Blocks diarrhoea
 
Prunes
 Slows aging process
 Prevents constipation
 Boosts memory
 Lowers cholesterol
 Protects against heart disease
 
Rice
 Protects your heart
 Battles diabetes
 Conquers kidney stones
 Combats cancer
 Helps stops strokes
 
Strawberries
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Boosts memory
 Calms stress
 
 
 
Sweet potatoes
 Saves your eyesight
 Lifts mood
 Combats cancer
 Strengthens bones
 
 
 
Tomatoes
 Protects prostate
 Combats cancer
 Lowers cholesterol
 Protects your heart
 
 
 
Walnuts
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats cancer
 Boosts memory
 Lifts mood
 Protects against heart disease
 
Water
 Promotes Weight loss
 Combats cancer
 Conquers kidney stones
 Smoothes skin
 
 
 
Watermelon
 Protects prostate
 Promotes Weight loss
 Lowers cholesterol
 Helps stops strokes
 Controls blood pressure
 
Wheat germ
 Combats Colon Cancer
 Prevents constipation
 Lowers cholesterol
 Helps stops strokes
 Improves digestion
 
Wheat bran
 Combats Colon Cancer
 Prevents constipation
 Lowers cholesterol
 Helps stops strokes
 Improves digestion
 
Yogurt
 Guards against ulcers
 Strengthens bones
 Lowers cholesterol
 Supports immune systems
 Aids digestion
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on December 05, 2011, 12:32:23 PM
Article on the herb, fenugreek is below. It is used in several cultures. including Asia. It is used as an herbal remedy for joint pain, arthritis, Diabetes Type I, Diabetes Type II; it has many uses including flushing out the kidney and helping get rid of kidney stones. It is proven to increase the milk supply of lactating humans. What got me thinking of fenugreek just now I found a recipe for a flatbread made in India and discovered methi (fenugreek is in the bread.)
I have used fenugreek and felt like it was cleaning out my blood and getting rid of some toxicity (I didn';t know the cause but the fenugreek helped me.)
Note: Methi thepla is Indian Bread made with fenugreek.
I posted a recipe for this in the Board, Survival Recipes of the World
Topic: Flatbreads - often unleavened, were an ancient staple of the human race
Link: http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=3487.msg49514#msg49514
- Barb Townsend
Topic Administrator
...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenugreek  Fenugreek article including medicinal information.
From Wikipedia
Fenugreek Trigonella foenum-graecum) is used both as a herb (the leaves) and as a spice (the seed, often called methi in Urdu/Hindi/Nepali). The leaves and sprouts are also eaten as vegetables. The plant is cultivated worldwide as a semi-arid crop and is a common ingredient in many curries.

Fenugreek is used in Eritrean and Ethiopian cuisine.[7] The word for fenugreek in Amharic is abesh (or abish), and the seed is used in Ethiopia as a natural herbal medicine in the treatment of diabetes.
Some Jews customarily eat fenugreek during the meal of the first and/or second night of Rosh Hashana (The New Year).[8]
Lactation
Fenugreek seeds are thought to be a galactagogue that is often used to increase milk supply in lactating women.[9]
Medicinal
Arthritis has a low incidence rate in India where a lot of fenugreek is consumed. Drinking 1 cup of fenugreek tea per day, made from the leaves, is said to relieve the discomfort of arthritis.[10]
A June 2011 study at the Australian Centre for Integrative Clinical and Molecular Medicine found that men aged 25 to 52 who took a fenugreek extract twice daily for six weeks scored 25% higher on tests gauging libido levels than those who took a placebo.[11][12
....
Fenugreek seeds are used as a medicinal in Traditional Chinese Medicine under the name Hu Lu Ba, where they are considered to warm and tonify kidneys, disperse cold and alleviate pain. Main indications are hernia, pain in the groin. They are used raw or toasted. In India about 2-3g of raw fenugreek seeds (called Methi in India) are swallowed raw early in the morning with warm water, before brushing the teeth and before drinking tea or coffee, where they are supposed to have a therapeutic and healing effect on joint pains, without any side effects.

Several human intervention trials demonstrated that the antidiabetic effects of fenugreek seeds ameliorate most metabolic symptoms associated with type-1 and type-2 diabetes in both humans and relevant animal models by reducing serum glucose and improving glucose tolerance.[15] Fenugreek is currently available commercially in encapsulated forms and is being prescribed as dietary supplements for the control of hypercholesterolemia and diabetes by practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine. Fenugreek contains high dietary fiber, so a few seeds taken with warm water before going to sleep helps avoiding constipation.[citation needed]

In Persian and Arabic traditional medicine, Fenugreek is known as حلبة (Helba or Hulba), tea made from the seeds is used to flush the kidneys and even fight kidney stones.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenugreek
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on December 05, 2011, 01:44:49 PM
This site has an article on home remedies to get rid of parasites. One of the herbs mentioned is  fenugreek seed powder. Fenugreek was mentioned in previous post.
I wasn't aware it was also for parasites so decided to look it up.
- Barb Townsend
Topic Administrator
...
http://www.gonaturalremedies.com/home-remedies/parasite.htm  Go Natural Remedies

Some of the very useful home remedies for parasite are given below.

    Early morning after getting up, you should eat few tomatoes. This will help to throw the worms out of your body.
    Fenugreek seeds powder is also good in treating the parasites. Take half a tablespoon of fenugreek seeds with water; this will clear out your system.
    To kill the eggs of the parasites inside the intestinal tract, you should eat cloves after every meal.
    Karela seeds are also effective over the parasites. Fry some seeds of bitter melon (Karela) in 1 teaspoon of ghee. Take this mixture two to three times in a day. This is one of the very effective home remedies for parasites .
    Eating bitter gourd is also very good to kill the parasites inside the body.
    Mix pumpkin seeds and onions in soymilk and have it once every day.
    Add apple cider vinegar drops into one glass of water and drink it whenever you want.
    To kill tapeworms, eat raw pineapples for three days in succession.
    Cleanse the colon without fail and try to maintain clean hygiene. Clean colon with ozonated water.
    Eating cranberries and pineapple will also help to prevent the parasites from growing.
    On an empty stomach take pomegranate or pumpkin seeds, as it helps to treat the worm conditions in a better way.
    Taking fruit juices and vegetable soups for few days will also help to treat parasites. Those who want and can manage; they can also keep fast for two to three days.
    Avoid cereals completely if your child has got parasites.
    To kill the parasites, you can also take juice of garlic.
    The best thing is to maintain cleanliness around you.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on December 07, 2011, 02:45:03 PM
http://www.mobimotherhood.org/MM/article-diet.aspx

Lactogenic Foods and Herbs
By Hilary Jacobson CH.HU.SI.
Based on her book Mother Food for Breastfeeding Mothers
What mothers eat can influence their milk supply

Around the world and throughout history, mothers have known that certain foods support their milk production. These foods were valued in earliest cultures and highlighted in mythology. Mother Goddesses were associated with barley grain, the almond, coconut, lotus, the elder tree, and many other plants and foods that were used historically to increase milk production.

Today, mothers dealing with low milk supply are again interested to learn how foods and herbs can support their milk production. Experts who work closely with low-supply mothers report that certain foods influence milk supply for some mothers. These so-called “lactogenic foods and herbs” are the subject of this article.

Dietary Guidelines Following Birth

Getting a good start the first few weeks after birth can be helpful in supporting the onset and development of a mother’s milk supply:

    Get enough to eat. Simply eating regularly and getting enough calories will support your milk supply.
    Get enough to drink, but not too much. Between 2 – 3 quarts a day is a good goal to aim for. Some mothers discover they need much more, and some find that they need to get “just enough” fluids to maintain an optimal milk supply.
    Eat at least one warm meal per day that includes a source of protein, a portion of green salad, a grain such as millet or rice, and cooked vegetables such as yam, carrot, and fennel.
    Spice moderately with lactogenic spices, for instance with sea-salt or gomasio, with dill or caraway, or basil and marjoram, and, if tolerated, with garlic.
    Avoid food that is hard to digest such as fried or extremely fatty food.
    Take probiotic yogurt or lactobacilli supplements to protect your intestinal flora and to help prevent colic and allergy in your baby(1).
    Get healthy fats such as butter and olive oil, and remember to supplement with essential fatty acids.
    Herbs useful after birth include stinging nettle to rebuild the blood lost during birth, turmeric, to help prevent breast inflammation, oat-straw, to nurture the nerves and to help prevent nervous exhaustion. These herbs also increase milk supply, so keep an eye on your supply and reduce or increase your dosage of these herbs as necessary.
    If you lost a lot of blood during birth, avoid taking ginger for several weeks.
    A traditional Chinese remedy used in the early postpartum is homemade chicken soup, simmered with the bones for several hours and rich with chicken fat, taken only once a week—otherwise, it is said to over-stimulate the baby. This remedy is reputed to prevent depression, to restore a mother's vitality, and to help develop an abundant milk supply.

Individual Dosage Requirements

Mothers have individual needs when it comes to lactogenic foods and herbs. Although most mothers produce milk well without having to consider their use at all, a few mothers find that they need to take a good amount every day, and that they may need to take a high dosage for two to four days to kick-start lactation.

As a breastfeeding mother gathers experience about her unique reaction to foods and herbs, she will learn the dosage that works best for her, both for building and for maintaining milk supply.

All mothers should consider the following: If you do not have low milk supply, and you take an abundance of herbs and foods to increase your supply, you may create unnecessary difficulties for yourself such as over-supply, engorgement, plugged ducts, or mastitis. Your baby may develop colic due to too much foremilk, or sucking difficulties due to an overly strong let-down reflex, both of which are common with over-supply. Use these foods and herbs wisely, and reduce or stop their use if you notice such problems.
LACTOGENIC FOODS

Lactogenic foods support lactation for many reasons. Eating sufficient calories and getting an abundant supply of nutrients is helpful in itself for lactation, but these foods also contain substances that interact with and support the chemistry of lactation. These substances include phytoestrogen, natural plant sedatives, plant sterols and saponins, and tryptophan, among others. In addition, a rich supply of minerals and a good balance of fats ensure that the mother’s cells and nerves are functioning at an optimal level.
Vegetables

Fennel

    Fennel can be eaten raw or cooked, for instance, steamed, or sautéed in butter and then simmered in a bit of water. Fennel seed is well-known as an herb to increase milk production. The vegetable, containing the same pharmacologically active volatile oils, acts as a gentler support.

Carrot, Beet, Yam

    These reddish vegetables are full of beta-carotene, needed in extra amounts during lactation. Carrot seed has been used as a galactagogue, and the vegetable, also containing the volatile oils and phytoestrogen, acts as a gentler support. The beet is a wonderful source of minerals and iron. Taking raw beet can help alleviate iron deficiency. These vegetables are naturally sweet, and they support the liver.

Dark Green Leafy Vegetables

    Dark green vegetables are a potent source of minerals, vitamins and enzymes, as well as phytoestrogen that support lactation. Dandelion and stinging nettle leaves are diuretic, and can help reduce edema during pregnancy and after birth. They can be plucked from your garden in early spring and eaten whole, chopped into salad, or used to make tea. Stinging nettle can be harvested for salad or cooked as spinach. In your market, you'll find arugula, beet leaves, kale, Swiss chard, spinach, chicory, collard greens and others.

Grains and Legumes

    Grains and legumes have a long history as galactagogues. The most commonly used grains include oats, millet, barley and rice. Oats are the most widely used lactogenic food in the US. Legumes to include in your diet are chickpea, mung beans and lentils.

Nuts

    Nuts that support milk supply include almonds, cashews, and macadamia nuts. As much as possible, eat raw nuts, not roasted or salted. The taste of raw nuts will grow on you.

Oils and fats

    Healthy fats play a vital role in cellular and neural metabolism. The kinds of fats a mother eats will influence the composition of fats in her milk. Please see the article “Dietary Tips for Pregnancy and the Postpartum” for more information.

    The renowned expert in fats, Mary G. Enig, suggests that mothers get regular and substantial dosages of butter and coconut oil. In addition, use cold-pressed virgin olive oil, and take equal amounts of cold-pressed sesame oil and flaxseed oil in salads.

    One way to balance the fats is to dribble a quarter teaspoon of olive oil, flaxseed oil, sesame oil, and a thin slab of butter over meals. Be sure to eliminate unhealthy fats such as partially hydrogenated vegetable oils and transfatty acids from your diet, as these will also enter your milk.

    In addition, be sure to have a source for essential fatty acids. For more information, see “Dietary Tips.”

Beverages

    Lactogenic beverages include getting enough plain water to hydrate the body, drinking commercial lactation teas, non-alcoholic beer, ginger ale, Rivella, and natural herbal root-beers from your health food store. Check out coffee substitutes based on the lactogenic grain barley, such as CARO, Roma, Caffix, Pero or Dandy Blend. These imitation coffees usually also contain chicory or dandelion, plus malt—ingredients that are all lactogenic. A recipe for "Barley Water," a potent lactogenic beverage, is at the bottom of this article.

Condiments

Garlic

    Garlic is famous for its medical benefits, and has a long history as a galactagogue.

    In one study, babies were seen to latch on better, suckle more actively, and drink more milk when the mother had garlic prior to nursing(2). If you do not wish to eat garlic, try adding a capsule of garlic extract to a meal eaten about an hour before breastfeeding.

    If you would like to introduce garlic to your diet, and are not used to eating garlic, introduce it very slowly and observe your baby’s reaction. Take only 1 – 2 cloves per day. These can be chopped or pressed through a garlic press into any food after it has finished cooking. Try it in vegetables, rice, grains, pulses, salad sauce, spaghetti sauce, or other sauce.

    Our culture does not encourage eating garlic, and many people do not tolerate garlic well (or onions, another food which is traditionally lactogenic). For this reason, garlic is not recommended by the American Herbal Product’s Association while breastfeeding except under the guidance of a qualified herbalist. However, if you do tolerate garlic there is no reason that you should not benefit from it. Take garlic in moderation as do mothers all over the world.

    Caution: Do not combine with anticoagulants, as garlic has blood-thinning actions.

    Danger: Babies and small children should never be given garlic in any form, whether fresh, dry, powdered or in capsules, to chew, swallow, eat or suck on. Garlic is highly caustic to delicate body tissues, and rubbing it in one’s nose or eyes could be painful and dangerous. Babies will benefit from the garlic a mother eats, and that reaches him through her milk.

Ginger

    Ginger is helpful for the letdown and milk flow. Some mothers benefit from drinking ginger ale. Even commercial ginger ale is flavored with “natural flavoring” that is real ginger.

    Warning: Do not use ginger or ginger ale in the early postpartum if there was significant blood loss during birth. Do not take ginger immediately after birth due to danger of hemorrhaging.

    Caution: Ginger tends to compound and increase the effects of medication being taken. Talk to your doctor if you are taking medication, especially diabetic, blood-thinning, or heart medicine.

    Sources: You can find ginger at your local grocery store. Check out stores that sell Asian foods, health food stores, and on line.

Spices

    Spices in your kitchen can be used to support milk production. Try adding marjoram and basil to your meals, and anise, dill or caraway. Black pepper, taken in moderation, is helpful.

Turmeric

    This powdered yellow root gives curry its yellow color and basic flavor. A potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, turmeric is being studied in connection with the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatism, and cancer. Turmeric has lactogenic properties and can also be taken to help prevent inflammatory conditions. One half teaspoon of turmeric a day may help prevent inflammation in the breasts.
    Caution: Some herbalists warn that pregnant women should not use turmeric if they are at risk for miscarriage.

SPECIAL FOODS

Oats (Avena Sativa)

    The humble oat is one of our most nutritious foods, and contains proteins, vitamins, minerals and trace elements that nourish the nerves, support the metabolism of fats, and uplift the spirit. In traditional medicine, both the seed and the leaf—called oat-straw—are taken. Oats are prescribed as a nervine tonic in the treatment of nervous exhaustion. In Europe, women traditionally take oats after birth. Oats are taken today in the US to increase milk production, both as food and as a supplement. Like other galactagogues, oats are antidepressant, antispasmodic, and they increase perspiration.

    Allergy: Occasional. Persons sensitive to gluten in wheat are frequently able to tolerate oats.

    Dosage and Preparation:

    Taking large dosages of oats is helpful in kick-starting milk production.

    Oatmeal can be taken for breakfast or an afternoon snack.

    Oat-straw is especially rich in minerals. It is available as capsules or as an ingredient in so-called “green-drinks.” Take as indicated on the package.

    Fluid extract: 3 – 5 ml (15 – 35 drops), three times a day.

Nutritional and Brewer's Yeast

    Nutritional or brewer’s yeast frequently leads to a significant boosts in a mothers’ milk supply. Mothers sometimes say that they feel much more energetic and emotionally balanced while taking yeast. This may signal a lack of essential nutrients in their diet, in particular, chromium, vitamin B complex, and especially vitamin B12, found in some brands of fortified nutritional yeast. Brewer’s and nutritional yeast also contain protein and good levels of phytoestrogen.

    Allergy: Persons who are allergic to yeast should avoid these products.

    Side-effects: Occasionally, mothers or babies become gassy, more so with brewer’s yeast than nutritional yeast. To be on the safe side, start with a small dosage and slowly increase.

    Sources: Vegetarian stores and health food stores.

Green Drinks

    Green foods are reputed to increase the fat content of breastmilk. Some mothers supplement with chlorophyll. So-called "green drinks" can be very helpful. Their ingredients include barley-grass, alfalfa leaf, spirulina, corellas, kelp, oat-straw and other herbs with lactogenic and medicinal properties.

    Caution: Chlorella, a common ingredient in commercial green-drinks, is used by medical specialists to chelate (remove) heavy metals from the body, especially mercury. If not taken at the correct dosage, chlorella can lead to an increase of mercury in the bloodstream and probably in a mother’s milk as well. It is wise to choose green-drinks that only contain a low percent of chlorella.

    Sources: Super markets, health food stores, online.

Green Papaya

    Green papaya is taken as a galactagogue across Asia. It is a superb source of enzymes, vitamins, and minerals, including vitamins C, A, B, and E. Green papaya is the unripe fruit, and it needs to be simmered until soft. Green papaya can also be taken in supplement form.

    Allergy: Persons allergic to latex may be allergic to papaya and other fruit.

    Caution: Persons taking Warfarin should consult with their doctor before taking papaya supplements.

Sesame Seed

    Large, black sesame seeds are used to increase milk production across Asia. Husked, light-colored sesame seeds are also effective and easier to digest. Sesame seed "butter" known as Tahini can be found in health food stores. Sesame is our most potent vegetable source of calcium!

    Allergy: Allergy to sesame is becoming more common.

Spirulina

    Spirulina is a non-toxic variety of blue-green algae. It has been farmed in lakes and ponds as a food source for thousands of years. It is valued for its proteins, enzymes, minerals, vitamins, chlorophyll, and essential fatty acids. Spirulina's nutrients are easily absorbed, even when a person’s digestion is not up to par.

    It is important that spirulina be cultivated on a farm that is not located in waters that are contaminated, in particular with heavy metals. It is also advisable not to use spirulina that has been genetically ‘improved.’ Spirulina and other “green foods” may increase the fat-content of breastmilk.

    Note: It is not wise to rely on spirulina as a source of B12.

Barley Water

    Barley-water is used medicinally to treat colds, intestinal problems (both constipation and diarrhea) and liver disorders. It was recorded in Greek medicine two thousand years ago as a galactagogue. Taken for a week or two, it often helps mothers with chronic low milk supply. Make a pot in the morning and drink it throughout the day, warming each cup and sweetening it with a natural sweetener as desired.

    Barley-water can be made with whole grain or pearl barley. Barley flakes can also be used, though these have been processed and are possibly less potent than the whole or pearled grain.

    Preparation:

        Quick-and-easy: 1/2 cup of flakes or pearled barley can be simmered in 1 quart of water for twenty minutes.
        Long-and-intensive: 1 cup of whole or pearled barley is simmered in 3 quarts of water for up to 2 hours. About half the liquid should cook off. Some recipes call for only 1/2 hour cooking time. However, the longer the barley simmers and the more pinkish (and slimier) the water becomes, the more of the ‘cream’ will enter the water and the stronger the medicinal effect will be.
        If the barley water becomes too thick to drink comfortably, add in more water.
        When finished, remove from the stove and sieve off the water. The grain is now tasteless and can be thrown out.
        Add 1 tablespoon of fennel powder or steep 2 – 3 teaspoons of fennel seeds for ten minutes in the barley-water before drinking.
        The traditional recipe calls for fennel seed. I personally find that powdered fenugreek seed is tastier than fennel in barley-water.

Endnotes

1. While studies on focusing on probiotics and allergy during pregnancy and in childhood continue and are controversial, a series of studies on the anthroposophic community in Europe convincingly shows results of a different composition of bacteria and lactobacteria in the stool of the lifestyle of these children: breastfed, eating naturally fermented vegetables, fewer treatments with antibiotics and vaccines. Therefore in this author’s opinion, it is fair to assume that each of these factors, and all of them combined, serve to protect the child against allergy. See:

Alm JS, Swartz J, et al., An anthroposophic lifestyle and intestinal microflora in infancy. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2002 Dec;13(6):402-11.

Alm JS, Swartz J, et al., Atopy in children of families with an anthroposophic lifestyle. Lancet. 1999 May 1;353(9163):1485-8.

2. Menella J, Beauchamp G. The effects of repeated exposure to garlic-flavored milk on the nursling's behavior. Pediatr Res 1993;34:805-808.

Mennella J. Mother's milk: A medium for early flavor experiences. J Hum Lact 1995;11(1):39-45.
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Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on December 11, 2011, 12:19:00 AM
Healing Foods and Herbs changing the name of this Topic.
Some posts will have a slightly different title.
................................................................................
Yoga Journal Home page:  http://www.yogajournal.com/
................................................................................
Article:
http://www.yogajournal.com/health/56   
Ghee: Better than Butter

Why cook with plain butter when you can reap the health benefits of its clarified form?

By Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa

Your yoga teacher says a little ghee will help loosen up tight hamstrings, and your Ayurvedic physician recommends ghee for a host of ailments ranging from poor digestion to memory loss. But what is this liquid gold and how does it differ from regular butter?

Ayurveda places ghee, or clarified butter, at the top of the oily foods list, as it has the healing benefits of butter without the impurities (saturated fat, milk solids). The Susruta Samhita, an Ayurvedic classic, claims ghee is beneficial for the whole body, and recommends it as the ultimate remedy for problems stemming from the pitta dosha, such as inflammation.

Long a favorite of yoga practitioners, ghee lubricates the connective tissues and promotes flexibility, says Dr. Vasant Lad, director of the Ayurvedic Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Traditionally, the preparation has been used to promote memory, intelligence, quantity and quality of semen, and to enhance digestion. Modern science tells us that ghee also harbors phenolic antioxidants, which bolster the immune system.

Even better than ghee is aged ghee—up to 100 years—which treats alcoholism, epilepsy, fever, and vaginal pain, according to Ayurvedic physician Robert Svoboda. Medicated ghee (ghrita in Sanskrit), meanwhile, combines clarified butter with healing herbs. Ghee's benefits extend to topical use as well. Ayurvedic beauty expert Pratima Raichur suggests it as a massage base to calm sensitive pitta-type skin. The Indian Materia Medica, a widely respected source book for Ayurvedic remedies, recommends ghee, sometimes mixed with honey, as an application for wounds, inflammation, and blisters.

You'll find ghee at the health food store, but it's easy to make. Place 1 to 2 pounds of butter in a saucepan on low heat. Melt until white curds separate and sink to the bottom. When a drop of water flicked into the pan boils immediately, the ghee is done. Discarding the curds and store in a jar. If kept out of contact with water, ghee needs no refrigeration. Take 2 teaspoons per day as a supplement, or simply use ghee in your cooking. Just remember that ghee is fat, and only a certain amount of total fat is necessary in the diet. If you use ghee, reduce your total fat intake proportionately.

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on December 11, 2011, 12:23:32 AM
http://www.ayurvedicure.com/recipes.html
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on December 13, 2011, 02:55:15 PM
    Home
    Diet & Nutrition
    General Nutrition Information
    Brain Food

    Foods to Reverse Brain Damage
http://www.livestrong.com/article/483656-foods-to-reverse-brain-damage/

Foods to Reverse Brain Damage

Jul 2, 2011 | By August McLaughlin
Foods to Reverse Brain Damage Photo Credit Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images

The term brain damage, or brain injury, refers to the destruction or degeneration of brain cells. Roughly 1.7 million people in the United States sustain a traumatic brain injury each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which may result from a jolt or blow to the head. Although foods aren't known to cure or solely treat brain damage, a nutritious diet may enhance healing and support medical care in managing your symptoms.
Nuts, Seeds and Vegetable Oils

Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant, meaning it supports your body's ability to resist and heal from infections and disease. In a study published in "Neurorehabilitation and Neurological Repair" in 2011, researchers examined the role vitamin E may play in the resistance to oxidative stress, which often stems from traumatic brain injuries. Rats were fed a typical diet supplemented with 500 IU/kg of vitamin E or without vitamin E for four weeks before experiencing a mild brain injury. Rats that consumed vitamin E showed less oxidative stress compared to rats that did not. Top sources of vitamin E include wheat germ oil, almonds, almond butter, sunflower seeds, sunflower oil and safflower oil. For added wellness benefits, replace saturated fat sources in your diet, such as butter and high-fat cheese, with nuts, seeds and vegetable oils.
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Fruits and Vegetables

Fruits and vegetables are prime sources of antioxidants, including vitamin C, beta-carotene and lycopene. Foods high in antioxidants clean your brain from substances known as free radicals, which cause deterioration, according to YourFamilyClinic.com. They can also help reverse memory loss and restore balance and coordination. Fruits and vegetables particularly rich in antioxidants include berries, cherries, raisins, grapes, prunes, tomatoes, leafy greens, bell peppers, broccoli and squash.
Whole Grains

Whole grains contain all nutritious parts of the grain. As a result, they provide more antioxidants, fiber and protein compared to refined grains. Eating too many simple carbohydrates, such as white flour and sugar, can damage brain and body function by causing sharp blood sugar increases. To guard against these risks, consume whole grain foods, which affect your blood sugar mildly. Nutritious examples include 100 percent whole grain breads and cereals, whole wheat pasta, brown rice, wild rice, pearled barley and air-popped popcorn.
Cold-Water Fish

The oil in cold-water fish is rich in omega-3 fatty acids -- healthy fats that play an important role in your brain's ability to recall information and function normally, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. They may also help reduce inflammation. Fish particularly high in omega-3 fats include salmon, mackerel, halibut, flounder, lake trout, sardines and herring.

References

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Traumatic Brain Injury
    "Neurorehabilitation and Neurological Repair"; Vitamin E Protects Against Oxidative Damage and Learning Disability After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats; Aiguo Wu; July 2011
    YourFamilyClinic.com: Foods and Vitamins That Help Brain Development and Repair Damage
    University of Maryland Medical Center: Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Article reviewed by Christine Brncik Last updated on: Jul 2, 2011

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/483656-foods-to-reverse-brain-damage/#ixzz1gSS5GocM
...
http://www.livestrong.com/article/428908-nutrients-needed-in-traumatic-brain-injuries/?utm_source=popslideshow&utm_medium=a1

Nutrients Needed in Traumatic Brain Injuries

raumatic brain injury is common among people who play competitive sports, ride motorcycles or are the unfortunate victims of motor vehicle injuries. Brain injury can be mild and temporary or can be very severe due to actual physical damage to the structures of the brain. In these more severe cases, traumatic brain injury may be complicated by a prolonged hospital or rehabilitation stay or the inability to take food by mouth and necessitating a gastrostomy tube. Research shows that several specific nutrients and supplements may help to reduce oxidative stress from traumatic brain injury. Early feeding of patients who are hospitalized may also help to improve patients with traumatic brain injuries.
Creatine

Creatine is a supplement used by bodybuilders to improve performance and to help in muscular healing. According to researchers at the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky, creatine may have a neuroprotective effect against traumatic brain injury. Researchers experimented on rats and mice who were given brain injuries. Those animals that were given ischemic injuries and were treated with creatine were noted to improve, suggesting that creatine may have protected their brains or improved their brains sooner from the ischemic damage related to traumatic brain injury.
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Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential nutrients that help to stabilize membranes. Omega-3 fatty acids supplements may stabilize the brain structures and normalize the levels of inflammatory cells during traumatic brain injury. Researchers at the Department of Physiological Science, University of California at Los Angeles, have experimented with rat models that mimic the damage from traumatic brain injury. These researchers note that rats treated with omega-3 fatty acid supplements can provide protection against the acute damage from traumatic brain injury and aid in the recovery of learning after traumatic brain injury.
Dietary Curcumin

A common dietary curry spice, curcurmin has antioxidant properties and has been evaluated by the same researchers at the Department of Physiological Science, University of California at Los Angeles. They note positive responses to oxidative stress in rats given dietary curcumin. They also noted that rats given a high-fat diet had more injury from traumatic brain injuries compared to rats who were not on a high-fat diet. These researchers surmise that the antioxidant properties of curcumin may act by reducing oxidative stress on the brain.
Early Feeding

An Institute of Medicine Concensus report related to traumatic brain injury in military personnel noted that traumatic brain injuries were common and could be delayed for weeks or years. The Department of Defense asked the IOM to review the role of nutrition in treatment of military personnel with TBI. One specific nutritional intervention suggested in the report was early feeding. It was suggested that patients with traumatic brain injury should receive, "a level of nutrition that represents more than 50 percent of the injured person's total energy expenditure and provides 1 to 1.5 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. This nutrition level should be continued for two weeks." The report also related that more research needs to be done in this area to consider what specific interventions can help patients to address inflammation related to traumatic brain injury.
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References

    Nutrition and Traumatic Brain Injury: Improving Acute and Subacute Health Outcomes in Military Personnel
    Mayo Clinic: Traumatic Brain Injury - Symptoms
    Mayo Clinic: Traumatic Brain Injury - Complications
    NCBI: Dietary Supplement Creatine Protects Against Traumatic Brain Injury
    "Journal of Neurotrauma"; Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Normalize BDNF Levels, Reduce Oxidative Damage, and Counteract Earning Disability After Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.; A Wu et. al, October 2004
    "Science Direct"; Dietary Curcumin Counteracts the Outcome of Traumatic Brain Injury on Oxidative Stress, Synaptic Plasticity, and Cognition.; A.We et. al; September 8, 2005

Article reviewed by Eric Althoff Last updated on: Apr 26, 2011

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/428908-nutrients-needed-in-traumatic-brain-injuries/#ixzz1gST24N2B
........
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on February 10, 2012, 12:18:59 PM
BuddhaKitty posted this info, in the Topic Where there is no doctor...
which is fine. Totally OK with me it gets posted in more than one topic, overlapping subjects.
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=3260.0
Thanks BuddhaKitty
- Barb Townsend
   Topic Administrator
...........................................................................................
MEDICINAL PLANTS/HOMEMADE CASTS

« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2011, 04:43:58 PM »

many plants have curative powers.  some of the best modern medicines are made from wild herbs.  nevertheless, not all "curative herbs" people use have medicinal value... and those that have are sometimes used the wrong way.  try to learn about the herbs in your area and find out which ones are worthwhile.
ANGEL'S TRUMPET (datura arborea)
the leaves of this and certain other members of the nightshade family contain a drug that helps to calm intestinal cramps, stomach aches, and even gallbladder pain.
grind up 1 or 2 leaves of the angel's trumpet and soak them for a day in 7 tablespoons (100 ml) of water.
doseage: between 10-15 drops every 4 hours (adults only).
WARNING: angel's trumpet is very poisinous if you take more than the recommended dose.

CORN SILK (the tassels or 'silk' from an ear of maize)
a tea made from corn silk makes a person pass more urine.  this can help reduce swelling of the feet - especially in pregnant women.
boil a large handful of corn silk in water and drink 1-2 glasses.  it is not dangerous.

GARLIC
a drink made from garlic can often get rid of pinworms and diarrhea.
chop finely, or crush, 4 garlic cloves and mix with one glass of liquid (water, juice or milk).
dosage:  for pinworms, drink 1 glass daily for 3 weeks.  for diarrhea, drink 1 glass every 2 hours until diarrhea stops.
(garlic treatments for vaginal infections are on a different page).

CARDON CACTUS (pachycerius pectin-aboriginum)
cactus juice can be used to clean wounds when there is no boiled water and no way to get any.  cardon cactus also helps stop a wound from bleeding, because the juice makes the cut blood vessels squeeze shut.
cut a piece of the cactus with a clean knife and press firmly against the wound.
when the bleeding is under control, tie a piece of the cactus to the wound with a strip of cloth.
after 2-3 hours, take off the cactus and clean the wound with boiled water and soap.  (more instructions on wound care/bleeding control on another page).

ALOE VERA (sabila)
aloe vera can be used to treat minor burns and wounds.  the thick, slimy juice inside the plant calms pain and itching, aids healing, and helps prevent infection.  cut off a piece of the plant, peel back the outer layer, and apply the fleshy leaf or juice directly to the burn or wound.
aloe can also help treat stomach ulcers and gastritis.  chop the spongy leaves into small pieces, soak them in water overnight, and drink one glass of the slimy, bitter liquid every 2 hours.

PAPAYA
ripe papayas are rich in vitamins and also aid digestion.  eating them is especially helpful for weak or old people who complain of upset stomach when they eat meat, chicken, or eggs.  papaya makes these foods easier to digest.
papaya can also help get rid of intestinal worms.   collect 3 or 4 teaspons (15-20ml) of the "milk" that comes out when the green fruit or the trunk of the tree is cut.  mix this with an equal amount of sugar or honey and stir into a cup of hot water.  if possible, drink along with a laxative.
or, dry and crush to a powder. take 2 tsp mixed with 1 glass water or some honey 3 times a day for 7 days.
papayas can also be used for treating pressure sores.  the fruit contains chemicals that help soften and make dead flesh easier to remove.  first clean and wash out a pressure sore that has dead flesh in it.  then soak a sterile cloth or gauze with "milk" from the trunk or green fruit of papaya plant and pack this into the sore.  repeat cleaning and repacking 3x a day.

HOMEMADE CASTS - for keeping broken bones in place
in mexico several different plants such as tepeguaje (a tree of the bean family) and solda con solda (a huge, tree-climbing arum lily) are used to make casts.  however, any plant will do if a syrup can be made from it that will dry hard and firm and will not irritate the skin.  in india, traditional bone-setters make casts using a mixture of egg whites and herbs instead of a syrup made from plant juices.  but the method is similar.  try out different plants in your area.

for a cast using tepeguaje: put 1 kilo of the bark into 5 liters of water and boil it until only 2 liters is left.  strain and boil until a thick syrup is formed.  dip strips of flannel or clean sheet in the syrup and carefully use as follows:

make sure the bones are in a good position (details on another page)

do not put the cast directly against the skin.

wrap the arm or leg in a soft cloth.

then follow with a layer of cotton or wild kapok.

finally, put on the wet cloth strips so that they form a cast that is firm but not too tight.

most doctors recommend that the cast cover the joint above and the joint below the break, to keep the broken bones from moving.

this would mean that, for a broken wrist, the cast should cover almost the whole arm (leaving finger tips uncovered so you can see if they keep a good color) from the hand to past the elbow.

however, traditional bone-setters in china and latin america use a short cast on a simple break of the arm saying that a little movement of the bone-ends speed healing.  recent scientific studies have proben this to be true.

a temporary leg or arm splint can be made of cardboard, folded paper, or the thick curved stem of a dried banana or palm leaf.

caution:  even if the cast is not every tight when you put it on, the broken limb may swell up later.  if the person complains that the cast is too tight, or if his fingers or toes become cold, white, or blue, take the cast off and put on a new, looser one.

never put a cast over a cut or wound.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: throwback1952 on February 10, 2012, 12:37:29 PM
I got this in an email today don't know how true it is?

If you like asparagus, this might be of interest......
I don't know if this is true, but I'm sure if you're interested you can check it out.  Asparagus -- Who knew?
 
My Mom had been taking the full-stalk canned style asparagus that she pureed and she took 4 tablespoons in the morning and 4 tablespoons later in the day.  She did this for over a month.  She is on chemo pills for Stage 3 lung cancer in the pleural area and her cancer cell count went from 386 down to 125 as of this past week.  Her oncologist said she does not need to see him for 3 months.
 
THE ARTICLE:
Several years ago, I had a man seeking asparagus for a friend who had cancer.  He gave me a photocopied copy of an article, entitled, 'Asparagus for cancer' printed in Cancer News Journal, December 1979.  I will share it here, just as it was shared with me: I am a biochemist, and have specialized in the relation of diet to health or over 50 years.  Several years ago, I learned of the discovery of Richard R. Vensal, D.D.S. that asparagus might cure cancer.  Since then, I have worked with him on his project We have accumulated a number of favorable case histories.  Here are a few examples:
 
Case No. 1:  A man with an almost hopeless case of Hodgkin's disease (cancer of the lymph glands) who was completely incapacitated.  Within 1 year of starting the asparagus therapy, his doctors were unable to detect any signs of cancer, and he was back on a schedule of strenuous exercise.
 
Case No. 2:  A successful businessman 68 years old who suffered from cancer of the bladder for 16 years.  After years of medical treatments, including radiation without improvement, he went on asparagus.  Within 3 months, examinations revealed that his bladder tumor had disappeared and that his kidneys were normal.
               
Case No. 3:  A man who had lung cancer.  On March 5th 1971, he was put on the operating table where they found lung cancer so widely spread that it was inoperable.  The surgeon sewed him up and declared his case hopeless.  On April 5th he heard about the asparagus therapy and immediately started taking it.  By August, x-ray pictures revealed that all signs of the cancer had disappeared.  He is back at his regular business routine.
               
Case No. 4:  A woman who was troubled for a number of years with skin cancer.  She finally developed different skin cancers which were diagnosed by the acting specialist as advanced.  Within 3 months after starting on asparagus, her skin specialist said that her skin looked fine and no more skin lesions.
 
This woman reported that the asparagus therapy also cured her kidney disease, which started in 1949.  She had over 10 operations for kidney stones, and was receiving government disability payments for an inoperable, terminal, kidney condition.  She attributes the cure of this kidney trouble entirely to the asparagus.  I was not surprised at this result, as 'The elements of materia medica', edited in1854 by a Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, stated that asparagus was used as a popular remedy for kidney stones.  He even referred to experiments, in 1739, on the power of asparagus in dissolving stones.  Note the dates!
               
We would have other case histories but the medical establishment has interfered with our obtaining some of the records.  I am therefore appealing to readers to spread this good news and help us to gather a large number of case histories that will overwhelm the medical skeptics about this unbelievably simple and natural remedy.
 
For the treatment:  Asparagus should be cooked before using, and therefore canned asparagus is just as good as fresh.  I have corresponded with the two leading canners of asparagus, Giant and Stokely, and I am satisfied that these brands contain no pesticides or preservatives.  Place the cooked asparagus in a blender and liquefy to make a puree, and store in the refrigerator.  Give the patient 4 full tablespoons twice daily, morning and evening.  Patients usually show some improvement in 2-4 weeks.
 
It can be diluted with water and used as a cold or hot drink.  This suggested dosage is based on present experience, but certainly larger amounts can do no harm and may be needed in some cases.  As a biochemist I am convinced of the old saying that 'what cures can prevent.'  Based on this theory, my wife and have been using asparagus puree as a beverage with our meals.  We take 2 tablespoons diluted in water to suit our taste with breakfast and with dinner.  I take mine hot and my wife prefers hers cold.  For years we have made it a practice to have blood surveys taken as part of our regular checkups.  The last blood survey, taken by a medical doctor who specializes in the nutritional approach to health, showed substantial improvements in all categories over the last one, and we can attribute these improvements to nothing but the asparagus drink.
 
As a biochemist, I have made an extensive study of all aspects of cancer, and all of the proposed cures.  As a result, I am convinced that asparagus fits in better with the latest theories about cancer.  Asparagus contains a good supply of protein called histones, which are believed to be active in controlling cell growth.  For that reason, I believe asparagus can be said to contain a substance that I call cell growth normalizer.  That accounts for its action on cancer and in acting as a general body tonic.  In any event, regardless of theory, asparagus used as we suggest, is a harmless substance.  The FDA cannot prevent you from using it and it may do you much good.  It has been reported by the US National Cancer Institute, that asparagus is the highest tested food containing glutathione, which is considered one of the body's most potent anti- carcinogens and antioxidants.
 
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on February 10, 2012, 02:14:06 PM
I got this in an email today don't know how true it is?

If you like asparagus, this might be of interest......
I don't know if this is true, but I'm sure if you're interested you can check it out.  Asparagus -- Who knew?
 
My Mom had been taking the full-stalk canned style asparagus that she pureed and she took 4 tablespoons in the morning and 4 tablespoons later in the day.  She did this for over a month.  She is on chemo pills for Stage 3 lung cancer in the pleural area and her cancer cell count went from 386 down to 125 as of this past week.  Her oncologist said she does not need to see him for 3 months.
 
THE ARTICLE:
Several years ago, I had a man seeking asparagus for a friend who had cancer.  He gave me a photocopied copy of an article, entitled, 'Asparagus for cancer' printed in Cancer News Journal, December 1979.  I will share it here, just as it was shared with me: I am a biochemist, and have specialized in the relation of diet to health or over 50 years.  Several years ago, I learned of the discovery of Richard R. Vensal, D.D.S. that asparagus might cure cancer.  Since then, I have worked with him on his project We have accumulated a number of favorable case histories.  Here are a few examples:
 
Case No. 1:  A man with an almost hopeless case of Hodgkin's disease (cancer of the lymph glands) who was completely incapacitated.  Within 1 year of starting the asparagus therapy, his doctors were unable to detect any signs of cancer, and he was back on a schedule of strenuous exercise.
 
Case No. 2:  A successful businessman 68 years old who suffered from cancer of the bladder for 16 years.  After years of medical treatments, including radiation without improvement, he went on asparagus.  Within 3 months, examinations revealed that his bladder tumor had disappeared and that his kidneys were normal.
               
Case No. 3:  A man who had lung cancer.  On March 5th 1971, he was put on the operating table where they found lung cancer so widely spread that it was inoperable.  The surgeon sewed him up and declared his case hopeless.  On April 5th he heard about the asparagus therapy and immediately started taking it.  By August, x-ray pictures revealed that all signs of the cancer had disappeared.  He is back at his regular business routine.
               
Case No. 4:  A woman who was troubled for a number of years with skin cancer.  She finally developed different skin cancers which were diagnosed by the acting specialist as advanced.  Within 3 months after starting on asparagus, her skin specialist said that her skin looked fine and no more skin lesions.
 
This woman reported that the asparagus therapy also cured her kidney disease, which started in 1949.  She had over 10 operations for kidney stones, and was receiving government disability payments for an inoperable, terminal, kidney condition.  She attributes the cure of this kidney trouble entirely to the asparagus.  I was not surprised at this result, as 'The elements of materia medica', edited in1854 by a Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, stated that asparagus was used as a popular remedy for kidney stones.  He even referred to experiments, in 1739, on the power of asparagus in dissolving stones.  Note the dates!
               
We would have other case histories but the medical establishment has interfered with our obtaining some of the records.  I am therefore appealing to readers to spread this good news and help us to gather a large number of case histories that will overwhelm the medical skeptics about this unbelievably simple and natural remedy.
 
For the treatment:  Asparagus should be cooked before using, and therefore canned asparagus is just as good as fresh.  I have corresponded with the two leading canners of asparagus, Giant and Stokely, and I am satisfied that these brands contain no pesticides or preservatives.  Place the cooked asparagus in a blender and liquefy to make a puree, and store in the refrigerator.  Give the patient 4 full tablespoons twice daily, morning and evening.  Patients usually show some improvement in 2-4 weeks.
 
It can be diluted with water and used as a cold or hot drink.  This suggested dosage is based on present experience, but certainly larger amounts can do no harm and may be needed in some cases.  As a biochemist I am convinced of the old saying that 'what cures can prevent.'  Based on this theory, my wife and have been using asparagus puree as a beverage with our meals.  We take 2 tablespoons diluted in water to suit our taste with breakfast and with dinner.  I take mine hot and my wife prefers hers cold.  For years we have made it a practice to have blood surveys taken as part of our regular checkups.  The last blood survey, taken by a medical doctor who specializes in the nutritional approach to health, showed substantial improvements in all categories over the last one, and we can attribute these improvements to nothing but the asparagus drink.
 
As a biochemist, I have made an extensive study of all aspects of cancer, and all of the proposed cures.  As a result, I am convinced that asparagus fits in better with the latest theories about cancer.  Asparagus contains a good supply of protein called histones, which are believed to be active in controlling cell growth.  For that reason, I believe asparagus can be said to contain a substance that I call cell growth normalizer.  That accounts for its action on cancer and in acting as a general body tonic.  In any event, regardless of theory, asparagus used as we suggest, is a harmless substance.  The FDA cannot prevent you from using it and it may do you much good.  It has been reported by the US National Cancer Institute, that asparagus is the highest tested food containing glutathione, which is considered one of the body's most potent anti- carcinogens and antioxidants.


Thanks for posting this info.
Many years ago I heard asparagus is one of the most life-giving foods, far beyond the daily amt of vites minerals etc.
For starters going to post a link to wikipedia, asparagus. Posting more soon. Scroll down for the article on Medicinal Uses. Next post the Indian version Asparagus racemosus (Satavar, Shatavari, or Shatamull)"curere of a hundred diseases. Wikipedia article.".
- Yowbarb  Partial info on asparagus, below.
...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asparagus   Asparagus

History
 
Already about 20,000 years ago, asparagus was eaten near Aswan in Egypt. It has been used as a vegetable and medicine, owing to its delicate flavour, diuretic properties, and more. It is pictured as an offering on an Egyptian frieze dating to 3000 BC. Still in ancient times, it was known in Syria and in Spain. Greeks and Romans ate it fresh when in season and dried the vegetable for use in winter; Romans would even freeze it high in the Alps, for the Feast of Epicurius. Emperor Augustus reserved the Asparagus Fleet for hauling the vegetable, and coined the expression "faster than cooking asparagus" for quick action.[Note 1][9][10] There is a recipe for cooking asparagus in the oldest surviving book of recipes, Apicius’s third century AD De re coquinaria, Book III.
 
