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ilinda - SURVIVAL HEALTH => SURVIVALIST HEAL THYSELF => Topic started by: Yowbarb on July 15, 2012, 04:46:16 PM

Title: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on July 15, 2012, 04:46:16 PM
http://www.nomeatathlete.com/gain-weight-vegan/

http://www.nomeatathlete.com/gain-weight-vegan/   

The Skinny Vegan’s Guide to Gaining Muscle
Written by Matt Frazier in Miscellaneous

You hear a lot about how to lose weight. Not so many of us are trying to gain it.

This article would be so much cooler if it had a headline like, “How I Gained 20 Pounds of Muscle in 30 Days (On a Vegan Diet).” And if it included dazzling before and after photos, it would probably do a lot to show people it’s possible.

That’s what I had in mind when, earlier this summer, I took a look at myself in the mirror, realized I had gotten too thin, and decided it was time to hit the gym.

Actually, even for a small guy like me (I was all the way down to 132 lbs when I decided it was time to start putting weight back on) a goal like 20 pounds in 30 days wasn’t as crazy as it sounds.

Twice in my life, once in college and once shortly after, I’ve gone from 140 to 160 pounds very quickly, drastically increasing my strength and staying fairly lean at the same time. The only difference now, with a vegan diet, would be the absence of chicken breasts and milk — two foods I absolutely relied on during any rapid muscle gain diets I did the past.

I knew that adding weight wouldn’t be any help to me as a runner, but that was okay. I needed a break and a change of pace, and I didn’t like being so skinny. And if in the process I could show a bunch of people that it is possible to put on a ton of muscle really quickly on a vegan diet, then all the better.

How it really turned out

I didn’t gain 20 pounds in 30 days.

I did, however, gain 17 pounds in about 6 weeks
, topping out at 149. Not exactly a strike-fear-in-the-hearts-of-enemies number, I know, but it’s a lot more than 132, and a total weight increase of almost 13%. And although the point wasn’t to gain strength but to gain mass, I got a lot stronger too, increasing my chest press from 130 to 195 pounds for a 7-rep set.

But my results could have been a lot better if not for two interruptions to my regimen:

I traveled a lot and was not able to maintain the volume of eating I could do at home. This killed my momentum on three separate weekends. I suppose I could have been more disciplined with my eating, but a large portion of my calories came from a “fat shake” that I just couldn’t make on the road (more on the fat shake later).
I got injured when I made a careless mistake in the gym. Six weeks after I had started, I tore a disc in my back when I inadvertently loaded more weight on one side of the barbell than the other for a deadlift and tried to lift the unbalanced load. When I learned this would keep me out for three weeks, I decided I was done with muscle gain.
Still, 17 pounds is nothing to shake a carrot at, especially for a skinny guy who has always found it harder to gain weight than to lose it. So here’s what I did, the vegan-adapted version of what I found success with the other two times I’ve succeeded at quickly putting on a bunch of muscle.

If you can’t gain weight, you’re probably making this mistake

Shortly after I got interested in fitness in college, I wanted desperately to get bigger. I drank all these Myoplex shakes, ate six meals a day, and lifted like crazy. And yet I just couldn’t get past 140 pounds.

After every trip to the gym, I’d eagerly weigh in, feeling all puffed up from my lift and sure I’d tip the scales. And every time, I’d see 140. F’ing 140.

So I did some research, and came across Anthony Ellis, a guy who went from 135 to 180, and finally discovered what was wrong:

Trying to gain muscle and lose fat at the same time is completely counterproductive.

Prior to learning this, I thought the road to muscle gain was more lean protein along with more lifting, and of course some cardio to keep the fat off. Wrong.

I made three big changes as a result, and experienced drastic, immediate muscle gain.

I stopped running and all other forms of cardio.
I started lifting fewer times each week, training each muscle group only once per week.
I started eating more fat. Way more fat. Like, getting up in the middle of the night to make a peanut butter sandwich.
And I gained weight. I went from 140 to 160 pretty quickly. I don’t remember exactly how long it took, but I figure it was about six weeks.