Asparagus drew little medieval attention until al-Nafzawi's The Perfumed Garden celebrates its aphrodisiacal power, which the Indian Ananga Ranga attributes to special phosporus elements that also counteract fatigue, and by 1469 it was cultivated in French monasteries. Asparagus appears to have been hardly noticed in England until 1538, and in Germany until 1542.
 
France's Louis XIV had special greenhouses built for growing it. The finest texture and the strongest and yet delicate taste is in the tips. The points d'amour ("love tips") were served as a delicacy to Madame de Pompadour. Asparagus became available to the New World around 1850, in the United States.

The second century physician Galen described asparagus as "cleansing and healing".
 
Nutrition studies have shown asparagus is a low-calorie source of folate and potassium. Its stalks are high in antioxidants. "Asparagus provides essential nutrients: six spears contain some 135 micrograms (μg) of folate, almost half the adult RDI (recommended daily intake), 20 milligrams of potassium," notes an article in Reader's Digest.[citation needed] Research suggests folate is key in taming homocysteine, a substance implicated in heart disease. Folate is also critical for pregnant women, since it protects against neural tube defects in babies. Studies have shown that people who have died from Alzheimer's Disease have extremely low to no levels of folate. Several studies indicate getting plenty of potassium may reduce the loss of calcium from the body.
 
Particularly green asparagus is a good source of vitamin C. Vitamin C helps the body produce and maintain collagen, the major structural protein component of the body's connective tissues.
 
"Asparagus has long been recognized for its medicinal properties," wrote D. Onstad, author of Whole Foods Companion: A Guide for Adventurous Cooks, Curious Shoppers and Lovers of Natural Foods. "Asparagus contains substances that act as a diuretic, neutralize ammonia that makes us tired, and protect small blood vessels from rupturing. Its fiber content makes it a laxative, too."
 
Water from cooking asparagus may help clean blemishes on the face if used for washing the face morning and night. From John Heinerman's "Heinerman's new Encyclopedia of Fruits and Vegetables": "Cooked asparagus and its watery juices are very good for helping dissolve uric acid (causes gout) deposits in the extremities, as well as inducing urination where such a function may be lacking or only done on an infrequent basis. Asparagus is especially useful in cases of hypertension where the amount of sodium in the blood far exceeds the potassium present. Cooked asparagus also increases bowel evacuations."

Particularly green asparagus is a good source of vitamin C. Vitamin C helps the body produce and maintain collagen, the major structural protein component of the body's connective tissues.
 
"Asparagus has long been recognized for its medicinal properties," wrote D. Onstad, author of Whole Foods Companion: A Guide for Adventurous Cooks, Curious Shoppers and Lovers of Natural Foods. "Asparagus contains substances that act as a diuretic, neutralize ammonia that makes us tired, and protect small blood vessels from rupturing. Its fiber content makes it a laxative, too."
 
Water from cooking asparagus may help clean blemishes on the face if used for washing the face morning and night. From John Heinerman's "Heinerman's new Encyclopedia of Fruits and Vegetables": "Cooked asparagus and its watery juices are very good for helping dissolve uric acid (causes gout) deposits in the extremities, as well as inducing urination where such a function may be lacking or only done on an infrequent basis. Asparagus is especially useful in cases of hypertension where the amount of sodium in the blood far exceeds the potassium present. Cooked asparagus also increases bowel evacuations."
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on February 10, 2012, 02:38:25 PM
Excerpts,
Asparagus racemosus
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Asparagus racemosus (Satavar, Shatavari, or Shatamull) is a species of asparagus common throughout Sri Lanka, India and the Himalayas. It grows one to two metres tall and prefers to take root in gravelly, rocky soils high up in piedmont plains, at 1,300 - 1,400 metres elevation).[2][3] It was botanically described in 1799.[1] Due to its multiple uses, the demand for Asparagus racemosus is constantly on the rise. Due to destructive harvesting, combined with habitat destruction, and deforestation, the plant is now considered 'endangered' in its natural habitat.
 
Asparagus racemosus (Shatavari) is recommended in Ayurvedic texts for the prevention and treatment of gastric ulcers, dyspepsia and as a galactogogue. A. racemosus has also been used successfully by some Ayurvedic practitioners for nervous disorders.[4]
 
Shatawari has different names in the different Indian languages, such as Shatuli, Vrishya and other terms. In Nepal it is called Kurilo. The name Shatawari means "curer of a hundred diseases" (shat: "hundred"; vari: "curer").
Leaves, flowers and fruits
 
Satavar has small pine-needle-like phylloclades (photosynthetic branches) that are uniform and shiny green. In July, it produces minute, white flowers on short, spiky stems, and in September it fruits, producing blackish-purple, globular berries.[3]

Binomial name
Asparagus racemosus
 Willd.[1]
Synonyms
Asparagus rigidulus Nakai[1]
Protasparagus racemosus (Willd.)
 
Roots
 
It has an adventitious root system with tuberous roots that measure about one metre in length, tapering at both ends, with roughly a hundred on each plant.[3]
 
Uses
 
Asparagus racemosus is an important medicinal plant of tropical and subtropical India. Its medicinal usage has been reported in the Indian and British Pharmacopoeias and in traditional systems of medicine such as Ayurveda, Unani and Siddha. It is mainly known for its phytoestrogenic properties.[citation needed] In Ayurveda, Asparagus racemosus has been described as a rasayana herb and has been used extensively as an adaptogen to increase the non-specific resistance of organisms against a variety of stresses. Besides use in the treatment of diarrhoea and dysentery, the plant also has antioxidant, immunostimulant, anti-dyspepsia and antitussive effects."[5]
 
The roots are used in Ayurvedic medicine, following a regimen of processing and drying. It is generally used as a uterine tonic, as a galactogogue (to improve breast milk), in hyperacidity, and as a general health tonic.
 
The reputed adaptogenic effects of Shatavari may be attributed to its concentrations of saponins,[citation needed] known as Shatavarins

Pharmacological Research
Note: Just one excerpt given here: Anti-cancer [12]
^ Asparanin A induces G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Liu W. Huang XF. Qi Q. Dai QS. Yang L. Nie FF. Lu N. Gong DD. Kong LY. Guo QL. Biochemical & Biophysical Research Communications. 381(4):700-5, 2009 Apr 17.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on February 10, 2012, 02:43:32 PM
throwback 1952 I couldn't tell you if all asparagus varieties would cure cancer but it is a powerful medicinal food and herb with many benefits. This particular type of asparagus grows in India. Asparagus racemosus. Compounds made of it are called Asparanin A and it appears it does cure cancer. This needs to be read more closely but it looks like a good thing to keep in the survival medicine box. - yowbarb

This is in the wikipedia article, Asparagus racemosus http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asparagus_racemosus#cite_note-8

Pharmacological Research
Anti-cancer [12]
^ Asparanin A induces G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Liu W. Huang XF. Qi Q. Dai QS. Yang L. Nie FF. Lu N. Gong DD. Kong LY. Guo QL. Biochemical & Biophysical Research Communications. 381(4):700-5, 2009 Apr 17.
..........
I got this in an email today don't know how true it is?

If you like asparagus, this might be of interest......
I don't know if this is true, but I'm sure if you're interested you can check it out.  Asparagus -- Who knew?
 
My Mom had been taking the full-stalk canned style asparagus that she pureed and she took 4 tablespoons in the morning and 4 tablespoons later in the day.  She did this for over a month.  She is on chemo pills for Stage 3 lung cancer in the pleural area and her cancer cell count went from 386 down to 125 as of this past week.  Her oncologist said she does not need to see him for 3 months.
 
THE ARTICLE:
Several years ago, I had a man seeking asparagus for a friend who had cancer.  He gave me a photocopied copy of an article, entitled, 'Asparagus for cancer' printed in Cancer News Journal, December 1979.  I will share it here, just as it was shared with me: I am a biochemist, and have specialized in the relation of diet to health or over 50 years.  Several years ago, I learned of the discovery of Richard R. Vensal, D.D.S. that asparagus might cure cancer.  Since then, I have worked with him on his project We have accumulated a number of favorable case histories.  Here are a few examples:
 
Case No. 1:  A man with an almost hopeless case of Hodgkin's disease (cancer of the lymph glands) who was completely incapacitated.  Within 1 year of starting the asparagus therapy, his doctors were unable to detect any signs of cancer, and he was back on a schedule of strenuous exercise.
 
Case No. 2:  A successful businessman 68 years old who suffered from cancer of the bladder for 16 years.  After years of medical treatments, including radiation without improvement, he went on asparagus.  Within 3 months, examinations revealed that his bladder tumor had disappeared and that his kidneys were normal.
               
Case No. 3:  A man who had lung cancer.  On March 5th 1971, he was put on the operating table where they found lung cancer so widely spread that it was inoperable.  The surgeon sewed him up and declared his case hopeless.  On April 5th he heard about the asparagus therapy and immediately started taking it.  By August, x-ray pictures revealed that all signs of the cancer had disappeared.  He is back at his regular business routine.
               
Case No. 4:  A woman who was troubled for a number of years with skin cancer.  She finally developed different skin cancers which were diagnosed by the acting specialist as advanced.  Within 3 months after starting on asparagus, her skin specialist said that her skin looked fine and no more skin lesions.
 
This woman reported that the asparagus therapy also cured her kidney disease, which started in 1949.  She had over 10 operations for kidney stones, and was receiving government disability payments for an inoperable, terminal, kidney condition.  She attributes the cure of this kidney trouble entirely to the asparagus.  I was not surprised at this result, as 'The elements of materia medica', edited in1854 by a Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, stated that asparagus was used as a popular remedy for kidney stones.  He even referred to experiments, in 1739, on the power of asparagus in dissolving stones.  Note the dates!
               
We would have other case histories but the medical establishment has interfered with our obtaining some of the records.  I am therefore appealing to readers to spread this good news and help us to gather a large number of case histories that will overwhelm the medical skeptics about this unbelievably simple and natural remedy.
 
For the treatment:  Asparagus should be cooked before using, and therefore canned asparagus is just as good as fresh.  I have corresponded with the two leading canners of asparagus, Giant and Stokely, and I am satisfied that these brands contain no pesticides or preservatives.  Place the cooked asparagus in a blender and liquefy to make a puree, and store in the refrigerator.  Give the patient 4 full tablespoons twice daily, morning and evening.  Patients usually show some improvement in 2-4 weeks.
 
It can be diluted with water and used as a cold or hot drink.  This suggested dosage is based on present experience, but certainly larger amounts can do no harm and may be needed in some cases.  As a biochemist I am convinced of the old saying that 'what cures can prevent.'  Based on this theory, my wife and have been using asparagus puree as a beverage with our meals.  We take 2 tablespoons diluted in water to suit our taste with breakfast and with dinner.  I take mine hot and my wife prefers hers cold.  For years we have made it a practice to have blood surveys taken as part of our regular checkups.  The last blood survey, taken by a medical doctor who specializes in the nutritional approach to health, showed substantial improvements in all categories over the last one, and we can attribute these improvements to nothing but the asparagus drink.
 
As a biochemist, I have made an extensive study of all aspects of cancer, and all of the proposed cures.  As a result, I am convinced that asparagus fits in better with the latest theories about cancer.  Asparagus contains a good supply of protein called histones, which are believed to be active in controlling cell growth.  For that reason, I believe asparagus can be said to contain a substance that I call cell growth normalizer.  That accounts for its action on cancer and in acting as a general body tonic.  In any event, regardless of theory, asparagus used as we suggest, is a harmless substance.  The FDA cannot prevent you from using it and it may do you much good.  It has been reported by the US National Cancer Institute, that asparagus is the highest tested food containing glutathione, which is considered one of the body's most potent anti- carcinogens and antioxidants.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Sunnybug on May 09, 2012, 06:17:43 AM
Was at the natural health news site and they had a link to a recipe and info about something called Four Thieves Oil. The story is that the thieves developed the oil as protection against the plague, and the gave up the recipe when they were caught in exchange for a lighter sentence. However it really came about, it looks like a great thing to have on hand as it seems to have a lot of good antibacterial, antiviral, antiseptic...well just some very good stuff!
Also it is from a blog that looks very interesting and informational. Here is the link.

http://mountainroseblog.com/thieves-oil/ (http://mountainroseblog.com/thieves-oil/)

Looks like the blog is by the people from the Mountain Rose Herb suppler, which I also gave a quick glace at and they seem to have some good products. I will check it out more as I have time but wanted to share the link to the recipe and info.
Sunny
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Jimfarmer on May 09, 2012, 07:20:35 AM
Quote
The story is that the thieves developed the oil as protection against the plague, and the gave up the recipe when they were caught in exchange for a lighter sentence.

The "thieves" were members of a family of apothecaries in Europe.  They went from house to house where everyone had died and took all the valuables, including gold from teeth, but they never contracted the plague themselves.   When they went to England to continue their activities, the king got news of them and had them arrested.  The recipe for Thieves Oil still exists in the official records of the English monarchy.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Sunnybug on May 09, 2012, 09:08:10 AM
Quote
The story is that the thieves developed the oil as protection against the plague, and the gave up the recipe when they were caught in exchange for a lighter sentence.

The "thieves" were members of a family of apothecaries in Europe.  They went from house to house where everyone had died and took all the valuables, including gold from teeth, but they never contracted the plague themselves.   When they went to England to continue their activities, the king got news of them and had them arrested.  The recipe for Thieves Oil still exists in the official records of the English monarchy.

Thanks for the history on that Jim!  :D
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: pbutter72 on July 08, 2012, 08:49:13 AM
Hi Everyone!

The other day, my son (11) went to summer daycamp and ate some of the lunch that they offer there-- though we are vegan now and I pack him lunch- I allow him to eat foods that others offer within moderation. Boy, that night he had a wicked stomach ache--  the next morning, he still didn't feel 100%, so I fed him some chunks of watermelon (high in alkaline) and it helped reduce the pains he experienced... I suspected he might have eaten foods high in acidity with little or no balance with any alkaline foods... 

Here are some good charts listing acidic foods vs alkaline foods:

(http://www.alkaline-ion-water.com/alkaline_food_chart/images/food_chart.jpg)

(http://www.taschmarholistichealth.co.uk/media/acid_alkaline_chart.gif)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 08, 2012, 10:22:48 PM
Pbutter, it's good to see your post.  :)
How is that boy?
Good chart! Thanks,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Aussie Leo on July 09, 2012, 12:45:11 AM
When I was meditating a lot, a lot of foods sat "heavy" in my stomach, I found a natural product called spirulina, you could live of this stuff if need be, I did for about ten days with no ill effect, my mind was clear and my meditations were clear and long, my body felt energized and healthy, now I work long hours and take about 15 tablets a day. I feel like a 20 year old when I take them, but if I don't I feel every year of my 40 years plus some...

I have enough of these tabs on hand when I bug out to last me about 12 months...

The best and purest I have found is lifestream brand
www.lifestream.co.nz (http://www.lifestream.co.nz)

Leo :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: pbutter72 on July 09, 2012, 03:27:59 AM
Thank you Barb!

It's good to be back and posting-- the 11 year old is doing great! And as for the one year old, he is active, curious, and full of energy :)
I look to post more soon ;D

@ Aussie Leo
Thank you for posting, I may look into getting some tablets for my next fast!
Have you ever tried Spirulina Balls? It's so yum --if ever you need a healthy chocolate fix, I suggest this recipe


1/4 C of hemp seeds
1/2 C cacao powder
2 TBSP Spirulina
2 TBSP coconut oil
3 TBSP organic, raw honey (soft is easier)
Pinch of Celtic sea salt (fine)
1 inside of a vanilla bean, or 1 tsp. vanilla bean powder or extract

mix in a bowl
roll into balls
freeze for 15 min
done!

(http://pure-manna.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Spi-Ball-photo3-282x437.jpg)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 09, 2012, 07:38:08 AM
Thank you Barb!

It's good to be back and posting-- the 11 year old is doing great! And as for the one year old, he is active, curious, and full of energy :)
I look to post more soon ;D

butter72 wow thanks for the recipe. Spirulina, hemp and all, looks like a good survival food recipe.
Will add one tidbit here, which you probably know, chia seeds.
Back in the 1970s I read that the Native Americans used to gather chia seeds.
During the daily chores or long walks or treks they would slowly chew them in their mouths.
I bought some at Organicville in L.A. and tried it. Definitely helped me.
I also found it was a good binding agent in mixtures... Will find some recipes.
- Yowbarb



Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 09, 2012, 08:00:33 AM
I'm going to post some chia recipes soon, in the Survival Recipes topic...
Meanwhile here is some nutritional info on chia seeds. Just some of it...
First of all chia has an amino acid score of 115 which is pretty good. (link and explanation below.)
Chia is mildly anti inflammatory.
Chia has 30% of the daily requirement of manganese.
- Yowbarb

............................................................
http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3061/2  Chia
............................................................

http://www.livestrong.com/article/518405-the-nutritional-value-of-manganese/  Live Strong

"Manganese is one of nine microminerals your body needs to function properly."

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/518405-the-nutritional-value-of-manganese/#ixzz208aVMg6g

Functions
"Manganese has a number of roles in the human body. It helps you metabolize carbohydrates and fat and absorb calcium. Manganese assists in maintaining normal blood sugar levels and nerve and brain functioning, and is also essential for healthy connective tissue and bones. Lower than ideal levels of this trace mineral may be linked to conditions such as osteoporosis, arthritis, diabetes, epilepsy and premenstrual syndrome.." [Continues]
Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/518405-the-nutritional-value-of-manganese/#ixzz208aGe696

http://icreatewisdom.com/chiaseed.html   I create wisdom, chia seeds info

Chia Seed  -  Ten Benefits from this Power Food and Brain Food

By Christopher Westra
Get Ten Free Chia Seed Recipes Right Here!
http://healthbenefitsofchiaseeds.com/

Do you want to increase your brain power and body strength with one of the most powerful foods imaginable?

Here are ten benefits to using chia seed in your life.  Chia seeds are:

1. Nutritious.  Chia seed provides ample calcium and protein to your tissues.  The seeds are also rich in boron, which helps the body assimilate and use calcium.  The nutrients also support proper brain functioning. Ten Free Recipes Here - Grab Yours.

2. Water loving.  The seed can soak up ten times its weight in water.  Do this fun experiment.  Put one tablespoon of chia seed in a cup of water and stir.  Wait a few hours and see what happens.  When inside your body, the seeds help you stay hydrated longer, and retain electrolytes in your bodily fluids.

3.  Easily digestible.  The shells are easily broken down, even when swallowed whole.  This is an improvement over flax seed, which have to be ground up to be digested properly.  If you eat flax seed whole, it will just pass through.

4. Concentrated.  If I could only take one cup of food for a few days, I'd choose chia!  The food value per volume is simply astounding.  You don't need much. Try out these Ten Free Recipes to Get Your Chia Seeds.

5. Mild tasting.  Unlike some seeds, the flavor is very mild.  The mild taste makes it easy to put in sauces, smoothies, breads, puddings, and whatever you want.  They won't really change the taste, but will add to your nutrition!

6. Energy enhancing.  The health pioneer Paul Bragg did an experiment an endurance hike with friends.  They divided up into a chia-eating group and another group, who ate whatever they wanted.  The group eating only chia seeds finished the hike four hours, twenty seven minutes before the others, most of whom didn't even finish at all.

7. Versatile.  The seeds can be used to replace less-healthy fat in just about any recipe.  You can use them uncooked in salad dressings, spreads, fruit shakes, ice cream, and just about anything you want.  You can also add them to cookies, cakes, muffins, and other baked goods.  I usually just mix in a couple of teaspoons to my juice or water and drink them down!

8. Slimming and trimming.  Yes, the seeds will help you lose weight, for two reasons.  The first reason is that they are so filling that you will eat less of other foods.  The second reason is that they actually bulk up and cleanse your body of old "junk" in your intestines. 

9. Endurance enhancing.  Chia seeds are known as the "Indian Running Food".  Also, the ancient Aztec warriors used chia seed during their conquests.  I'm a runner, and I've used chia seed to enhance stamina and endurance on my mountain runs, some of which are several hours long!

10. Regenerating.  After eating, the nutrients travel to the cells very quickly due to the ease in digestion and assimilation.  Use them when you want to build or regenerate healthy body tissue.

I hope to give you some recipes soon, but go ahead and experiment.  Chia seed is great for those who want to increase their energy, so get and use your Ten Free Chia Seed Recipes Here. Nine of the recipes are completely raw and healthy!

Sincerely,

Christopher :D
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: pbutter72 on July 10, 2012, 04:17:44 AM
Thank you for posting the links, Barb! I am definitely going to try some of these recipes out :)

pB
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 10, 2012, 07:37:39 AM
Thank you for posting the links, Barb! I am definitely going to try some of these recipes out :)

pB

I hope they're good. What I think the chia seeds are probably good in is natural baked goods,
which would tend to be crumbly but the chia might help hold them together...  :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on September 25, 2012, 07:50:52 AM
How to make cancer killing dandelion root tea 5:45

VIDEO:  http://youtu.be/hvg2bd-QjM0

Published on Jul 19, 2012 by BeautifulGirlByDana

Dandelion tea touted as possible cancer killer
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/story/2012/02/16/wdr-dandelion-tea-canc...

Cancer Cured In Canada, But Big Pharma Says NO WAY!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1ifXxbxhZc

New treatment for prostate cancer gives 'perfect results' for nine in ten men research
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/9206425/New-treatment-for-prosta...

Cancer-killing dandelion tea gets $157K research grant
http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/04/20/wdr-dandelion-tea-research-gra...

Milk thistle stops lung cancer in mice (PR)
http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Nutrition/Supplements/milk_thistle_stops_...

Is This Fruit Extract 10,000 Times Better Than Chemo
http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/fruit-extract-10000-times-better-chemo

Ginger Destroys Cancer More Effectively than Death-Linked Cancer Drugs
naturalsociety.com/ginger-destroys-cancer-more-effectively-than-cancer-drugs/#ix­zz1x9Y2tHpm

Pineapple Enzyme Superior to Chemotherapy in Treating Cancer
http://www.activistpost.com/2011/12/research-pineapple-enzyme-superior-to.html

Baking soda, cancer and fungus
http://www.naturalnews.com/035876_baking_soda_cancer_fungus.html

Cannabis Treatment Threatens Deadly Painkiller Industry
http://www.activistpost.com/2012/01/cannabis-treatment-threatens-deadly.html

Juicing cannabis miraculously saves lives after physicians declare the battle lost
http://www.naturalnews.com/035400_juicing_cannabis_remedies.html#ixzz1x9dm7nqP

Natural Cancer Cure? (Vitamin B17) Man Cures Himself Then Thrown In Jail
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvKQrATZ6bU

Every Cancer Can be Cured in Weeks explains Dr. Leonard Coldwell
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgbdNNfotwM&feature=player_embedded

How to Clean up the Pineal Gland
http://www.wakingtimes.com/2012/06/02/how-to-clean-up-the-pineal-gland/
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------­----
cancer causes

97% of Terminal Cancer Patients Previously Had This Dental Procedure
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/02/18/dangers-of-root...

sunscreen use actually causes cancer,
http://www.foodandthought.com/?p=1654

New study Radiation treatments create cancer cells 30 times more potent than regular cancer cells http://www.naturalnews.com/035289_radiation_cancer_stem_cells.html#ixzz1x9gjUalP

Disposable coffee cups, carryout containers filled with cancer-causing agents
http://www.infowars.com/disposable-coffee-cups-carryout-containers-filled-wit...

FDA admits mercury in cosmetic products is extremely toxic - so how is it safe in dental fillings, vaccines?
http://www.naturalnews.com/035229_cosmetic_products_mercury_toxicity.html#ixz...

Are Your Clothes Making You Sick
http://www.activistpost.com/2011/12/are-your-clothes-making-you-sick.html

Sausage industry blasts 'Hot Dogs Cause Butt Cancer' ad in Chicago
http://usnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/03/13/10671418-sausage-industry-blasts...

Dirty secret behind washing machines
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozerjQ1_Pjk

Junk food can hijack brain like drugs do, experts say
http://www.activistpost.com/2011/11/junk-food-can-hijack-brain-like-drugs.html

Greenpeace finds toxic chemicals in branded clothing
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iifYKDOTnwbgWHV9deZS-5VJmR...

Dude, That Isn't Wax On Your Apple!
https://realitybloger.wordpress.com/2012/01/08/that-isn-wax-on-your-apple/

Common Food Items Could Contain 180 Times More Fluoride Than Tap Water
http://naturalsociety.com/common-food-items-could-contain-180-times-more-fluo...

Babies Sleep Better If They Are Drugged And Vaccinated In The Afternoon?
http://gaia-health.com/gaia-blog/2012-03-30/shockingly-craven-behavior-in-vac...

Papaya Leaf Extract is a Powerful Cancer Fighter
http://naturalsociety.com/papaya-leaf-extract-is-a-powerful-cancer-fighter/#i...

Cancer industry total fraud exposed Nearly all 'scientific' studies fail to be replicated
http://www.naturalnews.com/035616_cancer_industry_scientific_fraud_studies.ht...

Chemicals in household items are 'causing huge increase in cancer, obesity and falling fertility
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2142953/Chemicals-household-items-c...

.............................................
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on September 25, 2012, 07:54:27 AM
Video says black salve and cannabis will cure skin cancer...Yowbarb
...

DERMATOLOGISTS HATE THIS VIDEO! (natural skin cancer cure)  9:54

http://youtu.be/Ob2fuMc9Hyk

Uploaded by thetruthergirls on Feb 6, 2012
Skin cancer is 100% curable and that is a fact, but Big Pharma doesn't want you to know about it!
DISCLAIMER: this video is for information purposes only and is not medical advice. Do go see your doctor if you have concerns about your health, but be sure to make informed decisions about your care.

DVD IS FOR SALE HERE http://www.oneanswertocancermovie.com/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4jgUcxMezM
http://dcmf.ca/tools
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2TlsNGydHLI
http://thetruthergirls.wordpress.com/2011/06/24/black-salve/
http://blacksalveinfo.com/blacksalvemov.htm
http://phoenixtears.ca/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tghUh4ubbg&feature=player_embedded
http://www.altcancer.com/products/user-instructions
http://www.herbhealers.com/
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on September 25, 2012, 11:10:51 PM
Yowbarb Note: To simplify this whole thing - in your survival setup, keep some chickens. Let them flourish and multiply - they are a very valuable commodity. Do have the eggs. Eat one chicken once in while.  Unless you are a vegetarian, do make some chicken soup - it does help with many ailments, and don't be too picky use the whole bird...beaks etc. These contain a lot of cysteine which is proven to help the immune system. Consider it a remedy it is. - YB
...

MY NOTE: ANCIENT STYLE CHICKEN SOUP PROBABLY HAS MORE CYSTEINE IN IT
...
Just a stray note about cysteine. Remember the old chicken soup remedy?
Well in the old days - the very old days - people used to put the beak and feet into the pot along with the meat of the chicken. Not only that when they did the removal of feathers by hand, inevitable there would be some small pin feathers left in there. These things were very rich in cysteine which scientists later found out really is good for the immune system, hence the "chicken soup cure."
I read this back in the 1970s.
Today I found this article but the writer probably didn't know it is the beak feet and feathers which used to add a lot of the cysteine to the Medieival "Jewish penicillin."
- Yowbarb
======================================================================
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ezV2Me0ok1Q/TtVoQh-bhOI/AAAAAAAAAL8/i3UKuUqBZ0k/s1600/Jewish+Penicillin.jp)g

...
Saturday, 16 October 2010
The Magic of Chicken Soup Healthkicker.com
http://www.healthkicker.com/734172431/the-magic-of-chicken-soup/
Excerpts:

Around the 12th century trusted healers started to prescribe "the broth of fowl" for their ill patients. It was during that time that Egyptian Jewish physician and philosopher, Rabbi Moshe ben Maimonides, started to write extensively about the benefits of chicken soup.

Maimonides used his 'fowl brew' to treat such things like hemorrhoids, constipation, and even leprosy. He strongly believed and especially praised the brew's healing power for respiratory illnesses like the common cold.

Since then, many researchers and scientists have pondered the question of whether or not chicken soup has any real health benefits to patients suffering from a cold. Some have even done experiments to see if there is such proof.

Dr. Stephen Rennard, MD at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, thought his family's chicken soup really did work, but as a scientist, he wanted proof.

"One day we were discussing chicken soup," Rennard explains. "My wife says that grandma says this is good for colds, and I said maybe it has some anti-inflammatory action."

Rennard tested his theory and added his wife's home made chicken soup to white blood cells, called neutrophils. To his surprise, the soup did slow the neutrophils. In fact, he claims that chemicals in the broth could clear a stuffy nose by inhibiting inflammation of the cells in the nasal passages.
..................
Since Dr. Rennard's findings in the early 1990's, several studies have since agreed with his results, and show chicken soup as a "relief" for the common cold, not a "cure."

All research agrees that the soup helps break up congestion and eases the flow of nasal secretions. In addition, many say it also inhibits the white blood cells that trigger the inflammatory response (causing sore throats and the production of phlegm.)

When you are feeling under the weather, it seems that everything hot helps to make you feel better. However, the good thing about chicken soup is that - properly prepared such as the recipes below - it is loaded with valuable nutrients. This includes:


       1. Chicken: Chicken contains an amino acid called cysteine, a substance released when you make the soup. This amino acid is similar to the drug acetylcysteine, which is prescribed by doctors to patients with bronchitis. It thins the mucus in the lungs, making it easier to cough out. And hot chicken vapors have been proven more effective than hot water vapors in clearing out the cold in your nose.

       2. Carrots: Carrots, one of the routine vegetable ingredients found in chicken soup, are the best natural source of beta-carotene. The body takes that beta-carotene and converts it to vitamin A. Vitamin A helps prevent and fight off infections by enhancing the actions of white blood cells that destroy harmful bacteria and viruses.

       3. Onions: Onions, another chicken soup regular, contains quercetin, a powerful anti-oxidant that is also a natural anti-histamine, and anti-inflammatory.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on November 24, 2012, 04:34:58 AM
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-patricia-fitzgerald/let-food-be-thy-medicine_b_406582.html

Dr. Patricia Fitzgerald.
Wellness Editor, Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, Nutritionist, Author

Let Food Be Thy Medicine: Top 10 Healing Foods Of The Decade

Posted: 12/30/09 09:01 AM ET

Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food. -- Hippocrates, father of medicine, 431 B.C.

Eat Food. Not Too much. Mostly Plants. -- Michael Pollan, renowned food expert and journalist, 2007 A.D.

The healing properties of food have been reported by cultures worldwide throughout history. However, the past decade has presented an explosion of clinical research to show specifically what health benefits individual foods can offer, identifying the various nutrients and phytochemicals associated with these benefits.

Many fruits, vegetables, and unprocessed whole foods have properties that can benefit our health. Studies in the past decade have taken nutritional research beyond protein, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals. Chemicals in the plants called phytochemicals have been a specific focus in the past decade, offering benefits such as cancer prevention, cholesterol reduction, and hormone regulation, to name a few.

There is truly a cornucopia of nutritional benefits that have been discovered. Here are a few "superfoods" that have received a lot of press in the past decade for their research-supported health benefits:

1.   HONEY
2.   BLUEBERRIES
3.   SALMON
4.   GREEN TEA
5.   BROCCOLI
6.   WALNUTS
7.   SPICES
8.   POMEGRANATE
9.   DARK CHOCOLATE


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-patricia-fitzgerald/let-food-be-thy-medicine_b_406582.html
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on November 25, 2012, 05:45:46 AM
GUANABANA JUICE! Also known as "Soursop."

Also there's this documentary which will have more natural foods herbs to help prevent or cure cancer...
- Yowbarb
...
...VIDEO:

Cancer the Forbidden Cures - Full Documentary   1:13:20   109,264 Views

Link: http://youtu.be/BTGye7kA6rM

Uploaded by strelitzia7564 on Oct 11, 2011
(Strelitzia7564's note: Please watch the other movies on my channel as they are just as enlightening about the topic dealt with in this movie, i.e. That natural remedies exist for supposedly incurable diseases. They could give you inspiration and knowledge to save your own life or that of a loved one one day :-) ) In the last 100 years dozens of doctors, scientists and researchers have come up with the most diverse, apparently effective solutions against cancer, but none of these was ever taken into serious consideration by official medicine. Most of them were in fact rejected out-front, even though healings were claimed in the thousands, their proposers often being labeled as charlatans, ostracized by the medical community and ultimately forced to leave the country. At the same time more than 20,000 people die of cancer every day, without official medicine being able to offer a true sense of hope to those affected by it. Why?
 
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on December 09, 2012, 09:48:33 AM
Yowbarb Note: I will be posting the info on each individual food in the next post.
Please note, walnuts are high in naturally - occurring arsenic so a person cannot eat them by the handful. However they
are an
excellent food in many ways, including being a powerful anti oxidant, Walnuts provide substances which protect the heart.
........................................................

http://www.healthcentral.com/multiple-sclerosis/cf/slideshows/10/1/?ap=825

1.   Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
2.   Red Wine
3.   Tea
4.   Grass-Fed Beef
5.   Oily Fish
6.   Cocoa
7.   Cranberries
8.   Grapes
9.   Walnut
10.   Broccoli


http://www.healthcentral.com/multiple-sclerosis/cf/slideshows/10/1/?ap=825
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on December 09, 2012, 05:40:34 PM
http://www.healthcentral.com/multiple-sclerosis/cf/slideshows/10/1/?ap=825

1.   Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
2.   Red Wine
3.   Tea
4.   Grass-Fed Beef
5.   Oily Fish
6.   Cocoa
7.   Cranberries
8.   Grapes
9.   Walnut
10.   Broccoli

Notes from article:

Extra-virgin olive oil – an unrefined type of olive oil – contains a substance called oleocanthol that interferes with two enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) involved with inflammation in the body. In fact, a 2005 study in the journal Nature found that oleocanthol inhibits inflammation in a way that’s identical to the painkiller ibuprofen.

Red Wine

Red wine contains a compound called resveratrol, which has been found to have both anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Scientists say the presence of this compound may help explain the so-called “French paradox” as to why the French –who drink red wine with most meals – can eat a diet that’s actually quite high in saturated fats and yet have healthy arteries and hearts.

Tea

Generally, any beverage that is high in water content will have anti-inflammatory qualities, and tea is a great choice. Teas such as white tea, oolong, and green tea are full of catechins, antioxidant compounds that reduce artery plaque and inflammation. Tea also has been linked to reduced risks of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

Grass-Fed Beef

If you’re eating beef that’s not specifically sold as “grass-fed,” it means the cows were fed a high-calorie diet of corn and grain in an effort to fatten them quickly. Corn and grain are full of omega-6 fatty acids, which have been linked to inflammation. Grass-fed cows are leaner, and their meat is rich in healthy compounds such as omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E

Oily Fish

You’ve probably seen bottles of fish oil supplements in your pharmacy or grocery store, but you can get the same healthy boost from going straight to the source, as well. Oily fish such as salmon, sardines, and tuna are fish that have fatty oils throughout the fillets and in the area around the gut, rather than just in just the liver. Experts say eating one to two servings of these fish per week can reduce inflammation and also decrease your risk for heart disease and sudden death.

Cocoa contains anti-inflammatory compounds called flavanols, substances that reduce both blood clotting and inflammation in the body. Enjoying a cup or two of hot cocoa per week can help reduce inflammation, particularly if it’s made with skim or low-fat milk to keep down the drink’s content of saturated fats. Keep in mind, however, that trying to get your cocoa in the form of candy will load you up on saturated fats

Cranberries are a powerhouse food, with studies linking the red berry to such benefits as inhibiting cancerous tumors and lowering bad (LDL) cholesterol. Scientists say the fact that the berries are rich in anti-inflammatory antioxidants contribute to their healthful effects. As a bonus, cranberries also contain tannins, substances that can act as a natural antibacterial agent to fight urinary tract and E. coli infections.

Grapes: A 2004 study in the medical journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology found that people with stable coronary disease lowered the amount of inflammatory markers in their blood by drinking Concord grape juice. This finding was likely due to the presence of resveratrol in the grapes’ skins, which inhibits inflammation and may even help to fight cancer. Eating grapes – and not drinking them – also adds fiber to the grapes’ benefits and eliminates any added sugar.

Walnuts contain the “plant version” of omega-3 fatty acids, a substance known as ALA, which reduces inflammation in the body. In a 2004 study published in the Journal of Nutrition, scientists found that people who ate at least 2.3 ounces of walnuts and flaxseed (which also contains ALA) daily had reduced levels of inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP), a major indicator of a person’s risk for heart disease.

Broccoli is a virtual disease fighter, rich in such healthy compounds as beta-carotene, vitamin B folate, vitamin C, and the inflammation-fighting flavanoid kaempferol. Broccoli also contains sulforaphane, which experts say helps the body cleanse itself of cancer-causing compounds.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on December 28, 2012, 07:08:44 AM
I randomly remembered kimchi - kim chi  as a good food especially in wintertime, dur to how it seems to help me stop a cold etc.
I saw kim-chi for the first time in WA state. I saw jars of it kept cold up in the produce section.
In L.A. in some of the neighborhoods I saw great big jars of it for sale. I realy love the taste. It is cabbage and other veges in a jar with garlic, ginger chile, etc.
A couple of times when I was just feeling like I was coming down with a cold, I ate a bunch of Kim chee, and the cold symptoms went away.  ;D
I could not claim that would happen for everyone...
- Yowbarb
...
This looks like the kind I saw in a WA state supermarket:

(http://mmm-yoso.typepad.com/mmmyoso/images/sfmarket11.jpg)
...
Natural Cures during cold and flu season:

http://www.catalogs.com/info/health/natural-cures-during-cold-and-flu-season.html

Kimchi, Sauerkraut, Kefir, and Yogurt

Kimchi (pronounced kim'-chee) is a Korean spicy fermented side dish that has been getting a lot of press since the BBC published a report by scientists in Seoul, Korea who found that 11 of 13 chickens infected with the avian flu started to recover after they were fed an extract of kimchi. It is important to note that there have been no published reports of its effect on people affected with the new strain of avian flu. The key ingredient is thought to be a natural organic acid called lactic acid, that's also found in sauerkraut, milk, yogurt, kefir (a yogurt-like effervescent beverage), meat, and beer. In fact recent reports also show sauerkraut being used to treat chickens.

Although research hasn't yet shown that fermented cabbage is active against the avian flu, there is research suggesting that lactic acid in other forms activates the immune system against influenza and cold viruses. Popular probiotic "friendly bacteria" supplements such as lactobacillus acidophilus produce lactic acid. A German study found that those who took a daily probiotic supplement had significantly less respiratory tract infections and people who caught the flu had had fewer symptoms and shorter fever duration.
...

Rowdy Cowgirl site, How to Make  Homemade Kimchi  

http://rowdychowgirl.com/2011/03/14/how-to-make-homemade-kimchi/

(Yowbarb Note: Next post will have the instructions on how to make and possibly a bunch of photos and/or a video.)

...........................
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 20, 2013, 06:33:51 AM
Hi All,
this article mentions three healing foods - blueberries plums and peaches.
"extracts from peaches and plums killed breast cancer cells, even the most aggressive kinds."
- Yowbarb

http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/subscribe/cn-2/index2.php?sb=GA5CUSD&affid=cacnp2&subid=c111&gclid=CM7N4_KP97QCFQGvnQodDjMA-w

Dr. Victor Marchione's latest special report reveals seven natural cancer fighting remedies that could help you reduce your chances of getting this dreaded disease.

These are 100% natural remedies that you can easily acquire... maybe even at your local grocery store! Remedies like the two fruits that have been shown to kill breast cancer.

That's right. Texas researchers have found that extracts from peaches and plums killed breast cancer cells, even the most aggressive kinds. Not only did the cancerous cells die, but also no nearby healthy cells were affected.

The study suggests that two polyphenols (plant-based chemicals) are responsible for the cancer cell deaths. It was published recently in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry. The phenols are organic compounds that occur specifically in fruits.

Researchers originally studied the antioxidants and phytonutrients in plums and found them to match or exceed those in the blueberry — a powerful fruit previously considered superior to other fruits in those categories.

The next step was to see if these antioxidants had any anticancer properties. They chose breast cancer, which is a major problem (to put it mildly), as it is one of the most common cancers for women. According to the National Cancer Institute, there were 192,370 new cases of breast cancer in females and 1,910 cases in males in 2009. That year, 40,170 women and 440 men died from breast cancer. The World Health Organization reports that breast cancer accounts for 16% of the cancer deaths of women globally.

Researchers used extracts from two everyday fruits: the "Rich Lady" peach; and the "Black Splendor" plum. The extracts killed even the most aggressive cancer cell, but left normal cells alone, which is very significant. In regular chemotherapy, normal cells are killed along with cancerous ones, causing major side effects.
 
A closer look determined that two specific phenols — chlorogenic and neochlorogenic — were responsible for this targeted kill. Both are very common in fruits, the researchers said, but stone fruits such as plums and peaches have especially high levels.
 
The team said laboratory tests also confirmed that the compounds prevented cancer from growing in animals as well. The researchers want to see how these compounds could be incorporated into the growing of peaches and plums.
 
It's cancer breakthroughs like this that are revealed by Dr. Marchione and the Doctors Health Press team in their latest special report: The Seven Fighting Remedies to Shield You From Cancer.

And the best part, this report is absolutely FREE!
http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/subscribe/cn-2/index2.php?sb=GA5CUSD&affid=cacnp2&subid=c111&gclid=CM7N4_KP97QCFQGvnQodDjMA-w

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 29, 2013, 10:17:06 AM
Grow your own medicines.
Yowbarb
..................................................................
http://www.motherearthnews.com/Modern-Homesteading/2008-06-01/Homegrown-Medicine-Grow-Medicinal-Herbs.aspx     

Homegrown Medicine

Explore the many benefits of planting medicinal herbs.  
By Harvey Ussery
 June/July 2008

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Modern-Homesteading/2008-06-01/Homegrown-Medicine-Grow-Medicinal-Herbs.aspx#ixzz2JOE0Lhdn
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on February 12, 2013, 06:10:43 PM
At first when you see the page it looks like maybe there's not much on it. You need to scroll and keep scrolling big spaces in there.  ;) Please check out the site for more links and images. On the page is info on herbs along with simple recipes and other subjects.
- Yowbarb

http://homesteadingsurvivalism.blogspot.com/
 

1Posted by cilivianous at 09:18 
The Dearthbox: A low-cost, self-watering planter

 
Joining many other excellent earthbox instructables, meet ours, the Dearthbox! The Dearthbox costs about $13-16 per box, and can grow up to three plants, depending on the type of plant. At our house in CA, we've been testing these out for the last month or so. Our tomatoes are thriving and it's a relief to know our plants aren't parched in the afternoon heat.

Even if you've already planted stuff, you could still transplant to the Dearthbox and save some water this summer.

This instructable shows you the materials we used, the steps we followed, and how to plant a fairly big plant, as well as how to plant seedlings.

STEP 1: GATHER YOUR MATERIALS

If you already own most of the cutting tools and the drill, this instructable costs about $13-15. We got everything at Home Depot, but you can find similar stuff at any hardware store.

Materials pictured:

2 big paint buckets that stack (~5 gallons each)
1 lid
1 plastic tub OR drain grate (The height of the tub/drain grate should be approximately the same height as the gap between the two buckets when stacked)
1 2' long 1" diameter plastic pipe (make sure it is longer than the height of the buckets when stacked)*
1 mesh baggie (find them as packaging for fruit, veggies, other stuff!)

Tools pictured:

drill with 1 inch bit and 1/4" masonry bit
utility knife with extra blades
rounded file
saw
permanent marker
tarp (collects all the plastic bits!)

Not pictured:

black plastic garbage bags
seedlings or established plants
potting mix
compost
fertilizer

*I've read different things about using PVC after making this first version, which does use PVC. This project is made entirely of plastic, so if plastics in general bother you, you probably should not make this. If PVC specifically bothers you, it's easy to find other plastic pipes that will work, just poke around the garden supply store. Also, Greenpeace has a big database of alternatives. What do you think about PVC? What alternatives have you discovered?

STEP 2: MARK THE BUCKETS

1) Hole for wicking basket
On the bottom of the first bucket, trace your drain grate or plastic tub and mark a circle on the bottom of the first bucket. Be sure your circle is smaller than the lip of the container.

2) Hole for pipe
Next, mark a hole for the pipe, also 1/2" from the wall of the bucket

3) Side drainage holes
On the side of the second bucket (not the one you've already marked!), measure and mark drainage holes. Finding this measurement is pretty easy--just place the buckets one next to the other and figure out how much of a gap there is between them when they stack together. Mark just below that line. Mark two drainage holes, one on each side.

4) Second hole for pipe
On the lid, mark a hole for the pipe (1/2" from the edge)

5) Holes for plants
Next mark holes for the seedlings on the lid, or one big hole for an established plant

Pictured is the finished bucket lid, so you get a sense of what the holes will be doing once you plant your dearthbox.

STEP 3: CUT THE HOLES IN THE BUCKETS

For the big holes on the first bucket and the lid, start them with a drill, using a 1" masonry bit. Use the utility knife to widen the holes.

Cut drainage holes in the bottom of your first bucket, using a 1/4" diameter drill bit.

Next, cut the side drainage holes on the second bucket.

Remember, do not cut the side drainage holes in the bucket with the holes in the bottom.

You can smooth the edges with the file if you want.

Note that I don't have a picture of this process for the bucket lid, but you want to do the same thing for the pipe hole and the plant holes you marked in step 2 on the lid.

STEP 4: PREPARE THE PIPE

Cut an angled segment from the bottom of the pipe, using your hacksaw.

The reason you're doing this is so that water can flow out of the pipe when it's at the bottom of the buckets.

STEP 5: ASSEMBLE THE WICKING BASKET

Either line the drain grate with mesh, or cut holes in your solid plastic container. We found these as a three pack at the dollar store. You could also use food containers, etc., as long as there is enough of a lip and they are the right height.

Even though it's significantly more expensive, I highly recommend the drain grate option. They both seem to be performing equally well, but the drain cover just seems sturdier and better.

The last photo is of the wicking basket with dirt inside already. You don't have to do that part yet, but this shows you how the netting helps contain the dirt.

STEP 6: ASSEMBLE THE BUCKET!

Place the assembled wicking basket in the bottom of the bucket.

Push the pipe through the holes in the lid and the bottom of the inner bucket

Stack two buckets, with the basket hanging between the two.

Now you're ready to plant!

STEP 7: PLANTING

Use your favorite potting mix, compost, plants, seedlings, etc., and put it all together! This part is really up to you, but I would encourage you to soak the wicking basket first, and only use a small amount of fertilizer. The bucket recycles it, so you probably won't need to add fertilizer again for a very long time.

If you cut smaller holes in the lid, gently thread the plants through the holes before lowering the lid completely.

If you cut one big hole, line the top of the bucket with black plastic. This helps keep the potting mix moist. (see Mr. Beefhead's comment about why it's important to use potting mix)

To water the dearthbox, just pour water down the pipe. You know it's full when water comes out the drainage holes on the sides. We started with moist earth to make the wicking basket's job easier.

Thanks for checking out our instructable! If something doesn't make sense, please tell me and I'll fix it!

ps: we just got our copy of Kelly Coyne and Erik Knutzen's The Urban Homestead(http://homegrownrevolution.com) in the mail, and it's great! Their SWC recipe is really really similar to ours, but with a few cool extras and best of all, lots of advice about which plants do well in SWCs and which plants do not. You should definitely check out their book if you're using or thinking about using any sort of earthbox.

source : http://www.instructables.com/id/The-Dearthbox-A-low-cost-self-watering-planter/?ALLSTEPS
 
[  Yowbarb Note: Much more on page  http://homesteadingsurvivalism.blogspot.com/  ]
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on February 12, 2013, 06:13:19 PM
http://homesteadingsurvivalism.blogspot.com/

•   2Posted by cilivianous at 15:23 
•   vendredi 8 février 2013tips for creating a wonderful hanging basket or container
•   
•   Here are several tips for creating a wonderful hanging basket or container this summer.  The first is to use an artificial soil composed  you can chose  peat moss.  And soils such  Pro-Mix use perlite, peat, and other ingredients to produce a soil that will not compact over the summer.  Real garden soil compacts and turns into concrete under the pressure of regular watering.  And when it does, plant roots stop growing because they require good open spaces to move into and absorb nutrients.  Hard, compacted soils do not grow good plants so do not use real soil in your containers.  I re-use my artificial potting soil from year to year.  I dump it out of the pot. Chew it up with a shovel to cut up all last year’s roots and add approximately 10 % by volume of compost. The compost increases air spaces and gives plants a boost in healthy nutrition.
•   
•   Feed your plants weekly.  Nitrogen, the engine of plant growth, is water soluble and as you water your containers from the top the dissolved nitrogen is leaving from the bottom.   I use a fish-emulsion liquid feed with seaweed to provide all the trace nutrients my plants require and recommend it highly.  You can use any liquid plant food (like Miracle Grow or Shultz) to promote growth.  Compost tea is the Cadillac of liquid plant food and if you make your own compost tea, your plants will respond with bigger and better blooms as well as increased vigour. 
•   
•   And finally, no matter the size of the container, it is important to soak it all the way to the bottom at each watering.  Continue watering until water emerges from the pot bottom.  This ensures the roots can reach all parts of the container and grow properly.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Survival101 on March 10, 2013, 11:05:54 AM

This appears to be an herb that everyone needs to have a good quanity of. Seems to be available in Middle Eastern/Indian Food Stores as a common spice and inexpensive, too...

Black Seed - 'The Remedy for Everything, But Death'
 
This humble, but immensely powerful seed, kills MRSA, heals the chemical weapon poisoned body, stimulates regeneration of the dying beta cells within the diabetic's pancreas, and yet too few even know it exists.

The seeds of the annual flowering plant, Nigella Sativa, have been prized for their healing properties since time immemorial. While frequently referred to among English-speaking cultures as Roman coriander, black sesame, black cumin, black caraway and onion seed, it is known today primarily as black seed, which is at the very least an accurate description of its physical appearance.

The earliest record of its cultivation and use come from ancient Egypt. Black seed oil, in fact, was found in Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun's tomb, dating back to approximately 3,300 years ago. In Arabic cultures, black cumin is known as Habbatul barakah, meaning the "seed of blessing." It is also believed that the Islamic prophet Mohammed said of it that it is "a remedy for all diseases except death."

Many of black cumin's traditionally ascribed health benefits have been thoroughly confirmed in the biomedical literature. In fact, since 1964, there have been 458 published, peer-reviewed studies referencing it.

We have indexed salient research, available to view on GreenMedInfo.com on our Black Seed (Nigella Sativa) page, on well over 40 health conditions that may be benefited from the use of the herb, including over 20 distinct pharmacological actions it expresses, such as:

Analgesic (Pain-Killing)
Anti-Bacterial
Anti-Inflammatory
Anti-Ulcer
Anti-Cholinergic
Anti-Fungal
Ant-Hypertensive
Antioxidant
Antispasmodic
Antiviral
Bronchodilator
Gluconeogenesis Inhibitor (Anti-Diabetic)
Hepatoprotective (Liver Protecting)
Hypotensive
Insulin Sensitizing
Interferon Inducer
Leukotriene Antagonist
Renoprotective (Kidney Protecting)
Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibitor

These 22 pharmacological actions are only a subset of a far wider number of beneficial properties intrinsic to the black seed. While it is remarkable that this seed has the ability to positively modulate so many different biological pathways, this is actually a rather common occurrence among traditional plant medicines.

Our project has identified over 1600 natural compounds with a wide range of health benefits, and we are only in our first 5 years of casual indexing. There are tens of thousands of other substances that have already been researched, with hundreds of thousands of studies supporting their medicinal value (MEDLINE, whence our study abstracts come, has over 600,000 studies classified as related to Complementary and Alternative Medicine).

Take turmeric, for example. We have identified research indicating its value in over 600 health conditions, while also expressing over 160 different potentially beneficial pharmacological actions. You can view the quick summary of over 1500 studies we have summarized on our Turmeric Research page, which includes an explorative video on turmeric. Professional database members are further empowered to manipulate the results according to their search criteria, i.e. pull up and print to PDF the 61 studies on turmeric and breast cancer. This, of course, should help folks realize how voluminous the supportive literature indicating the medicinal value of natural substances, such as turmeric and black seed, really is.

Black seed has been researched for very specific health conditions.

Some of the most compelling applications include:

Type 2 Diabetes: Two grams of black seed a day resulted in reduced fasting glucose, decreased insulin resistance, increased beta-cell function, and reduced glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in human subjects.[ii]
Helicobacter Pylori Infection: Black seeds possess clinically useful anti-H. pylori activity, comparable to triple eradication therapy.[iii]

Epilepsy: Black seeds were traditionally known to have anticonvulsive properties. A 2007 study with epileptic children, whose condition was refractory to conventional drug treatment, found that a water extract significantly reduced seizure activity.[iv]

High Blood Pressure: The daily use of 100 and 200 mg of black seed extract, twice daily, for 2 months, was found to have a blood pressure-lowering effect in patients with mild hypertension.[v]

Asthma: Thymoquinone, one of the main active constituents within Nigella sativa (black cumin), is superior to the drug fluticasone in an animal model of asthma.[vi] Another study, this time in human subjects, found that boiled water extracts of black seed have relatively potent antiasthmatic effect on asthmatic airways.[vii]

Acute Tonsillopharyngitis: characterized by tonsil or pharyngeal inflammation (i.e. sore throat), mostly viral in origin, black seed capsules (in combination with Phyllanthus niruri) have been found to significantly alleviate throat pain, and reduce the need for pain-killers, in human subjects.[viii]

Chemical Weapons Injury: A randomized, placebo-controlled human study of chemical weapons injured patients found that boiled water extracts of black seed reduced respiratory symptoms, chest wheezing, and pulmonary function test values, as well as reduced the need for drug treatment.[ix]

Colon Cancer: Cell studies have found that black seed extract compares favorably to the chemoagent 5-fluoruracil in the suppression of colon cancer growth, but with a far higher safety profile.
  • Animal research has found that black seed oil has significant inhibitory effects against colon cancer in rats, without observable side effects.[xi]
MRSA: Black seed has anti-bacterial activity against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.[xii]

Opiate Addiction/Withdrawal: A study on 35 opiate addicts found black seed as an effective therapy in long-term treatment of opioid dependence.[xiii]

Sometimes the biblical reference to 'faith the size of a mustard seed moving mountains' comes to mind in connection with natural substances like black seeds. After all, do seeds not contain within them the very hope for continuance of the entire species that bore it? This super-saturated state of the seed, where life condenses itself down into an intensely miniaturized holographic fragment of itself, promising the formation of future worlds within itself, is the very emblem of life's immense and immortal power.

If we understand the true nature of the seed, how much life (past, present and future) is contained within it, it will not seem so far-fetched that it is capable of conquering antibiotic resistant bacteria, healing the body from chemical weapons poisoning, or stimulate the regeneration of dying insulin-producing beta cells in the diabetic, to name but only a fraction of black seed's experimentally-confirmed powers.

Moving the mountain of inertia and falsity associated with the conventional concept of disease, is a task well-suited for seeds and not chemicals. The greatest difference, of course, between a seed and a patented synthetic chemical (i.e. pharmaceutical drug), is that Nature (God) made the former, and men with profit-motives and a deranged understanding of the nature of the body made the latter.

The time, no doubt, has come for food, seeds, herbs, plants, sunlight, air, clean water, and yes, love, to assume once again their central place in medicine, which is to say, the art and science of facilitating self-healing within the human body. Failing this, the conventional medical system will crumble under the growing weight of its own corruption, ineptitude, and iatrogenic suffering (and subsequent financial liability) it causes. To the degree that it reforms itself, utilizing non-patented and non-patentable natural compounds with actual healing properties, a brighter future awaits on the horizon. To the degree that it fails, folks will learn to take back control over their health themselves, which is why black seed, and other food-medicines, hold the key to self-empowerment.

References:________________________________________
Domestication of plants in the Old World (3 ed.). Oxford University Press. 2000. p. 206. ISBN 0-19-850356-3.
[ii] Abdullah O Bamosa, Huda Kaatabi, Fatma M Lebdaa, Abdul-Muhssen Al Elq, Ali Al-Sultanb. Effect of Nigella sativa seeds on the glycemic control of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2010 Oct-Dec;54(4):344-54. PMID: 21675032
[iii] Eyad M Salem, Talay Yar, Abdullah O Bamosa, Abdulaziz Al-Quorain, Mohamed I Yasawy, Raed M Alsulaiman, Muhammad A Randhawa. Comparative study of Nigella Sativa and triple therapy in eradication of Helicobacter Pylori in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Saudi J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jul-Sep;16(3):207-14. PMID: 20616418
[iv] Javad Akhondian, Ali Parsa, Hassan Rakhshande. The effect of Nigella sativa L. (black cumin seed) on intractable pediatric seizures. Med Sci Monit. 2007 Dec;13(12):CR555-9. PMID: 18049435
[v] Farshad Roghani Dehkordi, Amir Farhad Kamkhah. Antihypertensive effect of Nigella sativa seed extract in patients with mild hypertension. Braz J Med Biol Res. 2006 Apr;39(4):421-9. Epub 2006 Apr 3. PMID: 18705755
[vi] Rana Keyhanmanesh, Mohammad Hossein Boskabady, Mohammad Javad Eslamizadeh, Saeed Khamneh, Mohammad Ali Ebrahimi. The effect of thymoquinone, the main constituent of Nigella sativa on tracheal responsiveness and white blood cell count in lung lavage of sensitized guinea pigs. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Oct 29;126(1):102-7. Epub 2009 Aug 8. PMID: 19711253
[vii] M H Boskabady, N Mohsenpoor, L Takaloo . Antiasthmatic effect of Nigella sativa in airways of asthmatic patients. Phytomedicine. 2010 Feb 8. Epub 2010 Feb 8. PMID: 20149611
[viii] M Dirjomuljono, I Kristyono, R R Tjandrawinata, D Nofiarny. Symptomatic treatment of acute tonsillo-pharyngitis patients with a combination of Nigella sativa and Phyllanthus niruri extract. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Jun;46(6):295-306. PMID: 18541126
[ix] Mohammad H Boskabady, Javad Farhadi. The possible prophylactic effect of Nigella sativa seed aqueous extract on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function tests on chemical war victims: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. J Altern Complement Med. 2008 Nov;14(9):1137-44. PMID: 18991514
  • Elsayed I Salim, Shoji Fukushima. Chemopreventive potential of volatile oil from black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seeds against rat colon carcinogenesis. Nutr Cancer. 2003;45(2):195-202. PMID: 12881014
[xi] Elsayed I Salim, Shoji Fukushima . Chemopreventive potential of volatile oil from black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seeds against rat colon carcinogenesis. Nutr Cancer. 2003;45(2):195-202. PMID: 12881014
[xii] Abdul Hannan, Sidrah Saleem, Saadia Chaudhary, Muhammad Barkaat, Muhammad Usman Arshad. Anti bacterial activity of Nigella sativa against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. 2008 Jul-Sep;20(3):72-4. PMID: 19610522
[xiii] Sibghatullah Sangi, Shahida P Ahmed, Muhammad Aslam Channa, Muhammad Ashfaq, Shah Murad Mastoi . A new and novel treatment of opioid dependence: Nigella sativa 500 mg. J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. 2008 Apr-Jun;20(2):118-24. PMID: 19385474

Source: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/black-seed-remedy-everything-death
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: JKB on March 10, 2013, 02:46:56 PM
Thanks S101.  I will look for some of that for sure.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Schi-502 on March 10, 2013, 09:24:54 PM
Me too.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on March 11, 2013, 10:12:52 AM

This appears to be an herb that everyone needs to have a good quanity of. Seems to be available in Middle Eastern/Indian Food Stores as a common spice and inexpensive, too...

Black Seed - 'The Remedy for Everything, But Death'
 
This humble, but immensely powerful seed, kills MRSA, heals the chemical weapon poisoned body, stimulates regeneration of the dying beta cells within the diabetic's pancreas, and yet too few even know it exists.

The seeds of the annual flowering plant, Nigella Sativa, have been prized for their healing properties since time immemorial. While frequently referred to among English-speaking cultures as Roman coriander, black sesame, black cumin, black caraway and onion seed, it is known today primarily as black seed, which is at the very least an accurate description of its physical appearance.

The earliest record of its cultivation and use come from ancient Egypt. Black seed oil, in fact, was found in Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun's tomb, dating back to approximately 3,300 years ago. In Arabic cultures, black cumin is known as Habbatul barakah, meaning the "seed of blessing." It is also believed that the Islamic prophet Mohammed said of it that it is "a remedy for all diseases except death."

Many of black cumin's traditionally ascribed health benefits have been thoroughly confirmed in the biomedical literature. In fact, since 1964, there have been 458 published, peer-reviewed studies referencing it.

We have indexed salient research, available to view on GreenMedInfo.com on our Black Seed (Nigella Sativa) page, on well over 40 health conditions that may be benefited from the use of the herb, including over 20 distinct pharmacological actions it expresses, such as:

Analgesic (Pain-Killing)
Anti-Bacterial
Anti-Inflammatory
Anti-Ulcer
Anti-Cholinergic
Anti-Fungal
Ant-Hypertensive
Antioxidant
Antispasmodic
Antiviral
Bronchodilator
Gluconeogenesis Inhibitor (Anti-Diabetic)
Hepatoprotective (Liver Protecting)
Hypotensive
Insulin Sensitizing
Interferon Inducer
Leukotriene Antagonist
Renoprotective (Kidney Protecting)
Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibitor

These 22 pharmacological actions are only a subset of a far wider number of beneficial properties intrinsic to the black seed. While it is remarkable that this seed has the ability to positively modulate so many different biological pathways, this is actually a rather common occurrence among traditional plant medicines.

Our project has identified over 1600 natural compounds with a wide range of health benefits, and we are only in our first 5 years of casual indexing. There are tens of thousands of other substances that have already been researched, with hundreds of thousands of studies supporting their medicinal value (MEDLINE, whence our study abstracts come, has over 600,000 studies classified as related to Complementary and Alternative Medicine).

Take turmeric, for example. We have identified research indicating its value in over 600 health conditions, while also expressing over 160 different potentially beneficial pharmacological actions. You can view the quick summary of over 1500 studies we have summarized on our Turmeric Research page, which includes an explorative video on turmeric. Professional database members are further empowered to manipulate the results according to their search criteria, i.e. pull up and print to PDF the 61 studies on turmeric and breast cancer. This, of course, should help folks realize how voluminous the supportive literature indicating the medicinal value of natural substances, such as turmeric and black seed, really is.

Black seed has been researched for very specific health conditions.

Some of the most compelling applications include:

Type 2 Diabetes: Two grams of black seed a day resulted in reduced fasting glucose, decreased insulin resistance, increased beta-cell function, and reduced glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in human subjects.[ii]
Helicobacter Pylori Infection: Black seeds possess clinically useful anti-H. pylori activity, comparable to triple eradication therapy.[iii]

Epilepsy: Black seeds were traditionally known to have anticonvulsive properties. A 2007 study with epileptic children, whose condition was refractory to conventional drug treatment, found that a water extract significantly reduced seizure activity.[iv]

High Blood Pressure: The daily use of 100 and 200 mg of black seed extract, twice daily, for 2 months, was found to have a blood pressure-lowering effect in patients with mild hypertension.[v]

Asthma: Thymoquinone, one of the main active constituents within Nigella sativa (black cumin), is superior to the drug fluticasone in an animal model of asthma.[vi] Another study, this time in human subjects, found that boiled water extracts of black seed have relatively potent antiasthmatic effect on asthmatic airways.[vii]

Acute Tonsillopharyngitis: characterized by tonsil or pharyngeal inflammation (i.e. sore throat), mostly viral in origin, black seed capsules (in combination with Phyllanthus niruri) have been found to significantly alleviate throat pain, and reduce the need for pain-killers, in human subjects.[viii]

Chemical Weapons Injury: A randomized, placebo-controlled human study of chemical weapons injured patients found that boiled water extracts of black seed reduced respiratory symptoms, chest wheezing, and pulmonary function test values, as well as reduced the need for drug treatment.[ix]

Colon Cancer: Cell studies have found that black seed extract compares favorably to the chemoagent 5-fluoruracil in the suppression of colon cancer growth, but with a far higher safety profile.
  • Animal research has found that black seed oil has significant inhibitory effects against colon cancer in rats, without observable side effects.[xi]
MRSA: Black seed has anti-bacterial activity against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.[xii]

Opiate Addiction/Withdrawal: A study on 35 opiate addicts found black seed as an effective therapy in long-term treatment of opioid dependence.[xiii]

Sometimes the biblical reference to 'faith the size of a mustard seed moving mountains' comes to mind in connection with natural substances like black seeds. After all, do seeds not contain within them the very hope for continuance of the entire species that bore it? This super-saturated state of the seed, where life condenses itself down into an intensely miniaturized holographic fragment of itself, promising the formation of future worlds within itself, is the very emblem of life's immense and immortal power.

If we understand the true nature of the seed, how much life (past, present and future) is contained within it, it will not seem so far-fetched that it is capable of conquering antibiotic resistant bacteria, healing the body from chemical weapons poisoning, or stimulate the regeneration of dying insulin-producing beta cells in the diabetic, to name but only a fraction of black seed's experimentally-confirmed powers.

Moving the mountain of inertia and falsity associated with the conventional concept of disease, is a task well-suited for seeds and not chemicals. The greatest difference, of course, between a seed and a patented synthetic chemical (i.e. pharmaceutical drug), is that Nature (God) made the former, and men with profit-motives and a deranged understanding of the nature of the body made the latter.

The time, no doubt, has come for food, seeds, herbs, plants, sunlight, air, clean water, and yes, love, to assume once again their central place in medicine, which is to say, the art and science of facilitating self-healing within the human body. Failing this, the conventional medical system will crumble under the growing weight of its own corruption, ineptitude, and iatrogenic suffering (and subsequent financial liability) it causes. To the degree that it reforms itself, utilizing non-patented and non-patentable natural compounds with actual healing properties, a brighter future awaits on the horizon. To the degree that it fails, folks will learn to take back control over their health themselves, which is why black seed, and other food-medicines, hold the key to self-empowerment.

References:________________________________________
Domestication of plants in the Old World (3 ed.). Oxford University Press. 2000. p. 206. ISBN 0-19-850356-3.
[ii] Abdullah O Bamosa, Huda Kaatabi, Fatma M Lebdaa, Abdul-Muhssen Al Elq, Ali Al-Sultanb. Effect of Nigella sativa seeds on the glycemic control of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2010 Oct-Dec;54(4):344-54. PMID: 21675032
[iii] Eyad M Salem, Talay Yar, Abdullah O Bamosa, Abdulaziz Al-Quorain, Mohamed I Yasawy, Raed M Alsulaiman, Muhammad A Randhawa. Comparative study of Nigella Sativa and triple therapy in eradication of Helicobacter Pylori in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Saudi J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jul-Sep;16(3):207-14. PMID: 20616418
[iv] Javad Akhondian, Ali Parsa, Hassan Rakhshande. The effect of Nigella sativa L. (black cumin seed) on intractable pediatric seizures. Med Sci Monit. 2007 Dec;13(12):CR555-9. PMID: 18049435
[v] Farshad Roghani Dehkordi, Amir Farhad Kamkhah. Antihypertensive effect of Nigella sativa seed extract in patients with mild hypertension. Braz J Med Biol Res. 2006 Apr;39(4):421-9. Epub 2006 Apr 3. PMID: 18705755
[vi] Rana Keyhanmanesh, Mohammad Hossein Boskabady, Mohammad Javad Eslamizadeh, Saeed Khamneh, Mohammad Ali Ebrahimi. The effect of thymoquinone, the main constituent of Nigella sativa on tracheal responsiveness and white blood cell count in lung lavage of sensitized guinea pigs. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Oct 29;126(1):102-7. Epub 2009 Aug 8. PMID: 19711253
[vii] M H Boskabady, N Mohsenpoor, L Takaloo . Antiasthmatic effect of Nigella sativa in airways of asthmatic patients. Phytomedicine. 2010 Feb 8. Epub 2010 Feb 8. PMID: 20149611
[viii] M Dirjomuljono, I Kristyono, R R Tjandrawinata, D Nofiarny. Symptomatic treatment of acute tonsillo-pharyngitis patients with a combination of Nigella sativa and Phyllanthus niruri extract. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Jun;46(6):295-306. PMID: 18541126
[ix] Mohammad H Boskabady, Javad Farhadi. The possible prophylactic effect of Nigella sativa seed aqueous extract on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function tests on chemical war victims: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. J Altern Complement Med. 2008 Nov;14(9):1137-44. PMID: 18991514
  • Elsayed I Salim, Shoji Fukushima. Chemopreventive potential of volatile oil from black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seeds against rat colon carcinogenesis. Nutr Cancer. 2003;45(2):195-202. PMID: 12881014
[xi] Elsayed I Salim, Shoji Fukushima . Chemopreventive potential of volatile oil from black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seeds against rat colon carcinogenesis. Nutr Cancer. 2003;45(2):195-202. PMID: 12881014
[xii] Abdul Hannan, Sidrah Saleem, Saadia Chaudhary, Muhammad Barkaat, Muhammad Usman Arshad. Anti bacterial activity of Nigella sativa against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. 2008 Jul-Sep;20(3):72-4. PMID: 19610522
[xiii] Sibghatullah Sangi, Shahida P Ahmed, Muhammad Aslam Channa, Muhammad Ashfaq, Shah Murad Mastoi . A new and novel treatment of opioid dependence: Nigella sativa 500 mg. J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. 2008 Apr-Jun;20(2):118-24. PMID: 19385474

Source: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/black-seed-remedy-everything-death

Survival101- thank you so much for posting! Awesome info!
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Survival101 on March 11, 2013, 11:54:06 AM

I was very disappointed when Amazon wanted to sell the 'Black Cumin or Black Seed' for $20/lb. I thought, there should be better pricing than that...so, after a few inquiries, here is what I found. I've bought from Nuts.com before and usually had really good service and quality of product.

Black Caraway Seeds

Nuts.com - Order now, we'll ship today!

1. 1lb bag — $4.99$ = 4.99/lb
2. 5lb bag — $24.20 = $4.84/lb
3. 25lb case — $89.75 = $3.59/lb (bulk - not individually packaged)
Plus, shipping costs. (Reduced rates for 100# or more orders)

Quantity:123456789more...$4.99 Add to cart »See our bulk discounts

Certified: Kosher

Aromatic with a peppery bite, black caraway seeds are enjoyed as a spice in Egyptian, Indian, and Middle Eastern cuisines and is often used in spice blends, breads, and vegetable dishes.

Middle Easterners refer to black caraway seeds as "the blessed seed" because of its healing properties. Studies show that the spice may strengthen and stimulate the immune system and act as an anti-histamine, anti-tumor, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory. Some recent studies even point to its ability to prevent some toxic side effects of cancer treatments and slow cancer growth.

King Tutankhamen's tomb contained black caraway oil, of paramount importance to the ancient Egyptians. Both Hippocrates and the Greek physician Dioskorides recommended black caraway extensively as a remedy, and it was also reputedly used by Cleopatra. It can be found in the Old Testament, where it's called "black seed." And the Prophet Muhammad underlined its therapeutic qualities, stating, "Hold on to use of the black seed, for it has a remedy for every illness, except death."

Yup, this 'seems' to be the right one...!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Survival101 on March 19, 2013, 05:37:32 AM

I was very disappointed when Amazon wanted to sell the 'Black Cumin or Black Seed' for $20/lb. I thought, there should be better pricing than that...so, after a few inquiries, here is what I found. I've bought from Nuts.com before and usually had really good service and quality of product.

Black Caraway Seeds

Nuts.com - Order now, we'll ship today!

1. 1lb bag — $4.99$ = 4.99/lb
2. 5lb bag — $24.20 = $4.84/lb
3. 25lb case — $89.75 = $3.59/lb (bulk - not individually packaged)
Plus, shipping costs. (Reduced rates for 100# or more orders)

Quantity:123456789more...$4.99 Add to cart »See our bulk discounts

Certified: Kosher

Aromatic with a peppery bite, black caraway seeds are enjoyed as a spice in Egyptian, Indian, and Middle Eastern cuisines and is often used in spice blends, breads, and vegetable dishes.

Middle Easterners refer to black caraway seeds as "the blessed seed" because of its healing properties. Studies show that the spice may strengthen and stimulate the immune system and act as an anti-histamine, anti-tumor, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory. Some recent studies even point to its ability to prevent some toxic side effects of cancer treatments and slow cancer growth.

King Tutankhamen's tomb contained black caraway oil, of paramount importance to the ancient Egyptians. Both Hippocrates and the Greek physician Dioskorides recommended black caraway extensively as a remedy, and it was also reputedly used by Cleopatra. It can be found in the Old Testament, where it's called "black seed." And the Prophet Muhammad underlined its therapeutic qualities, stating, "Hold on to use of the black seed, for it has a remedy for every illness, except death."

Yup, this 'seems' to be the right one...!

Has anyone looked further at the Black Caraway, that I posted a few days ago, which Nuts.com carries...? Wouldn't want anyone to miss out on this super cure-all/heal-all. Seems to me, it's a 'deal' that can't be beat...what an amazing product to have set aside in our B.O.B or just plain start using immediately.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: JKB on March 19, 2013, 05:54:48 PM
Thanks S101.  I'm ordering some!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on March 20, 2013, 10:42:26 PM
The black seeds... which I am sure are used a lot in classic breads from Germany Eastern Europe and in Jewish baking.
- Yowbarb


https://drfugawe.wordpress.com/2011/08/09/americas-contribution-to-the-worlds-rye-breads-classic-jewish-rye/
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Survival101 on March 21, 2013, 05:58:31 AM

Ahh, great post and recipe... Thanks, Yowbarb...
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Endtimesgal_2012 on March 21, 2013, 08:15:05 AM
I recently suffered with a terrible sore throat, which lasted for several months, and progressively got worse to the point where I could not sleep at night. It turned out I had post nasal drip, why I do not know, never had anything like this ever before.

 Finally after researching on the web, I started gargling several times a day with Apple Cider Vinegar and Honey, and miraculously after a couple of days the sore throat was almost completely healed.

Recipe:  3 tablespoons Apple Cider Honey  (I used the Braggs vinegar with the "mother" in it.)
              1 tablespoon honey
               1/4 cup of warm water.

If anyone has a cure for post nasal drip, I want to hear about it.  The pharmacist had nothing to recommend at all.  I have tried antihistamines to no avail.
           
Stir well, and gargle in small increments.  I did this several times a day.  Worked great!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on March 21, 2013, 09:25:32 AM
I recently suffered with a terrible sore throat, which lasted for several months, and progressively got worse to the point where I could not sleep at night. It turned out I had post nasal drip, why I do not know, never had anything like this ever before.

 Finally after researching on the web, I started gargling several times a day with Apple Cider Vinegar and Honey, and miraculously after a couple of days the sore throat was almost completely healed.

Recipe:  3 tablespoons Apple Cider Honey  (I used the Braggs vinegar with the "mother" in it.)
              1 tablespoon honey
               1/4 cup of warm water.

If anyone has a cure for post nasal drip, I want to hear about it.  The pharmacist had nothing to recommend at all.  I have tried antihistamines to no avail.
           
Stir well, and gargle in small increments.  I did this several times a day.  Worked great!

Endtimesgal  :) I am so glad this natural remedy worked so well for you!
I had not heard of this use of the apple cider and vinegar!
Since I have had this condition for decades -and - truth be told I take plenty of drugs for it...
this is really wonderful to know about. (It hits me seasonally and contributes to other problems.)
Thank you for posting this!
 :)
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Survival101 on March 21, 2013, 09:30:33 AM
I recently suffered with a terrible sore throat, which lasted for several months, and progressively got worse to the point where I could not sleep at night. It turned out I had post nasal drip, why I do not know, never had anything like this ever before.

 Finally after researching on the web, I started gargling several times a day with Apple Cider Vinegar and Honey, and miraculously after a couple of days the sore throat was almost completely healed.

Recipe:  3 tablespoons Apple Cider Honey  (I used the Braggs vinegar with the "mother" in it.)
              1 tablespoon honey
               1/4 cup of warm water.

If anyone has a cure for post nasal drip, I want to hear about it.  The pharmacist had nothing to recommend at all.  I have tried antihistamines to no avail.
           
Stir well, and gargle in small increments.  I did this several times a day.  Worked great!

Endtimesgal_2012 - I have several documents that I would share with you that would address your sinuses/post nasal drip symptoms, I could email them to you...? If you could PM me and give me the contact info to send to you...
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Endtimesgal_2012 on March 22, 2013, 11:26:32 AM
Survival101:  I sent you a pm, look forward to hearing from you,
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on April 02, 2013, 04:00:27 PM
Survival101:  I sent you a pm, look forward to hearing from you,

Endtimesgal thanks for your posts...
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 05, 2013, 03:32:05 PM

I was very disappointed when Amazon wanted to sell the 'Black Cumin or Black Seed' for $20/lb. I thought, there should be better pricing than that...so, after a few inquiries, here is what I found. I've bought from Nuts.com before and usually had really good service and quality of product.

Black Caraway Seeds

Nuts.com - Order now, we'll ship today!

1. 1lb bag — $4.99$ = 4.99/lb
2. 5lb bag — $24.20 = $4.84/lb
3. 25lb case — $89.75 = $3.59/lb (bulk - not individually packaged)
Plus, shipping costs. (Reduced rates for 100# or more orders)

Quantity:123456789more...$4.99 Add to cart »See our bulk discounts

Certified: Kosher

Aromatic with a peppery bite, black caraway seeds are enjoyed as a spice in Egyptian, Indian, and Middle Eastern cuisines and is often used in spice blends, breads, and vegetable dishes.

Middle Easterners refer to black caraway seeds as "the blessed seed" because of its healing properties. Studies show that the spice may strengthen and stimulate the immune system and act as an anti-histamine, anti-tumor, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory. Some recent studies even point to its ability to prevent some toxic side effects of cancer treatments and slow cancer growth.

King Tutankhamen's tomb contained black caraway oil, of paramount importance to the ancient Egyptians. Both Hippocrates and the Greek physician Dioskorides recommended black caraway extensively as a remedy, and it was also reputedly used by Cleopatra. It can be found in the Old Testament, where it's called "black seed." And the Prophet Muhammad underlined its therapeutic qualities, stating, "Hold on to use of the black seed, for it has a remedy for every illness, except death."

Yup, this 'seems' to be the right one...!

Survival101 thank you for your posts on black caraway...black seed.
I think this is what we are talking about...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigella_sativa

- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 05, 2013, 03:34:48 PM
In Russia these black seeds are called "chernushka."
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 06, 2013, 09:39:16 PM
Yowbarb Note:
Excerpts from article

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/medicinal-properties-plantain 

Green Medicine Info - Medicinal properties of plantain.

Medicine
The leaves as well as the juice have been widely used as topical substances in poultices and lotions for treating sunburns, stings, insect bites, snakebites, poison ivy breakouts, rashes, burns, blisters, and cuts.

 

Furthermore, the leaves have also been heated and applied topically to swollen joints, sore muscles, sprains, and sore feet. Interestingly enough, Plantain is a common folk remedy in many part of Latin America for treating cancer. It has also been used for many centuries in treating sore throats, coughs, bronchitis, tuberculosis, and mouth sores.

 

Studies have shown that plantain has anti-inflammatory effects, and it is also rich in tannin (which helps draw tissues together to stop bleeding) and allantoin (a compound that promotes healing of injured skin cells). Further studies have indicated that plantain may also reduce blood pressure, and that the seeds of the plant may reduce blood cholesterol levels. Plantain seeds were also widely used as a natural laxative, given their high source of fibre. Teas made from the plant, were used to treat diarrhea, dysentery, intestinal worms, and bleeding mucous membranes. The roots were also recommended for relieving toothaches and headaches as well as healing poor gums.

Other Uses

It is believed that plantain tea was used as a hair rinse for presenting dandruff.  The rather strong fibres within the leaves were also used for making thread, fishing line and even cloth.
For first-hand scientific literature from the National Library of Medicine on plantain's medicinal properties in well over a dozen health conditions you can visit GreenMedInfo.com's Plantain Research page.

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/substance/plantain

 

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 06, 2013, 09:42:59 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago 

Plantago species have been used since prehistoric times as herbal remedies. The herb is astringent, anti-toxic, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-histamine, as well as demulcent, expectorant, styptic and diuretic.[citation needed] Externally, a poultice of the leaves is useful for insect bites, poison-ivy rashes, minor sores, and boils. In folklore it is even claimed to be able to cure snakebite. Internally, it is used for coughs and bronchitis, as a tea, tincture, or syrup. The broad-leaved varieties are sometimes used as a leaf vegetable for salads, green sauce, et cetera.

Plantain seed husks expand and become mucilaginous when wet, especially those of P. psyllium, which is used in common over-the-counter bulk laxative and fiber supplement products such as Metamucil. P. psyllium seed is useful for constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, dietary fiber supplementation, and diverticular disease. Plantain has been consumed as human food since prehistory. For example, archaeological recovery along California's Central Coast has demonstrated use of this species as a food since the Millingstone Horizon.[2]

Psyllium supplements are typically used in powder form, along with adequate amounts of fluids. A dose of at least 7 grams daily taken with adequate amounts of fluid (water, juice) is used by some for management of elevated cholesterol. There are a number of psyllium products used for constipation. The usual dose is about 3.5 grams twice a day. Psyllium is also a component of several ready-to-eat cereals.

Mucilage from Desert Indianwheat (Plantago ovata) is obtained by grinding off the husk. This mucilage, also known as Psyllium, is commonly sold as Isabgol, a laxative which is used to control irregular bowel syndrome and constipation.[3] It has been used as an indigenous Ayurvedic and Unani medicine for a whole range of bowel problems.

As Old English Wegbrade the plantago is one of the nine plants invoked in the pagan Anglo-Saxon Nine Herbs Charm, recorded in the 10th century. In Serbia, Romania, and Bulgaria, leaves from Plantago major are used as a folk remedy to preventing infection on cuts and scratches because of its antiseptic properties. In Slovenia and other Central European regions, the leaves were traditionally used topically as a cure for blisters resulting from friction (such as caused by tight shoes etc.) and as relief on mosquito bites in eastern Westphalia as well as western Eastphalia.

There may also be a use for plantains in the abatement of enteric methane from ruminants,[4] as the natural compounds present (e.g. condensed tannins; ~14g/kg DM), affect the acetate-propionate ratio in the rumen which is a primary mechanism by which methanogenesis is restricted.[5] Currently this is not a viable option in any significant scale due to agronomic difficulties.

Species[edit]

The boundaries of the genus Plantago have been fairly stable, with the main question being whether to include Bougueria (one species from the Andes) and Littorella (2–3 species of aquatic plants).[6]

There are about 200 species of Plantago
[ Continues ]   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Endtimesgal_2012 on July 07, 2013, 08:58:56 AM
I just finished reading a wonderful book written by Masaru Emoto, titled"  The True Power of Water.  In this book he discusses the amazing properties and abilities water has to affect us health wise, (and in many other ways as well.)

 The premise of the book is that water responds to our thoughts and intentions.  In the book they have photographs of ice crystals they collected in a special process from waters in different parts of the world.  I had previously read a different book Emoto wrote on the subject, and it was fascinating to see how beautiful ice crystals form from some waters and no ice crystals at all or only really partially formed/deformed ice crystals form from polluted waters.

 In this book he details how he has conducted scientific experiments on water by writing words or sayings on paper and taping them to a container of water, waiting a certain amount of time and then taking a sample and freezing it to examine the ice crystals or lack thereof. There are many pictures in the book which I found most interesting.

 He has also created a machine which measures a person's "hado" which will tell him their physical or emotional status and then he treats water with a special process and has the patient drink it several times a day and it eventually either completely cures them or helps them a great deal.  There are others in this field, (of course, apparently not in the US, we do not recognize any other methods that are not mainstream, but there are others in other countries who are working on the same principles.

He suggests we write words, for instance, "Love and Gratitude" or other positive statements and tape them to a container of water, and even tape them in our shower's to correct the water and infuse it with helpful properties.  I know it sounds farfetched, but he has had very positive measurable results. 

He also discusses how music affects water crystals.  Uplifting music forms wonderful crystals, acid rock and other such music has a negative effect on the crystals.  He concludes that many things can affect the water we drink or that aquatic life live in and we need to pay attention and be concerned about it.

 I found myself pondering  how little we really know about our world, and how much we take such a simple thing as water, of which we ourselves are composed of by at least 70%, for granted, not realizing how really powerful and amazing this essential substance is to our well being and even survival.  When one realizes that one can go a long time without food, but only a few days without water, it only seems imperative that we pay closer attention to this wonderful liquid we take so much for granted.

It is a very interesting and thought provoking book, I highly recommend it.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 07, 2013, 02:29:10 PM
Endtimesgal thanks for that wonderful post! I just learned some new things. A few years ago my only son Wes told me he had read about the water...I am sure now that is who he read. (Masaru Emoto.)
I didn't get the full story... Really good info to have and truly inspirational.
 :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: pbutter72 on September 04, 2013, 10:06:24 PM
Hi Everyone!

I'd like to add to this great thread!

15 houseplants to improve indoor air quality which includes:

Rest of the article is found in the link below:
http://www.mnn.com/health/healthy-spaces/stories/15-houseplants-to-improve-indoor-air-quality (http://www.mnn.com/health/healthy-spaces/stories/15-houseplants-to-improve-indoor-air-quality)

(http://static.environmentalgraffiti.com/sites/default/files/images/Spider-Plantjpg.img_assist_custom-600x450.jpg)

~pB
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on September 10, 2013, 07:10:17 AM
Pbutter, awesome info to have! A lot of homes really do have indoor pollution, so having these plants would be a great idea.
 :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: bk on January 18, 2014, 06:40:38 AM
An article on growing your own medicine

Grow Your Own Medicinal Herbs

Herbs have been used for thousands of years as a medicine to help your body heal naturally and effectively. Herbs such as Borage, Yarrow, Cayenne and more can be used to treat infections, fight blood loss, treat sickness and more.Check out this list of common herbs that you might use to help you in an emergency.

http://www.thereadystore.com/diy/6889/grow-your-own-medicinal-herbs/?utm_source=rne_thursday_20140116b--google--organic&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=thursday--promotion--sf_sale_january&utm_content=2post_promotion_btn-grow_medicinal_herbs&trk_msg=5QQS5RGSDN04TB0KS4KLGELHTC&trk_contact=T8U4UKNVGRVIM2H073MBUB0NG0
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: pbutter72 on January 18, 2014, 11:14:50 AM
An article on growing your own medicine

Grow Your Own Medicinal Herbs

Herbs have been used for thousands of years as a medicine to help your body heal naturally and effectively. Herbs such as Borage, Yarrow, Cayenne and more can be used to treat infections, fight blood loss, treat sickness and more.Check out this list of common herbs that you might use to help you in an emergency.

http://www.thereadystore.com/diy/6889/grow-your-own-medicinal-herbs/?utm_source=rne_thursday_20140116b--google--organic&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=thursday--promotion--sf_sale_january&utm_content=2post_promotion_btn-grow_medicinal_herbs&trk_msg=5QQS5RGSDN04TB0KS4KLGELHTC&trk_contact=T8U4UKNVGRVIM2H073MBUB0NG0

Thank you for this post bk!

Great information and very useful :)

~pB
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 24, 2014, 10:17:42 AM
Buying and growing from a seedling helps you identify plants... from Coffman video.

SHTF Herbology - Sam Coffman
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 24, 2014, 11:42:00 PM
Yowbarb Note: This was in my Facebook news feed... Worth reading!
...

http://www.lahealthyliving.com/1/post/2013/04/eggshells-calcium-rich-food.html

How Eggshells Can Naturally Heal Your Cavities and More
 
Posted on 28 April, 2013 by Anya Vien

The shell of an egg is such a common product that is readily discarded as useless. We don’t view it as anything beneficial to our household. Unfortunately, this is a common misconception because it is not only beneficial as a nutritionally dense food, but It can be used for several purposes. Hungarian physician Krompeher, with a group of medics and biologists, became interested in the healthy properties of eggshells. More than 10 years of research have shown that eggshells are the ideal source of bio-available calcium (dense and well absorbed).

How Eggshells Can Naturally Heal Your Cavities and More
 
Eggshells contain the perfect amount of the ideal substances for healing cavities – massive amounts of calcium and 27 other minerals. The composition of eggshells resembles our teeth. Eggshells provide the necessary amount of calcium to remineralize teeth. Just boil shells from one organic free range egg  for about 5 minutes. You can add them daily into your smoothies or grind them into a fine powder and add it to your food.
 
Eggshells have unique beneficial medicinal properties
•Bone tissue is composed of calcium.  Actually, human bones and teeth are very similar to an eggshell’s composition. One of the benefits of eggshells is the calcium contained in the shell (93 %), the bone marrow is fulfilling its hematopoietic function better.
•Additionally, eggshells also contain mineral elements: magnesium, phosphorus, silicon,  sodium, potassium, iron, sulfur, aluminum, etc.

Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox: How a Little-Known Vitamin Could Save Your Life
•  There are 27 elements found in the eggshells.  Also the protein of a shell is composed of such essential amino acids as methionine, cysteine, lysine, isoleucine. Thus, properly prepared eggshells are the most balanced natural means to obtain calcium.
•Eggshells are especially beneficial for small children because their bodies experience more intensively involved in the formation of bone tissue, which requires an uninterrupted flow of calcium. Shell’s included in baby food can be beneficial to prevent  rickets and anemia, which usually develops in parallel with rickets. Shell’s promote activation of blood in the bone tissue.
•Studies also showed accelerated healing when using the shell for treating such orthopedic diseases as congenital dislocation of a hip or osteoporosis (softening of the bones).

To use  eggshells for medicinal purposes, you need to use organic eggs in order to avoid any chemicals or antibiotics.

How to prepare:
 Take eggshells and put them in boiling water for about 5 minutes. The boiling will kill any pathogens. Then, air dry the shells and grind the shells in a coffee grinder. Take a 1/2 teaspoon a day. It is important to note that Vitamin D greatly aids calcium absorption.  So make sure to get enough sunlight or eat organ meats such as liver.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23607686
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Jimfarmer on January 25, 2014, 08:03:13 AM
Quote
How Eggshells Can Naturally Heal Your Cavities and More

The membrane on the interior of the shell contains an anti-aging molecule.  I put the shell of my morning egg in the tea water as it heats.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: pbutter72 on January 25, 2014, 08:48:43 PM
Quote
How Eggshells Can Naturally Heal Your Cavities and More

The membrane on the interior of the shell contains an anti-aging molecule.  I put the shell of my morning egg in the tea water as it heats.

Thank you for this tidbit Jimfamer! My children eat eggs often, so I am going to try this the next time they do!

~pB
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Kyirrie on January 26, 2014, 01:57:45 AM
Great info guys :) I can definitely testify to the value of eggshells as I let my chooks eat them along with shell grit to make their eggs shells stronger. I always know when they are not getting enough calcium in their diet because their eggshells become very thin and brittle.
(I have about 30 something chickens, and have just had 2 chicks hatch 3 weeks ago and another 7 hatched overnight!  :D )

Cheers,
Kyirrie
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: pbutter72 on January 26, 2014, 12:31:38 PM
Great info guys :) I can definitely testify to the value of eggshells as I let my chooks eat them along with shell grit to make their eggs shells stronger. I always know when they are not getting enough calcium in their diet because their eggshells become very thin and brittle.
(I have about 30 something chickens, and have just had 2 chicks hatch 3 weeks ago and another 7 hatched overnight!  :D )

Cheers,
Kyirrie

Awesome Kyrrie! I plan to keep a few chickens once I move to a larger space with at least a backyard-- I would like to contact you for some advice when I do :)

(http://media.treehugger.com/assets/images/2011/10/unclesamchickens.jpeg.492x0_q85_crop-smart.jpg)

~pB
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on February 01, 2014, 07:57:02 AM
pbutter I love those old Government - War time posters.  :)

Wouldn't it be nice if the government totally expected everyone to have chickens and gardens? No matter where they lived? There could be a small free range one - but enclosed - and partly covered...
and a garden too - on top of every high rise, in every apartment back yard.  ;D  :o  8) Little pathways in and around...

Well, it is starting to happen ? I couldn't tell by looking at this image, but that is  ALL food growing on that NY rooftop.  ;D I'd like to see more dirt and more chickens but I suppose it's all happening somewhere...

Rooftop Farm in New York City Grows 50,000 Pounds of Organic Produce Per ... http://prn.fm/tag/chicken-coop/ 
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Kyirrie on February 02, 2014, 04:08:13 AM
Great info guys :) I can definitely testify to the value of eggshells as I let my chooks eat them along with shell grit to make their eggs shells stronger. I always know when they are not getting enough calcium in their diet because their eggshells become very thin and brittle.
(I have about 30 something chickens, and have just had 2 chicks hatch 3 weeks ago and another 7 hatched overnight!  :D )

Cheers,
Kyirrie

Awesome Kyrrie! I plan to keep a few chickens once I move to a larger space with at least a backyard-- I would like to contact you for some advice when I do :)

(http://media.treehugger.com/assets/images/2011/10/unclesamchickens.jpeg.492x0_q85_crop-smart.jpg)

~pB

Hi pB :)
It's been a while since we talked on MySpace :) If you get a chance to have some chooks of your own, you won't regret it. They are great pets as well as food providers, and excellent recyclers of organic waste, you can't go wrong :)
BTW, love that old poster :) It's a classic!  :D
Contact me anytime you like, I'd be happy to help :)
Cheers,
Kyirrie
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on May 05, 2014, 11:57:53 AM
http://ezinearticles.com/?10-Benefits-of-Chickweed---Using-Chickweed-to-Boost-Your-Health-and-Cleanse-Your-Body&id=5913721

10 Benefits of Chickweed - Using Chickweed to Boost Your Health and Cleanse Your Body
by Sean N. Burrows
...........................................................
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on August 29, 2014, 12:18:19 PM
I'm back on the D.E. - diatomaceous earth. One of my daughters is now stirring it into our Nutribullet drinks. I sitll have the diatomaceous in cranberry juice regular (sweetened but no corn syrup) along with honey, Lousiana Hot Sauce with cayenne...
Liking it,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on February 09, 2015, 05:21:52 PM
An article from Dr. Mercola's e-newsletter today showcases how a food can be a medicine, and a medicine can be a food:

(from www.mercola.com)

Subscribe to The World's #1 Natural Health Website†

Collard Greens
Recipe
Story at-a-glance

    Collard greens bring a number of cancer-fighting nutrients to the table: vitamin K to resist inflammation, glucosinolates to rid your body of toxins and enzyme-releasing myrosinase.
    Cruciferous vegetables like collard greens, broccoli, cabbage, kale, and turnips have more vitamin A carotenoids, folic acid, and dietary fiber than any other food group.
    Steamed for just five minutes, simple collard greens blended with a homemade Mediterranean dressing and tasty options make this dish versatile as well as delicious.



 
5-Minute Collard Greens
February 09, 2015 | 16,701 views

 

By Dr. Mercola

    A cool-temperature crop, collard greens may be one of the more obscure leafy veggies in some parts of the world, but in others – the American South in particular – it’s been a staple for generations. Broad and relatively smooth with deep green coloring, collard green leaves can grow as high as three to four feet , so harvesting enough for dinner shouldn’t take long!

    From the cruciferous family of vegetables (sometimes referred to as a “brassica”), collard greens, as well as its cousin kale and mustard greens, come in a leafy variety. Also crucifers, broccoli, and cauliflower produce florets and stems, while rutabagas, radishes, and turnips are root veggies with similar nutritive advantages.

    When buying collard greens at the grocery store, they’re best between November and April. You want to find them with firm, crisp leaves with no yellowing. Choose organic whenever possible. When growing them yourself, cut the leaves about four inches from the ground. Note that after cutting, they’ll continue to grow for later harvest.

    Store leaf vegetables in a plastic bag with as much of the air released as possible, and place them in the crisper section of your refrigerator to keep for up to five days. If you wash them, blot them dry– and even wrap them – with paper or cotton towels to prevent mildew.

Best of the Best Benefits of Collard Greens


    These leafy greens rank in the top four vegetables providing vitamin K1 – a whopping 1,045 percent of the daily value – which aids your body in two ways: First, it provides a healthy level of blood clotting activity that involves a delicate balance of proteins only this vitamin can give.

    Second, it offers bone support. Bone cells called osteoclasts rely on a two-part mechanism to help prevent mineral loss. One part of the mechanism extracts minerals from your bones to use in other parts of your body when necessary, while the other part keeps them from taking too much. Vitamin K works to keep the two in balance.

    Another aspect of vitamin K is that it works with omega-3 fatty acids, specifically alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA, to battle inflammation. While the vitamin K regulates the inflammatory response, the omega-3s form the cornerstone for some of the most important anti-inflammatory messaging molecules in your body.

    As a further three-pronged approach, collard greens contain glucosinolates called glucobrassicin that can convert into an isothiocyanate molecule called indole-3-carbinol, or I3C, a compound with the ability to activate and prevent an inflammatory response at its earliest stage.2

    Individuals of every age might appreciate the fact that another benefit of Vitamin K is its ability to limit neuronal damage in the brains of Alzheimer's patients.3

    Collard greens also contain four specific phytonutrients – caffeic acid, ferulic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol – that lower oxidative stress in your cells.  . Factors like air pollution, second-hand smoke and even poor eating habits can be harmful to your body; eating fresh vegetables like collard greens not only helps negate those factors, it helps fight cancer even further.

    Other phytonutrients in collard greens, specifically diindolylmethane and sulforaphane, have been clinically proven to combat breast, prostate, ovarian, cervical, and colon cancer cells, help prevent their growth and even help prevent them from forming in the first place.4

‘And That’s Not All…’


    Collard greens are an excellent source of dietary fiber, once known by our great grandparents as “ruffage.” Ingesting naturally high-fiber foods like these can not only help control your LDL (bad) cholesterol levels and prevent constipation, but may inhibit colon cancer.

    A Medical News Today article5 noted:

        “Collard greens and other green vegetables that contain high amounts of chlorophyll have been shown to be effective at blocking the carcinogenic effects of heterocyclic amines, which are generated when grilling foods at a high temperature. If you tend to like your grilled foods charred, make sure to pair them with green vegetables to help negate these effects.”

    Many different foods contain the nutrients to make you healthier by eating just one serving, and collard greens fit this bill. Here’s another way: When the sulfur-containing leaves are broken down by chopping or chewing, glucosinolates release the enzyme myrosinase which break down cancer-fighting isothiocyanates. Research notes this compound to be particularly effective against lung and esophageal cancers, as well as cancers of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts.6

    Besides providing necessary folates to augment DNA synthesis and help prevent neural tube defects in babies, these greens are also an excellent source of vitamin A and carotenoids like lutein, carotenes, zeaxanthin and crypto-xanthin, which also contain antioxidants. Vitamin A in collard greens also aids in maintaining healthy skin, mucous membranes, and healthy vision.

More Reasons to Eat Collard Greens


    Experts recommend that you not only eat cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, kale, and mustard greens “often,” but that collard greens specifically should have a regular place in your lunch and dinner repertoire on a fairly regular basis.

    Why collard greens?
To quote the George Mateljan Foundation:

        “In a recent study, steamed collard greens outshined steamed kale, mustard greens, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and cabbage in terms of its ability to bind bile acids in the digestive tract. When this bile acid binding takes place, it is easier for the bile acids to be excreted from the body. Since bile acids are made from cholesterol, the net impact of this bile acid binding is a lowering of the body's cholesterol level. It's worth noting that steamed collards show much greater bile acid binding ability than raw collards.”

    At the same time, because of the odiferous break-down of these sulfur compounds, you want to make sure you don’t steam your collard greens too long.

    For the best collard greens flavor and texture, choose slightly smaller leaves than the toughest outer layer. For the optimum nutritional benefits from the aforementioned enzyme-releasing myrosinase, allow these leafy greens to sit for at least five minutes after chopping.

    It’s the versatility in serving options that make fresh foods – like lettuce, for instance – so popular. By adding flavor-enhancing ingredients, you can work your collard greens repertoire in much the same way. The George Mateljan Foundation7 recommends a delicious, nutritious serving technique that’s also quick and convenient:

    5-Minute Collard Greens


    Ingredients:

        1 pound collard greens, chopped

    Mediterranean Dressing

        1 tsp. lemon juice
        1 medium garlic clove, pressed or chopped
        1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
        Sea salt and black pepper to taste
        1-½ TBS sunflower seeds

    Optional:

        ½ red onion, sliced (add to steamer with collard greens)
        6 kalamata olives, sliced
        3 Tbsp. pumpkin seeds
        5 drops organic soy sauce
        Dash of cayenne pepper

    Instructions

        Rinse the greens in cold water.
        Place two inches of water into a steamer pot and bring to a rapid boil.
        Cut the leaves into half-inch slices, turn to cut crosswise, and chop the stems into quarter-inch pieces. Sprinkle on the lemon juice (another way to activate the enzymes) and allow to sit for a minimum of five minutes.
        Press or finely chop the garlic and allow it to sit for 5 minutes, as well.
        Add your greens and garlic to the steamer and steam for no more than five minutes.
        Transfer to a large bowl and, while they’re hot, toss with the remaining ingredients.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on February 15, 2015, 07:12:56 PM
Last week I received results of my laboratory/medical tests and one of them is very encouraging, not only for me, but hopefully for those reading this who are concerned about bone health, bone loss, and even osteoporosis.  '

Osteoporosis, the medical name for thinning bones, often affects women as they approach and pass menopause, but it can also affect men.  There are many factors that can aggravate it, including intake of coffee, dark carbonated soft drinks, cigarette smoking, alcoholic beverages, lack of physical activity, certain pharmaceuticals, and more.  In general it could be thought of as a disease of civilization.

I have done as much as possible to avoid it, wishing to erase the effects of a former smoking habit and former intake of Pepsi, and began getting tested for osteoporosis in 2011.  There are several ways to test for it, and I choose the non-radiological method, ultrasound of the heel bone.  This "BMD" or Bone Mineral Density Ultra Sound Screening gives results in one of three categories:

Low Risk-- levels of  >=  -1.2
Moderate Risk--levels between  -1.3  and  -2.5
High Risk -- levels of <=  -2.6

My 2011 level was -1.9 which was exactly halfway into the Moderate Risk category.  The second testing, February, 2015, results were also in the Moderate Risk, but level was  -1.4  which is very close to the Low Risk category.

In my opinion the reason my bone mineral density actually increased during that time period from 2011 till 2015 was due to one or both of the only changes in my lifestyle during that time:
1)  began daily intake of RAW, organic goat milk in 2012; and
2) began ingesting organic eggshells in 2014.

Since there is an approximate 25% increase in my "score" from the 2011 level of  -1.9  to the 2015 level of  -1.4, I take this as meaning I have regained 25% of the bone mass that I had presumably lost in years past.  With continuing use of eggshells and raw milk, I hope to someday have a level of "zero" which would mean zero bone loss.

Both eggshells and raw milk are noted for their positive influence on bones (as well as other benefits).  ( Eggshells are discussed in Reply #122 above.) 
Weston Price has information that talks about how the pasteurization process denatures some of the milk proteins, one important one being a phosphatase enzyme that is critical for helping in bone-building.  With that phosphatase enzyme denatured and useless from pasteurization, bone-building is severely impaired.  This may be one reason many people are flocking to raw milk, although it has many other benefits as well.

I should mention that when I get raw milk, I immediately make it into yogurt which has a very long shelf life, in addition to being a fermented product which is helthful in its own right.  The easiest way for me to take a bit of eggshell every morning and evening is to take it with a little whey, which is plentiful when you have yogurt around.

If I can find some of the relevant links I've seen in the past, will post them as well.  Hope this helps others.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on February 16, 2015, 08:26:36 AM
More on eggshells and how they help build healthy bones.  It should be noted that organic eggshells are always preferable, as convenional eggshells often contain heavy metals.  It has been discussed in Mother Earth News and other publications, that arsenic is often fed to chickens to "help them fatten", but then of course that arsenic ends up in the meat as well as the eggs, including their shells.  So, go organic.

Below are one link and two articles (each with links) relevant to the eggshell issue related to bone health.  Some of this might be repetitious since Yowbarb had already posted a rather dynamite article on eggshells for health.  You can never have too many good articles to read!

http://www.curezone.org/forums/fm.asp?i=114358
Article-Egg Shells as a Calcium Supplement
Forum: Ask Moreless: pH Balance


Article-Egg Shells as a Calcium Supplement    R joylovepeace   9y  5,572 

joylovepeace
Date: 6/21/2006 11:48:44 PM   ( 9y ago )   Hits:   5572
Status:       R [Message recommended by a moderator!]
Just like Moreless teaches-minerals are absorbed better when they are combined with other trace minerals!

http://www.regardingme.com/shells-calcium-supplement-a-4.html?sPath...

"Egg Shells as a Calcium Supplement

By Hal Ewing, B.Sc. in Nutrition
Abstract

Egg Shell Calcium presents healthy, balanced calcium support—and is great for women, due to trace amounts of concomitant minerals. Egg Shell Calcium is probably the best natural source of calcium, and is easier for your body to digest and absorb.

The use of egg shells as an ideal calcium supplement is backed by "hard science." Studies show that egg shell minerals can exert beneficial effects on bone density, largely as a consequence of their well absorbed content of calcium.

An added advantage of egg shells is their content of other trace amounts of elements that are useful in building bone e.g. magnesium, sulphur, silicon and boron. Dutch researchers have described recently a highly positive effect of egg shell calcium, (with added magnesium and vitamin D) on bone mineral density.

Egg Shell Calcium Post-Menopause


These researchers treated 85 post-menopausal women between the age of 50 and 70 years in a well controlled scientific study (double blind, placebo-controlled). Laboratory test and measures of bone density were carefully made in these studies and the subjects were divided into three groups.

One group received egg shell powder enriched supplements, the second group received calcium carbonate enriched supplements and the third group received placebo-("sugar" pills, "dummy" medicine). The striking outcome of the study was that only the egg-shell-supplemented group had measurable increases in bone density in their hip bones, after one year of supplements.

The calcium carbonate treated group and placebo treated group showed no significant increase in hip bone density. These findings suggested that egg shell calcium enriched with other nutrients were superior to calcium carbonate (a popular supplement).

Proven...by the chickens!


This documented benefits of dietary supplementation with eggshell powder comes from an unlikely source. This research source is from experiments in chickens themselves! Turkish researchers have studied the effects of various sources of calcium fed to hens on egg production and egg shell quality.

In these studies, hens fed egg shell calcium in their diet produced eggs with thicker shells than hens fed "regular" calcium carbonate. Experiments in young pigs demonstrate that egg shell powder is a better source of calcium than calcium carbonate. In this important study, the ability of calcium to be absorbed from egg shell powder and digestibility and tolerance of egg shell powder was measured and compared with regular calcium carbonate additions to diet.

The results showed that calcium from egg shells was more digestible, compared with regular calcium carbonate. This study also showed that benefits of egg shells as an ideal way of adding of calcium to protein in the diet.

Egg Shell Calcium and Vitamin D


The ideal bone-building combination of egg shell calcium and vitamin D3 is well documented in Japanese studies. Researchers at the Japan Women's University, Tokyo studied a combination of vitamin D3 and egg shell powder in animals with osteoporosis. Not only was the egg shell powder with added vitamin D3 able to improve bone mineral density, it did it without significantly increasing blood calcium levels. It did not cause hypercalcemia like regular calcium carbonate.
 


http://thehealthyadvocate.com/2010/06/01/eggshells-a-bioavailable-source-of-calcium/

Eggshells – A Bioavailable Source of Calcium


[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1-mxRQOqBo]

The Calcium “Myth”

Each and everyone of us have been told that we need calcium to build stronger bones, and this nutrient has been blasted on the airwaves, promoting the mass consumption of milk and dairy products. I do believe that raw dairy products are beneficial, but the conventional pasteurized dairy is what is being touted as the healthy source of our daily calcium, and this just isn’t true.
If you are only focusing on calcium for building strong bones, you are going to increase your risks for developing fractures and osteoporosis later on in your life. This is because many minerals work together synergistically to combine a strong support system for bone health and growth. Calcium is an important nutrient; however, there are minerals that are essential that you may be missing out on while only focusing on drinking your milk.

Get your bones in shape! Photo courtesy of TeamSugar.com
Bone Building Nutrients and Their Sources

Let’s look at the most important minerals and nutrients you need to grow stronger bones. Listen to that last part of the sentence–stronger bones, not just denser bones. Density and size of bone doesn’t always equal strength.
Incorporating these nutrients are quite easy to do, and do not provide much effort or money to place into your healthy lifestyle.
Vitamin D. I’ve written about Vitamin D before (specifically Vitamin D3), and you are probably already aware of the importance that Vitamin D has in our body. This vitamin is usually added to milk to fortify it, as it helps increase the absorption of calcium into our bodies. However, sometimes this is in the form of Vitamin D2, not D3 which is what you need, or even worse, it isn’t absorbable by the majority of your body.
I have a few plants growing outside, and they require sunlight at all times. Humans require sunlight as well; not as much as the plant kingdom, but it still provides this incredible vitamin for us when we expose our bare skin to it a few minutes a day. When sunlight hits our naked skin (meaning arms and legs and face uncovered–not necessarily your entire body, unless you have a private place to yourself…), it converts the cholesterol in our skin to Vitamin D and regulates over 3,000 genes in our body. It also helps facilitate and transport the calcium in our diet to the bones and muscles that need it.
Vitamin D can be found in food sources in small quantities, and also in supplement form. However, the best source is from the sunlight, and is completely free. Dr. Joseph Mercola, from Mercola.com, advises to go outside in the sun just until your skin turns a light shad of pink. This is when all the Vitamin D that your body can produce has been produced, and any more exposure to the sun can lead to free radical production and damage to your body. One food source of Vitamin D comes from egg yolk, which also provides a high quality protein.
Vitamin K. This vitamin is almost like Vitamin D, except it acts a “binder”, in a way, to help ‘insert’ the calcium that you take in from food sources into your bones. It is essential that you receive this vitamin in the forms of K1 and K2. Vitamin K1 is found in most green, leafy vegetables, and K2 is found in fermented foods raw, fermented dairy products (natto, kefir, yogurt, aged cheese). K2 is probably the most significant, whereas K3 (synthetic version) can have adverse health effects due to the likelihood of toxicity.
Protein. Most people believe that those who consume more protein will actually secrete it in their urine, and lead to the leeching of calcium from your bones. This is true, but increasing your levels of calcium intake, along with your protein intake, will compensate for the loss and help you build stronger bones. In the Journal of Clinical Nutrition, it was reported that those who consumed the most protein had a 7.5-8% higher bone mineral density and strength than those who consumed less. Today’s conventional animal protein (those that are NOT organic, do not have access to grass or free range) can challenge your body’s pH levels, leading to an acidic reaction in your body. This will steal important minerals from your bones. Therefore, when choosing an animal protein, be sure to try and get local, free range and preferably organic (if dairy, perhaps raw).
Folic Acid and B Vitamins. In The Journal of New England Medicine, they showed that increased intake of B vitamins in the diet led to lower homocysteine levels in the body. This hormone raises the risks of bone fractures. Good dietary sources include green vegetables, carrots, avocados, cantaloupe, apricots and almonds.
Omega 3 Fats. This fat, found primarily in fish, flax and chia seeds, has been shown to provide stronger bone density in a study recorded in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Exercise. Believe it or not, but this is an essential nutrient. We must all try to aim for as much physical exercise during our day unless we want our bodies to slowly rust. Numerous studies have shown that weight bearing exercises and resistance training can help build strong bones and protect bones from becoming thin and weak. Squats and weight training are very powerful sources of this nutrient.


Egg Shells as a Bioavailable Calcium Source

Even though calcium isn’t the only mineral we need for strong bones, it is an important nutrient to consume to ensure adequate protection of them. Eggshells are about 90-95% calcium carbonate, and is easily absorbable by our bodies, unlike most dairy products and fortified foods today. This is a completely safe and health source of calcium that anyone can incorporate into their diets.
Find a source of locally grown, free range and organic eggs. The likeliness that you contract salmonella from raw eggs and egg shells are actually quite low, and in fact decrease when choosing local, free range organic eggs. In fact, nutrient quality (such as omega-3 fatty acids) are much more available in these eggs, compared to ones you find at the store.
Use the eggs as you normally would, and instead of discarding the egg shells, run them under clean, cool water. Make sure to get all the egg white out of the egg shell. You can then boil the egg shell in hot water, if you feel as though you need to kill any bacteria, and then place it in a place to air dry. Then, using a blender or coffee grinder, pulverize the egg shell into a powder.
1/2 tsp. of dry, powered egg shell contains around 400 mg of calcium. The average person should consume around 1000 mg of calcium, which is easily done if you are eating a proper diet. A good source of calcium that is bioavailable, besides egg shells, include any green leafy vegetable, as well as sardines (which contain mercury, but not as much as other fish–consume with knowledge 1-2 times per week, unless you can find a source that tests mercury free).
Use 1/2 tsp. in drinks, smoothies, cereals, recipes, etc. Excessive intake of calcium can lead to muscle cramps, so be sure to eat a banana or a magnesium source food to negate these effects.
___________________________________________________________________
Next post, I will discuss what you want to avoid at all costs if you are trying to protect or build your bones. Some fascinating bits of information you do not want to miss, so stay tuned for Thursday’s post.
For now, this is The Healthy Advocate.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks
   1.   Cat Care – The Best, The Easiest, The Most Natural | Cat Lovers - June 20, 2010 [...] Eggshells – A Bioavailable Source of Calcium « [...]
   2.   Healthy Bone Week, Day Two: Osteoporosis Drugs and Healthier Options « - August 6, 2010 [...] P.S. Be sure to check out this video that I did on eggshells and how you can use them in your diet for a bioavailble source of calcium. If you don’t consume dairy products, local, free range and organic egg shells may be a good option. You can also read the blog post about eggshells I did here. [...]



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Published: 01.06.2010 / 01:30 PM
Category: egg shells calcium,strong bones
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http://www.pjbs.org/ijps/fin2058.pdf
A Review of the Uses of Poultry Eggshells and Shell Membranes
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on February 22, 2015, 08:46:41 AM
Beets Have Hemoglobin!
That was new information to me, found in this very interesting article below, about beets:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/02/16/sugar-beets-benefits.aspx?e_cid=20150216Z1_DNL_NB_art_2&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art2&utm_campaign=20150216Z1_DNL_NB&et_cid=DM67802&et_rid=843907353

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Story at-a-glance
   •   Hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout your body, is found in plants, too, including sugar beets
   •   Beet hemoglobin is nearly identical to human hemoglobin and might one day become a blood substitute
   •   About 2.5 acres of sugar beets could produce 1-2 tons of hemoglobin, which could potentially save thousands of lives


Sugar Beets Make Hemoglobin

February 16, 2015 | 45,967 views

By Dr. Mercola
Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout your body. While you might assume this is a uniquely human protein, it’s actually found in plants, too, including sugar beets.
Researchers from Lund University in Sweden, who note that hemoglobin from blood donations falls far short of demands, hope that this plant hemoglobin, known as leghemoglobin, may one day become a blood substitute capable of saving lives.
2.5 Acres of Beets Could Save Thousands of Lives?
Sugar beets (unfortunately often genetically modified) are a common raw material used for the production of sugar, but extracting sugar from the beets is far easier than extracting hemoglobin.
According to researchers, the challenge is extracting enough from each mature beet, although they estimate that one hectare of beets (about 2.5 acres) could produce 1-2 tons of hemoglobin, which they say “could save thousands of lives.”1
While complete blood is ultimately needed for blood transfusions, hemoglobin can be given in the first five hours following an accident to help oxygen circulate throughout the body.2
The beet hemoglobin is, surprisingly, nearly identical to human hemoglobin, except for a small “surface detail” that Nélida Leiva, a doctoral student of applied biochemistry at Lund University, said extends the lifespan of the beet hemoglobin.
There are multiple types of hemoglobin in your body, including that in your blood as well as in your brain and testicles in men. The beet hemoglobin shares the most similarities with the brain hemoglobin. If you’re wondering why hemoglobin, which transports oxygen, is needed in plants, Leiva explained:3
“We have found that the hemoglobin in the plant binds nitric oxide. It is probably needed to keep certain processes in check, for example so that the nitric oxide doesn’t become toxic, and to ward off bacteria.”
More research is planned to determine if the sugar beet hemoglobin could one day be used as a blood substitute, but at least one expert is skeptical. Raúl Arredondo-Peter, who has studied the evolution of plant hemoglobins, believes the idea “is conceivable but far off because they do not carry and release oxygen at the same rates as human hemoglobins.”4
6 Reasons to Add Beets to Your Diet
Beet roots have the highest sugar content of all vegetables, but they also contain a wealth of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Adding beets to your diet a few times a week is a good way to benefit from their nutrition without overdosing on their high amounts of sugar.
Keep in mind that the red beets most people add to salads and side dishes in the US are known as table beets, and they are not the same variety as the sugar beets mentioned above (which are actually white). What are beets good for?
1. Lower Your Blood Pressure
Drinking beet juice may help to lower blood pressure in a matter of hours. One study found that drinking one glass of beet juice lowered systolic blood pressure by an average of 4-5 points.5
The benefit likely comes from the naturally occurring nitrates in beets, which are converted into nitric oxide in your body. Nitric oxide, in turn, helps to relax and dilate your blood vessels, improving blood flow and lowering blood pressure.
2. Boost Your Stamina
Those who drank beet juice prior to exercise were able to exercise for up to 16 percent longer.6 The benefit is thought to also be related to nitrates turning into nitric oxide, which may reduce the oxygen cost of low-intensity exercise as well as enhance tolerance to high-intensity exercise.
3. Fight Inflammation
Beets are a unique source of betaine, a nutrient that helps protects cells, proteins, and enzymes from environmental stress. It’s also known to help fight inflammation, protect internal organs, improve vascular risk factors, enhance performance and likely help prevent numerous chronic diseases.7 As reported by the World’s Healthiest Foods:8
“[Betaine’s]… presence in our diet has been associated with lower levels of several inflammatory markers, including C reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha.
As a group, the anti-inflammatory molecules found in beets may eventually be shown to provide cardiovascular benefits in large-scale human studies, as well as anti-inflammatory benefits for other body systems.”
4. Anti-Cancer Properties
The powerful phytonutrients that give beets their deep crimson color may help to ward off cancer. Research has shown that beetroot extract reduced multi-organ tumor formations in various animal models when administered in drinking water, for instance, while beetroot extract is also being studied for use in treating human pancreatic, breast, and prostate cancers.9
5. Rich in Valuable Nutrients and Fiber
Beets are high in immune-boosting vitamin C, fiber, and essential minerals like potassium (essential for healthy nerve and muscle function) and manganese (which is good for your bones, liver, kidneys, and pancreas). Beets also contain the B vitamin folate, which helps reduce the risk of birth defects.
6. Detoxification Support
The betalin pigments in beets support your body’s Phase 2 detoxification process, which is when broken down toxins are bound to other molecules so they can be excreted from your body. Traditionally, beets are valued for their support in detoxification and helping to purify your blood and your liver.
Most US Sugar Beets Are Genetically Modified
It is important to know that about 95 percent of sugar beets grown in the US are genetically modified (GM). A number of organizations challenged the USDA approval of Roundup Ready sugar beets in 2008, arguing that the beets would contaminate related organic and non-GM crops such as table beets and chard.
Further, they said that the pesticide-resistant beets would increase pesticide impacts on the environment and worsen the current epidemic of pesticide-resistant superweeds. Roundup Ready crops are designed to withstand otherwise lethal topical doses of glyphosate—a broad spectrum herbicide, and the active ingredient in Monsanto's herbicide Roundup as well as hundreds of other products.
With genetic engineering, the crop survives the toxic herbicide while weeds are theoretically eliminated from the field. I say “theoretically” because the overuse of the herbicide has led to the rapid development of glyphosate-resistant superweeds. It's estimated that more than 130 types of weeds spanning 40 U.S. states are now herbicide-resistant, and the superweeds are showing no signs of stopping.
Roundup Ready crops have also been linked to serious health problems—particularly relating to fertility and birth defects—as has glyphosate itself. A lawsuit was filed against the USDA in 2009 for failure to complete an Environmental Impact Study. A federal judge agreed, temporarily suspending all planting of GM sugar beets. The suspension was later overridden by the USDA, ostensibly to prevent a sugar shortage – and the rest is history.
While the table beets most people eat are not currently genetically modified, they’re often grown in close proximity to sugar beets, and cross-pollination is known to occur. So when choosing beets to eat, opt for organic varieties whenever possible. It’s unclear whether the sugar beets being considered to make hemoglobin for humans are also the genetically modified variety… but let’s hope not, since the consequences of such an experiment are completely unknown.
Beet Greens Are Good for You, Too

No discussion of beets would be complete without beet greens, which are among the healthiest part of the plant. Besides containing important nutrients like protein, phosphorus, zinc, fiber, vitamin B6, magnesium, potassium, copper, and manganese, beet greens also supply significant
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on February 25, 2015, 12:20:53 PM
Wow Linda! What a great article. I knew beets were good for the blood and had iron -
but this is really inspirational!
Thank You,
Barb Townsend
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on March 27, 2015, 07:47:16 AM

http://www.naturalblaze.com/2015/03/this-salad-vegetable-has-5-times.html


(By visiting the link, you will see the beautiful pics as well.)


This Salad Vegetable Has 5 Times the Vitamin C as Oranges


By Jeffrey Green
Vitamin C is crucial to our health on multiple levels. It has even shown to have strong anti-cancer properties. Yet most Americans don't get enough from their diet or supplements, according to a recent study. These days it's difficult to trust off-the-self supplements. Almost all chewable vitamins now have sucralose (artificial sweetener) in them. So it's best to get as much of your essential vitamins as possible through your food. Quick: name five foods that are high in Vitamin C. Don't cheat by Googling it. Your mental list probably starts and ends with citrus fruits or dark leafy greens. Well, there's one common salad item that you may be overlooking that blows them all away. - See more at: http://www.naturalblaze.com/2015/03/this-salad-vegetable-has-5-times.html#sthash.dYbQfN2p.dpuf

I called it a vegetable in the title but it's technically a fruit. I'm talking about sweet or bell peppers. Bell peppers are super rich in Vitamin C with yellow varieties packing nearly five times the amount contained in oranges. - See more at: http://www.naturalblaze.com/2015/03/this-salad-vegetable-has-5-times.html#sthash.8cwjp3Jv.dpuf

One yellow sweet pepper contains 341 milligrams of Vitamin C, or about 569% of recommended daily intake. In contrast one orange has 69.7 milligrams, or around 116% of daily recommendations. Even green and red sweet peppers outperform oranges coming in at 220% and 349% in daily value, respectively. Peppers also have significantly less sugar than citrus fruits making them a healthier option for getting your Vitamin C. So what are you waiting for. Get some seeds and plant them this Spring. Use them in salads, salsa, fajitas, over your steaks, in your omelets and in anything else that tastes awesome. - See more at: http://www.naturalblaze.com/2015/03/this-salad-vegetable-has-5-times.html#sthash.8cwjp3Jv.dpuf


Stats source: Healthaliciousness
Salad image: National Cancer Institute
- See more at: http://www.naturalblaze.com/2015/03/this-salad-vegetable-has-5-times.html#sthash.8cwjp3Jv.dpuf
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on March 30, 2015, 05:40:22 PM
(Note: I included this, not to discourage people from eating meat if that is their choice, but to show that if meat is not available, that mushrooms make a wonderful, tasty and acceptable substitute.  The original article has been truncated a bit, but link is below:)


http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/03/29/roasted-mushroom-base-recipe.aspx?e_cid=20150329Z1_SNL_NB_art_2&utm_source=snl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art2&utm_campaign=20150329Z1_SNL_NB&et_cid=DM71103&et


Cut Down on Meat by Using Mushrooms

March 29, 2015 | 10,278 views

By Dr. Mercola
The flavor "umami," which means "delicious" in Japanese, is valued for making foods taste meatier and more satisfying. Umami is the natural flavor of glutamic acid, which, in your body is often found as glutamate; eating umami-rich foods may increase post-meal satiety, helping you eat less throughout the day and ultimately lose weight.
Umami is valued for making foods taste better. When an umami-rich food like is added to soup stock, for instance, it makes the broth heartier, more "meaty", and more satisfying.
Mushrooms, and shiitake mushrooms in particular, are rich in umami flavor. This is why they're often used in place of meat in sandwiches. While I don't necessarily recommend cutting back on meat in your diet, particularly if it's organic and pastured, mushrooms do make an ideal meat "enhancer" for those trying to cut back.
By adding a "mushroom base" to burgers, meat sauce, and more, you can cut the meat in your recipes by half or more, without sacrificing flavor and heartiness. This will certainly shave some dollars off your food budget and, at the same time, will add valuable nutrition to your meals.
How to Make a Roasted Mushroom Base
"At this year's Worlds of Health Flavors conference in Napa, Calif., Pam Smith, a culinary nutritionist, presented delicious recipes by the Chef Clifford Pleau featuring a finely chopped roasted mushroom mix (chefs refer to it as simply 'The Mix'), that she combined with beef for a delicious burger with half the meat…"  the New York Times reported.1
The recipe that follows, posted by the New York Times,2 is your basic mushroom base to add to virtually any meat-based recipe. Try substituting half the meat called for with mushrooms, and adjust up or down accordingly.
If you're in a hurry, pick up pre-sliced mushrooms, which will cut down on prep time. Even if you use whole mushrooms and slice them yourself, this recipe is simple and quick. Store leftovers in the fridge and you'll have a healthy meat substitute at the ready.
Roasted Mushroom Base
Ingredients:
   •   2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil (or coconut oil)
   •   2 pounds organic mushrooms, sliced, or quartered
   •   Salt to taste
   •   Freshly ground black pepper to taste
Preparation:
   1.   Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment.
   2.   In a large bowl, toss mushrooms with oil, salt, and pepper. Spread in an even layer on baking sheets and bake in the middle and lower racks of the oven for 20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes, and switching pans top to bottom halfway through. The mushrooms should be tender and dry when done. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
   3.   Grind in a grinder or pulse in a food processor fitted with steel blade until broken down into small pieces resembling ground meat. Taste and adjust seasoning.
The mix will keep for about 4 days in the refrigerator.
Mushrooms Are a Superfood
There's good reason to add mushrooms to just about any recipe you can; they're excellent for your health. You really can't go wrong with any of the edible mushrooms, as they are rich in protein, fiber, vitamin C, B vitamins, calcium, and minerals, along with being excellent sources of antioxidants.
Mushrooms contain polyphenols and selenium, which are common in the plant world, as well as antioxidants that are unique to mushrooms (like ergothioneine, which scientists are now beginning to recognize as a "master antioxidant").
About 100 species of mushrooms are being studied for their health-promoting benefits, and about a half dozen really stand out for their ability to deliver a tremendous boost to your immune system. They've even been studied for their ability to prevent cancer.
The compound lentinan in sh*take mushrooms has been found to increase the survival rate of cancer patients.3 And extracts from maitake mushrooms, when combined with vitamin C, were shown to reduce the growth of bladder cancer cells by 90 percent, as well as kill them.4
A previous study in the journal Nature5 discusses the importance of ergothioneine, which is fairly exclusive to mushrooms, describing it as "an unusual sulfur-containing derivative of the amino acid, histidine," which appears to have a very specific role in protecting your DNA from oxidative damage.
Which Mushrooms Are the Healthiest?

If there's a certain type of edible mushroom that you enjoy, feel free to indulge, as they all have unique benefits. According to Steve Farrar, who has studied mushrooms professionally for the last three decades, Americans consume about 900 million pounds of mushrooms a year, but 95 percent of that is just one species: the common button mushroom and its relatives, the Crimini, and the Portabello mushrooms.
Granted, the button mushroom is an excellent low-calorie food, especially for diabetics. It contains a number of valuable nutrients, including protein, enzymes, B vitamins (especially niacin), and vitamin D2.
However, there are many other types of mushrooms worthy of consideration if you want to improve your diet, including shiitake, reishi, cordyceps, turkey tail, and Himematsutake.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on April 04, 2015, 07:28:24 AM
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx

Dr. Mercola

Ashwaganda: Ancient Herb Proven to be a Potential Cure for Alzheimer's

April 07, 2012 | 197,368 views


By Dr. Mercola
Ashwagandha is a small evergreen perennial herb that grows up to nearly 5 feet tall.
Common names used for ashwagandha include: Winter Cherry, Withania somnifera (Latin botanical name), and Indian Ginseng to name a few.
Regardless of the name you use to describe this adaptogenic herb, ashwaganda has been a part of India's Ayurvedic medical system for thousands of years.
There it's regarded as a wonder herb.

While often regarded as an herb for stress reduction and improved energy and vitality, there is a robust body of scientific research confiming ashwaganda's potential therapeutic value in several dozen health conditions.1
Now, new research has revealed this herb may also fight off the devastating effects of Alzheimer's disease.
Could Ashwaganda Cure Alzheimer's?
Alzheimer's disease is currently at epidemic proportions, with 5.4 million Americans -- including one in eight people aged 65 and over -- living with Alzheimer's disease, according to the Alzheimer's Association's 2011 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures.2
With no known cure and a terminal prognosis, Alzheimer's disease is associated with degeneration and death in brain cells, leading to a steady loss of both intellectual and social skills, and, ultimately, premature death.
Researchers at the National Brain Research Centre (NBRC), however, have conducted studies on mice that suggest ashwaganda extract may reverse memory loss and improve cognitive abilities in those with the disease. Initially, mice with Alzheimer's were unable to learn or retain what they learned, but after receiving ashwaganda for 20 days, this improved significantly. After 30 days, the behavior of the mice returned to normal. Researchers reported:
   •   A reduction in amyloid plaques (amyloid plaques, along with tangles of nerve fibers, contribute to the degradation of the wiring in brain cells)
   •   Improved cognitive abilities
Rather than impacting the brain directly, researchers found that the herb worked by boosting a protein in the liver, which enters the bloodstream and helps clear amyloid from the brain. Researchers concluded:
"The remarkable therapeutic effect of W. somnifera [ashwaganda]... reverses the behavioral deficits and pathology seen in Alzheimer's disease models."
More Promising Research on Ashwaganda and Alzheimer's
The featured study is not the first time this humble herb has been implicated in improved brain health among Alzheimer's disease patients. In 2005, researchers found that withanolide derivatives (withanolide A, withanoside IV, and withanoside VI) isolated from ashwagandha improved neurite extension in both normal and damaged brain cells in Alzheimer's disease-model mice.3 This is a key component of treating the disease, as researchers pointed out:
"The reconstruction of neuronal networks in the damaged brain is necessary for the therapeutic treatment of neurodegenerative diseases."
Separate research in Phytotherapy Research, published in 2010, revealed ashwaganda may help manage cell damage in the brain, offering even more potent antioxidant activity than vitamins A, C, and E.4 They noted:
"Several studies have revealed that natural antioxidants, such as vitamin E, vitamin C and beta-carotene, may help in scavenging free radicals generated during the initiation and progression of this [Alzheimer's] disease. Therefore, there has been considerable interest in plant phytochemicals with antioxidant property as potential agents to prevent the progression of AD. Our earlier investigations of the Withania somnifera fruit afforded lipid peroxidation inhibitory withanamides that are more potent than the commercial antioxidants.
In this study, we have tested two major withanamides A (WA) and C (WC) for their ability to protect... rat neuronal cells, from beta-amyloid induced cell damage. The cell death caused by beta-amyloid was negated by withanamide treatment."
Another Ancient Herb for Alzheimer's...
The compound curcumin, which is found in the spice turmeric, is another notable herb for brain health. Recently revealed as effective in helping to stop the protein clumping that is the first step in diseases such as Parkinson's disease,5 past research has shown that curcumin may help inhibit the accumulation of destructive beta amyloids in the brain of Alzheimer's patients, as well as break up existing plaques.
Researchers determined:
   •   Curcumin is more effective in inhibiting the formation of the protein fragments than many other potential Alzheimer's treatments
   •   The low molecular weight and polar structure of curcumin allows it to penetrate the blood-brain barrier effectively and bind to beta amyloid
   •   Alzheimer's symptoms caused by inflammation and oxidation are eased by curcumin's powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties
People with Alzheimer's tend to have higher levels of inflammation in their brains, and curcumin is most known for its potent anti-inflammatory properties. The compound has been shown to influence the expression of more than 700 genes, and it can inhibit both the activity and the synthesis of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and 5-lipooxygenase (5-LOX), as well as other enzymes that modulate inflammation.

(Editor's Note:  Several years ago I began cooking with turmeric, usually on a daily basis, and it was about six months later that both hubby and I, independently of each other, began to notice an improvement in short-term memory.  We both believe it is due to our ingestion of turmeric, which we plan to be a permanent part of our diet.)



Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on April 26, 2015, 01:33:07 PM
Recently I became infected with a Pneumococcus (type of Streptococcus) infection of the bronchial area.  Am still recovering, but am glad it happened because it was a wakeup call to not let one's guard down.  Mainstream medicine saved the day, and in fact a small town hospital, Washington County Memorial Hospital in Potosi, Missouri, USA, did an excellent job--better than I've ever been treated at a so-called prestigious hospital complex in St. Louis, MO, USA.  So hats off to WCMH in Potosi. 

However I need to be better prepared for a day when hubby might not be able to transport me so easily to this hospital, or any hospital for that matter.   Over time, we get lazy, cocky, or just forgetful and that includes yours truly.  I've been using herbs for decades and have quite a few growing in an herb garden, or know where to gather them from Nature.

About five years ago we got goats and became extremely busy, so busy that I've not been able to have some favorite herbal preprations in storage "just in case".  Two of those are coltsfoot and hops tincture.  The coltsfoot was eaten and/or trampled by the goats, and likewise with the hops.

Coltsfoot is useful in many ways for respiratory infections (asthma, bronchitis, "mucous reducer", etc.), and the hops is used to make a tincture (hops berries when covered with bright yellow pollen) that is as good or better than any prescription med. for calming the lungs and assisting in sleep.  An old book I have (1832 or 1835 Materia Medica) states that "hops has all the qualities of the opiates."

Well, when I was hit with this sudden onset of bronchitis, I had nothing to loosen the mucous, causing three asthma attacks over a period of about six hours, and also had almost nothing to take before bedtime to relax the muscles lining the bronchioles for sleep without constant coughing.  It was miserable.  I did use hot black tea after that, as it is a potent bronchodilator.  However it also causes serious insomnia in some including myself.

Neither of those two herbs is to be taken lightly, and I would never take either on a regular basis.  They are too valuable, and don't want the body to be accustomed to a steady diet of it, so that when it is REALLY needed, it might not have the "oomph" effect needed.

Long story short, keep up your guard regarding protecting your own health.  This week I have to dig a few scrappy remnants of hops shoots and transplant them to the herb garden before the goats discover them.  Also have to coddle the approximate six seedlings of coltsfoot I have waiting to be transplanted outdoors into their new herb garden.

Ceaseless awareness.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on May 08, 2015, 09:15:10 AM
Recently I became infected with a Pneumococcus (type of Streptococcus) infection of the bronchial area.  Am still recovering, but am glad it happened because it was a wakeup call to not let one's guard down.  Mainstream medicine saved the day, and in fact a small town hospital, Washington County Memorial Hospital in Potosi, Missouri, USA, did an excellent job--better than I've ever been treated at a so-called prestigious hospital complex in St. Louis, MO, USA.  So hats off to WCMH in Potosi. 

However I need to be better prepared for a day when hubby might not be able to transport me so easily to this hospital, or any hospital for that matter.   Over time, we get lazy, cocky, or just forgetful and that includes yours truly.  I've been using herbs for decades and have quite a few growing in an herb garden, or know where to gather them from Nature.

About five years ago we got goats and became extremely busy, so busy that I've not been able to have some favorite herbal preprations in storage "just in case".  Two of those are coltsfoot and hops tincture.  The coltsfoot was eaten and/or trampled by the goats, and likewise with the hops.

Coltsfoot is useful in many ways for respiratory infections (asthma, bronchitis, "mucous reducer", etc.), and the hops is used to make a tincture (hops berries when covered with bright yellow pollen) that is as good or better than any prescription med. for calming the lungs and assisting in sleep.  An old book I have (1832 or 1835 Materia Medica) states that "hops has all the qualities of the opiates."

Well, when I was hit with this sudden onset of bronchitis, I had nothing to loosen the mucous, causing three asthma attacks over a period of about six hours, and also had almost nothing to take before bedtime to relax the muscles lining the bronchioles for sleep without constant coughing.  It was miserable.  I did use hot black tea after that, as it is a potent bronchodilator.  However it also causes serious insomnia in some including myself.

Neither of those two herbs is to be taken lightly, and I would never take either on a regular basis.  They are too valuable, and don't want the body to be accustomed to a steady diet of it, so that when it is REALLY needed, it might not have the "oomph" effect needed.

Long story short, keep up your guard regarding protecting your own health.  This week I have to dig a few scrappy remnants of hops shoots and transplant them to the herb garden before the goats discover them.  Also have to coddle the approximate six seedlings of coltsfoot I have waiting to be transplanted outdoors into their new herb garden.

Ceaseless awareness.
An addendum to this story is that now I'm recovering, but still there is the threat of asthma, etc., for those of us who are subject to such things. 

During all of this I discovered the usefulness of a beautiful, wonderfully aromatic plant called Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis).  I have grown this plant for years, and have known it was/is used for viral infections such colds and influenza, and even virus researchers are investigating its use in AIDS, but I never thought to use it until now.

A few nights ago while still coughing a lot for some reason, I went to my herb garden, plucked one leaf of Lemon Balm, and walked back inside and made a "tea" by pouring boiling water on the pulvrized leaf in the cup.  (The instructions on www.botanical.com say to pour 1 pint of boiling water over 1 ounce of Melissa officinalis.)   I drank this tea and even as weak as it was, felt my lungs were ever so slightly improved.  So I gathered a bit more and just before bed, made a more potent tea, drank that, and felt a definite improvement.  What I sense is that Lemon Balm is somehow reducing or dissipating the mucous deep in the lungs. 

The process of reducing the mucous somehow also dehydrates the body, so it is really important to drink more water than normal, as I noticed my mouth and throat unusually dry after using this tea.  As long as the water intake is upped, along with use of Lemon Balm, I feel this herb is a very important addition to anyone's herb garden.  Lemon Balm will always have a place in my herb garden.

The only caveat is about geography.  A relative living in southern Texas said that it has taken over his yard and basically will grow anywhere and everywhere, invasively.  So in a warmer climate, it could still be grown in a large container.

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on May 12, 2015, 06:16:47 AM
Another very potent, healing herb is garlic.  This most recent respiratory ailment from which I'm recovering was the worst I've had in maybe a decade or two, and presumably due to self-imposed stress causing my body to be more susceptible to whatever pathogen wafts along.

One thing is important to note that during respiratory illness when there is a lot of mucous being produced in lungs, and not always able to be coughed up, there is a good chance the body's oxygen levels will be dimished--remember the oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange occurs deep in the alveoli of the lung.  Imagine with lowered blood oxygen levels, as person might not be able to think clearly or concentrate.  I felt this was my case this time, and in fact the blood oxygen levels recorded in my emergency room visit were lower than normal.

Last night I suddenly remembered something I have always done in recent years during respiratory infections, and that is breathe garlic vapors, but I had forgotten to do so this time, until last night just before bedtime.

Here is an easy way to get garlic vapors into lungs:  Fill a small saucepan with water, and bring it to boil.  As it approaches boiling point, grate several large, fresh garlic cloves.  As soon as the water boils, remove pan and place it on potholder on table.  Immediately place grated garlic into the water and stir a bit to get them immersed or at least wet all over.  Sit at the table with head directly over the saucepan containing garlic in water, and drape a large towel completely over head in such a way to direct vapors directly upward.  Continue breathing garlic vapors for 5-15 minutes.

There is scientific research which shows that breathing fresh garlic vapor can actually facilitate killing pathogenic microorganisms in the lungs.  As soon as I can find the link again, will post it here.

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods: Medicinal Uses for Baking Soda
Post by: Ruth on June 10, 2015, 04:40:03 PM
Baking Soda – Cheap Blessing
Baking soda is a marvel of nature that keeps on blessing those wise enough to learn how to use it, and treasure it. Put small boxes of it, in zip lock bags, and stash them in bug out bags for everyone.

Storage – keep it dry
Before going out and buying a lot of it consider how it will be stored. I’ve tried using recycled plastic gallon jugs, canning jars and zip lock bags when I got it in bulk. It was a hassle and at times I got it mixed up with citric acid and salt. My favorite way to store is buying it in the 4lb orange “Arm & Hammer” box. Yes, I use it a lot so a 4lb box doesn’t sit around long. The 4lb box looks very similar to the 4lb box of washing soda, so keep the well marked. I store both, the washing soda for laundry and cleaning.
For long term storage I put the individual boxes in recycled plastic bags and secure them, in case my storage area floods. If I had more 5gal buckets I’d put several boxes inside one of them and tape it shut.  Baking soda will go stale and get lumpy, but I’ve never noticed any decrease in its quality, even the box I keep in the fridge to control odors – still works for other uses when I change it out, though I don’t use it for cooking. 

What is Baking Soda? From Wikipedia
Sodium bicarbonate[note 1] (IUPAC name: sodium hydrogen carbonate) is a chemical compound with the formula NaHCO3. Sodium bicarbonate is a white solid that is crystalline but often appears as a fine powder. It has a slightly salty, alkaline taste resembling that of washing soda (sodium carbonate). The natural mineral form is nahcolite. It is a component of the mineral natron and is found dissolved in many mineral springs. It is among the food additives encoded by European Union, identified by the initials E 500. Since it has long been known and is widely used, the salt has many related names such as baking soda, bread soda, cooking soda, and bicarbonate of soda. The word saleratus, from Latin sal æratus meaning aerated salt, was widely used in the 19th century for both sodium bicarbonate and potassium bicarbonate. The term has now fallen out of common usage.

Ancient Usage of Sodium Bicarbonate
Historical and archeological evidence shows the natural source, natron occurs in many places worldwide making it accessible for use. But the refining of natron produces baking soda and washing soda, or sodium bicarbonate and sodium carbonate. Washing soda is also called caustic soda. As natron is found with salt and mineral inclusions it is often confused with salt in ancient records. As natron however it was used for mummification as it dried out the corpse.

Medicinal Uses of Baking Soda

HeartburnA half teaspoon of baking soda dissolved in 8 oz of water, sip slowly or drink all at once, eases heartburn and indigestion for many people. It is much faster acting than over the counter medicines for acid indigestion. If use of this remedy starts to become daily then see a health professional as something serious may be going on, and baking soda might not be enough for relief.
 
Kidney Disease. A small dose of baking soda could stop the progression of chronic kidney disease, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Researchers divided 134 patients with kidney disease into two groups. One group received a 600 mg tablet of baking soda each day in addition to their regular care. After one year, only 9 percent of the baking soda group showed that their disease had progressed significantly, compared with 45 percent of those in the control group. British scientists say baking soda is so effective that it could stop patients from having to undergo dialysis. (Would like to see this translated into the drink. In a survival situation, still good to know.)

Cancer. Animal models of human breast cancer cells show that baking soda can increase the alkalinity of tumors and inhibit their metastasis, while not harming healthy tissues. Some doctors are so impressed that they are using baking soda as a part of their overall treatment for cancer patients. Dr. Julian Whitaker, founder and director of the Whitaker Wellness Institute, advises his cancer patients to sip drinks made with two teaspoons of baking soda mixed in two cups of water three times a day.

The following information on athletic performance may be very helpful in a survival wellness situation when on the move, or engaged in heavy or prolonged physical movement.
Athletic performance. Runners often take baking soda capsules before they race, a practice called "soda doping." A study conducted by the American College of Sports Medicine found that runners who took baking soda improved their performances.

Tests have also shown that baking soda improves the speed of swimmers. A study at Loughborough University found that eight of nine swimmers who took baking soda before a race improved their times. "Essentially, sodium bicarbonate is an alkali substance that increases the pH of the blood," researcher Jonathan Folland told the Daily Mail. "This seems to reduce and offset the acidity produced in the muscles during intense, anaerobic exercise that produces lactic acid most quickly, such as fast running or swimming." The bottom line is that baking soda appears to reduce acids in the muscles and cause the body to tire more slowly. (1 teaspoon of baking soda in 8oz pure water, several times a day.)

Insect bites. A strong alkaline paste of baking soda and warm water eases the intense itching of mosquito and chigger bites. Dab a bit of cider vinegar on the spot or witch hazel extract to kill bacteria. Then apply the paste. Make the paste by adding just enough water to a teaspoon of baking soda so that it makes a thick paste. This will dry out however and flake off. So if it needs to stay in place, smear the paste onto a gauze pad and tape in place. Remove in a few hours and replace if needed.

If there is a concern about infection apply 1 drop of antibacterial essential oil to the paste. Use any one of these: oregano, tea tree, peppermint, lavender, eucalyptus, niaouli, raventsara, basil, thyme, pine, fir balsam, sandalwood, frankincense.

Tooth and gum paste. One review of data from five controlled clinical studies found that toothpaste containing baking soda "enhanced plaque removal effectiveness of tooth brushing to a significantly greater extent" than brushing with a non-baking soda toothpaste.

Baking soda also has antibacterial activity and has been found to kill Streptococcus mutans bacteria – a significant contributor to tooth decay.

Many believe baking soda can be too abrasive on tooth enamel, and Dr. Curatola (Rejuvenation Dentistry) believes that killing the oral microbiome may be highly counterproductive. Perhaps reserving it for use in situations of tooth decay or pain, may be the better idea use.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on June 30, 2015, 07:03:33 AM

http://readynutrition.com/resources/off-grid-antibiotics-for-when-there-is-no-medicine_27062015/

Off Grid Antibiotics: For When There is No Medicine
Jeremiah Johnson

Good Day to you Ready Nutrition Readers!  Today’s article details Lomatium, the most powerful herb in North America for use as an antiviral or antibiotic.  After reading this article, you may wish to add this herb to your naturopathic first-aid arsenal and include it in your stores of preps.  The bottom line: those who used Lomatium during the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic survived the virus and all of its complications.  Nifty, huh?
An Off the Grid Antibiotic and Antiviral Solution


There are 11 species of the genus as identified by the U.S. National Herbarium back in the year 1840, and three that hold special medicinal significance in the field of naturopathic medicine: Lomatium dissectum, Leptotaenia dissecta, and Leptotaenia multifida.  The one we are going to focus on primarily is Lomatium dissectum. The following list gives the indications and uses for the herb:  Coughs and associated illnesses of the throat, allergies, bronchitis, pneumonia, asthma, influenza, tuberculosis, venereal diseases, and distemper.
Lomatium is also a healing agent in cuts, abrasions, sores, and rashes of the skin, as well infections of the eye and an external wash for smallpox.  It has additional uses as an antiseptic rinse.  One of the pioneers of its study and use was an individual named Ernest T. Krebs, a biochemist with a very good background in medicine (as his father was a physician).  He wrote a treatise that outlined the results obtained among the Washoe Indian Tribe during the time the pandemic was running rampant in the U.S. and throughout the world.
The article was entitled, “An Indian Remedy for Influenza,” published in the Bulletin of the Nevada State Board of health, Jan. 1920, pg. 7-9.   The following quotations are excerpts from that bulletin that are worth mention:
During the Fall of 1918 when the influenza visited Nevada, the Washoe Indians used a root in the treatment of their sick. The plant proved to be a rare species of the parsley family (Leptotaemia dissecta).
.. There was not a single death in the Washoe tribe from influenza or its complications, although Indians living in others parts of the state where the root did not grow died in numbers.
A preparation was prepared and employed in a great many cases among the whites from the mildest to the most virulent types of influenza, and it proved, among other things, that it is the nearest approach we have today to a specific for epidemic influenza and the accompanying pneumonia. Where used early, it proved itself to be a reliable agent in preventing pulmonary complications.… Its therapeutic action in this direction is established and beyond any doubt…. Its action on coughs is more certain than opiate expectorants…. It acts as a powerful tonic to the respiratory mucous membranes…. It is a bronchial, intestinal, and urinary antiseptic and is excreted by these organs…. It is a stimulative and sedative expectorant.
Suffice it to say, readers, this herb bears particular value for preppers and survival-minded groups and families.  The root is the primary part utilized within a capacity of naturopathic medicine.  Since the 1918 Pandemic and the work of Krebs, numerous other studies were undertaken that proved conclusively the effectiveness of the herb against all of the ailments mentioned.  A work was also put out by the USDA entitled “Medicinal Uses of Plants by Indian Tribes of Nevada” in 1941 categorizing its use among three different tribes.
Lomatium is readily-available today in tincture and raw-herb form.  The Tribes made preparations from the root by chopping it up and boiling it to extract the oil from it.  During the pandemic each member of the tribe utilized about a pound of the root during times when the sickness was running rampant.  It is available throughout the United States in tincture form and can be ordered from growers to obtain the whole root and also in your better health-food concerns.
The root needs to be at least three (3) years old to be able to produce the chemicals that are medicinally-therapeutic in nature.   Lomatium has been proven effective against 41 types of bacteria and 21 strains of mold and fungi.  Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli are among those it inhibits and kills; these I note for you because they are bacteria that are so rampant in a time of collapse/loss of infrastructure, as well as being found commonly in everyday life.
How to Make a Lomatium Tincture
I have been tincturing Lomatium for years, and find that it is easier than boiling the root to obtain the oil.  Macerate (chop up) the root as finely as possible, and place the root-choppings into a large glass jar.  Then use grain alcohol (such as Everclear) in an amount cut with distilled water to a ratio of 52% alcohol or higher, in order to tincture it.  When it comes to Lomatium, I use at least a 75% ratio for my tinctures.  The reason is twofold.  Firstly, an alcohol-based tincture stores and preserves longer and better than any other form and can be kept for a minimum of 3 years and still retain effectiveness.  Secondly, the alcohol will prevent the tincture from freezing by lowering the freezing point of the liquid exponentially, and this is valuable to me as winters here in Montana easily reach -30 degrees F.
Another consideration is that even without such low winter temperatures, if an EMP should occur, how will you ensure that your medicines and tinctures are not exposed to such low temperatures?  Proceeding onward, cover your herb completely with the alcohol-water solution, cap up the jar and seal it, and shake it vigorously about 100 times.  Do this 2-3 times per day and keep the sealed jar inside of a dark cabinet or place where there is no light.  After 2 weeks, you can remove your jar and strain the liquid.  Place the saturated herb in a coffee filter, handkerchief, gauze, etc., and press the remaining liquid for your tincture out.
All tinctures should be stored in either brown or blue bottles to protect from light and UV exposure.  Always label your tincture with what it is, the date you made it, an estimated expiration date, and any other important warnings or considerations you wish to include.  At the aforementioned ratio, the tincture produces Lomatium at a 52% solution in a concentration of approximately 325 mg/ml (from an eyedropper, 15 drops = 1 ml.  This can be taken preventatively in a time of pandemic 1-2 times per day with juice or water after a meal.  The herb is also a perennial and grows sporadically throughout the Northwest of the U.S. and Canada.
As with all things mentioned herbally, this article is not meant to diagnose, treat, prescribe, cure, or take any action or activity from a medical perspective, and is provided for informational purposes only.  Prior to utilizing any information consult with your licensed family physician for permission and approval.
Hope you enjoyed an introduction to Lomatium dissectum, a fascinating herb with a rich and successful history as a naturopathic aid.  Have a great day!
 
JJ
 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.
Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.
Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on June 30, 2015, 10:54:24 PM
ilinda - great post!  :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 01, 2015, 06:19:00 AM
http://foodrevolution.org/blog/how-to-clean-your-arteries-with-one-simple-fruit/
How To Clean Your Arteries With One Simple Fruit

May 21, 2015
By Sayer Ji • Originally posted on GreenMedInfo.com
The future of cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment will not be found in your medicine cabinet, rather in your kitchen cupboard or in your back yard growing on a tree.

Pomegranate Found To Prevent Coronary Artery Disease Progression

A new study published in the journal Atherosclerosis confirms that pomegranate extract may prevent and/or reverse the primary pathology associated with cardiac mortality: the progressive thickening of the coronary arteries caused by the accumulation of fatty materials known as atherosclerosis. Mice with a genetic susceptibility towards spontaneous coronary artery blockages were given pomegranate extract via their drinking water for two weeks, beginning at three weeks of age. Despite the fact that pomegranate treatment actually increased cholesterol levels associated with very low density lipoprotein-sized particles, the treatment both reduced the size of the atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic sinus (the dilated opening above the aortic valve) and reduced the proportion of coronary arteries with occlusive atherosclerotic plaques. Remarkably, the researchers also found that pomegranate extract treatment resulted in the following beneficial effects:
   •   Reduced levels of oxidative stress
   •   Reduced monocytie chemotactic protein-1, a chemical messenger (chemokine) associated with inflammatory processes within the arteries.
   •   Reduced lipid accumulation in the heart muscle
   •   Reduced macrophage infiltration in the heart muscle
   •   Reduced levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and fibrosis in the myocardium
   •   Reduced cardiac enlargement
   •   Reduced ECG abnormalities
How can something as benign and commonplace as a fruit extract reverse so many aspects of coronary artery disease, simultaneously, as evidenced by the study above?  The answer may lie in the fact that our ancestors co-evolved with certain foods (fruits in particular) for so long that a lack of adequate quantities of these foods may directly result in deteriorating organ function.  Indeed, two-time Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling argued that vitamin C deficiency is a fundamental cause of cardiovascular disease, owing to the fact that our hominid primate ancestors once had year-round access to fruits, and as a result lost the ability to synthesize it.  [see Linus Pauling vitamin C lecture on GreenMedTV] Discussion This study adds to the already extant body of clinical research indicating that pomegranate can help unclog your arteries.  For instance, back in 2004, the journal Clinical Nutrition published the results of a three year clinical trial in an Israeli population, finding that the daily consumption of pomegranate juice reversed carotid artery stenosis by up to 29% within 1 year.  Remarkably, the blockages in the control group increased 9%, indicating that pomegranate’s artery unblocking effects were even greater than at first apparent. [ii] Pomegranate’s value in cardiovascular disease is quite broad, as evidenced by the following experimentally confirmed properties:
   •   Anti-inflammatory: Like many chronic degenerative diseases, inflammation plays a significant role in cardiovascular disease pathogenesis. There are five studies on GreenMedInfo.com indicating pomegranate’s anti-inflammatory properties.[iii]
   •   Blood-Pressure Lowering: Pomegranate juice has natural angiotensin converting enzyme inhibiting properties, [iv] and is a nitric oxide enhancer, two well-known pathways for reducing blood pressure. [v] Finally, pomegranate extract rich in punicalagin has been found reduce the adverse effects of perturbed stress on arterial segments exposed to disturbed flow.[vi]
   •   Anti-Infective: Plaque buildup in the arteries often involves secondary viral and bacterial infection, including hepatitis C and Chlamydia pneumoniae.[vii] Pomegranate has a broad range of anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties.
   •   Antioxidant: One of the ways in which blood lipids become heart disease-promoting (atherogenic) is through oxidation. LDL, for instance, may be technically ‘elevated’ but harmless as long as it does not readily oxidize. Pomegranate has been found to reduce the oxidative stress in the blood, as measured by serum paraoxonase levels.  One study in mice found this decrease in oxidative stress was associated with 44% reduction in the size of atherosclerotic lesions. [viii]
Resources
   •    Aishah Al-Jarallah, Fatima Igdoura, Yi Zhang, Christine B Tenedero, Elizabeth J White, Melissa E Macdonald, Suleiman A Igdoura, Bernardo L Trigatti. The effect of pomegranate extract on coronary artery atherosclerosis in SR-BI/APOE double knockout mice.Atherosclerosis. 2013 May ;228(1):80-9. Epub 2013 Mar 7. PMID: 23528829
   •   [ii] Michael Aviram, Mira Rosenblat, Diana Gaitini, Samy Nitecki, Aaron Hoffman, Leslie Dornfeld, Nina Volkova, Dita Presser, Judith Attias, Harley Liker, Tony Hayek. Pomegranate juice consumption for 3 years by patients with carotid artery stenosis reduces common carotid intima-media thickness, blood pressure and LDL oxidation. Clin Nutr. 2004 Jun;23(3):423-33. PMID: 15158307
   •   [iii] GreenMedInfo.com, Pomegranate’s Anti-Inflammatory Properties
   •   [iv] Mahalaxmi Mohan, Harshal Waghulde, Sanjay Kasture. Effect of pomegranate juice on Angiotensin II-induced hypertension in diabetic Wistar rats. Phytother Res. 2009 Dec 17. PMID: 20020514
   •   [v] Filomena de Nigris, Maria Luisa Balestrieri, Sharon Williams-Ignarro, Francesco P D’Armiento, Carmela Fiorito, Louis J Ignarro, Claudio Napoli. The influence of pomegranate fruit extract in comparison to regular pomegranate juice and seed oil on nitric oxide and arterial function in obese Zucker rats. Nitric Oxide. 2007 Aug ;17(1):50-4. Epub 2007 May 5. PMID: 17553710
   •   [vi] Filomena de Nigris, Sharon Williams-Ignarro, Vincenzo Sica, Lilach O Lerman, Francesco P D’Armiento, Russell E Byrns, Amelia Casamassimi, Daniela Carpentiero, Concetta Schiano, Daigo Sumi, Carmela Fiorito, Louis J Ignarro, Claudio Napoli. Effects of a pomegranate fruit extract rich in punicalagin on oxidation-sensitive genes and eNOS activity at sites of perturbed shear stress and atherogenesis. Cardiovasc Res. 2007 Jan 15;73(2):414-23. Epub 2006 Sep 1. PMID: 17014835
   •   [vii] Yasunori Sawayama, Kyoko Okada, Shinji Maeda, Hachiro Ohnishi, Norihiro Furusyo, Jun Hayashi. Both hepatitis C virus and Chlamydia pneumoniae infection are related to the progression of carotid atherosclerosis in patients undergoing lipid lowering therapy.Fukuoka Igaku Zasshi. 2006 Aug;97(8):245-55. PMID: 17087362
   •   [viii] M Aviram, L Dornfeld, M Rosenblat, N Volkova, M Kaplan, R Coleman, T Hayek, D Presser, B Fuhrman. Pomegranate juice consumption reduces oxidative stress, atherogenic modifications to LDL, and platelet aggregation: studies in humans and in atherosclerotic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 May ;71(5):1062-76. PMID: 10799367
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 01, 2015, 06:23:57 AM
http://www.latimes.com/home/la-he-healing-garden-recipes-20150627-story.html
How to make your own herb tincture or peppermint oil

(Karen Tapia-Andersen / Los Angeles Times)
By Peg Moline

Many of the studies done on herbs use an extraction of the plant. Oils are usually used externally; tinctures are for internal use (oil of oregano is actually a tincture).

Here are recipes for a tincture and peppermint oil from Gayle Engels of the American Botanical Council:
For an herb tincture
1. Pack fresh herbs into a clean glass jar with a tight lid.
2. Fill with 80-proof vodka.
3. Cover the mouth of the jar with wax paper or plastic wrap. Close the lid tightly and shake well. Keep in a dark place for four to six weeks, shaking daily.
4. Strain and keep the liquid in a glass bottle. Label with the name and date. It will keep for years in a brown glass bottle in a dark cabinet. Add 10% glycerin to make it more palatable, or you can use glycerin if you don't want to ingest alcohol.

For peppermint oil

1. Crush or muddle fresh peppermint leaves in a glass jar with a tight lid.
2. Cover the leaves with olive or grapeseed oil. Close the jar and shake.
3. Store for three days. Strain into a bowl and discard the leaves.
4. Pack the jar with fresh leaves, pour the oil back in the jar and cover with fresh oil. Repeat until you have the desired amount.
Twenty drops of the oil should be diluted with 1.5 ounces of another oil — coconut or almond, for example — before using it topically, and with water (1 cup per five to 10 drops of oil) for mouthwash. Never put essential oils directly on your skin (they can burn).
health@latimes.com
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on October 02, 2015, 08:11:48 AM
Another great article from Dr. Mercola at www.mercola.com, and it's about beets again!


The World's #1 Natural Health Website†

Beetroot Juice Can Benefit Your Muscles

October 02, 2015 | 12,860 views


By Dr. Mercola

    Beetroots, also known simply as beets or table beets in the US, are a sweet, surprisingly concentrated source of nutrition. The first clue they’re loaded with nutrition is their bright red color, which indicates the presence of powerful phytonutrients called betalains.

    Betalains include reddish-purple betacyanin pigments and yellowish betaxanthin pigments. Many of the betalain pigments in beets have been shown to provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and detoxifying effects.

    Newer research suggests that, in addition, compounds in beets may improve muscle performance, offering allure not only for athletes but also for maintaining muscle function as you age.

Naturally Occurring Nitrates in Beets May Boost Muscle Health

    Beets are a good source of naturally occurring nitrates, which are converted into nitric oxide (NO) in your body. Nitric oxide is perhaps most well-known for its benefits to heart health. As noted by cardiologist Dr. Stephen Sinatra:1

        “Adequate NO production is the first step in a chain reaction that promotes healthy cardiovascular function, while insufficient NO triggers a cascade of destruction that eventually results in heart disease…

        NO promotes healthy dilation of the veins and arteries so blood can move throughout your body. Plus, it prevents red blood cells from sticking together to create dangerous clots and blockages.”

    Your heart, of course, is a muscle, so it makes sense that boosting NO production would also lead to improvements in other muscles in your body.

    Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in Missouri have previously found dietary nitrates improve muscle performance in elite athletes, and they wanted to determine if such nitrates would also benefit patients with heart failure, whose weakened hearts make them prone to fatigue and shortness of breath with everyday activities.

    Senior study author Dr. Linda R. Peterson, associate professor of Medicine at the Washington University School of Medicine, told Medical News Today:2

        "A lot of the activities of daily living are power-based - getting out of a chair, lifting groceries, or climbing stairs. And they have a major impact on quality of life… We want to help make people more powerful because power is such an important predictor of how well people do, whether they have heart failure, cancer, or other conditions."

Beet Juice May Increase Muscle Power By 13 Percent


    For the latest study, participants with heart failure drank beet juice, either with the naturally occurring nitrates or with the nitrate content removed. Two hours after consuming the juice, those who consumed the nitrates-containing beverage had a 13 percent increase in power in muscles that extend the knee.3

    Andrew R. Coggan, PhD, assistant professor of Radiology at the Washington University School of Medicine, told Medical News Today:4

        "I have compared the beet-juice effect to Popeye eating his spinach. The magnitude of this improvement is comparable to that seen in heart failure patients who have done 2 to 3 months of resistance training."

    Past research has also found that beet juice may boost your stamina, as those who drank beet juice prior to exercise were able to exercise for up to 16 percent longer.5

    This benefit is also thought to be related to nitrates turning into nitric oxide, which may reduce the oxygen cost of low-intensity exercise as well as enhance tolerance to high-intensity exercise.

    A separate study similarly revealed that consuming a concentrated beet juice supplement increases whole-body NO production as well as muscle speed and power in healthy men and women.6

Beet Juice May Lower Your Blood Pressure and Benefit Brain Health


    Your blood pressure may also benefit from the nitrates in beet juice, with benefits occurring within in a matter of hours. One study found that drinking one glass of beet juice lowered systolic blood pressure by an average of 4 to 5 points.7

    A separate study found consuming beet juice daily for four weeks lead to reductions in blood pressure, improvements in endothelial function, and reduced arterial stiffness. The researchers concluded:8

        “This is the first evidence of durable BP [blood pressure] reduction with dietary nitrate supplementation in a relevant patient group. These findings suggest a role for dietary nitrate as an affordable, readily-available, and adjunctive treatment in the management of patients with hypertension.”

    Aside from the blood pressure benefits, drinking beet juice may also be good for your brain. The nitrates, and resulting NO, help increase blood flow to the brain in elderly people. As you age, blood flow to certain areas of your brain decreases, which is associated with dementia and poor cognitive function.

    When adults aged 70 and over ate a high-nitrate breakfast including beet juice, they had increased blood flow to their brain’s white matter, which is an area associated with dementia.9

Beets Are Antioxidant-Rich, Inflammation-Fighting Superstars


    If you enjoy beets, there’s good reason to add them to your meals regularly. You can grate them raw over salads, marinate them with lemon juice, herbs, and olive oil as a side dish, or steam them, whichever you prefer.

    Nutritionally, beets are high in immune-boosting vitamin C, fiber, and essential minerals like potassium (essential for healthy nerve and muscle function) and manganese (which is good for your bones, liver, kidneys, and pancreas). Beets also contain the B-vitamin folate, which helps reduce the risk of birth defects.

    The betalain pigments in beets support your body’s Phase 2 detoxification process, which is when broken down toxins are bound to other molecules so they can be excreted from your body. Traditionally, beets are valued for their support in detoxification and helping to purify your blood and your liver.

    Research has even shown that beetroot extract reduced multi-organ tumor formations in various animal models when administered in drinking water, while beetroot extract is being studied for use in treating human pancreatic, breast, and prostate cancers.10

    Beets are also a unique source of betaine, a nutrient that helps protects cells, proteins, and enzymes from environmental stress. It’s also known to help fight inflammation, protect internal organs, improve vascular risk factors, enhance performance, and likely help prevent numerous chronic diseases.11 As reported by the World’s Healthiest Foods:12

        “[Betaine’s]… presence in our diet has been associated with lower levels of several inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. As a group, the anti-inflammatory molecules found in beets may eventually be shown to provide cardiovascular benefits in large-scale human studies, as well as anti-inflammatory benefits for other body systems.”

Beets Are a High-Sugar Veggie


    Although the benefits of beet juice appear well established, keep in mind that beets are a very high-sugar vegetable. In fact, beets have the highest sugar content of all vegetables, although they also contain a wealth of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

    For this reason, I recommend adding beets (in whole, non-juiced form) to your diet a few times a week to benefit from their nutrition without overdosing on their high amounts of sugar. The sugar will be even more concentrated in beet juice, without any of the fiber to somewhat moderate its effects, so you have to be cautious when consuming beets in juiced form.

    If you struggle with high blood pressure or heart failure, you may want to experiment with beet juice and see how it impacts you. If you notice improvements in your blood pressure or stamina after drinking the juice, it may be a good fit for you. If you have diabetes or are insulin resistant, carefully monitor how beet juice affects your overall health and factor that in to how often you choose to consume it. Typically, moderation is best.

    Keep in mind that this article is referring to the red beets most people add to salads and side dishes; they are not the same variety as sugar beets, which are actually white, commonly genetically modified, and used in the production of sugar. Also, if you’re solely interested in the benefits of nitrates in beet juice, you might also try consuming other nitrate-rich (but lower-sugar) vegetables (or juicing them), such as celery, lettuce, parsley, and spinach.

    Beet greens are also a good source and contain additional important nutrients like protein, phosphorus, zinc, fiber, vitamin B6, magnesium, potassium, copper, and manganese. Beet greens also supply significant amounts of vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, and iron. For reference, here are some examples of vegetables you can juice, along with the level of nitrates they contain.13
    Vegetable (100 grams)    Nitrates (milligrams, mg)
    Arugula    480
    Cilantro    247
    Butter leaf lettuce    200
    Spring greens    188
    Beet greens    177
    Swiss chard    151
    Beets    100

Visit Our Food Facts Library for Empowering Nutrition Information

    If you want to learn even more about what's in the food you're eating, visit our Food Facts library. Most people are not aware of the wealth of nutrients available in healthy foods, particularly organic fruits and vegetables. By getting to know your food, you can make informed decisions about how to eat healthier and thereby boost your brain function, lower your risk of chronic disease, lose weight, and much more.

    Food Facts is a directory of the most highly recommended health foods to add to your wholesome diet. Its purpose is to provide you with valuable information about various types of foods including recipes to help you maximize these benefits. You'll learn about nutrition facts, scientific studies, and even interesting trivia about each food in the Food Facts library. Remember, knowing what's in your food is the first step to choosing and preparing nutritious meals each and every day. So visit Mercola Food Facts today to get started.

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on October 04, 2015, 07:40:09 AM

Organic Food during Mother's Pregnancy Reduces Risk of Male Birth Defects

   •   press-release@i-sis.org.uk
   •   
   •   Today at 10:22 AM
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This article can be found on the I-SIS website at http://www.i-sis.org.uk/Organic_Food_Reduces_Birth_Defects.php
ISIS Report 30/09/15
Organic Food during Mother's Pregnancy Reduces Risk of Male Birth Defects

Expecting mothers eating mostly organic produce reduce risk of urogenital anomalies in male offspring
--Dr Eva Sirinathsinghji

A fully referenced version of this article is posted on ISIS members website and otherwise available for download here
Please circulate widely and repost, but you must give the URL of the original and preserve all the links back to articles on our website. If you find this report useful, please support ISIS by subscribing to our magazine Science in Society, and encourage your friends to do so. Or have a look at the ISIS bookstore for other publications

A large epidemiological study links consumption of organic food with decreased rates of hypospadias and cryptorchidism, both common types of male urogenital birth defects [1]. This is the first prospective study to find a significant link between consumption of organic foods and reduced risk of hypospadias.
The study analysed over 37 000 women and children pairs, finding that women who consume any organic food during pregnancy are 0.42 times as likely to give birth to a boy with hypospadias as those who report seldom or never eating organic food. This decrease is modest but significant, and builds on a growing list of studies linking pesticides and other endocrine disrupters to these types of defects. Of all the food groups analysed (vegetables, fruit, cereal, dairy, eggs and meat), consumption of organic vegetables as well as organic dairy were most strongly associated with the protective effect, with baby boys 0.30 times as likely to get hypospadias when mothers consumed either organic dairy or organic vegetables. For cryptorchidism, a borderline negative association was found solely with the consumption of organic milk/dairy products, with those consuming this organic food group being 0.65 times as likely to give birth to a boy with the condition. Results were adjusted for food intakes, sociodemographic variables and lifestyle factors, though these factors had marginal influence on the results.
Published in Environmental Health Perspectives and led by Dr Anne Lise Brantsæter at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo, the research used data collected from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. It is an ongoing long-term prospective cohort study of 110 000 pregnant women that aims to provide a resource for assessing the role of environmental and other exposures in the health of women and their children, conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. For this study in particular, the data were used to uncover the unknown aetiology of these urogenital anomalies.
Rates of urogenital defects rising in many global regions
Hypospadias is a male birth defect of the urethra where the urinary opening is not at the correct location at the head of the penis. It is the second most common birth defect in boys, affecting approximately 1 in 250 people in the US, and 3 in 1 ooo in Europe [2]. Its prevalence has been rising in many parts of the world including numerous countries in Europe, Americas and Asia. Increased rates in 7 European countries were reported by the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Monitoring Systems, a non-governmental organisation of the World Health Organisation in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s [3]. Concurrently, a Danish study reported rising rates from 0.24 % of the population in 1977 to 0.52 % in 2005, corresponding to an annual increase of 2.4 % [4]. In the US, The Centre for Disease Control and Prevention reported a doubling of rates from 1968 to 1993 [5]. This analysis included data from the population-based registry that uses active case studies in 22 hospitals and clinics in the 2 different states, Atlanta and Georgia. The US Birth Defects Monitoring Program which gathers discharge diagnoses of newborns across the country reports an increase in hypospadias from 20.2 per 10 000 live births in 1970 to 39.7 per 10 000 in 1993, almost a doubling of rates in a 14-year period [6].  Data from the Japanese International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research show that the prevalence of hypospadias in Japan from 1997 to 2002 and 2003 to 2006 were 3.43 per 10 000 and 4.23 per 10 000 births, respectively [7]. In China, rising rates are found in rural populations and in children of mothers with higher maternal age, with a national annual increase in prevalence of 7.43 % reported in one study [8]. There appears to be geographical variation in disease rates however, and not all regions or countries are seeing rises in disease but either levelling off or even decreases in disease rates, including California, Mexico, Israel, Australia and some parts of Europe [3].
Cryptorchidism is diagnosed when one or both testicles have not descended into the scrotum. Prevalence varies depending on geographical location, with rates between 2-8 % of all male births [9]. Prospective cohort studies have indicated an increased prevalence of the defect in England (1950s-1980s) and Denmark (1960s-2000) [10].
Hypsospadias, hormones and endocrine disrupting chemicals

The development of the external male genitalia is a complex process that involves both androgen hormone-dependent and independent pathways that are also susceptible to other endocrine and environmental influences. Non-hormonal influences that have been identified include foetal growth restriction and preeclampsia (a condition of pregnant women characterised by high blood pressure and protein in the urine), which have been consistently associated with hypospadias, suggesting that placental insufficiency may be a factor [11]. It is known that maternal diet influences placental function, level of inflammation and foetal nutrient supply [12], indicating that diet may be related to hypospadias via this mechanism.
Hormonal influences tie into their complex involvement in the development of the reproductive system early in foetal life. Initially, male and female reproductive systems follow a similar pattern of development and at 6 weeks of age, the differentiation of external genitalia is yet to take place. At 9-10 weeks the sex determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY) is required to initiate male gonadal differentiation including the differentiation of testicular Sertoli cells, as well as Leydig cells which produce testosterone. Testosterone induces the development of the epididymis (a highly convoluted duct behind the testis, along which sperm passes to the vas deferens), vas deferens and seminal vesicles. By the 10-12th week, the genitalia are distinguishable externally. Testosterone is also a substrate for the enzyme, 5α-reductase, which converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. This even more potent androgen drives growth of the external genitalia and prostate [13].
Studies of the genetics of hypospadias point towards hormonal abnormalities as a key cause. Though it is considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental causes, some single gene traits can lead to hypospadias, including partial androgen insensitivity syndrome, testosterone 5α-reductase deficiency and Drash syndrome [14]. Clinical studies also indicate that defects in testosterone metabolism or testosterone receptors are a potential cause of hypospadias. Exposure to synthetic oestrogens and progestins used for contraceptives or assisted reproduction have been linked to the defect.
Animal studies show the importance of hormone-dependent pathways in reproductive development. Blocking dihydrotestosterone in rabbits results in feminisation of male reproductive organs in rabbits. Rats exposed to antiandrogens leads feminisation as well as cryptorchidism. Pesticides such as linuron and vinclozolin cause feminisation of external genitalia and abnormal urethral opening in rats and mice.  Phthalates, chemicals added to a large variety of products from pharmaceutical pills to gelling & emulsifying agents, agricultural adjuvants, building materials, personal care products as well as paints, textiles and plastic products such as children’s toys and food packaging, also act as antiandrogens and have been shown to cause feminisation and hypospadias in male rats (see [14] for summary of animal studies of hormonal roles in reproductive development.) Human studies have also found a link of hypospadias to phthalate exposure. It is thought that human exposure to phthalates happens most commonly through ingestion, either by the contamination of food via its use as an adjuvant for pesticides or food packaging, as well as sucking of children’s toys. It has been detected in most food groups from meats to vegetables and grains [15].
Pesticides are the other obvious candidate for the observed disparity in disease rates between those eating organic versus conventional foods. Several classes of pesticide have been shown to have endocrine disrupting effects including glyphosate, 2,4-D, atrazine, endosulfan, linurin, vinclozolin and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) [16]. A metal-analysis of 9 studies found a marginal but significant risk of hypospadias associated with both maternal and paternal exposures to pesticides, reporting a 1.4 times increased chance of getting hypospadias following maternal pesticide exposure [17]. Individual studies have found increased rates of hypospadias children of people living or working in agricultural environments in North Indian boys [18] and increased cryptorchidism in gardeners in Denmark [19]. Greek boys with hypospadias as well as their parents show the presence of organophosphate and organochlorine pesticides in hair samples, with mother’s showing significantly higher levels than the fathers, though was limited by a lack of control [20].
Glyphosate herbicides have also been suggested to contribute to hypospadias in a recent review of the decline of health in both people and wild animals in the state of Montana, USA, in the last 20 years, that correlates with the increased use of glyphosate [21]. Glyphosate has been widely reported to cause birth defects and has been shown to disrupt endocrine pathways such as the retinoic acid signalling pathway and aromatase enzyme activity, which converts testosterone precursors to oestrogens (see [22] Banishing Glyphosate, Special ISIS report). This latter mechanism may cause a disruption of testosterone signalling that could lead to the development of hypospadias, though this is yet to be mechanistically studied.
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Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on November 26, 2015, 11:03:05 AM

http://thetruthaboutcancer.com/video-sources-laetrile-vitamin-b17-amygdalin/

Video – The Best Sources of Laetrile (aka Vitamin B17 or Amygdalin) for Cancer Patients

Posted by: Ty Bollinger in Experts, Foods, Videos

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Video Transcript: The Best Sources of Laetrile (aka Vitamin B17 or Amygdalin) for Cancer Patients

Ty Bollinger: I would like to find out from you what you would recommend as far as maybe the top five or six foods that would contain Laetrile, because after hearing this I want to make sure that we’re eating foods that contain Laetrile. Where would we find them in a typical grocery store or are they—can you find them in a grocery store?
G. Edward Griffin: Oh yeah, they’re there. In fact we published, our little company published a book some years ago called “The Little Cyanide Cookbook.”
Ty Bollinger: Okay. I like the name.
G. Edward Griffin: We were afraid a lot of ladies might want the book for other reasons.
Ty Bollinger: I would buy the book just because of the ingenious title.
G. Edward Griffin: But it is all about how to cook delicious meals with foods that contain natural resources of cyanide in this vitamin b17 format, or amygdalin format. So if anybody wants to know the complete list we’ve got the list there in the back of that book called “The Little Cyanide Cookbook.” But no, getting past that and if you want to go down to your grocery store today it’s hard to find foods that are really rich in that because people don’t buy them. They don’t want them.
The best source, easiest source is an apple seed. Get apples and if you chew those seeds—your grandmother might have said “don’t chew those seeds, it’s poisonous.” Well,  it’s not poisonous. It’s got amygdalin in it. That’s what makes it so bitter. So if you’re eating an apple seed and really chew it up you’ll get that bitter taste. And now you know what amygdalin tastes like.
That’s one good source. Apricot seeds are very good and you can find those in some health food stores. Or you can go on the internet. There are companies that sell them on the internet. Apricot seeds. The California seeds are the most bitter, meaning they have the most amygdalin in them. But they also import them from Turkey and they’re a little sweeter. But you have to eat more of them to get the same amount.
So those are two good sources. Peach seeds. Plum seeds if you can crack these hard shells open and get the little seeds out. Almonds? No. Now, it used to be that all almonds were very rich in amygdalin, but they were very bitter.
Ty Bollinger: Right, the bitter almond tree.
G. Edward Griffin: The bitter almond tree was the almond tree that one time 80 or 90 years ago that’s all there was. And some farmer found a tree in his pasture that “hey, this isn’t bitter, this is sweet” and everybody started grafting onto the twigs from that tree. And now you can drive through mid-California orchards and you drive for miles and miles and miles. There’s thousands of these almond trees, but this far off the ground you can see where the color and the texture of the bark changes. They’ve all been grafted. So all almonds today are grafted trees. They’re not natural.
That’s sort of a symbol of what’s been going on in the modern world. We’re getting rid of all the bitter stuff. Lima beans, not my favorite bean even today, though I understand that at one time they were very bitter. They had amygdalin in them. But they’ve been hybridized out. Lima beans have a very low amount of amygdalin in them today.
So, through this process you know we’ve been killing ourselves by getting rid of that natural flavor. To answer your question I would say if you want to have a steady source, a reliable source would be apricot seeds and apple seeds
.
Ty Bollinger: Eat the seeds.
G. Edward Griffin: Now, a caution. You can eat too much so that you’ll get sick. I think there’s a natural law there, you know. How many apricot seeds would you eat if you’re also eating the whole apricot? Well, what six? Seven? How many apricots can you eat?
Six maybe, that’s a lot. Maybe seven. Perfectly safe. But now somebody might say, “Gee, if six or seven are good, maybe 20 or 30 are even better.” I wouldn’t do that. I know that you can get an overdose and you get nauseous and dizzy and it’s not good for you.
Ty Bollinger: Good rule of thumb, then, is don’t eat more than you would eat the actual fruit. Okay, I like that.
G. Edward Griffin: At one time.
Ty Bollinger: In one sitting.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on November 27, 2015, 04:21:05 PM

The Landmark Johns Hopkins Sulforaphane Cancer Study Your Doctor Isn’t Telling You About

Posted by: Dr. Veronique Desaulniers in Foods, Nutrition, Ways to Prevent Cancer

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Truth be told, conventional medicine has made some strides (let’s call them baby steps) over the last 40 years when it comes to disease prevention. Mainstream medicine does continue to tout the “slash-and-burn” method as the be-all and end-all for treating cancer after the fact. Yet the concept of taking proactive steps to reduce the risk of cancer (like exercising and eating “healthier”) is now fairly commonplace.
What your conventional doctor is probably forgetting to mention, however, is that for years there has been a simple, natural, and yes, scientifically proven way to keep cancer at bay. It’s called sulforaphane. It can be found in cruciferous vegetables and especially in broccoli sprouts.
Dr. Talalay’s Game-Changing Sulforaphane Study
“Three-day-old broccoli sprouts consistently contain 20 to 50 times the amount of chemoprotective compounds found in mature broccoli heads and may offer a simple dietary means of chemically reducing cancer risk,” Dr. Paul Talalay reported in a 1997 Johns Hopkins press release.
Dr. Talalay is the Founding Director of the Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Chemoprotection Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is one of the top biomedical researchers in the world and a pioneer in the field of phytochemicals.
Talalay’s ground-breaking study, completed in 1991, was one of the first to focus on cancer prevention through diet. It was the very first to isolate sulforaphane in cruciferous vegetables as a cancer preventer. Sulforaphane works its magic by boosting Phase 2 enzymes in the body, whose job it is to neutralize the processes of disease.
Talalay and his team fed broccoli sprout extracts to female rats for five days. They then exposed them and a control group to a carcinogen. The rats that had received the extract developed fewer tumors. Those that did have tumors developed smaller ones that took longer to grow than the control group’s did.
Not surprisingly, the first publishing venue Talalay and his colleagues approached about their findings (Science magazine) rejected it. The study was eventually published a year later in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Since then, there have been hundreds of published reports proving the healing effects of phytochemicals such as sulforaphane.
There is No Time to Waste When It Comes to Cancer Prevention
Still, conventional medicine continues to drag its feet when it comes to pursuing and funding cancer prevention research.
“There’s no romance in it,” says Michael Sporn, professor and cancer prevention researcher at Dartmouth Medical School. “There’s no one on death’s door whose life is saved through prevention. The American public is way ahead of medicine on this.”
As 10 million new cancer cases are discovered each year, including 230,000 cases of invasive breast cancer, it is long past the time when doctors and researchers have the luxury of tip-toeing around the issue of cancer prevention.
Remember, it is up to YOU to be proactive with prevention for your body’s overall health and vitality. A good place to start is by adding more sulforaphane-rich foods in your diet.
What's Your Cancer Risk?
You may or may not know this, but your everyday habits (nutrition, environment and activities) play a significant role in your risk for getting cancer or avoiding it. To find out, take this short 13 question quiz.
Discover the many hidden causes of cancer and what you can do TODAY so you don't become a cancer statistic. Here's the cancer-risk quiz.
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Previous: The Cancer-Fighting Benefits of Leafy Greens
Next: Did Sandra Lee’s Doctors “Lie” to Her About DCIS?
About Dr. Veronique Desaulniers

Dr. Veronique Desaulniers, also known as “Dr. V” is a natural health pioneer with over 30 years active practice in Bio-Energetics, Digital Thermography, Meridian Stress Analysis, Homeopathy, and Chiropractic. After she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2004 and healed herself through natural means, she decided to devote her time to sharing her personal, non-toxic healing journey with others. Her years of experience and extensive research have culminated in the award-winning book "Heal Breast Cancer Naturally" and “The 7 Essentials,™" her coaching program that unravels the mystery of healing the body in 7 easy steps. Her story, wisdom and knowledge has touched the lives of thousands internationally.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on December 22, 2015, 04:30:32 PM
http://sorendreier.com/grape-seed-extract-more-effective-than-chemotherapy/
   •   

Grape Seed Extract More Effective Than Chemotherapy

Posted on December 21, 2015 by Soren Dreier
Author: Jonathan Landsman


For patients facing a diagnosis of life-threatening cancer, the recommended cure can often be as potentially harmful to health as the disease itself. But for many of these patients, scientific research shows a natural treatment using grape seed extract may hold the key to slowing the growth of cancer cells without the dangerous and deadly side effects of chemotherapy and radiation.

In fact, some of the very traits that allow certain cancer cells to resist traditional therapies may make them particularly susceptible to treatment using natural grape seed extract. In fact, findings suggest that the benefits grow with more advanced stages of cancer.
Conventional ‘treatments’ will never cure cancer
This is not wishful thinking: grape seed extract benefits hold clinical significance. Unfortunately, cancer patients are often pushed to begin radical and invasive procedures – including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy – immediately following a diagnosis of cancer. And, sadly, fear tactics are often used to rush people into risky (ineffective) procedures – which are known to cause secondary cancers later in life.

To be perfectly clear, although a majority of healthcare providers tout the “importance” of conventional care, there is little evidence that undergoing these harmful procedures can actually halt or even slow the progression of cancer cells.

In fact, a study published back in 2003 showed that chemotherapy was ineffective a startling 97 percent of the time. Later studies found that chemotherapy caused critical damage to the DNA of healthy cells and that some cancer-treatment drugs actually caused cancer tumors to grow, sometimes at an alarming rate. Despite the growing mountain of evidence, the mainstream medical community continues to push chemotherapy and radiation as the only hope for cancer patients.
There are many ways to naturally cure cancer. The NaturalHealth365 INNER CIRCLE offers over 300 audio/video programs (and counting!) plus over 200 integrative healthcare providers talking about natural ways to detoxify the body and boost immune function.

Let’s face the truth: There is substantial evidence that cancer patients suffer greatly when undergoing these treatments, including increased incidence of organ damage, premature aging, sexual dysfunction, neuropathy, cancer recurrence and secondary cancers, dental problems, diabetes, endocrine changes, fatigue, hypothyroidism, memory loss and incontinence, among other conditions.

By contrast, there is no evidence of harmful side effects from the use of grape seed extract. Of course, the obvious must be said, grape seed extract should never be considered the ‘only way’ to treat cancer. To successfully overcome a cancer diagnosis – one must develop a comprehensive approach to remove unwanted toxins, nourish the body with high-quality nutrients and, of course, address any other physical, mental or emotional issues such as dental problems, systemic infections or chronic issues of anger.

Great news for cancer patients
: Natural, lifesaving alternatives are available today
In the journal Cancer Letters, a December 2012 article uncovered that grape seed extract was effective against colorectal cancer in experiments using cultured cancer cells. It also noted that grape seed extract benefits increased with the higher stages of cancer.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on December 23, 2015, 08:18:03 AM
http://foodrevolution.org/blog/parsley-cancer-health/


Home Blog Food and Health How to stay healthy and fight cancer with parsley

How to stay healthy and fight cancer with parsley
Dec 16, 2015


Parsley is often used as a decorative garnish, but it may be the world’s most underappreciated herb. When you understand the amazing health and healing potential of this vibrant, curly green, you’ll realize it’s a lot more than a decoration.

Parsley is a great source of antioxidant nutrients. It boosts your liver health, and it’s good for your eyes. Perhaps most impressive of all, components of parsley have been found to help prevent — and even fight — cancer.

Parsley’s anti-cancer power
Apigenin, a compound found in parsley, has repeatedly been found to have strong anti-cancer properties.
In fact, more than 600 PubMed-indexed journal articles relate to the compound’s role in cancer. In research published September 2015 in Oncotarget, scientists for the first time were able to identify how apigenin is able to effectively slow down or stop an undesirable enzyme called IKKA, which plays a role in cancer progression. Their conclusion? Apigenin has the potential to significantly reduce cancer progression.

The researchers also showed how, in mice, apigenin stops tumor growth and lowers the growth rate of dangerous cancer cells.
But this research is not alone in identifying apigenin’s anticancer abilities. Some other examples:
   •   A 2008 clinical trial used apigenin, along with green tea, to great success in reducing the rate of cancer in patients with colon cancer.
   •   A 2012 study at the University of Missouri found that apigenin was able to effectively treat breast cancer.
   •   A 2013 study in PubMed.gov found that apigenin killed up to 86 percent of lung cancer cells in vitro.
Also, the volatile oils in parsley neutralize certain types of carcinogens, and make this herb a “chemoprotective” food — one that protects healthy tissues from the toxic effects of anticancer drugs. And parsley is also a good source of carotenoids, which help protect the body against cancer-causing cellular damage.

How to take advantage of the anticancer compounds in parsley

Dried parsley — with 13,000 mg per 100 grams — is one of the most abundant sources of apigenin. On the other hand, fresh parsley has a good amount as well, with 225 to 300 mg per 100 grams.
To get a 10 mg dose as used in a clinical trial by Prof. Harald Hoensch of the University of Frankfurt, you would need to take one tablespoon of raw chopped parsley per day. Or you could sprinkle a small amount of dried parsley into your food.

Other sources of apigenin include grapefruit, peppermint, thyme, raw celery, and rutabagas, as well as chamomile flower tea.
When you begin to add parsley to your meals, here’s a tip: much of the vitamins and volatile compounds are lost during cooking, so eat it raw or add it at the end of cooking, right before serving.

Using parsley safely

As far as the safety of eating parsley, cancer advisor Ralph W. Moss, Ph.D. warns that while generally safe, apigenin may cause undesired interactions with other drugs. There was one laboratory study that seemed to show that apigenin interfered with a standard chemotherapy drug used in the treatment of leukemia. So, Dr. Moss suggests, “It might be wise to NOT take high doses of this chemical if you are currently undergoing chemotherapy for cancer.”

Parsley’s other health benefits

Parsley has some powerful cancer-fighting potential, but its healthful properties don’t stop there. The apigenin that is so abundant in parsley has been found to have remarkable anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties as well.

Plus, parsley is a rich source of chlorophyll and fiber and also vitamins A, C, and E, as well as beta-carotene, lutein, cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and folate. It also has more vitamin K than kale, with just 2 tablespoons of raw parsley containing 155 percent of the recommended daily amount.
And eating a bit of fresh parsley after your meal will freshen your breath naturally.

So do you have a whole new appreciation for this herb? Will you include parsley in your diet as more than a garnish? The benefits of parsley are far-reaching. And once you learn how to use it, you’ll find it can be pretty easy to enjoy. Sprinkle some on top of this Indian cauliflower rice bowl or this oil-free daal soup.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on December 28, 2015, 07:47:18 AM
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/12/28/herbs-for-brainpower.aspx?e_cid=20151228Z1_DNL_art_3&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art3&utm_campaign=20151228Z1&et_cid=DM95317&et_rid=1287488964
Herbs for Brainpower
December 28, 2015 | 11,919 views

By Dr. Mercola
Adding herbs like parsley and thyme to your diet might help boost your brainpower, courtesy of apigenin. Apigenin is a flavonoid found in many herbs, including parsley, thyme, and chamomile, and certain other plants like celery and other vegetables.
When researchers applied apigenin to human stem cells in a petri dish, something remarkable happened – 25 days later, the stem cells had turned into neurons (an effect that didn't occur without apigenin).1
The synapses, or connections between neurons, were also "strong and more sophisticated," which is crucial for memory consolidation, learning, and overall brain function.2
The researchers noted that apigenin binds to estrogen receptors, which affect the development, maturation, function, and plasticity of the nervous system. They wrote in the journal Advances in Regenerative Biology:3
" … (B)y simply adding a plant compound called apigenin to human pluripotent stem cells, they become neurons after a few days. We also observed that neurons could make more sophisticated connections among themselves after treatment with this natural compound.
This observation suggests that flavonoids derived from plants can be used as a tool for the production of neurons in a dish.
Moreover, since flavonoids are present at high amounts in some foods, we can speculate that a diet rich in flavonoids may influence the formation of neurons and the way they communicate within the brain."

How Might Apigenin Help Grow New Brain Cells?

The fact that apigenin triggers stem cells to become neurons is quite remarkable. Neurogenesis, or your brain's ability to adapt and grow new brain cells, is known to be influenced by lifestyle factors, including exercise and diet.
Apigenin may be one factor in the latter and may explain why flavonoid-rich foods are associated with neurogenesis. According to Stanford University, antioxidants such as flavonoids promote neurogenesis not only in a petri dish but also in rodent brains.
Flavonoids, in particular, increase neurogenesis in the hippocampus of stressed rats, possibly by increasing blood flow to the brain and/or increasing levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).4 BDNF is a remarkable rejuvenator in several respects.
In your brain, BDNF not only preserves existing brain cells,5 it also activates brain stem cells to convert into new neurons and effectively makes your brain grow larger.

Apigenin May Fight Cancer Too

Brain health isn't the only reason to include more apigenin-rich foods in your diet; it also appears to be a potent cancer fighter. When mice implanted with cells of a particularly deadly, fast-growing human breast cancer were treated with apigenin, the cancerous growth slowed and the tumors shrank.6
Blood vessels feeding the tumors also shrunk and restricted nutrient flow to the tumor cells, starving them of the nutrients need to spread. In 2013, apigenin was again shown to block the ability of breast cancer cells to inhibit their own deaths.
Interestingly, the compound was also found to bind to 160 proteins in the human body, which suggests it has far-reaching health effects (unlike pharmaceutical drugs, which typically only have one specific target). The researchers explained:7
"… (I)n contrast to small-molecule pharmaceuticals designed for defined target specificity, dietary phytochemicals affect a large number of cellular targets with varied affinities that, combined, result in their recognized health benefits."
Apigenin has even been found to make treatment with the breast cancer drug paclitaxel more effective.8 And according to the International Journal of Oncology:9
"Apigenin has been shown to possess remarkable anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-carcinogenic properties. In the last few years, significant progress has been made in studying the biological effects of apigenin at cellular and molecular levels."

You Can Increase Your Apigenin Intake by Eating Celery, Parsley, and More

Apigenin is most prevalent in celery and parsley, but it's also found in many other plant foods, including:
Apples
Chamomile
Basil
Oregano
Tarragon
Cilantro
Endive
Broccoli
Cherries
Leeks
Onions
Tomatoes
Grapes
Tea
Beans and barley
Apigenin may even be one reason why drinking chamomile tea has been found to reduce thyroid cancer risk by up to 80 percent.10
Human exposure to apigenin occurs mostly through the consumption of apigenin-containing fruits and vegetables, although researchers are not sure how much is absorbed into the bloodstream.
Some of the research studies used an injection of apigenin, but you also obtain biologically significant quantities through a healthy diet. Researchers of the 2011 study noted:11
" … (I)t appears that keeping a minimal level of apigenin in the bloodstream is important to delay the onset of breast cancer …
It's probably a good idea to eat a little parsley … every day to ensure the minimal amount. However, you can also find this compound in pill supplements …"

Turmeric: A Spice with Brain-Boosting, Cancer-Fighting Potential

The plant world is teeming with ingredients that can support your health. Another food worth mentioning is turmeric, whose active ingredient, curcumin, is beneficial for both brain health and cancer prevention/treatment, much like apigenin.
Curcumin has potent anti-cancer properties and is also capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier, which is one reason why it holds promise as a neuroprotective agent in a wide range of neurological disorders.
Researchers have previously investigated curcumin for its potential role in improving Parkinson's, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke damage. It can also promote brain health in general, courtesy of its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.
One of the ways it works, which is similar to vitamin D, is by modulating large numbers of your genes. But unlike vitamin D that influences thousands of genes, curcumin has been shown to influence about 700 genes.
Another bioactive compound in turmeric called aromatic-turmerone can increase neural stem cell growth in the brain by as much as 80 percent at certain concentrations.12 Neural stem cells differentiate into neurons and play an important role in self-repair.
The findings suggest aromatic-turmerone may help in the recovery of brain function in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and stroke — provided the effect also applies to humans.
Previous research has also shown that curcumin may help inhibit the accumulation of destructive beta-amyloids in the brain of Alzheimer's patients, as well as break up existing plaques.

Ashwagandha for Your Brain

Another lesser-known herb (at least in the U.S.) is ashwagandha, a small evergreen perennial herb that's been a part of India's Ayurvedic medical system for thousands of years.
While often regarded as an herb for stress reduction and improved energy and vitality, researchers at the National Brain Research Centre (NBRC) have conducted studies on mice that suggest ashwagandha extract may reverse memory loss and improve cognitive abilities in those with Alzheimer's disease.13
Initially, mice with Alzheimer's were unable to learn or retain what they learned, but after receiving ashwagandha for 20 days this improved significantly. After 30 days, the behavior of the mice returned to normal. Researchers reported a reduction in amyloid plaques (amyloid plaques, along with tangles of nerve fibers, contribute to the degradation of the wiring in brain cells) and improved cognitive abilities.
Rather than impacting the brain directly, researchers found that the herb worked by boosting a protein in the liver, which enters the bloodstream and helps clear amyloid from the brain. Researchers concluded, "The remarkable therapeutic effect of W. somnifera [ashwagandha] ... reverses the behavioral deficits and pathology seen in Alzheimer's disease models."

Ginseng and Green Tea: Two More Brain-Boosting Compounds

American ginseng is another beneficial herb that's been linked to improved mental performance. For instance, American ginseng was found to improve working memory and mood in both young individuals and middle-age adults.14 Another study revealed "robust working memory enhancement following administration of American ginseng."15 Green tea shows promise for protecting brain health.
In a study presented at the 2015 International Conference on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases, those who drank green tea one to six days a week had less mental decline than those who didn't drink it.16 Green tea isn't actually an herb, it (as well as black, oolong, dark, and white teas) comes from an evergreen called Camellia sinensis.

What Are Other Top 'Brain Foods?'

If you want to boost your brainpower, one of the best choices you can make is to eat more real foods. Inside healthy foods are the vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and countless other phytochemicals to nourish your brain cells (and even grow new ones).
Consider this: people who eat plenty of vegetables and fruits (about 1.6 cups, or 400 grams) a day perform better on cognitive tests,17 while those who eat a lot of sugar are 1.5 times more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment than those who do not.18
Celery may be particularly beneficial, as in addition to containing apigenin, it's also a rich source of luteolin, a plant compound that may calm inflammation in your brain, which is a primary cause of neurodegeneration. Luteolin has also been linked with lower rates of age-related memory loss in mice, and older mice fed a luteolin-supplemented diet scored better on learning and memory tasks.19 In addition to celery, peppers and carrots are also good sources of luteolin.
The omega-3 fats found in wild Alaskan salmon are also important, as they help fight inflammation throughout your body, including in your brain, and offer numerous protections to your brain cells.
For instance, a study in the journal Neurology found "older women with the highest levels of omega-3 fats … had better preservation of their brain as they aged than those with the lowest levels, which might mean they would maintain better brain function for an extra year or two."20
In separate research, when boys were given an omega-3 supplement, there were significant increases in the activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex part of the brain.21 This is an area of your brain that is associated with working memory. They also noticed changes in other parts of the brain, including the occipital cortex (the visual processing center) and the cerebellar cortex (which plays a role in motor control).
You can get omega-3 fats in therapeutic doses by taking a supplement like krill oil. But, if you're looking for a food source, wild Alaskan salmon (along with sardines and anchovies) is among the best. Keep in mind that your brain is not "programmed" to shrink and fail as a matter of course as you age. In fact, you can build a bigger, better brain by making smart choices, including fortifying your diet with herbs, vegetables, and healthy fats.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on January 20, 2016, 09:37:37 AM
For those interested in gathering, eating, and using for medicine, a variety of mushrooms, there are two valuable books, one of which is The Fungal Pharmacy, The Complete Guide to Medicinal Mushrooms & Lichens of North America, by Robert Rogers, RH (AHG) North Atlantic Books, 2011. 

Another is Medicinal Mushrooms  An Exploration of Tradition, Healing & Culture, 1995, Botanica Press, by Christopher Hobbs, L.Ac.

In Hobbs' book, pages 81-86 are devoted entirely to the Cordyceps mushrooms, including specific dosages.

Likewise with Rogers' book, there are dosages, plus a lot of other details about the Cordyceps mushrooms, which covers pages 115 through 124.

There is a lot of information on many types of mushrooms, but I specifically mention the Cordyceps genus because of its use to increase oxygen levels in the body.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: steedy on January 20, 2016, 03:37:29 PM
I recently bought an Herbal Remedies magazine and it is full of recipes on herbal treatment for all kinds of ailments.  I have been very interested in herbal treatments and healing plants that you can find in your own backyard for a while now and am very excited to be in a position now to be able to make my own meds.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on January 21, 2016, 08:57:07 AM
Same here. I love studying things from Nature to be used for medicines, especially plants.

I grew oregano and thyme last year and hope if they survive winter in their huge flowerpots, they can be transplanted into their permanent bed in herb garden, and then possibly I can experiment with tincturing one or both.  Still, they have use as food as well.

Keep us posted about what you do with making your own meds.  It's so empowering, isn't it?
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: steedy on January 21, 2016, 09:16:32 AM
Today I'm making cough syrup because I had a cough last night that kept me up half the night! 
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 21, 2016, 12:14:27 PM
Same here. I love studying things from Nature to be used for medicines, especially plants.

I grew oregano and thyme last year and hope if they survive winter in their huge flowerpots, they can be transplanted into their permanent bed in herb garden, and then possibly I can experiment with tincturing one or both.  Still, they have use as food as well.

Keep us posted about what you do with making your own meds.  It's so empowering, isn't it?
ilinda thanks so much for these articles, especially about natural substances more effective than chemotherapy.
I may have to make that choice someday...will remember what you have posted.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on January 24, 2016, 03:26:17 PM
Same here. I love studying things from Nature to be used for medicines, especially plants.

I grew oregano and thyme last year and hope if they survive winter in their huge flowerpots, they can be transplanted into their permanent bed in herb garden, and then possibly I can experiment with tincturing one or both.  Still, they have use as food as well.

Keep us posted about what you do with making your own meds.  It's so empowering, isn't it?
ilinda thanks so much for these articles, especially about natural substances more effective than chemotherapy.
I may have to make that choice someday...will remember what you have posted.
One of the things discussed in that excellent nine-part series The Truth About Cancer by Ty Bollinger is that in cancers, there are the "cancer tumor stem cells" and the "cancer cells".  The cancer cells are the "daughter cells" (and granddaughter, etc.) that derive from those orginating "cancer tumor stem cells".  What BigPharma does not tell cancer patients is that their chemo does not kill the "cancer tumor stem cells", but only kills the daughter cells, along with a lot of normal cells.  Then the tumor mass shrinks, as seen on x-ray, and everyone is happy because there is something positive to tell the patient. 

But often, especially if the stimulus to create cancer in the first place remains, then the cancer returns with a vengeance, and it is those "cancer tumor stem cells" that are the most difficult to eradicate for mainstream medicine.  However there are many, many ways to kill them, or to make them commit suicide (apoptosis), and that is where these herbs, essential oils, etc., etc., come in.

Many cancer patients opting to go the alternative route will use several treatments, simultaneously.  Because there aren't side effects with these other treatments, it is possible to do this.  So much to learn.....
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on January 30, 2016, 04:22:48 PM
That is really inspiring info!
One of the ideas that was repeated several times in those episodes is that Cancer Is Not An Automatic Death Sentence.

 I learned there are thousands of ways to deal effectively with cancer, and that many, many people with Stage 4 Metastatic Cancer of various types have been cured.  And those alternative methods do not have the horrendous side effects of chemo and radiation.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: steedy on January 30, 2016, 04:24:58 PM
I'm glad to see that parsley  is an anti-cancer food.  I just love parsley and use it on almost everything!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 30, 2016, 04:55:36 PM
I'm glad to see that parsley  is an anti-cancer food.  I just love parsley and use it on almost everything!

steedy, glad to hear that, a good thing to do.
I used to add a piece of parsley to lunch and dinner...recommended by a great naturopath back in
the 1960s. I got out of the habit...harder for me to chew greens.
Now I want to buy some again and add it to my Vitamix... ! :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on February 20, 2016, 02:33:40 PM
These two gems speak for themselves:
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on February 25, 2016, 01:05:35 AM
ilinda, that's good to know!
I feel a lot of Americans need to work to heal their brains from poor diet and also to help them prevent Alzheimers. I am going to get some Ashwaganda.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on February 25, 2016, 01:08:25 AM
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspxAnother Excerpts -

Ancient Herb for Alzheimer's...

The compound curcumin, which is found in the spice turmeric, is another notable herb for brain health. Recently revealed as effective in helping to stop the protein clumping that is the first step in diseases such as Parkinson's disease,5 past research has shown that curcumin may help inhibit the accumulation of destructive beta amyloids in the brain of Alzheimer's patients, as well as break up existing plaques.

Researchers determined:
•Curcumin is more effective in inhibiting the formation of the protein fragments than many other potential Alzheimer's treatments
•The low molecular weight and polar structure of curcumin allows it to penetrate the blood-brain barrier effectively and bind to beta amyloid
•Alzheimer's symptoms caused by inflammation and oxidation are eased by curcumin's powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties

People with Alzheimer's tend to have higher levels of inflammation in their brains, and curcumin is most known for its potent anti-inflammatory properties. The compound has been shown to influence the expression of more than 700 genes, and it can inhibit both the activity and the synthesis of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and 5-lipooxygenase (5-LOX), as well as other enzymes that modulate inflammation
[ Continues:
http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-953-ASHWAGANDHA.aspx?activeIngredientId=953&activeIngredientName=ASHWAGANDHA ]
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on February 25, 2016, 06:59:37 AM
ilinda, that's good to know!
I feel a lot of Americans need to work to heal their brains from poor diet and also to help them prevent Alzheimers. I am going to get some Ashwaganda.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx
Kind of makes you want to grow Ashwaganda as a "houseplant".  So much we Westerners need to learn about our bodies and our entire world.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on February 27, 2016, 05:51:44 PM
ilinda, that's good to know!
I feel a lot of Americans need to work to heal their brains from poor diet and also to help them prevent Alzheimers. I am going to get some Ashwaganda.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx
Kind of makes you want to grow Ashwaganda as a "houseplant".  So much we Westerners need to learn about our bodies and our entire world.
Linda, I feel I definitely need to grow it... I don't want to suddenly loose my marbles or my memory...
I agree with you, we have much to learn, still from the Eastern world.
:)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on February 28, 2016, 03:28:06 PM
ilinda, that's good to know!
I feel a lot of Americans need to work to heal their brains from poor diet and also to help them prevent Alzheimers. I am going to get some Ashwaganda.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx
Kind of makes you want to grow Ashwaganda as a "houseplant".  So much we Westerners need to learn about our bodies and our entire world.
Linda, I feel I definitely need to grow it... I don't want to suddenly loose my marbles or my memory...
I agree with you, we have much to learn, still from the Eastern world.
:)
Glad you brought up the topic of memory.  Don't you think that there are many signs, way ahead of time, that the memory is going?  Or, maybe that the "mind" is going?  Here's why I say this.  When mom moved from FL to live on our farm, in 1994, I noticed a difference in her logic that I'd never seen before.  It was slightly out of kilter, or skewed, or somehow not quite right.  All else seemed the same.  I can give an example, but that's a good way to condense the idea I'm trying to convey.
But it was at least five years later that memory loss began to creep in, and in fact, shortly after a hard fall causing a frontal lobe injury, something known to be implicated in later dementia, (but not always) is when the memory loss really became obvious.  But because of her slightly flawed logic, I wonder if she was headed in the direction of memory loss anyway, but will never know. 

So, one clue might be altered and seemingly flawed logic (seemingly to others).  But I didn't start her on turmeric until after the memory loss became obvious.  Too late, no doubt.

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: steedy on February 29, 2016, 03:45:05 PM
I have heard so much about rose hips that I am going to use it in my herbal treatments.  But I thought it grew wild and I was going to have to find it somewhere in the woods, but I found out you can order seeds for it and grow it on your property.  I'm pretty excited about this.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on March 01, 2016, 07:44:51 AM
I have heard so much about rose hips that I am going to use it in my herbal treatments.  But I thought it grew wild and I was going to have to find it somewhere in the woods, but I found out you can order seeds for it and grow it on your property.  I'm pretty excited about this.
Wild roses will have rose hips, so if you have wild roses in your new area, you're "in"!  IIRC, they are blooming by June around here in southern MO and on some roadsides they are profuse where they are far enough from the pavement and shoulder that they are never mowed and are allowed to bramble and be beautiful, especially where they are against a rock outcropping.

Good luck with growing them, but also with finding some wild ones as your backup.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on March 01, 2016, 08:18:32 AM
ilinda, that's good to know!
I feel a lot of Americans need to work to heal their brains from poor diet and also to help them prevent Alzheimers. I am going to get some Ashwaganda.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx
Kind of makes you want to grow Ashwaganda as a "houseplant".  So much we Westerners need to learn about our bodies and our entire world.
Linda, I feel I definitely need to grow it... I don't want to suddenly loose my marbles or my memory...
I agree with you, we have much to learn, still from the Eastern world.
:)
Glad you brought up the topic of memory.  Don't you think that there are many signs, way ahead of time, that the memory is going?  Or, maybe that the "mind" is going?  Here's why I say this.  When mom moved from FL to live on our farm, in 1994, I noticed a difference in her logic that I'd never seen before.  It was slightly out of kilter, or skewed, or somehow not quite right.  All else seemed the same.  I can give an example, but that's a good way to condense the idea I'm trying to convey.
But it was at least five years later that memory loss began to creep in, and in fact, shortly after a hard fall causing a frontal lobe injury, something known to be implicated in later dementia, (but not always) is when the memory loss really became obvious.  But because of her slightly flawed logic, I wonder if she was headed in the direction of memory loss anyway, but will never know. 

So, one clue might be altered and seemingly flawed logic (seemingly to others).  But I didn't start her on turmeric until after the memory loss became obvious.  Too late, no doubt.

Was your Mother diagnosed with Dementia?
Also Alzheimers? Just wondering, I hope you don't mind my asking.
My Father had Alzheimers and I saw some clues decades earlier but he was able to function and take care of the household bills and maintenance until he was well past 84. Then suddenly he wasn't able to do these things. He never did lose his ability to carry on a conversation, was still witty at times and remembered everyone...
You mention your Mother had a head injury, that's sad.
My Father had some lumber slip out of place and go onto onto his head, which gave him quite a jolt. After that the Alzheimers did show up more quickly...I mean it accelerated. He was able to continue taking supplements, Coenzyme Q10 until he had his system failing (atherosclerosis can suddenly bring about heart and kidney failure.) at that point he could no longer tolerate the supplements...
We are so grateful he manage to pretty much be himself up to the end...We feel he did pretty good nearly made it to 86. My Mother had forgetful spells but did not have Alzheimers and made it to age 90 without having to go to nursing care or the hospital... Honestly I do feel the Coenzyme Q10 and multiple supplements helped them do as well as they did, Bless them.
Getting back to Ashwagandha - anyone planning to grow some?
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on March 04, 2016, 07:27:15 AM
ilinda, that's good to know!
I feel a lot of Americans need to work to heal their brains from poor diet and also to help them prevent Alzheimers. I am going to get some Ashwaganda.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx
Kind of makes you want to grow Ashwaganda as a "houseplant".  So much we Westerners need to learn about our bodies and our entire world.
Linda, I feel I definitely need to grow it... I don't want to suddenly loose my marbles or my memory...
I agree with you, we have much to learn, still from the Eastern world.
:)
Glad you brought up the topic of memory.  Don't you think that there are many signs, way ahead of time, that the memory is going?  Or, maybe that the "mind" is going?  Here's why I say this.  When mom moved from FL to live on our farm, in 1994, I noticed a difference in her logic that I'd never seen before.  It was slightly out of kilter, or skewed, or somehow not quite right.  All else seemed the same.  I can give an example, but that's a good way to condense the idea I'm trying to convey.
But it was at least five years later that memory loss began to creep in, and in fact, shortly after a hard fall causing a frontal lobe injury, something known to be implicated in later dementia, (but not always) is when the memory loss really became obvious.  But because of her slightly flawed logic, I wonder if she was headed in the direction of memory loss anyway, but will never know. 

So, one clue might be altered and seemingly flawed logic (seemingly to others).  But I didn't start her on turmeric until after the memory loss became obvious.  Too late, no doubt.

Was your Mother diagnosed with Dementia?
Also Alzheimers? Just wondering, I hope you don't mind my asking.
My Father had Alzheimers and I saw some clues decades earlier but he was able to function and take care of the household bills and maintenance until he was well past 84. Then suddenly he wasn't able to do these things. He never did lose his ability to carry on a conversation, was still witty at times and remembered everyone...
You mention your Mother had a head injury, that's sad.
My Father had some lumber slip out of place and go onto onto his head, which gave him quite a jolt. After that the Alzheimers did show up more quickly...I mean it accelerated. He was able to continue taking supplements, Coenzyme Q10 until he had his system failing (atherosclerosis can suddenly bring about heart and kidney failure.) at that point he could no longer tolerate the supplements...
We are so grateful he manage to pretty much be himself up to the end...We feel he did pretty good nearly made it to 86. My Mother had forgetful spells but did not have Alzheimers and made it to age 90 without having to go to nursing care or the hospital... Honestly I do feel the Coenzyme Q10 and multiple supplements helped them do as well as they did, Bless them.
Getting back to Ashwagandha - anyone planning to grow some?
Mom was diagnosed with dementia, but they never used the term Alzheimer's Disease.  She fell one day while en route to the mailbox, a 1/2-mile walk down the driveway.  She was always "in a hurry" and her doctor later even demonstrated for her how her center of gravity was out of kilter because the upper half of her body was always ahead of the rest! 
That altered center of gravity caused her to lurch forward when she fell, smacking her forehead flat on the ground, and she ended up with lots of bruises, etc., but nothing broken.  It was hubby who commented on how the dementia seemed to appear after that head injury and then a bit of research on dementia revealed a list of six or seven factors that seem to increase one's risk of dementia, one of which was a frontal lobe injury.  She did live to 92 and most of the years were good.

Your parents were equally lucky to be blessed with old age.

I tried to grow Astragulus and Ashwaghanda once (IIRÇ) and neither grew here.  IIRC the astragalus needs sandy soil and cannot recall about the Ashwagandha, but want to try again.  IIRC you mentioned wanting to have it or grow it.  Let us know how it goes.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on March 06, 2016, 07:15:21 PM
ilinda, that's good to know!
I feel a lot of Americans need to work to heal their brains from poor diet and also to help them prevent Alzheimers. I am going to get some Ashwaganda.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx
Kind of makes you want to grow Ashwaganda as a "houseplant".  So much we Westerners need to learn about our bodies and our entire world.
Linda, I feel I definitely need to grow it... I don't want to suddenly loose my marbles or my memory...
I agree with you, we have much to learn, still from the Eastern world.
:)
Glad you brought up the topic of memory.  Don't you think that there are many signs, way ahead of time, that the memory is going?  Or, maybe that the "mind" is going?  Here's why I say this.  When mom moved from FL to live on our farm, in 1994, I noticed a difference in her logic that I'd never seen before.  It was slightly out of kilter, or skewed, or somehow not quite right.  All else seemed the same.  I can give an example, but that's a good way to condense the idea I'm trying to convey.
But it was at least five years later that memory loss began to creep in, and in fact, shortly after a hard fall causing a frontal lobe injury, something known to be implicated in later dementia, (but not always) is when the memory loss really became obvious.  But because of her slightly flawed logic, I wonder if she was headed in the direction of memory loss anyway, but will never know. 

So, one clue might be altered and seemingly flawed logic (seemingly to others).  But I didn't start her on turmeric until after the memory loss became obvious.  Too late, no doubt.

Was your Mother diagnosed with Dementia?
Also Alzheimers? Just wondering, I hope you don't mind my asking.
My Father had Alzheimers and I saw some clues decades earlier but he was able to function and take care of the household bills and maintenance until he was well past 84. Then suddenly he wasn't able to do these things. He never did lose his ability to carry on a conversation, was still witty at times and remembered everyone...
You mention your Mother had a head injury, that's sad.
My Father had some lumber slip out of place and go onto onto his head, which gave him quite a jolt. After that the Alzheimers did show up more quickly...I mean it accelerated. He was able to continue taking supplements, Coenzyme Q10 until he had his system failing (atherosclerosis can suddenly bring about heart and kidney failure.) at that point he could no longer tolerate the supplements...
We are so grateful he manage to pretty much be himself up to the end...We feel he did pretty good nearly made it to 86. My Mother had forgetful spells but did not have Alzheimers and made it to age 90 without having to go to nursing care or the hospital... Honestly I do feel the Coenzyme Q10 and multiple supplements helped them do as well as they did, Bless them.
Getting back to Ashwagandha - anyone planning to grow some?
Mom was diagnosed with dementia, but they never used the term Alzheimer's Disease.  She fell one day while en route to the mailbox, a 1/2-mile walk down the driveway.  She was always "in a hurry" and her doctor later even demonstrated for her how her center of gravity was out of kilter because the upper half of her body was always ahead of the rest! 
That altered center of gravity caused her to lurch forward when she fell, smacking her forehead flat on the ground, and she ended up with lots of bruises, etc., but nothing broken.  It was hubby who commented on how the dementia seemed to appear after that head injury and then a bit of research on dementia revealed a list of six or seven factors that seem to increase one's risk of dementia, one of which was a frontal lobe injury.  She did live to 92 and most of the years were good.

Your parents were equally lucky to be blessed with old age.

I tried to grow Astragulus and Ashwaghanda once (IIRÇ) and neither grew here.  IIRC the astragalus needs sandy soil and cannot recall about the Ashwagandha, but want to try again.  IIRC you mentioned wanting to have it or grow it.  Let us know how it goes.

ilinda, thanks for sharing about your Mother. That is fortunate she had mostly good years and lived so long. That's a Blessing.
Thanks for the info...we have sandy soil here so maybe I can grow the Astragulus.
I haven't been good at growing things, I mean I haven't been getting to it. I know I have a natural green thumb but seems all my activities are not in that down to earth area... I have grown some things and they like, sprang out of the earth, so I know I have a feeling for it...
It is very healing, too...
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on April 21, 2016, 04:00:39 AM
http://www.fungi.com/  See Turkey Tail Mushroom

also: ...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-stamets/mushrooms-cancer_b_1560691.html

Turkey Tail Mushrooms Help Immune System Fight Cancer 
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on April 21, 2016, 04:42:57 AM
http://www.fungi.com/  See Turkey Tail Mushroom

also: ...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-stamets/mushrooms-cancer_b_1560691.html

Turkey Tail Mushrooms Help Immune System Fight Cancer
One good thing is that these Turkey Tails are so common.  Very common.  I can't walk the woods without seeing some.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on May 04, 2016, 01:08:12 AM
http://www.fungi.com/  See Turkey Tail Mushroom

also: ...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-stamets/mushrooms-cancer_b_1560691.html

Turkey Tail Mushrooms Help Immune System Fight Cancer
One good thing is that these Turkey Tails are so common.  Very common.  I can't walk the woods without seeing some.

That's wonderful!
I heard about them used to help cure cancer, from my third-born daughter Jessica. :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Jimfarmer on April 04, 2017, 09:16:28 PM
I found this article today:

"Ten of the Most Powerful All-Natural Antibiotics Known to Man" at https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia2/ciencia_healthyfood33.htm

They are:
Oregano Essential Oil
Apple Cider Vinegar
Raw Honey
Garlic
Colloidal Silver
Ginger Extract
Onion Extract
Horseradish Root
Habanero Peppers
Turmeric
Title: Healing plants, herbs and foods - Turmeric and ginger root tea
Post by: matrixsojourner on May 18, 2017, 07:40:42 PM
Last month I added turmeric root and ginger root tea to my morning repertoire. It has greatly helped with inflammation and the daily aches and pains of just getting older. I have experienced less stiffness (especially in the morning) and can make it through to retiring to bed relatively pain free. I usually would take Goody powder or an NSAID a couple of times a day which was hard on my stomach. It was recommended to me by a bodybuilder friend who is 53 that said along with matcha tea, he gets through his day, the workouts and post-workout without any soreness and more energy than he has ever felt. I plan to grow some turmeric root. Word of advice: when slicing the root I recommend gloves since it will stain your hands yellow-orange. Badly. A tea is far more beneficial than the capsule supplements I was taking. I highly recommend turmeric and am so happy I tried it!

2 cups of water
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric root
1/2 teaspoon chopped ginger
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
1 Tablespoon of honey
1 lemon wedge

*maple syrup may be substituted for honey if desired

Bring water to a boil in a small saucepan; add turmeric, ginger, and cinnamon. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 10 minutes. Strain tea into a large glass; add honey and lemon wedge. Source: allrecipes.com



Anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric and ginger

The anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric and ginger have been well researched and documented. By using the herbs separately or in a combination such as in turmeric and ginger tea, you can help reduce inflammation and relieve pain in your body.

The journal Advances in Pharmacological Studies reported that extracts of turmeric have been used for centuries to treat inflammatory conditions. Among some of these are joint swelling, indigestion, irritable bowel syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Similarly, ginger is viewed as a medicinal herb with broad anti-inflammatory actions. The Journal of Medicinal Food published information that ginger has a similar effect to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in reducing pain and inflammation. The journal reported that the advantage of ginger over NSAIDs is that there are fewer side effects from using ginger to reduce pain and inflammation.

Boosts brain power

Turmeric and ginger have a positive effect on cognitive power and have an antioxidant effect against some neurological diseases.

For example, research has found that the compound 6-shogaol in ginger has an anti-inflammatory effect on neurological processes and can help to reduce memory impairment and the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Other studies have shown that ginger extracts improve the cognitive function of middle-aged women.

Turmeric has also shown to have a positive neuro-effect on people with dementia. A study showed that Alzheimer’s patients who took turmeric supplements for over a year showed significant signs of improvement.

Another study reported that in countries where turmeric is used in cooking (for example in India where curry is popular), fewer people suffer from dementia than in western countries.10

Helps digestion

Ginger on its own or a combination of ginger and turmeric can help to relieve many digestion issues.

A study from 2008 found that ginger has a positive effect on your gastrointestinal system and can help food pass through the intestines easier.

Other studies have confirmed that ginger reduces inflammation in the digestive tract and can prevent and treat indigestion.

Ginger also helps to prevent nausea and vomiting due to its power to soothe the intestines. This also helps reduce abdominal pain, stomach cramping, and other symptoms of gastric distress.

Turmeric also has an anti-inflammatory effect on the digestive system. Among the digestive diseases that curcumin has proved to be effective in helping to treat are irritable bowel disease, indigestion, stomach ulcers, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and Crohn’s disease. 

Improves heart health and lowers blood pressure

A very important health benefit of both ginger and turmeric is their ability to naturally improve cardiovascular health.

The International Journal of Cardiology published studies on how curcumin extracts have protective effects on heart health. Among these are reducing the risk of blood clots, preventing irregular heartbeat, and having an anti-inflammatory effect on the cardiovascular system

Source: healthyandnaturalworld.com



Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on May 19, 2017, 12:46:28 AM
Welcome to the Planet X Town Hall, matrixsojourner. :)
What a great post!
Glad you are here.
 - Barb Townsend
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on May 23, 2017, 08:35:09 AM
Quote
In folklore it is even claimed to be able to cure snakebite.

Barb, we have rattlesnakes and copperheads here, and because snake venom's toxicity is due in large part to very complex protein molecules ( http://www.jbc.org/content/278/41/40097.full.html ), we keep chewable papaya and pineapple enzymes on hand at all times, to use as documented in these references:

http://nopr.niscair.res.in/bitstream/123456789/10091/1/IJEB%2048%289%29%20865-878.pdf

http://astore.amazon.com/wsdm-20/detail/013385857X/104-6745254-8710355

http://www.digherbs.com/papaya.html

http://thecompleteherbalguide.com/entries/digestive/digestion-problems/

Papain is one of the ingredients of a current allopathic anti-venon treatment : https://poisoncontrol.utah.edu/newsletters/pdfs/toxicology-today-archive/Vol3_No1.pdf

http://www.surgicalcriticalcare.net/Guidelines/envenomation%202010.pdf

Here is another good reason to keep your own anti-venon supply of papain or bromelain on hand:

 Unfortunately,  production  of  Antivenin Micrurus   Fulvius,   the   only   coral   snake   antivenom   currently   available   in   the   United   States,   was discontinued  by  Wyeth  Pharmaceuticals  in  2003.    The  last  remaining  Antivenin  (Lot  No.  4030026)  was initially dated to expire on October 31, 2008.  Wyeth  Pharmaceuticals, in conjunction  with the U.S. Food and Drug  Administration (FDA) has currently  extended the expiration date to October 31, 2011 (9).  Thecost of Antivenin Micrurus Fulvius is currently $1513.63 per vial.   If  no  other  coral  snake  antivenom  is  approved  when the  current  supply  is  exhausted  or  expires, physicians  will  have  to  rely  on  supportive  care  or non-FDA  approved  antivenom.   

In other words, if you get bitten by a snake, and are able to identify what bit you, there is no guarantee that your hospital will have any or the correct anti-venon in supply.

And yet two more reasons:
The average cost to treat a venomous snake bite can be between $15,000 and $20,000 without medical complications, but almost halfof the treated bites can become complicated, e.g., an allergic reaction to horse-based sera or to the venom itself. http://www.thebestcontrol.com/lice-chapter/Chapter16.pdf

Instead of taking just one or two tablets as advised on the supplement bottle, best to chew them in larger amounts.  Papaya has a GRAS rating (generally recognized as safe) in the medical community, and one study safely used a 4g dose ( https://www.drugs.com/npp/papaya.html ).  Both snake venom and papaya or pineapple enzymes can thin the blood, so avoid blood thinners such as vitamin E, and once the immediate crisis is over, might want to supplement vitamin K and/or eat yogurt for the clotting factor.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on May 23, 2017, 05:04:56 PM
Quote
In folklore it is even claimed to be able to cure snakebite.

Barb, we have rattlesnakes and copperheads here, and because snake venom's toxicity is due in large part to very complex protein molecules ( http://www.jbc.org/content/278/41/40097.full.html ), we keep chewable papaya and pineapple enzymes on hand at all times, to use as documented in these references:

http://nopr.niscair.res.in/bitstream/123456789/10091/1/IJEB%2048%289%29%20865-878.pdf

http://astore.amazon.com/wsdm-20/detail/013385857X/104-6745254-8710355

http://www.digherbs.com/papaya.html

http://thecompleteherbalguide.com/entries/digestive/digestion-problems/

Papain is one of the ingredients of a current allopathic anti-venon treatment : https://poisoncontrol.utah.edu/newsletters/pdfs/toxicology-today-archive/Vol3_No1.pdf

http://www.surgicalcriticalcare.net/Guidelines/envenomation%202010.pdf

Here is another good reason to keep your own anti-venon supply of papain or bromelain on hand:

 Unfortunately,  production  of  Antivenin Micrurus   Fulvius,   the   only   coral   snake   antivenom   currently   available   in   the   United   States,   was discontinued  by  Wyeth  Pharmaceuticals  in  2003.    The  last  remaining  Antivenin  (Lot  No.  4030026)  was initially dated to expire on October 31, 2008.  Wyeth  Pharmaceuticals, in conjunction  with the U.S. Food and Drug  Administration (FDA) has currently  extended the expiration date to October 31, 2011 (9).  Thecost of Antivenin Micrurus Fulvius is currently $1513.63 per vial.   If  no  other  coral  snake  antivenom  is  approved  when the  current  supply  is  exhausted  or  expires, physicians  will  have  to  rely  on  supportive  care  or non-FDA  approved  antivenom.   

In other words, if you get bitten by a snake, and are able to identify what bit you, there is no guarantee that your hospital will have any or the correct anti-venon in supply.

And yet two more reasons:
The average cost to treat a venomous snake bite can be between $15,000 and $20,000 without medical complications, but almost halfof the treated bites can become complicated, e.g., an allergic reaction to horse-based sera or to the venom itself. http://www.thebestcontrol.com/lice-chapter/Chapter16.pdf

Instead of taking just one or two tablets as advised on the supplement bottle, best to chew them in larger amounts.  Papaya has a GRAS rating (generally recognized as safe) in the medical community, and one study safely used a 4g dose ( https://www.drugs.com/npp/papaya.html ).  Both snake venom and papaya or pineapple enzymes can thin the blood, so avoid blood thinners such as vitamin E, and once the immediate crisis is over, might want to supplement vitamin K and/or eat yogurt for the clotting factor.
Excellent information, RR, and thanks for educating us a bit more.  So I'll be looking for organic papaya and pineapple for drying, but must first do a bit of research to see if slow, low-temp. drying harms the enzymes.  My best guess is "no".

I haven't read your links yet, but do you think the blood thinning aspect is the main way the antivenin works?  Or is there something else at work as well?
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on May 24, 2017, 05:57:23 AM
Ilinda, I did some checking, and found an answer to your question about enzyme life in low heat at the Weston A. Price Real Milk website.  I found this interesting:
Quote
All enzymes are deactivated at a wet-heat temperature of 118 degrees Fahrenheit, and a dry-heat temperature of about 150 degrees. It is one of those happy designs of nature that foods and liquid at 117 degrees can be touched without pain, but liquids over 118 degrees will burn. Thus we have a built-in mechanism for determining whether or not the food we are eating still contains its enzyme content.

Regarding your question about blood thinning:
If I understand correctly from studying the literature in the previous post, the snake venom itself, depending upon the species of snake, has one or more of three routes of toxicity: attacking the digestive system, the blood, or the central nervous system.  If blood is affected, which seems to be the main concern with our North American pit vipers (rattlesnakes and copperheads), the result is Coagulopathy:
Quote
Coagulopathy is characterized by decreased fibrinogen,  decreased  platelets,  and  elevated  pro-thrombin time (clotting).
( https://poisoncontrol.utah.edu/newsletters/pdfs/toxicology-today-archive/Vol3_No1.pdf ).  So a snake bite can cause blood not to clot.  In administering CroFab, which is a combination of sheep antibodies and the naturally occurring papain enzyme from papayas, the complex blood-thinning venom protein is broken down in kind of a paradox, since both the venom and the treatment thin blood by reducing fibrinogen and the sticky blood platelets.  However, in the immediate crisis, breaking down the venom protein structure takes priority over concern about lack of clotting, as the absence of clotting can be brought under control over the next couple of weeks with careful monitoring, while the invading protein must be excreted with haste to avoid further complications. 

Title: Re: snake venom
Post by: Socrates on May 24, 2017, 09:03:38 AM
MMS also reportedbly works against things like snake bites... [If there exists a cureall, it must truly be MMS.]
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on June 04, 2017, 06:18:03 PM
I'm trying to find the very recent discussion (via search box) without a lot of luck, in which we talked about yogurt, culturing yogurt and the history of it all.  Well about a day or so later I saw the following article online, so how convenient that the "Universe" knew we needed it.  So I'm posting it here and if I ever find the original location, will re-post there as well.


http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/05/29/yogurt-lowers-osteoporosis-risk.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art3&utm_campaign=20170529Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM147016&et_rid=2023828654

Early Yogurt Production and Consumption

The (potential) health benefits of milk products were recorded in Ayurvedic medicine as early as 6,000 B.C. Today, Indian cuisine serves up hundreds of types of yogurt, and its name, “yogurt,” is universal. Hurriyet Daily News reports how it came about:

“The first findings pertaining to the domestication of cows go back to Libya around 9000 B.C., but it is a known fact that the Central Asian Turks consumed horse milk long before cow milk was utilized … Although there is no definite scientific verification of the consumption of yogurt at that specific time in history, it is not difficult to make an assumption about it, given the living conditions of the day.

It is highly probable that the Central Asians observed their main staple food, milk, turn into something else due to the living organisms present in the animal intestines in which it was stored while traveling the steppes.”1
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on June 05, 2017, 08:40:34 PM
ilinda - good post. I will also try to find the yogurt posts or topic...
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods: Artemisia: Wormwood and Sweet Annie
Post by: R.R. Book on June 09, 2017, 05:09:54 PM
Posting a photo of Grand Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium), a mugwort, from the bee nectary garden.   The medicinal uses of it and close relative Sweet Annie (Artemisia annua) comprise a long list.  Wormwood is a silvery perennial, while Sweet Annie is an annual.

Sweet Annie is the species that is used as an anti-malarial in the tropics.  Perennial wormwood, the naturalized North American species, is common to temperate climates, and also contains arteminsinin.  Arteminsinin concentration in tropical/annual artemisia was measured to be between .27 and .44% by these researchers: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2989329/ , while the concentration in perennial temperate artemisia was measured to be between .05 and .40% in another study, comparable to the annual species only when the North American plant was in full flower.  There are many other artemisias in other parts of the world that also contain high concentrations of arteminsinin, and there are many other phytochemicals in plants of the genus.

Here are some resources on the medicinal uses of artemisia:
http://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia+absinthium

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2758403/ (an overview)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20542104 (neuroprotective in smaller doses)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17240130 (inflammatory bowel disease treatment)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20843592 (kidney disease treatment)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20161947 (lead poisoning treatment)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4790293/ (Lyme disease treatment)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2629082/ (prostate cancer treatment)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=wormwood+and+malaria (long list of malaria treatment studies)

Interestingly, higher concentrated doses of artemisia compounds can cause some of the very same non-infectious illnesses that the compound is believed to ameliorate at lower doses, as many other studies will attest.  The inverse seems to be true for artemisia as a cancer treatment: lower doses encourage cell proliferation, while higher doses inhibit it (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24660592 ).  My medical botany instructor advocates the safety of eating one fresh leaf per day from the live plant, rather than taking it in concentrated pill form in which the compound has been isolated. 
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on June 09, 2017, 09:54:40 PM
AWESOME work: Socrates, ilinda and R.R. Book!  :)

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on June 11, 2017, 09:41:47 AM
R.R. see Reply #185, it is for you, Socrates and ilinda. :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on June 11, 2017, 12:13:44 PM
Thanks, Barb for all the neat graphics - we'll try to live up to your kind praise! :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on June 11, 2017, 02:22:10 PM
Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) does smell wonderfully seductive, and looks like that beautiful pic in #184.  Mine gets a bit more ragged as the summer wears on, with the seed stalks and all, but I planted it years ago and it's fairly hardy here in MO.

Funny thing, shortly after my very good friend moved back to Montana in 2012, she informed me that the plant grows wild all around her area!  She and I both had carefully tended it in our herb gardens, and there it is out west growing in the ditches and along roadsides.

But I certainly was not aware of the many uses of it as posted by RRBook, thinking it was of limited use.  Good information to have.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on June 11, 2017, 03:23:13 PM
Thanks, Barb for all the neat graphics - we'll try to live up to your kind praise! :)
8)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on June 11, 2017, 06:53:05 PM
Hi Ilinda,
Yes, they do sprawl, don't they?  The only reason mine was so tidy looking is that I had just pruned it back.    But I guess that floppy stage when it's in flower is also when it's the strongest medicinally. 

It does make sense to me that the plant would be widespread out in Montana, as PFAF and other resources refer to it as a kind of sage, other than the Salvia genus.  Confusingly, it is sometimes referred to as being "white sage," because of the silver color, but being a mugwort it's a completely different plant than the sacred white sage that grows only in the West.

P.S. I don't know if this will help, but we had a yogurt discussion under this heading around May 10:


    Planet X Town Hall »
    Linda - SURVIVAL HEALTH »
    SURVIVALIST HEAL THYSELF »
    Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells

Would love to hear what you discovered recently on that topic!



Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods: medicinal cherry juice
Post by: R.R. Book on June 12, 2017, 05:26:04 AM
Barb messaged me with this wonderful link to information about the medicinal uses of cherry juice (esp. tart): http://swedishhospital.com/hl/?/134666/Cherries

Am adding some studies posted on the NIH website:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3133468/ (insomnia treatment, natural NSAID)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22038497 ( " ")

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4566454/ (peripheral neuropathy treatment)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4566454/ (gout and joint pain)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2874510/ (protection from muscle damage during running)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4880859/ (promotes athletic endurance)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3151016/ (antioxidant able to protect genome)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11600045 (antioxidant phytochemicals analyzed and found to be stronger than vitamin E at a certain concentration)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24570273 (reduced arterial stiffness)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27146650 (significantly lowers systolic BP)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26163338 (cherry phytochemicals have a lasting residual effect in the body and "significantly influence" cell migration, good for immune response)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16366675 (tart cherries exceed sweet ones for phytochemicals that are neuro-protective)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12706854 (inhibit tumor development)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23566055 (combined with essential fatty acids reduces cognitive impairment)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18598166 (improves blood sugar, cholesterol and weight)

Thanks again Barb! :)



Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods: medicinal cherry juice
Post by: ilinda on June 12, 2017, 03:55:47 PM
Barb messaged me with this wonderful link to information about the medicinal uses of cherry juice (esp. tart): http://swedishhospital.com/hl/?/134666/Cherries

Am adding some studies posted on the NIH website:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3133468/ (insomnia treatment, natural NSAID)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22038497 ( " ")

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4566454/ (peripheral neuropathy treatment)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4566454/ (gout and joint pain)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2874510/ (protection from muscle damage during running)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4880859/ (promotes athletic endurance)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3151016/ (antioxidant able to protect genome)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11600045 (antioxidant phytochemicals analyzed and found to be stronger than vitamin E at a certain concentration)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24570273 (reduced arterial stiffness)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27146650 (significantly lowers systolic BP)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26163338 (cherry phytochemicals have a lasting residual effect in the body and "significantly influence" cell migration, good for immune response)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16366675 (tart cherries exceed sweet ones for phytochemicals that are neuro-protective)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12706854 (inhibit tumor development)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23566055 (combined with essential fatty acids reduces cognitive impairment)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18598166 (improves blood sugar, cholesterol and weight)

Thanks again Barb! :)
More incredible information!  Imagine comparing the nutritients in tart cherries to "nutrients" in Pepsi, Coca Cola, Mountain Dew, fast hamburgers, etc., etc.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on June 12, 2017, 05:02:58 PM
A refreshing "soda" would be to mix the cherry juice with seltzer and add a twist of lime - it would be like the old-fashioned cherry limeade that some of us remember from the old drugstore / five-and-dime store soda counter, but without all the sugar. :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods: Butterbur
Post by: R.R. Book on June 15, 2017, 09:09:13 AM
The National Institutes of Health lists several studies on Butterbur (Petasites hybridus, Petasites officinales, Tussilago hybrida), also commonly known as coltsfoot, for the treatment of migraines and allergic rhinitis (hayfever).  A good overview is posted at the NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health website: https://nccih.nih.gov/health/butterbur .  The site recommends that usage within dosing parameters is safe for up to 16 weeks at a time.

Studies:
https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/noms/support_docs/butterbur_nov2009.pdf (useful for migraines and hayfever, neuroprotective effects, endocrine metabolism, steriod, lowers BP, increases brain glutathione, blocks seizures, stomach protective.  Aerial parts are useful for antihistimine and anti-anaphylaxis effects, but not effective against skin allergies.   Tea not recommended from fresh leaves due to alkaloid content.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15623680 (migraines reduced by 48% at dose of 75mg twice a day - specifically the root was used)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20828319 (exerts antioxidant activity and improves lipid profiles)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14720270 (anti-inflammatory)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12859442 (up to 400 mg used safely)

The plant is a hardy perennial, with seeds available from Richter's in Canada and from private growers on websites such as Etsy.  If purchasing commercial capsules, look for "PA free" label, evidence that no toxic alkaloids are present.  If harvesting from your own plants, follow one of these methods to reduce alkaloid content: air drying, cooking, fermenting, long-term storage, chilling. 
Drawing from PFAF:


Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods: Butterbur
Post by: ilinda on June 15, 2017, 03:13:12 PM
The National Institutes of Health lists several studies on Butterbur (Petasites hybridus, Petasites officinales, Tussilago hybrida), also commonly known as coltsfoot, for the treatment of migraines and allergic rhinitis (hayfever).  A good overview is posted at the NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health website: https://nccih.nih.gov/health/butterbur .  The site recommends that usage within dosing parameters is safe for up to 16 weeks at a time.

Studies:
https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/noms/support_docs/butterbur_nov2009.pdf (useful for migraines and hayfever, neuroprotective effects, endocrine metabolism, steriod, lowers BP, increases brain glutathione, blocks seizures, stomach protective.  Aerial parts are useful for antihistimine and anti-anaphylaxis effects, but not effective against skin allergies.   Tea not recommended from fresh leaves due to alkaloid content.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15623680 (migraines reduced by 48% at dose of 75mg twice a day - specifically the root was used)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20828319 (exerts antioxidant activity and improves lipid profiles)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14720270 (anti-inflammatory)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12859442 (up to 400 mg used safely)

The plant is a hardy perennial, with seeds available from Richter's in Canada and from private growers on websites such as Etsy.  If purchasing commercial capsules, look for "PA free" label, evidence that no toxic alkaloids are present.  If harvesting from your own plants, follow one of these methods to reduce alkaloid content: air drying, cooking, fermenting, long-term storage, chilling. 
Drawing from PFAF:
This article is just in the nick of time!  I used to grow coltsfoot, not realizing it is also known as butterbur, etc.  When we got the goats in 2010, they proceeded to wipe out many things I had growing, and over time I've been able to replace some, putting the new plantings inside cages and fences.

One thing about coltsfoot is that it loves to have wet feet and will even grow in a fen-like area.  I had beginner's luck, because when I got my first seeds, I planted it directly under a downspout, and in some black, rich soil that always seemed moist.  Coltsfoot did well there and spread and spread.

When the goats began to decimate it, I replanted it in two other areas, but neither did well, as I did not know about its water-loving qualities at the time.  Now, sadly, my 2014 seeds did not germinate this year, and now, happily I know it's still available at Richter's.  Yippee.

This is a good one to have for the anti-histamine effect, but it's wise to underdose until you know how much to use.  It's potent and can easily dry out your sinuses too much.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on June 15, 2017, 03:37:27 PM
Here are some butterbur rootstock sources (more developed plants), but they are the giant fuki (japonicus) plants with the edible stems, not the same species:

https://strictlymedicinalseeds.com/product/butterbur-live-root-petasites-palmatus-organic/

https://onegreenworld.com/product/green-fuki-2/ (gallon pots $20)

https://www.goodwincreekgardens.com/product.asp?specific=2457  (3 inch pots $6)

http://www.edibleacres.org/purchase/fuki  (root cutting $8)

https://www.rollingrivernursery.com/products/764/179/perennial-vegetables-and-herbs/perennial-vegetables/fuki-petasites-japonicus-detail
one-gallon pots $14
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on June 15, 2017, 08:49:18 PM
Great posts, ilinda and R.R.
do you both make herbal tinctures?
All The Best,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on June 16, 2017, 05:39:48 AM
Hi Barb,

I've taken classes on making herbal tinctures and salves, taught by a neighboring family of women from among the "plain folk" here (plain meaning "not fancy" rather than "living on the plains").  They use traditional knowledge passed down for generations, with the eldest unmarried daughter also having left the farm to study for several years abroad at a botanical medicine institute, before returning to bring the knowledge back to our community.  Some of the techniques of the plain people are being studied by mainstream medicine (bone repair, treatment of third degree burns), and some may be suppressed by it (a Lyme class that they had scheduled to capacity was abruptly cancelled and never re-scheduled).  It was fun to tease them about stashing gin and vodka by the caseload for their tinctures, which we used in the classes, as the plain folk are culturally constrained from using alcohol ;)

That having been said, my preferred medicines to make at home are colloidal solutions brewed from minerals; teas and tisanes; and dried pulverized material that can be encapsulated in gelatin capsules using a simple device available from a health food store.  I also follow the plain women's advice of eating one fresh leaf per day of any medicinal herb that I may be growing and using at the time, unless the fresh herb is high in pyrrolizine alkaloids.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on June 16, 2017, 03:28:49 PM
Hi Barb,

I've taken classes on making herbal tinctures and salves, taught by a neighboring family of women from among the "plain folk" here (plain meaning "not fancy" rather than "living on the plains").  They use traditional knowledge passed down for generations, with the eldest unmarried daughter also having left the farm to study for several years abroad at a botanical medicine institute, before returning to bring the knowledge back to our community.  Some of the techniques of the plain people are being studied by mainstream medicine (bone repair, treatment of third degree burns), and some may be suppressed by it (a Lyme class that they had scheduled to capacity was abruptly cancelled and never re-scheduled).  It was fun to tease them about stashing gin and vodka by the caseload for their tinctures, which we used in the classes, as the plain folk are culturally constrained from using alcohol ;)

That having been said, my preferred medicines to make at home are colloidal solutions brewed from minerals; teas and tisanes; and dried pulverized material that can be encapsulated in gelatin capsules using a simple device available from a health food store.  I also follow the plain women's advice of eating one fresh leaf per day of any medicinal herb that I may be growing and using at the time, unless the fresh herb is high in pyrrolizine alkaloids.

R.R. Book what an impressive and wonderful reply.
That is so great, what you do!
:)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 16, 2017, 10:32:22 AM
Yowbarb Note - this book is likely a really good reference:
...

Medical Herbalism: The Science Principles and Practices Of Herbal Medicine Hardcover – October 24, 2003
by David Hoffmann  (Author)
4.7 out of 5 stars    99 customer reviews  See all 4 formats and editions [link on page.]
                                                             Kindle eBook $40.99
                                                             Read with Our Free App          [link on page.]
 
Hardcover $42.46      27 Used from $32.81 40      New from $34.23
...
Yowbarb Note,
This is one excellent review of this book, posted on Amazon by Mr. Wheeler on December 10, 2016:

https://www.amazon.com/Medical-Herbalism-Principles-Practices-Medicine/dp/0892817496/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500225672&sr=8-1&keywords=medical+herbalism+by+david+hoffman

"I own and have read many many books on herbalism, medicinal herbs and their uses, herbal medicine, etc. and this one, although its a literal textbook, is the most useful so far. I think it completes any collection on medicinal herb literature since it gives a recent, scientific explanation of WHY components of certain plants help certain conditions, without suggesting that it is only the isolated chemicals within plants that is therapeutic. Has a wonderful section on the organic chemistry which I find incredibly useful, since most books merely mention an active compound without showing/explaining exactly what it is and how it works in the body. Likewise most chemistry books do not go into any depth about compounds found in herbs, so this book is a great bridge between herbalism and the chemistry of medicine. I have taken an introductory year of organic chemistry and biochemistry so the information is very digestible- but for those who have not, I think this introduction to the most important ideas of organic chemistry and biochemistry as they relate to herbs may be a great gateway. There are numerous videos on each subject (like bonding or molecular structure) on youtube that can be used to supplement the information.
Even if one were to ignore the entire chemistry section, the rest of the book is well organized and full of very useful information, such as dosing, cross references of common/Latin plant names, explanations of common ailments, and a section on how to make remedies using the plants. Very highly recommended."
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 16, 2017, 03:50:30 PM
Great posts, ilinda and R.R.
do you both make herbal tinctures?
All The Best,
Yowbarb
Getting caught up and just now seeing this.

Yes, I make herbal tinctures.  In fact in the past couple of years I've begun to make homeopathic preps from some of the tinctures, and am experimenting right now (on myself) with the wild yam homeopathic preps, trying to find the correct dose for myself.  (Am seeing positive results, and now just looking for the optimum dose).  Am also working with another woman who needs something besides wild yam, and I made homeop. preps. from 1C through 12C for her, and she will experiment to see if that will do what she wants.  If not, we have several other herbs lined up to try.  There is never a lack of "things to try" in herbalism.

Also, I recently discovered organic wheat vodka, so I bought some for the alcohol tinctures, as I felt uncomfortable using Everclear anymore after thinking about the probable connection between Monsanto and Everclear made from GM corn. 

BTW, it's easy to get started in herbs.  Herbalist friend with formal training said in one of her talks that for someone interested in all of this, find 5 to 10 herbs that really interest and intrigue you,  particularly for their usefulness, then begin to study and grow and learn to use them.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 16, 2017, 04:19:39 PM
Hi Barb,

I've taken classes on making herbal tinctures and salves, taught by a neighboring family of women from among the "plain folk" here (plain meaning "not fancy" rather than "living on the plains").  They use traditional knowledge passed down for generations, with the eldest unmarried daughter also having left the farm to study for several years abroad at a botanical medicine institute, before returning to bring the knowledge back to our community.  Some of the techniques of the plain people are being studied by mainstream medicine (bone repair, treatment of third degree burns), and some may be suppressed by it (a Lyme class that they had scheduled to capacity was abruptly cancelled and never re-scheduled).  It was fun to tease them about stashing gin and vodka by the caseload for their tinctures, which we used in the classes, as the plain folk are culturally constrained from using alcohol ;)

That having been said, my preferred medicines to make at home are colloidal solutions brewed from minerals; teas and tisanes; and dried pulverized material that can be encapsulated in gelatin capsules using a simple device available from a health food store.  I also follow the plain women's advice of eating one fresh leaf per day of any medicinal herb that I may be growing and using at the time, unless the fresh herb is high in pyrrolizine alkaloids.
Wonder if TPTB or TPTW clamped down on the Lyme lecture.  Guess we'll never know.

How do you make your colloidal solutions brewed from minerals?  I'm wanting to do somethng similar with stinging nettle, one very useful, high-mineral plant, but have never actually worked it into any preps, in spite of having grown it for some years now.  I once saw Susun Weed tak about making some concoction in which she simmered stinging nettle for what seemed like hours, then strained it and stored in fridge, using only small amount at a time.  But details are lost now.

Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on July 17, 2017, 01:31:10 PM
Hi Ilinda,

To make a colloidal solution, you can order a foot of jeweler's wire in whatever metal you want to use (the precious metals have the most medicinal value as colloids), in the gauge range of between maybe 16 at the thickest and 22 at the thinnest.  Thicker gauges should last a lifetime.  Be sure to get .999 fine wire so that you're not mixing a baser metal into the colloid.  This is the most expensive part of your purchases besides a way to recharge batteries, if any.

A typical colloidal silver generator can be obtained inexpensively on the web, and might require 3 9-volt batteries for a total of 27 volts' power.  For prepping, you might either want to choose lithium batteries or NiMH (nickel metal hydride) or NiCD (nickel cadmium).  Nickel batteries have two important advantages over lithium: (1) if damaged, they don't produce fires that can climb vertically like lithium batteries, and (2) they can be discharged (including self-discharge from sitting idle) down to zero power and still recover their rechargeability.

For prepping purposes, you'll then either need to stock up on batteries or consider a way to recharge batteries.  Some colloidal silver generators come with their own solar panel, but that forces you into dependence upon sunlight at a time when volcanic ash and other debris may be clouding skies for a lengthy period of time.  I've opted to attach a small generator box to my stationary bike and hook it up to a 12v DC power pack.  Whatever 12v battery you might choose, if any, needs to be a deep cycle battery in order to survive continuous recharging - a car battery charger may only supply a high voltage charge for a limited number of times.  Max probably is a good person to consult on this aspect - Max, could you please weigh in, or anyone else who uses 12v DC?.  An alternative is to get the colloidal silver generator now and make up lots of jars of solution to put away safely (buried if necessary, as Barb has suggested), and then not worry at this late date about power generating equipment, unless it's in the budget.

Back to making colloids: The only other materials you need on hand are distilled water, a jar with coated metal, plastic or glass lid, and saline solution, which you can make yourself from sea salt and water.  Wide-mouth canning jars are good, but the narrower mouths potentially place electrodes too close together.  Cut your foot of jeweler's wire into two 6" lengths.  Bend the tips of one end of each so that they'll hang over the edge of the jar.  Then set them aside.

Fill your jar about 3/4 full with distilled water and add 4 drops of saline per quart to make the water electroconductive.  Close the lid and shake vigorously.  Never use a metal utensil with a colloid.  Some recipes call for the water to be heated, but it's not necessary in my opinion (I do it only for colloidal gold).  If you do choose to heat the water, either use the jar in a double boiler or the water without jar directly in a glass or an enamel coated pan with no chips in it. 

If making colloidal silver, once the saline solution is added and the jar shaken, add your bent electrodes over opposite sides of the jar rim, and make sure the immersed ends go straight down into the water, so that they remain away from one-another's energy field, lest they cancel each other out.  Attach the alligator clips to the small portion of each wire that extends outside the mouth of the jar and be sure that the unit lights up.  At this point, it is enjoyable to engage children to watch hydrogen being displaced from the solution as bubbles form on one electrode, while a swirling cloud of silver forms in the water around the other electrode.  Consult your favorite recipe for length of time to "brew" the solution before detaching from the generator (can Google this). 

If making colloidal gold for the purpose of vivid dreaming, sharpened cognition, or potential cellular radiation shield, recipes usually call for a little sugar such as from maple syrup, as well as a citric acid source such as a squeeze of lemon.  The carbohydrate coats gold molecules and aids their transport in the body, while blocking them from cluttering the cell nucleus unless the cell is dying.  Otherwise, the procedure is the same.  Other precious metals, such as platinum, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium and irridium may also have medicinal properties, especially vs. cancer.

When finished, cap and shake the bottle vigorously before taking any, especially if it has sat on the shelf, as entropy will cause colloidal molecules to settle out of solution toward the bottom.  Shaking reinvigorates the ions.  Always store colloids in the dark and at room temperature away from refrigeration.

When putting your equipment away, take a plastic wool pot scrubbing pad and wipe the oxidized silver from your electrodes.  Afterward, if you attach the alligator clips to either side of the pad, that will prevent the clips from touching together in storage and inadvertently discharging the batteries of a unit that doesn't have an on/off switch.   

As far as stinging nettle or any other medicinal plant, nature has already created the colloid within the plant.  For plants that you wouldn't eat raw, you only need either to brew it in hot water or bruise and soak it to get the colloid out.  If you use distilled water, the emptiness of the water will permit more of the nutrients from your plant to be infused into your solution.  :)

Attaching photo: I don't recommend these jars with bailing wire for brewing colloids, but it's what I had on hand and I've been using this one for two decades!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 17, 2017, 02:42:37 PM
Thanks for the lengthy explanations.  This will be on my list of things to do.  I like the idea of making solutions now and storing them in the dark for future needs.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 17, 2017, 02:49:21 PM
Thanks for the lengthy explanations.  This will be on my list of things to do.  I like the idea of making solutions now and storing them in the dark for future needs.

Ditto to all that!
:)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 17, 2017, 02:50:52 PM
Great posts, ilinda and R.R.
do you both make herbal tinctures?
All The Best,
Yowbarb
Getting caught up and just now seeing this.

Yes, I make herbal tinctures.  In fact in the past couple of years I've begun to make homeopathic preps from some of the tinctures, and am experimenting right now (on myself) with the wild yam homeopathic preps, trying to find the correct dose for myself.  (Am seeing positive results, and now just looking for the optimum dose).  Am also working with another woman who needs something besides wild yam, and I made homeop. preps. from 1C through 12C for her, and she will experiment to see if that will do what she wants.  If not, we have several other herbs lined up to try.  There is never a lack of "things to try" in herbalism.

Also, I recently discovered organic wheat vodka, so I bought some for the alcohol tinctures, as I felt uncomfortable using Everclear anymore after thinking about the probable connection between Monsanto and Everclear made from GM corn. 

BTW, it's easy to get started in herbs.  Herbalist friend with formal training said in one of her talks that for someone interested in all of this, find 5 to 10 herbs that really interest and intrigue you,  particularly for their usefulness, then begin to study and grow and learn to use them.

ilinda, excellent post, inspirational.
:)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on July 17, 2017, 03:29:16 PM
Ilinda, I'd be interested in learning more about how you make your homeopathics.  I understand the principle of more dilute being stronger, but would like to learn more.  Would you mind sharing your favorite 5 or 10 herbs, and how you go about diluting them to different strengths?
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 18, 2017, 05:59:25 PM
Ilinda, I'd be interested in learning more about how you make your homeopathics.  I understand the principle of more dilute being stronger, but would like to learn more.  Would you mind sharing your favorite 5 or 10 herbs, and how you go about diluting them to different strengths?
Here is an example of wild yam:
1 dig wild yam; then dry the whole root on a tabletop, out of the sun, for several weeks although it probably doesn't take that long.  It's as hard as rock or concrete.
2 try to pulverize it, which you will find impossible due to its hardness; so find the best way to pulverize one "arm" or "leg" of it.  I use a steel file, and have tried many things, but always come back to the file.
3 after pulverization, you have a pile of powder and this is your base for tincture.
4 make a tincture out of this powder.  For example, I usually make 10% tinctures, IIRC, although I've made 5% before.  IOW, for a small experimental batch of tincture, weigh out 1 gram of your powder, and add this 1 g. powder to 10 g. alcohol such as organic wheat vodka.  Place the powder into the alcohol in a large enough container (has headroom).
5 shake this container vigorously about 100X, at least 2X/day, storing it out of light and heat.
6 Shake your tincture 2X daily for at least a month, preferably two weeks or more.  (Some say 2 weeks is enough, but I do one month.)
7 After the tincture is "done" you may decant and save the clear liquid, and send the crude pulp to the compost pile.  (I leave it much longer.)
8 The clear liquid you decanted into a very clean container is the beginnings of your homeopathic dilutions.
9 Let's say you should now have about 10 grams of liquid (alcohol that contains many dissolved phytochemicals from the wild yam).
10 Decide whether you want to do "X" or "C" dilutions.  I do "C" because that's what Hannemann (sp) did.  Then decide "how far" you want to do with it.  My first homeopathic remedy I made into 30 jars, 1C through 30C.
11 Let's pretend we will do only 12 jars, of 1C through 12C;  To make our first jar, 1C, (1 in 100), we take 1 ml of our tincture, and place it in 99 ml. of appropriate solvent, which in this case is organic wheat vodka, then succuss 40X.  Now you have your first homeopathic dilution, a 1C Wild Yam prep. or 1C Wild Yam remedy or 1C Wild Yam dilution. 
12 now to make your 2C dilution, do this:  take 1 ml from your 1C jar, add it to your jar labeled "2C", which already contains 99 ml organic wheat vodka.  Now succuss 40X
13 you continue this with each numbered diluion.  When finished, you will have many remedies for many uses.  Also, remember that solids, such as sulfur powder can be made into homeopathicd preps, w/o the use of alcohol,  but which use galactose, IIRC.  There is more to homeopathy, much more, but I've tried to give a tiny preview
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 18, 2017, 06:06:39 PM
This is an addendum.  I forgot to list any of my favorite herbs, as I have so many I'm not sure I can narrow it down that much but will try, and they are not in any particular order:
1. Milk thistle
2. Hops
3. Foxglove
4. Lily of the Valley
5. Stinging Nettle
6. Holy Basil
7. Coltsfoot
8. Pleurisy Root
9. Black Cohosh
10. Wild yam

And as a BTW, the herbs that are water soluble, don't need to be in an alcoholic tincture first, but often in vinegar.  I'm no expert on homeopathy but decided to take the plunge and teach myself from what I've read and seen.  With my using the wild yam, I am seeing slow, but definite, improvements in the conditions I wanted to change.
If you have any questions, please yell.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on July 19, 2017, 05:59:37 AM
Ilinda, Thank you so much for sharing all these details.  So when you make the series of different strengths of a single substance (such as the 1C through 12 C example), is each separate dilution strength used for a different purpose?  Seems as if you have nearly infinite dilutions possible.

I don't know how Hahnemann explained it, but the best way that I have been able to comprehend the principle of more dilute=stronger is to think of the cells of the human body as having sub-atomic parts that we have not yet discovered or adequately described.  So very dilute homeopathics might be able to reach these nooks and crannies, while macroscopic meds would be like trying to fit the camel through the eye of a needle.  In the debate over how long to brew colloidal silver, for example, some people feel that less time is better for similar reasons.

Re: your favorite herbs - hope you'll post more pics of your garden now that we're in the prime of the growing season :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on July 20, 2017, 09:49:32 AM
Vitex agnus, also known as chastetree, has a 5-star PFAF medicinal rating.  PFAF says that the seeds have been used for millennia to balance female hormones, particularly correcting estrogen dominance.  Other effects on the female reproduction system include restoring stopped menstruation, increasing fertility, restoring ovulation, easing menstrual pain and premenstrual tension, and helping to smooth the transition to menopause.  Seeds and fruits are also diuretic, diaphoretic (causing perspiration), febrifuge (breaking fevers), galactogogue (promoting lactation), sedative, stomachic, and paradoxically both aphrodesiac and anaphrodesiac, depending upon where the hormonal balance is needed.  A tincture of the berries relieves paralysis, as well as limb pain and weakness.  The plant also has opthalmic uses, as well as being carminative, suppressing appetite and promoting sleep.  It has not been demonstrated to support the male reproductive system.

Non-medicinal uses include yellow-dye production and basket making, as well as providing a pepper substitute.  It is hardy to zone 5 and a good source of nectar for bees.

I wait until flower heads have dried in autumn, and then harvest and place them in re-usable cloth tea bags with drawstrings.


Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods: Phlox for aspirin
Post by: R.R. Book on July 20, 2017, 01:02:02 PM
Garden Phlox is in full bloom now, and is a natural source of salicylates for aspirin.  A database called The Pherobase posts a very long list of phytochemicals:

http://www.pherobase.com/database/floral/floral-taxa-species-Phlox-paniculata.php

Posting photo from the bee nectary garden:
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 20, 2017, 04:04:24 PM
Vitex agnus, also known as chastetree, has a 5-star PFAF medicinal rating.  PFAF says that the seeds have been used for millennia to balance female hormones, particularly correcting estrogen dominance.  Other effects on the female reproduction system include restoring stopped menstruation, increasing fertility, restoring ovulation, easing menstrual pain and premenstrual tension, and helping to smooth the transition to menopause.  Seeds and fruits are also diuretic, diaphoretic (causing perspiration), febrifuge (breaking fevers), galactogogue (promoting lactation), sedative, stomachic, and paradoxically both aphrodesiac and anaphrodesiac, depending upon where the hormonal balance is needed.  A tincture of the berries relieves paralysis, as well as limb pain and weakness.  The plant also has opthalmic uses, as well as being carminative, suppressing appetite and promoting sleep.  It has not been demonstrated to support the male reproductive system.

Non-medicinal uses include yellow-dye production and basket making, as well as providing a pepper substitute.  It is hardy to zone 5 and a good source of nectar for bees.

I wait until flower heads have dried in autumn, and then harvest and place them in re-usable cloth tea bags with drawstrings.
Wow, that's a lot of help from one herb.  I had read and heard of its female hormone assistance, but not really much else, so it's a very versatile plant.  It must be what is called an adaptogen--my herbalist friend said that an adaptogen such as this one, or cayenne, or ginseng, or others, will evoke one reaction when needed, but when the opposite is needed, it will instead evoke that one!  Sounds like a plant with ESP!  Thanks for posting.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 20, 2017, 04:28:42 PM
Ilinda, Thank you so much for sharing all these details.  So when you make the series of different strengths of a single substance (such as the 1C through 12 C example), is each separate dilution strength used for a different purpose?  Seems as if you have nearly infinite dilutions possible.

I don't know how Hahnemann explained it, but the best way that I have been able to comprehend the principle of more dilute=stronger is to think of the cells of the human body as having sub-atomic parts that we have not yet discovered or adequately described.  So very dilute homeopathics might be able to reach these nooks and crannies, while macroscopic meds would be like trying to fit the camel through the eye of a needle.  In the debate over how long to brew colloidal silver, for example, some people feel that less time is better for similar reasons.

Re: your favorite herbs - hope you'll post more pics of your garden now that we're in the prime of the growing season :)
My understanding of the various dilutions is that one never knows for sure which dilution will work, so often people will start with 6C or 12C, but depending on the situation, may even start with 200C (emergency).  One thing I've read is that, theoretically, at the 12C dilution, there are no particles or material remaining from the original material.  Still, most preps are available at at least the 30C level.   I read that Hahnemann(sp) used mainly the 30C potency, so that is why I often make the dilutions from 1C through 30C of a given herb.  But all of these dilutions are what you get when making it at home, whereas when you order kits, you will rarely receive any given named prep in more than one strength.  For example I have a kit of emergency preps, and they are all 200C.  And have several other kits of non-emergency dilutions, and they are mostly 30C, possibly all are 30C.  (If you felt you needed more than the usual 5-7 drops, you could just use more drops, or dose more often, since you're working with what you bought, which was 30C.)  Thus, my 1C through 30C wormseed (for goat worms), and which I have not yet used, will be experimental.  If I need it, I might start with 1C, being cautious with new things, and see how the 1C performs.  Also, when I run out of a given 30C, I can then go back to the lesser dilutions to make a new 30C bottle.

That is an interesting way of conceptualizing the "dilute is stronger" idea about homeopathy.  I too have thought a lot about this, and here is my own 2 cents:
Think of E=mc2, Einstein's famous equation that says the energy in a given thing, grain of sand, for example, is equal to its mass multiplied by the speed of light, squared.  Anyway, taking that a step further, think that a grain of sand is matter.  But it has a huge amount of potential energy; said another way, that grain of sand can be converted into a huge amount of energy, or that grain of sand will gradually disappear as it is converted into its innate energy.

Anyway, each time we "succuss and dilute", we are replacing some of the matter/material with energy, so that neither the matter nor energy can be destroyed, but can be converted back and forth, energy to matter, matter to energy, etc.  So as we dilute and remove matter, we are simultaneously amplifying an amount of energy commensurate with the matter removed, so that eventually (theoretically at 12C) we have no matter left, but all of the energy that can be calculated by E=mc2.  I did calculate out one time the amount of energy trapped in a 1 gram piece of rock and it was incredibly huge.  Anyway, think of the energy that continues to be amplified in the dilutions greater than 12C. 

Sorry if I blather on about this, but it's good to hear your take on it too, since even the experts still cannot explain it any better than you or I just did.  Well, maybe Hahnemann did and we haven't read it yet.  Hope this hasn't been too garbled!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on July 20, 2017, 05:42:35 PM
Quote
neither the matter nor energy can be destroyed, but can be converted back and forth, energy to matter, matter to energy

Quote
...that grain of sand can be converted into a huge amount of energy, ...that grain of sand will gradually disappear as it is converted into its innate energy.

Quote
I did calculate out one time the amount of energy trapped in a 1 gram piece of rock and it was incredibly huge.

What an elegant explanation of the potential waiting to be tapped into as we grow in our understanding of how we can co-create with Heaven, as well. :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Jimfarmer on July 20, 2017, 08:17:25 PM
Quote
That is an interesting way of conceptualizing the "dilute is stronger" idea about homeopathy.  I too have thought a lot about this, and here is my own 2 cents:
Think of E=mc2, Einstein's famous equation that says the energy in a given thing ... is equal to its mass multiplied by the speed of light, squared.

Well, dilution does not destroy mass, so that can't be the mechanism of "dilute is stronger".  And if it did, the energy would not all be contained in the frequencies that the solid mass was contributing to the liquid.

Here is my guess.  Water (and alcohol?) molecules and clusters have many more resonant frequencies of vibration than the emission-absorption frequencies of the individual atoms, and so the liquid's components can resonate to many of the frequencies that the solid mass is contributing.  And, the more contact between liquid and solid, the more the liquid components will vibrate at the same frequencies that the solid contributes.  Now, "Homeopaths have discovered that the effect of homeopathic medicines is strengthed upon successive dilutions as long as the medicine is succussed (shaken) between each dilution" (http://homeopathy.inbaltimore.org/faq.html), and the shaking of the mixture causes increased contact between the liquid molecules-clusters and the solid molecules.  Even after the mixture is so dilute that only a few molecules of the solid remain, the shaking makes the liquid's different molecules-clusters contact each other, and so the effect of induced resonance is continued, giving a liquid in which many of its components are vibrating at the frequencies that the solid was contributing.

I suspect that the resonance phenomena that Dr Emoto discovered might be relevant also. Note that he decontaminated some large bodies of water by adding only some liters of energized water.  Along those lines, the "dilute is stronger" effect might be a result of the intention and concentration of the person who is shaking the mixtures.   Hmmm, many research projects arise.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on July 21, 2017, 02:46:28 AM
Quote
Water...molecules and clusters have many more resonant frequencies of vibration than the emission-absorption frequencies of the individual atoms, and so the liquid's components can resonate to many of the frequencies that the solid mass is contributing.

So this is how the Universal Solvent works?
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Jimfarmer on July 21, 2017, 11:02:36 AM
Quote
   
Quote
Water...molecules and clusters have many more resonant frequencies of vibration than the emission-absorption frequencies of the individual atoms, and so the liquid's components can resonate to many of the frequencies that the solid mass is contributing.

So this is how the Universal Solvent works?

Oh, I don't think so; my knowledge of chemistry is not that deep, but dissolving occurs when the molecules of the solvent break the electrical bonds between molecules of the solute.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 21, 2017, 06:34:45 PM
Quote
That is an interesting way of conceptualizing the "dilute is stronger" idea about homeopathy.  I too have thought a lot about this, and here is my own 2 cents:
Think of E=mc2, Einstein's famous equation that says the energy in a given thing ... is equal to its mass multiplied by the speed of light, squared.

Well, dilution does not destroy mass, so that can't be the mechanism of "dilute is stronger".  And if it did, the energy would not all be contained in the frequencies that the solid mass was contributing to the liquid.

Here is my guess.  Water (and alcohol?) molecules and clusters have many more resonant frequencies of vibration than the emission-absorption frequencies of the individual atoms, and so the liquid's components can resonate to many of the frequencies that the solid mass is contributing.  And, the more contact between liquid and solid, the more the liquid components will vibrate at the same frequencies that the solid contributes.  Now, "Homeopaths have discovered that the effect of homeopathic medicines is strengthed upon successive dilutions as long as the medicine is succussed (shaken) between each dilution" (http://homeopathy.inbaltimore.org/faq.html), and the shaking of the mixture causes increased contact between the liquid molecules-clusters and the solid molecules.  Even after the mixture is so dilute that only a few molecules of the solid remain, the shaking makes the liquid's different molecules-clusters contact each other, and so the effect of induced resonance is continued, giving a liquid in which many of its components are vibrating at the frequencies that the solid was contributing.

I suspect that the resonance phenomena that Dr Emoto discovered might be relevant also. Note that he decontaminated some large bodies of water by adding only some liters of energized water.  Along those lines, the "dilute is stronger" effect might be a result of the intention and concentration of the person who is shaking the mixtures.   Hmmm, many research projects arise.
Dilution does not destroy mass, but repeated, serial dilutions will eventually remove any traces of the original material/mass.  For example, put 1 gram of sodium chloride in 100 ml water for your 1% solution.  Now, with or without succussing, if you remove 1ml from that 100ml solution, and place that 1ml into a new container of 99ml H20 to make a second 100 ml solution, you will have even fewer molecules of sodium chloride than before.  If you continue this type of serial dilution, there will be a point at which statistics will tell you it is a near (or real) impossibility that any of the sodium chloride remains in the resulting solution.  That has to happen eventually.  At some point, 12C according to some, there will be no traces of the actual material left.  So, dilution does not destroy mass, but it is diluted out, little by little.

The "dilute is stronger" theme was also touched on, without the mention of "homeopathy", in Theo Colburn's book, "Our Stolen Future, in which she described findings which surprised her--that often some toxic organic synthetic chemicals show signs of greater toxicity, the more dilute they are!   IIRC she was discussing the effects of those toxins on fetal development, and was totally surprised to see that "less" can mean "more".

Yes, this is a field that is wide open for more research.  Funny thing, all the naysayers are probably unaware that homeopathy in the hands of someone with a lot of knowledge and know-how can be used successfully in veterinary medicine, making it difficult to claim "placebo effect".  There are at least two books about homeopathy for livestock, each written by a veterinarian.

One type of research would be a good idea:  what effect does the potency of the initial solution have on the end product?  IOW, if we start with a 1% tincture of wild yam in ethanol, as compared to a 10% tincture of the same ingredients, what are the properties of the final homeopathic preps?  I don't know yet, but am pondering comparing several "runs" in order to determine the results.  Logic says the 10% tincture would produce something 10X as potent as the 1% tincture.  But logic might not work when we are dealing with homeopathy, and as we have found, the ideas underlying homeopathy (successive dilutions with succussion produce amplification of effects) are actually counterintuitive.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 23, 2017, 05:30:44 PM
Milk thistle is a very valuable herb, especially for liver health and this year's crop is probably the best I've grown.  The flowers are very short-lived, one day it seems, and the drought has affected them a bit, but pic is attached anyway.  One thing for sure--you won't want to try to weed these without thick gloves.  Bumblebees seem to like it, as well as the similar flower of cardoon, whose leaves are on the left, somewhat overhanging the milk thistle.

Cardoon, BTW, is a celery substitute.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on July 24, 2017, 06:11:50 AM
Thank you for bringing this one up Ilinda, I agree that it's one of the more important herbs.  Nice photo!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on November 08, 2017, 04:35:48 PM
Recently several of our prolific writers have posted some really good stuff on Alzheimer's Disease.  Now, as usual, I cannot find that thread, so will continue it here, until I do.

In September, 2017, I viewed a many-part series (14?) on Alzheimer's Disease, hosted by Peggy Sarlin, author of a book (recently revised) about the same topic.   I took copious notes, and will glean some tidbits from the first episode, featuring Richard Brown, M.D., lasting 1 hr 12 min.  Dr. Brown made it very clear, as did his wife in a later interview, that neither of them has any financial interest in any of the herbs or other products they mention in their talks.

 Dr. Brown's wife, Patricia Gerberg, M.D., at one time was not interested in herbs or anything non-conventional, that is, until she found herself becoming more and more ill, and finally nearly totally disabled, physically, as well as mentally with what they eventually discovered was Lyme Disease, in a later stage.  Her husband's work with herbs and her doctor finally telling her "there's nothing more we can do for you", gave her the impetus to try something non-conventional.  She did, then began to heal.  More on this later.

Dr. Brown said that "for the most part, Alzheimer's Disease is preventable."  He first discusses the diagnostic workup that should precede treatment for A.D. or any dementia. 
1) how much diagnostic workup has the patient had?
2) Is there a problem with blood vessels in this patient?  Have they had a MRI of brain?
3) do they have microvascular ischemia?
4) often in early dementia, we assume A.D., but often we find patient is taking too many meds, or there is synergism between them.
5) neuropsychological testing is needed to determiine if the supplements are working.
6) often a patient will have MCI (mild cognitive impairment) for years.

One supplement, an OTC known as "centrophenoxine" (spelled by phonetics as I never saw it in print).  Dr. Brown's advice: "Get it made in Europe, not China."
There are several thousand studies showing the effectiveness of centrophenoxine (sp), (a plant hormone??), combined with nerve cells, pulls "protein garbage" out of neurons, garbage which has built up over the years.  In Europe it is still a prescription, but now in the U.S., it can be gotten OTC, and even over internet.

Centrophenoxine rejuvenates cells, makes them more flexible, helps expel junk, and is certainly used for the aging brain.

 
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on November 08, 2017, 09:28:09 PM
RR and ilinda: Wow what awesome posts... with so much info!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on August 12, 2018, 02:01:40 PM
It is long overdue that I post results of my experiment with homeopathic wild yam.  Yikes, I could have killed myself.  Discovered, or was reminded, that homeopathy can be yield very potent medicines that are not to be taken lightly.

In a nutshell, I had mentioned previously that I was working with wild yam (for myself) knowing that it has some of the properties and qualities that I'm looking for in an herb.  So I decided, why keep making these tinctures, which is labor intensive?  Why not make one tincture, then from that tincture, make homeopathic dilutions, each more potent than the one before, and experiment using them, which will give me "more miles per plant".

Well, I was in the process of making up a small jar of my own skin cream/lotion, starting with 1C wild yam.  After the jar was empty, I'd begin using the "2C wild yam" preparation, then 3C, etc., thinking that eventually I would find the dilution that is perfect for me.

One day, some months ago, I had finished a jar of 19C, and was ready to begin using the 20C.  That night I had a snippet dream, which is how I describe the dreams that are short and very much "to the point"--there is rarely any guess as to the meaning.  This one was a perfect example:
The last thing before I awoke, a voice said very clearly:

"End this.  It's like larkspur.  It's deadly."   Then I awoke.

Needless to say, I did end the process and immediately went back to making up a tincture, and from that tincture making a skin lotion/cream.  I am having good results and glad I was reminded that homeopathy can create very powerful medicines that are not for daily use for the rest of one's life.  There may be exceptions to that statement, but for now I'm of the opinion that they are not to be used as some would take vitamins or other supplements.  Very thankful for the dream, which I should post in the dream board.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on August 12, 2018, 04:24:56 PM
I use wild yam cream topically on a regular basis, per doctor's orders.  Can't imagine that being deadly, as it is a food and contains weak amounts of phyto-progesterone that are beneficial to post-menopausal women.  But maybe I underestimate the strength of homeopathics?
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on August 13, 2018, 07:41:33 PM
I use wild yam cream topically on a regular basis, per doctor's orders.  Can't imagine that being deadly, as it is a food and contains weak amounts of phyto-progesterone that are beneficial to post-menopausal women.  But maybe I underestimate the strength of homeopathics?
I don't believe the material wild yam is deadly, as I also use it daily.  But the homeopathic wild yam is an energy version, and homeopathic remedies are usually for a specific ailment or condition, usually with a course of treatment, but not meant to take every day for the rest of one's life.

What I had been doing was gradually increasing the potency, beginning at 1C, and by 20C, I got the message to stop.  I realized later that the reason I was taking it was not a disease or medical condition, but more of a quasi-cosmetic reason.  Not necessary, but desired.  I just had not realized how powerful homeopathics can be.

But if a person has found that a particular potency of wild yam works for them, that would probably be fine.  Problem is, I hadn't found that perfect potency, and had probably accidentally gotten into potencies too powerful for my own good.

Is the wild yam you take homeopathic?  If so, which potency?
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on August 14, 2018, 06:59:01 AM
Mine is a purely topical cream. 

Well, I have a fresh respect for the potency of homeopathics now!   :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on September 19, 2018, 10:09:23 AM
In reviewing my decades-old HerbalGram magazines before donating them to an herbalist and her herb shop, I am discovering things I had long since forgotten, and some of these are incredible.  I could not find copyright infringement notices of any kind, so am reposting an article from HerbalGram No. 26, (1992).  Also, note that this article may be relevant to a new rash of "food doctoring" in which strawberries have apparently been spiked with needles, as posted elsewhere on PXTH. 

The following is posted, not because I am suggesting those so affected should avoid the allopathic medical community and instead try the following procedure.  But in a crisis situation where no physician or medical help is available, the following information could save a life.

Traditional Chinese Medicine — (chives for swallowed pins & needles)
By Albert Leung, Ph.D.
Here are two simple but interesting remedies from a single issue of the Sichuan Zhongyi  (Sichuan Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine), …the second remedy may be new to most Westerners.

….Jiucai (Chinese chives, allium tuberous) for removing swelled needles in children.  Sichuan Zhongyi, 8(11): 2-3 (1990).
These two cases are reported by Zhou Laifa of the PLA Hangzhou Sanatorium.

Case 1 was a five-year-old girl who had accidentally swallowed a 4-cm-long needle.  On presentation, X-ray examination revealed that the needle was lodged crosswise at the lesser curvature of the stomach.  Following a folk remedy, 250 g of fresh Chinese chives were cut into 3-inch lengths, cooked to half-done, and fed to the child all at once.  The next morning, no needle was found in the child’s feces.  X-ray examination revealed that the needle had moved down to the ileocecal region.  Another 250 g of Chinese chives were used in the same manner as before.  The next morning, the needle was found excreted in the feces wrapped in the chives.  The patient suffered no deleterious effects.

Case 2 was a six-year-old boy who had accidentally swallowed a pin.  X-ray examination revealed the pin lodged crosswise at the gastropyloric region.  Immediately, 400 g of Chinese chives were cooked as in the Case 1 example and fed to the child all at once.  The next morning, the pin was found excreted in the feces, wrapped in the chives.  The patient suffered no ill effects,

Chinese chives are sold in Chinatowns in major cities.  They are called “gao choi” in Cantonese and “jiu Cai” in Mandarin.  Flowers and leaves are sold separately as vegetables; the seeds are used as a male tonic.  There are two kinds of leaves:  the blanched (yellow) and unbalanced (green).  Blanches chives are produced by depriving the plant of sunlight during part of its growth; these leaves are normally used in wonton soups and have different flavor than that of unbalanced chives.  The leaves used in the remedy are unbalanced.

This is not the first report  of using Chinese chives to remove swallowed pins and needles that I have seen.  The difference is that this report traced the location of the swallowed needle/pin.  I am not familiar with what modern physicians normally do in this kind of situation, but the Chinese chives method seems so easy and effective.

(HerbalGram offers the material in this article for informational purposes only, not to be used as a basis for self-medication.)
(This article was originally published on page 34 of HerbalGram No. 26  — 1992.)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on September 19, 2018, 10:44:47 AM
Found this handsome bunch of them:

(https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1069/2032/products/Allium_tuberosum_5_nbrcg_wi_1024x1024.jpg?v=1509362320)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on September 20, 2018, 01:40:41 PM
Makes one wonder if all chives have the same qualities. 
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on September 20, 2018, 01:47:57 PM
In that same article containing the Chinese chives research, entitled "Traditional Chinese Medicine", HerbalGram No. 26 -- 1992, is a discussion of peanut leaves for insomnia.

"Use of fresh peanut shoots in treating insomnia."    Sichuan Zhongyi 8,(11)29-30 (2990).  This is a report by Yang Ceming of the Nuclear Industry No. 416 Hospital in Chengdu.  Yang tried peanut shoots on his patients suffering from insomnia and found the treatment to be fast, effective, simple, and economical with no adverse side effects.

Method:  Place 30 g fresh young shoots in a teacup and pour in 150 ml boiling water.  Drink this tea one hour before retiring every night.  It normally takes only two to three days to take effect.

The author did not give the number of patients treated by this method.   
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods: Disinfo Campaign Against Superfoods
Post by: R.R. Book on October 07, 2018, 11:27:37 AM
For at least a decade now, many of us have been learning about Superfoods and trying to include more of them in our diets.  They tend to be from plants which naturally happen to be highly colored and flavored:

(https://www.consumerhealthdigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/superfoods-improves-dieting-habits.jpg)

Here's an article, however, which says that Big-Agra and Big-Pharma are withdrawing their funding from periodicals which mention Superfoods, and furthermore may even be actively persuading editors to include disinformation debunking their benefits.  Never mind that scientific journals have published countless clinical trial results unequivocally concluding their importance to human health.

https://www.thesleuthjournal.com/the-fake-news-war-on-superfoods/

Quote
Among the superfoods attacked...are quinoa, goji and acai berries, chia seeds, maca tea, coconut oil, spirulina, kale, all of which have a solid record of aiding people’s nutrition.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on October 07, 2018, 03:50:36 PM
Any time anyone tries to discredit organic, brightly colored fruits and veggies, many people nowadays know to run in the other direction (towards those brightly colored fruits and veggies)!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on October 07, 2018, 04:49:54 PM
Absolutely!  :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on November 28, 2018, 09:44:09 AM
Ranking of antioxidant levels in northern berry species:

(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3751288/bin/IJCH-72-21188-g001.jpg)
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3751288/figure/F0001/

One of the most remarkable conclusions of this study was that the antioxidant levels were so high that heat-processing didn't significantly reduce their value.  Good to know for those who put up preserves and dehydrate.

Another study demonstrated that liquid preparations of the berries at the higher antioxidant (left-side) end of the spectrum remained shelf-stable and did not deteriorate over time:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23868799
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on November 28, 2018, 11:52:05 AM


Another study demonstrated that liquid preparations of the berries at the higher antioxidant (left-side) end of the spectrum remained shelf-stable and did not deteriorate over time:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23868799
Fascinating about the liquid preps.  Maybe liquefying the berries makes the nutrients more readily accessible to our digestive tracts.  Makes sense, as "they" often say we don't chew our food properly, which means nutrients go down the drain, literally.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on November 30, 2018, 04:40:21 AM
Adding another ORAC score profile which includes a few other berries not previously mentioned:

(http://www.traditional-foods.com/graphs/antioxidants/09042_Blackberries.png)
http://www.traditional-foods.com/antioxidants/elderberries/

If I understand the antioxidant measurement scale correctly, the values in the chart in the previous post are stated in micromols of *Trolox Equivalents/100g fresh weight, while the values in this chart may just be stated in µmTE (not divided by 100).  Please feel welcome to correct me, if anyone can find a better definition.

So Black Raspberries as measured on this chart at 192 µmTE ORAC would fit between the highest two berries scored on the above chart, Lingonberries and High-Bush Cranberries, if dividing by 100.

*Trolox Equivalents are total antioxidant strength of all antioxidants present in a food, unsorted by type.

Also noteworthy in the above ORAC study in Post #235: Dehydrated berries are 10x higher in antioxidants than fresh, and wild berries are at least twice as potent as cultivated, so by all means we should plan to stash fruit leather/dried fruits, and go foraging

Discrepancies between same berry-type on the two charts can be attributed to the soil composition in which each berry sample was grown, so values do vary widely by geographical location, but berries that tend to have high ORAC scores will consistently be at the higher end of the scale.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on January 06, 2019, 08:36:54 AM

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/how-sesame-seeds-could-save-your-life
 Sayer Ji, Founder of GreenMedInfo.com
How Sesame Seeds Could Save Your Life

Posted on:   Saturday, October 20th 2018 at 5:30 am
Written By:   Sayer Ji, Founder
This article is copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2018


We don't think of sesame seed paste as a 'life saver,' but compelling research shows it is capable of reducing blood markers of cardiovascular disease risk by 39% within only six weeks.

Sadly, in the Western world, when the average Joe thinks of protecting himself from heart disease, aspirin and statin drugs are often as high on the list – if not higher – than exercise and eating better. Through decades of intense marketing and miseducation millions have been made to think of the #1 killer as an inevitable force; one against which we fling pills and various pharmaceutical potions to 'minimize risk,' never to strike to the core of the problem and resolve it permanently.

This is one reason why natural medicine continues to gain popularity, as it is founded in more than a palliative approach to disease, and does not require the ingestion of patented chemicals (i.e. pharmaceuticals) whose side effects are often worse and far more plentiful than their claimed therapeutic ones. Instead of simply managing and/or suppressing symptoms, the goal is to invoke bodily self-healing, which is to say remove the interference that keeps it from doing so. And often, this is simply a matter of modifying the diet – adding something medicinal here, removing something not so healthy there.  

One of the most promising studies to come through the biomedical pipeline of late was a gem published in the journal Archives of Iranian Medicine, and which looked at a traditional, sesame-based food-medicine known as Ardeh (aka tahini) for its ability to decrease cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetics – a group whose risk of cardiac mortality is greatly enhanced due to unhealthy ratios and quantities of blood lipids associated with chronically elevated blood sugar, glycation and insulin resistance.

Titled, "Ardeh (Sesamum indicum) Could Improve Serum Triglycerides and Atherogenic Lipid Parameters in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial", the study consisted of 41 patients with type 2 diabetes, who were randomly assigned to one of the two groups: group A (Ardeh 28 g/d, n = 21) and group B (control, n = 20).  The patients in group A were given 28 grams (two tablespoons) of Ardeh with their breakfast, while group B patients continued with their regular breakfast, both for six months (the energy content of both groups was kept within the same range).

Both groups were evaluated at baseline and six weeks later for blood pressure, serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), LDL-C, HDL-C, and the so-called atherogenic index (i.e. heart disease promoting index) of plasma (AIP; log TG/HDL-C), TC/HDL-C ratio, and LDL/HDL-C ratio .

Remarkably, after the six week test period, significant positive changes were reported:
"After six weeks, there were significant decreases in serum TG (15.3 mg/dL) and AIP (39 %) in group A. Moreover, slight decreases in serum TC, LDL-C, and other atherogenic lipid parameters and a mild increase in HDL-C also were observed during Ardeh supplementation. Anthropometric measures and blood pressure were unchanged during the study period in both groups." [emphasis added]

Based on these promising observations the researchers concluded: "Ardeh could have favorable effects in decreasing CVD risk factors in type 2 diabetics." Keep in mind that they found a 39% decrease in the so-called atherogenic index of plasma (AIP), which is no small effect for a relatively small dietary change. It should be noted that the brand of tahini used in this study (Oghab Halva Company) had no additional additives or oil. It was ground sesame seed, plain and simple. Were this a drug trial, results like these would be broadcast the world over as the next life-saving (multi-billion dollar selling) blockbuster drug. For a more detailed explanation of the results, read the entire study at the link here.

This is not the first human clinical study to find a beneficial effect of sesame on cardiovascular health or diabetes. Here are few others:
   •   A 2012 study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology found that "Sesame oil consumption exerts a beneficial effect on endothelial function in hypertensive men.[ii]
   •   A 2010 study published in the journal Clinical Nutrition found that "Sesame oil exhibits synergistic effect with anti-diabetic medication in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus."iii]
   •   A 2006 study published in the Journal of Medical Food found that "The substitution of sesame seed oil as the sole edible oil lowers blood pressure and glucose in hypertensive diabetics."[iv]
   •   A 2006 study published in the Yale Journal of Biological Medicine found that "Sesame seed oil has a beneficial effect in hypertensive patients on either diuretics or beta-blockers."[v]
Sesame is truly a super star among medicinal foods.  In fact, recently, we reported on a study that found that eating 40 grams of sesame seeds, or the equivalent of two tablespoons of tahini, was superior to Tylenol in reducing pain in those suffering from knee arthritis. You can also take  a look at the over 40 health benefits of sesame seed and/or its components on our sesame seed health benefits research page to learn more about this remarkable healing food.

Let's face it. At this point, with human clinical research from respected, peer-reviewed journals revealing that simple dietary changes – yes, as simple as eating some sesame paste (tahini) daily -- can have huge impacts on risk factors for the most deadly and common diseases known in modern times, the time has come to reevaluate what exactly it is that is going on under the name of medicine today. Drugs don't cure disease any more than bullets cure war. Foods, on the other hand, can be curative, and may just help us to put our 'war against heart disease' – like are failed 'war on cancer' --  to rest once and for all.
Finally, for a quick tahini recipe, take a look at this About.com how to, and consider super-charging the heart-friendly properties of this food with the addition of garlic, whose life-saving properties we have expanded on in another article.
References



Parvin Mirmiran, Zahra Bahadoran, Mahdieh Golzarand, Asadolah Rajab, Fereidoun Azizi. Ardeh (Sesamum indicum) Could Improve Serum Triglycerides and Atherogenic Lipid Parameters in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.  Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Apr;20(2):202-8. doi: 10.1177/2047487312437625. Epub 2012 Jan 25.


[ii] Kalliopi Karatzi, Kimon Stamatelopoulos, Maritta Lykka, Pigi Mantzouratou, Sofia Skalidi, Nikolaos Zakopoulos, Christos Papamichael, Labros S Sidossis. Sesame oil consumption exerts a beneficial effect on endothelial function in hypertensive men. Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Jan 25. Epub 2012 Jan 25. PMID: 22345690


[iii] Devarajan Sankar, Amanat Ali, Ganapathy Sambandam, Ramakrishna Rao. Sesame oil exhibits synergistic effect with anti-diabetic medication in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clin Nutr. 2011 Jun ;30(3):351-8. Epub 2010 Dec 16. PMID: 21163558


[iv] D Sankar, M Ramakrishna Rao, G Sambandam, K V Pugalendi. A pilot study of open label sesame oil in hypertensive diabetics. J Med Food. 2006 Fall;9(3):408-12. PMID: 17004907


[v] D Sankar, M Ramakrishna Rao, G Sambandam, K V Pugalendi. Effect of sesame oil on diuretics or Beta-blockers in the modulation of blood pressure, anthropometry, lipid profile, and redox status. Yale J Biol Med. 2006 Mar;79(1):19-26. PMID: 17876372
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on January 06, 2019, 01:42:38 PM
Very valuable info Ilinda - thank you so much. 

For those who can eat sesame, there are some other beneficial properties of it as well, such as being antimicrobial and protective of breast tissue.

Definitely agree that aspirin and statins come with serious risks. 

For those who form stones and can't consume sesame, at least a gram a day of lecithin preserves the pliability of blood vessel walls, while vitamin E (mixed tocopherols) &/or krill (mixed tocotrienols) thin the blood with less wear and tear on the gastric lining than aspirin.  High-dose B-complex also prevents homocysteine formation.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on January 07, 2019, 07:53:24 AM
Does ingesting sesame seeds and/or tahini encourage stone formation?  What kind of stones?  Is it a genetic susceptibility?
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on January 07, 2019, 08:35:03 AM
The composition of stones depends in part upon the diet:
Acidic diet: uric acid stones
Alkaline diet: calcium or phosphate stones

Stone formation is often a side-effect of past use of prescription antibiotics, but can also follow silver use.

Traditional replacement probiotic formulations don't include oxalobacter formigenes, which digests crystals, so one needs to consume fresh or fermented cabbage to replace that when it's wiped out by antibiotics, or take a pill containing cabbage.

Other causes of stone formation:

Heavy antihistimine use, even just seasonally

High salt intake, unbalanced by potassium or magnesium citrate

An error of purine metabolism

Foods that form oxalic acid crystals: spinach, sesame, rhubarb, chocolate, chard, quinoa, caffeine (a purine), sweet potatoes, etc.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 09, 2019, 12:26:11 PM
Great info, R.R. and ilinda...
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on February 14, 2019, 05:24:48 PM

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2018/12/09/retrovirus.aspx

https://articles.mercola.com/herbs-spices/mugwort.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art3&utm_campaign=20181018Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM240755&et_rid=447790928
The Benefits of Mugwort
Mugwort plays an important role in Chinese acupuncture, with a history going back around 3,000 years.5

It is used in moxibustion, a process where mugwort leaves are gathered into sticks or cones the size of a cigar, and then burned over an acupuncture point to help release energy.6

Moxibustion can help treat menstrual cramping, stimulate a regular menstrual cycle and may even aid unborn infants to move into the correct position prior to delivery. In a study published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, researchers noticed that performing moxibustion at the tip of the fifth toe yielded positive results for infants in the breech position.7
Editor's Note:  This is the second time in just a few months of seeing mention of alternative health/medical treatments of the little toe, in aiding and assisting infant deliveries, particularly in case of breech presentation.

Native American tribes in California also use mugwort in their folk medicine tradition. It is believed to help with common conditions such as pain, colds and allergies.8
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on February 14, 2019, 05:30:14 PM
Quote
In a study published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, researchers noticed that performing moxibustion at the tip of the fifth toe yielded positive results for infants in the breech position.

Very interesting, and Cochrane is considered one of the toughest standards for vetting clinical trials.
Title: 20 Wild Plants That Can Save Your Life
Post by: Solani on February 23, 2019, 04:30:42 PM
20 Wild Plants That Can Save Your Life

Found at: http://www.askaprepper.com/wild-plants-that-can-save-your-life/
Links to share on various Social Media sites found on website along with outside links to more information

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/20-Wild-Plants-That-Can-Save-Your-Life-jpg-890x395_c.jpg)


By C. Davis April
 
Wild plants were the main food and the “survival kit” for our ancestors. But if you find yourself in the wilderness without food or a first aid kit – for whatever reason – can you identify common wild plants that can save your life? Most of us can’t. When you shop it’s easy to pick the veggies and herbs as they are all edible. The same thing when you go to the drugstore and you need to treat an injury.

Some wild plants have adapted to very limited, unusual environments, exceptional soil conditions or very harsh climates. Although some types of plants for these reasons exist only within a very limited range (endemism), others can live in diverse areas or by adaptation to different environments. But all the bellow mentioned plants can be found on US territory. Maybe some of you have already used one or two.

Edible Wild Plants

Edible wild plants have much more nutrients than their domestic counterparts – if there is one. Wild plants have survived on their own without the help of modern agricultural practices. Only the strongest wild plants survived, leaving the best, and most nutritious of the line to continue the species. Keep in mind that every domestic plant has it’s beginning from an edible wild plant.

The problem is how to distinguish a wild plant that can save your life from another that is poisonous. Gregory Davenport, author of Wilderness Living  suggests you stay away from mushrooms, umbrella shaped flower clusters, bulbs resembling onions or garlic, carrot like leaves/roots, bean and pea like fruits, plants with shiny leaves or fine hairs. Unfortunately, this list also eliminates many very beneficial edible wild plants, but it will help you to avoid some very dangerous poisonous ones as well.

Also, these 10 edible wild plants can save your life during a food crisis. There is evidence that during the Holodomor (1932-1933 Ukrainian Famine) many people survived the food crisis by moving to the woods or the wild parts of the country.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Blackberries.jpg)

1      Blackberries
There are many wild berries not safe for human consumption. Wild blackberries are 100% edible and easy to recognize. Found all over America. Don’t confuse raspberries with wild blackberries. The blackberry’s stem also come off the branch whilst a raspberry doesn’t. Further, blackberries have red branches with long thorns with wide, jagged green leaves. They have white, 5-petaled flowers.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Daylily.jpg)

2      Daylily
Daylilies have a 6-petal orange flower. Flower lasts a single day. It has a leafless flower stalk. Ensure there are no leaves. Many poisonous species have leaves on the stalk.  It has light green leaves which are long and has pointed tips. The root has small tubers. The whole plant can be eaten raw or cooked.  Can also cook the tubers. Found all over America.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Plantain.jpg)

3       Plantain
Plantain can be found in almost any state. Essentially a weed but can be eaten. Broadleaf plantain has green oval leaves. The leaves have thick stems. Long pointed green flowers grow from the stem. The leaves grow in a rosette and can be from 1-12 inches in length.  Pick the green leaves and cook them or eat them raw.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Wild-bee-balm-Wild-bergamot.jpg)

4      Wild bee balm (Wild bergamot)
Wild bergamot can be found all over America. It occurs commonly in large clumps. The plants are typically up to 3 feet tall with a few erect branches. The leaves are typically 3 inches long, toothed and pointed.  The flowers cluster at the end of the branch. The flowers are typically lavender (or even pink) in color. The leaves and / or are to be eaten raw or cooked. Leaves and / or flowers can also be used for preparing tea.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Pineapple-weed.jpg)

5      Pineapple weed
This is often mistaken for chamomile. Chamomile does not emit a pineapple smell when crushed.  Found in sandy locations in the wilderness; the hairless leaves look like feathers and are about 1 inch long. It is a low growing wild plant. The yellow-greenish flowers are cone shaped.  Leaves and flowers can be eaten. Leaves can also be used for making tea.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Amaranth.jpg)

6       Amaranth
These wild plants that can save your life grow in the wilderness and are delicious. They get 35 – 59 inches tall. They have alternate leaves and very small dense flowers on top. The seeds are brown or black. All parts of the plant are eatable. However, look out for sharp spines on the leaves. You may boil the leaves before eating, but you can eat them raw too. The seeds can be turned into flour.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Cattail.jpg)

7      Cattail
It has a brown cigar shaped head that stands on top of a very long stem.  Cattails can grow up 6 feet. The leaves are linear and flat. They are around 3mm wide.  They are usually found close to wetlands. The underground rootstock can be boiled or eaten raw. The stem can also be eaten raw or cooked with especially the white part at the bottom being tasty. You can boil the leaves as spinach. The flowers can be roasted and eaten.
 
(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Curled-dock.jpg)

8      Curled dock
These wild plants can be found all over America. Its main characteristic is the leaves that curl around the edges and has a lance shape. It has a long, red stalk that reach up to 3 feet. Flowers are green. The flower is located right on top of the stem. Peel the stems and eat them raw. The leaves must be boiled a few times to get rid of the bitter taste. The root can be used to make a bitter tea. The seeds can be used as a caffeine substitute and thus boiled and used as coffee.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Wood-sorrel.jpg)

9        Wood sorrel
These wild plants are found all over America.  The leaves nearly look like a shamrock. The seed pods bend quickly upwards as well as the stalks from the main stalk. It’s a yellow, 5 petal flower that has a straight pistil. The leaves are compound and three heart shaped leaflets on each. The plant grows 3-13 inches high. This plant is a thirst quencher and all parts are edible. The leaves, flowers and seed pots have a sour taste, but really refreshing.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Dandelion.jpg)

10        Dandelion
Dandelion is extremely common in the wilderness. These wild plants have a rosette base with lots of flower stems and leaves. The toothy leaves are usually between 2-11 inches long. The flower is easily distinguished with its yellow color and rosette look head. All the parts of this plant are eatable. The mature leaves may taste bitter though, so boil them first. The root should also be boiled first before eaten.

Healing Wild Plants

Before medical breakthroughs of the 20th century, mankind had a long history of using indigenous, or native, plants for a wide variety of medicinal purposes. Some of these methods are being used even today to treat patients.  Medicinal plants and their applications are as diverse as the people who use them.
In the wilderness or in a major SHTF situation getting a disease of any type can be crippling or deadly. Infections can strike your immune system and leave you out to dry. If you have no medication you can always turn to wild plants that can save your life. But would you know what plants and natural herbs can cure you?

Before antibiotics there was garlic. Garlic was used to cure almost any kind of infection from dysentery to influenza. This immune system booster contains powerful sulfur compounds that fight infections. The sulfur compounds in garlic act as antibiotics almost as strong as penicillin.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Aloe-vera.jpg)

1      Aloe Vera
It is a succulent plant species. It has a short stem and a rosette of leaves. It produces yellow flowers on a stick like stem. Aloe vera is used in many remedies. Out in the wild the gel of the leaves can be used as anti-septic for cuts, scrapes and burns. Aloe vera helps eliminate dry skin and sun burn as well. This wild plant that can save your life as a remedy is also edible. However, take caution:  eating the wrong part of the Aloe vera plant will result in severe vomiting, loose stool, and painful bowel movements. Avoid the green-yellow part of the plant that can be found at the bottom of the plant’s stalk. Remove the skin and inner layer of juice and you will find a very important, highly coveted gel substance.
 
(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Canada-lily.jpg)

2      Canada lily
This wildflower is 2-4 inches tall and is unbranched. Found in various wild parts of America, this flower has healing properties. Should you be bitten by a spider, take the flower and chew it in your mouth until there is a paste (poultice). Take the paste and rub over affected area. This will draw the poison out.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/St.-John%E2%80%99s-wort.jpg)

3       St. John’s wort
Commonly found in dry soil, fields and pastures all over America, It has a woody base, yellow flowers and opposite leaves with transparent dots. The plant can grow up to 3 feet. The fresh flowers can be boiled in water and the extract used to put on sunburn, scratches and cuts. This plant has many herbal remedies and the tea can also be drunk for insomnia.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Nettle.jpg)

4      Nettle
Most people must have been stung by the stinging nettle. It is found all over.  It has sharp, stingy hairs and small white flowers. When collecting this plant, please ensure that all exposed skin is covered. It has an itchy, burning sting to it which might last for a couple of hours, even days. Use the leaves and boil them in water when you get bladder infection and can’t urinate whilst hiking or camping. You can boil the roots to increase the effect. Also, eatable!

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Mullein-cowboy-toilet-paper.jpg)

5      Mullein (cowboy toilet paper)
These wild plants are found all over America. In its first year it has a rosette of soft leaves. In its second year Mullein has a long stem with small yellow flowers and soft leaves. The leaves can grow up to 19 inches long. The plant itself can grow over 6 feet high.  The leaves can be used as a poultice for back pain. Boil water and place leaves inside. Let it simmer for two minutes, and then apply the leaves directly on pain.
 
(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Comfrey.jpg)

6       Comfrey
Found throughout America, it has a distinctive purple or white bell-shaped flowers. It is a rough, hairy wild plant found close to water. The plant’s leaves can be used to make a tea and applied locally to treat insect bites, stings, burns, irritated skin, inflamed skin or wounds. Do not drink the tea.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Horsetail.jpg)

7      Horsetail
These wild plants are found close to rivers and streams.  Horsetail has a green leafless stem which is tubular in shape. The plant can get 3 feet high. Take the whole plant and boil. Take the froth and apply it to bleeding wounds. You can drink the tea for stomach pains. This plant can even be used as a tooth brush.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Witch-hazel.jpg)

8.     Witch Hazel
This wild plant has been used for centuries by American Indians and is found across America. It’s multi-trunked and grow up to 15 feet high.  The flower is individualistic as it’s fragrant and the petals look crumpled.  It has green leaves and a smooth grey bark. Should you pick up eye inflammation, soak a rag or shirt in cold water in which the leaves have been soaked.  Place it over your eyes for 10 minutes. The redness will be gone, and your eyes refreshed.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Yarrow.jpg)

9        Yarrow
It grows throughout America and typically found in fields and meadows. The plant grows up to 3 feet high and has white, clustered flowers on the top of the stalks. The flower can be boiled in water and the extract drank for headaches, diarrhea and flu. The yarrow tea prevents clotting so do not drink it if you have a bleeding wound.

(http://www.askaprepper.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Burdock.jpg)

10        Burdock
It is an annoying weed with burrs sticking all over your clothes.  It has large wavy leaves which are green on top and white at the bottom. The flowers are purple on top of prickly ball. The florets are surrounded by overlapping hooked bracts. The plant grows 3-6 feet high. Take the leaves and make poultice in mouth. Smear paste over insect bites and stings.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on February 24, 2019, 04:18:24 AM
Great list Solani!

Just adding that the comfrey makes a very nutritious livestock feed, as well.  :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on February 24, 2019, 04:23:19 PM
Another comment on Solani's post #245: 

Besides the post being very helpful and interesting, last year I had a dream I didn't understand.  It was one of those "snippet" dreams I have, which are essentially a short snippet or clip of an action or a picture of something.  The dream showed me gathering seed heads from Wild Bergamot. 

The reason this seemed so odd is that we have lots of it, and it's very beautiful when large swaths of it grow, plus it attracts butterflies and bumblebees, and the real bonus is that goats hate it, so it grows unmolested in a swath here and there.  Because it seems a prolific and healthy perennial, and it's so bitter, I couldn't see why I should save seeds.  But because of the dream, I did gather a bunch of seedheads and they are stashed with yarrow, etc.

And I never really thought it had much value for food or tea, but according to Solani's post, it does!  Maybe I'm supposed to plant more in a different location.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Solani on February 26, 2019, 09:09:29 AM
Another comment on Solani's post #245: 

Besides the post being very helpful and interesting, last year I had a dream I didn't understand.  It was one of those "snippet" dreams I have, which are essentially a short snippet or clip of an action or a picture of something.  The dream showed me gathering seed heads from Wild Bergamot. 

The reason this seemed so odd is that we have lots of it, and it's very beautiful when large swaths of it grow, plus it attracts butterflies and bumblebees, and the real bonus is that goats hate it, so it grows unmolested in a swath here and there.  Because it seems a prolific and healthy perennial, and it's so bitter, I couldn't see why I should save seeds.  But because of the dream, I did gather a bunch of seedheads and they are stashed with yarrow, etc.

And I never really thought it had much value for food or tea, but according to Solani's post, it does!  Maybe I'm supposed to plant more in a different location.

Here is one link: https://herbpathy.com/Uses-and-Benefits-of-Wild-Bergamot-Cid2718 where you can read up on some of the uses of Wild Bergamont
Here is a link: https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/essential-oils/health-benefits-of-bergamot-essential-oil.html where you can read up on the various uses of Bergamot essential oil. I know that the oil is made from the Bergamot tree and I'm trying to find the difference between the Bergamot tree and Wild Bergamot.

I do drink Bergamot tee nearly daily and also use the Bergamot essential oil in my bath and body products.

You can most likely find many other sites online with more health benefits, these are just the 2 that I found first.  ;)

//Solani
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on February 26, 2019, 06:01:03 PM
I, too, need to research the Bergamot Tree, as that is unfamiliar, and presumably different from Wild Bergamot.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on March 28, 2019, 12:46:48 PM
One of my favorite healthy foods is also an excellent survival food: organic, dehydrated, unsweetened, unsulphured papaya.

Papaya is considered to be both a fruit and a vegetable by the cultures that grow it.  Dehydrated, it retains most of its nutrients intact except for water-soluble vitamin C and the B complex. 

Each 2 ounce serving contains:
130 calories
    2 g protein
  20 g natural sugar
    6 g fiber
    1 g fat
    0 g cholesterol
612 IU vitamin A
144 mg potassium
155 mcg beta carotene
426 mcg beta cryptoxanthine
  42 mcg lutein + zeaxanthine

https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1985/2

Papaya contains the enzyme papain, which is in the protease family of enzymes, breaking down proteins, including tumors.  Papain also counteracts inflammation, stimulates the immune system and thins mucous.

Dried papaya that is brightly colored likely has been sulphited, so papaya that is a bit brown is healthier.

It's important to opt for organic when possible, as otherwise papaya is now a GMO crop.

This study found no fungi in dehydrated papaya, possibly making it an extra-good storage food:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26056470

(https://cdn.instructables.com/F82/NCWR/INER0798/F82NCWRINER0798.LARGE.jpg)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 01, 2019, 12:45:01 AM
NIH 2002 - Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Artemisia annua essential oil.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 01, 2019, 12:45:52 AM
One of my favorite healthy foods is also an excellent survival food: organic, dehydrated, unsweetened, unsulphured papaya.

Papaya is considered to be both a fruit and a vegetable by the cultures that grow it.  Dehydrated, it retains most of its nutrients intact except for water-soluble vitamin C and the B complex. 

Each 2 ounce serving contains:
130 calories
    2 g protein
  20 g natural sugar
    6 g fiber
    1 g fat
    0 g cholesterol
612 IU vitamin A
144 mg potassium
155 mcg beta carotene
426 mcg beta cryptoxanthine
  42 mcg lutein + zeaxanthine

https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1985/2

Papaya contains the enzyme papain, which is in the protease family of enzymes, breaking down proteins, including tumors.  Papain also counteracts inflammation, stimulates the immune system and thins mucous.

Dried papaya that is brightly colored likely has been sulphited, so papaya that is a bit brown is healthier.

It's important to opt for organic when possible, as otherwise papaya is now a GMO crop.

This study found no fungi in dehydrated papaya, possibly making it an extra-good storage food:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26056470

(https://cdn.instructables.com/F82/NCWR/INER0798/F82NCWRINER0798.LARGE.jpg)

R.R. thanks for the reminder on papaya. It is really wonderful stuff.
 :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on July 01, 2019, 05:35:59 AM
NIH 2002 - Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Artemisia annua essential oil.

Thanks so much Barb for sourcing and posting this! 

Will add a study on the phytochemicals (a.k.a. "ethnopharmacology") of the other artemisia, the perennial absinthia:

http://jprsolutions.info/files/final-file-57a74945a05487.28059068.pdf

*The study notes non-toxicity at a level of 1.6 g / kg body weight

So a 150 pound person could ingest 8 ounces per day safely in the short term, and perhaps a lesser does in the long term.

*Cognitive enhancement

*Anti-fungal (incl. candida)

*Neurological regeneration

*Increased free-radical scavenging

*Liver protection (esp. vs. acetamenophin)

*Vermicidal

*Anti-protazoan

*"Marked" anti-tumor properties, esp. vs. melanomas

*Not to be used chronically at the higher doses due to toxicity of the phytochemical thujone.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 01, 2019, 08:14:39 PM
NIH 2002 - Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Artemisia annua essential oil.

Thanks so much Barb for sourcing and posting this! 

Will add a study on the phytochemicals (a.k.a. "ethnopharmacology") of the other artemisia, the perennial absinthia:

http://jprsolutions.info/files/final-file-57a74945a05487.28059068.pdf

*The study notes non-toxicity at a level of 1.6 g / kg body weight

So a 150 pound person could ingest 8 ounces per day safely in the short term, and perhaps a lesser does in the long term.

*Cognitive enhancement

*Anti-fungal (incl. candida)

*Neurological regeneration

*Increased free-radical scavenging

*Liver protection (esp. vs. acetamenophin)

*Vermicidal

*Anti-protazoan

*"Marked" anti-tumor properties, esp. vs. melanomas

*Not to be used chronically at the higher doses due to toxicity of the phytochemical thujone.
Those are some amazing properties.  The anti-melanoma property is very surprising and would give many people hope.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 17, 2019, 10:30:24 PM
It Could Promote Liver Health
Dandelion root has long been held as a “liver tonic” in folk medicine. ... Naturopaths believe it means that dandelion root tea could help detoxify the liver, help with skin and eye problems, and relieve symptoms of liver disease.
7 Ways Dandelion Tea Could Be Good for You - Healthline

https://www.healthline.com/health/ways-dandelion-tea-could-be-good-for-your#utis

1. It reduces water weight
If you’re feeling bloated, dandelion tea could provide relief because it acts as a diuretic and increases urine output. One studyTrusted Source showed an increased urine output after two 1-cup servings of dandelion tea made from the leaves of the plant.

2. It Could Promote Liver Health
Dandelion root has long been held as a “liver tonic” in folk medicine. Preliminary studies suggest this is due, in part, to its ability to increase the flow of bile.

Naturopaths believe it means that dandelion root tea could help detoxify the liver, help with skin and eye problems, and relieve symptoms of liver disease. A 2017 study suggests that polysaccharides in dandelion may indeed be beneficial to liver function.

3. It Can Act As a Natural Coffee Substitute
You may be able to find this product of pre-prepared dandelion root at your local health food stores, but you can also harvest and make it from your own non-insecticide-treated, lawn-variety dandelions.

The roots of young dandelion plants are roasted to a dark brown color. Then, after steeping in hot water and straining, it can be enjoyed as a coffee substitute.

4. Similarities Between Dandelion and a Weight Loss Drug?
A recent Korean studyTrusted Source suggests that dandelion could have similar effects on the body as the weight loss drug Orlistat, which works by inhibiting pancreatic lipase, an enzyme released during digestion to break down fat.

Testing the impact of dandelion extract in mice revealed similar results, prompting researchers to recommend further study on the possible anti-obesity effects of dandelion.

5. Dandelion Tea May Soothe Digestive Ailments
Dandelion root tea can have many positive effects on your digestive system, although much of the evidence is anecdotal. It has historically been used to improve appetite, soothe minor digestive ailments, and possibly relieve constipation.

6. It Could Have Future Anti-Cancer Applications
Recently, dandelion root has been studied for its cancer-fighting potential, and so far the results appear promising.

A 2011 Canadian studyTrusted Source showed that dandelion root extract induces cell death in melanoma cells without impacting non-cancerous cells. AnotherTrusted Source showed that it does the same to pancreatic cancer cells.

While the anti-cancer effects of dandelion tea haven’t been tested, the potential is positive.

7. It May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Paired with another herb, uva ursi, dandelion roots and leaves may help prevent urinary tract infections. It’s believed this combination works because of anti-bacterial compounds in uva ursi, and the increased urination associated with dandelion.

Possible Side Effects

Dandelion is considered safe for most people. However, some people may have an allergic reaction from touching or ingesting dandelion. Dandelion has also been found to interact with certain medications, including diuretics, lithium, and Cipro.

If you are taking any prescription medications, consult your doctor before drinking dandelion tea.

How to Make It
Perhaps one of the most important facts about dandelion tea is that it’s easy to find and make. Just make sure the plants have not been treated with any chemicals before harvesting them.

Also, harvest the plants when they are young, preferably. After cleaning and preparing the plant, pour hot water over the top of greens or roasted and ground roots, steep, strain, and enjoy!

HOW TO MAKE IT
If your garden is already flooded with dandelions, you don’t need to rely on store-bought tea (just make sure you or someone else hasn’t treated your lawn with chemicals):

Flowers and Leaves: Wash, then let steep in hot water for 15-20 minutes.

Roots: Wash very thoroughly, chop into fine pieces, and heat on high in an oven for about two hours. Steep 1-2 teaspoons in hot water for about 10 minutes.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on July 18, 2019, 07:50:49 PM
Very interesting about the potential/possible affect of dandelion on melanoma cells, as well as pancreatic cancer cells.  Barb, you always find the neatest things!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 20, 2019, 12:11:07 AM
Very interesting about the potential/possible affect of dandelion on melanoma cells, as well as pancreatic cancer cells.  Barb, you always find the neatest things!

ilinda -
Thanks for all your wonderful posts. :)
BTW it's nice to find out stuff like this. If dandelion root could lower my cancer risk i will definitely go back to it.
Just because I started drinking coffee again doesn't mean I can't drink dandelion root coffee. :)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on July 20, 2019, 12:16:31 AM
Solani, I think I missed your wonderful post, Reply #245 on: February 23, 2019, 04:30:42 PM
20 Wild Plants That Can Save Your Life
«

Great Stuff!
- Barb T.
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: R.R. Book on January 16, 2020, 04:38:04 PM
A relatively new study was published last year in the Journal of Functional Foods detailing Elderberry's potent anti-influenza capability:

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1756464619300313

(https://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S1756464619X0002X-cov150h.gif)

Findings:

*The bio-active compound in Elderberry is a form of cyanide, a portion of which is common in many blue or purple fruits and vegetables

*The activity of Elderberry increases in direct proportion to the level of infection.  If the influenza is mild in its early stages, the elderberry exerts a slight effect, allowing the person's immune system to go to work.  If the influenza is not halted at this point, the action of elderberry becomes markedly stronger.

*Elderberry uses multiple fronts to interfere with influenza:

1. It degrades the glycoproteins in the outer shell of the virus, exposing it to the immune system

2. It prevents the virus from releasing inflammatory cytokines that would cause the worst effects of flu, such as body aches, etc.

3. It leaves behind a compound which friendly gut bacteria use to mount yet another immune offensive vs. flu

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/10/21/elderberry-extract-for-influenza.aspx

(https://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S1756464619300313-ga1.jpg)

(https://returntonow.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/Elderberries700.jpg)
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: ilinda on January 17, 2020, 01:29:44 PM
A relatively new study was published last year in the Journal of Functional Foods detailing Elderberry's potent anti-influenza capability:
*The bio-active compound in Elderberry is a form of cyanide, a portion of which is common in many blue or purple fruits and vegetables

*The activity of Elderberry increases in direct proportion to the level of infection.  If the influenza is mild in its early stages, the elderberry exerts a slight effect, allowing the person's immune system to go to work.  If the influenza is not halted at this point, the action of elderberry becomes markedly stronger.
All of it is fascinating, but most amazing is the research suggesting innate intelligence of the healing plant, who knows "how hard to work" in a given case. 
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 17, 2020, 04:20:44 PM
Yes that is really strange and wonderful!
Title: Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
Post by: Yowbarb on January 17, 2020, 04:22:00 PM
Yes ilinda, that is really strange and wonderful! 
Quote
*The activity of Elderberry increases in direct proportion to the level of infection.  If the influenza is mild in its early stages, the elderberry exerts a slight effect, allowing the person's immune system to go to work.  If the influenza is not halted at this point, the action of elderberry becomes markedly stronger.