My approach this time
Really, putting on weight is about only two things. Lifting, which is important. And eating, which is more important. I’ll explain what I did for each.

The lifting

For the lifting, I decided to try out Tim Ferriss’ methods from The 4-Hour Body, specifically the chapter “Occam’s Protocol I: A Minimalist Approach to Mass.”

Here, Tim proposes a lifting regimen that requires less than half an hour a week of gym time per week: just two sets of exercise each session (one each of two different lifts), performed at extremely slow cadence (5 seconds up, 5 seconds down), until utter and painful failure is reached.

And not just “I can’t get this next rep, so I’ll quit” failure, but really putting every bit of effort you have into pushing that last rep up, and then lowering it as slowly as possible. (Tim quotes a funny line from Arthur Jones: “If you’ve never vomited from doing a set of barbell curls, then you’ve never experienced outright hard work.”)

There are way more details you should know about Tim’s plan before you try it, especially about how frequently to work out and how to increase the weights. And since I don’t want to get sued for plagiarism, you’ll have to check out The 4-Hour Body to learn about that stuff.

I must admit, this was fun. An unexpected benefit was what knowing that my gym time was precious helped me get amped up for it –knowing, for example, that this one set of 7 or 8 reps is my only chance all week to do chest press certainly made it easy, almost fun, to keep going until I reached that point of true failure.

And it worked. I followed Tim’s plan to the letter for about three weeks, gaining 3-4 pounds per week, until I decided I wanted to alter the plan to include some lifts I really liked, like squats and deadlifts (in hindsight, not my best idea). But I followed the same cadence, rep scheme, and frequency of workouts, and kept getting results.

As it turns out, Tim’s approach isn’t all that different from what I had done to put on weight before. Infrequent workouts, heavy weight, and sets to all-out failure. So I knew going in it would work. The diet, however, I wasn’t so sure about.

The eating

As I wrote before: The major difference between this time and previous ones was my diet. I wasn’t vegan then, or even vegetarian. When I wanted to bulk up in the past, I just ate tons of cheese, milk, steak, and chicken breasts, and it was pretty easy.

Not that I doubted it was possible for people to get big on a vegan diet. Look at Robert Cheeke or Derek Tresize. But for me, a guy whose equilibrium size is more sapling than mature oak, I wasn’t so sure.

In looking at my diet, it was pretty clear that it was lower in both protein and fat than what had worked for me in the past. So I focused on adding those two nutrients to my current diet, without reducing carbohydrates, hence increasing total calories.

I also tried to eat larger portion sizes in general, and found that after just a few days this became comfortable. I did eat fewer salads and raw vegetables, since they take up a lot of room without providing many calories. (That’s just one reason why I would never stick with  diet like the one described here long-term, nor recommend it for all-around health.)

Looking back at the journal I kept of my meals, I see that the protein and fat increases came primarily from protein powder, almond butter, flax and coconut oil.

Here’s what a typical day looked like (I don’t have calorie counts, because I just hate counting calories, even with mass-gaining):

Smoothie, with an extra scoop of protein powder (11 additional grams protein) and an extra 2 tablespoons of almond butter
12 ounces coffee
Orange
1 cup brown rice with 1.5 cups yellow lentils and zucchini
Whole wheat bagel with almond butter
Banana
Vega Sport Performance Optimizer before workout
Apple juice immediately after workout
Vegan Fat Shake (see recipe below)
Handful of snacks, like Mary’s Gone Crackers sticks
2 servings of millet with kidney beans, carrots, and collard greens
Glass of red wine
Clif Mojo Bar, peanut butter pretzel flavor
Not a crazy amount of food, really. But way more than I usually eat, and definitely higher in fat, thanks to the “fat shake.”

The vegan fat shake

The fat shake is something else I got from 4-Hour Body. Tim’s version is about as far from vegan as a shake could be, with raw milk and raw eggs as key ingredients. My vegan version was obviously lacking in the raw animal protein category, but I found it did a nice job of providing a lot of protein and fat among its roughly 1000 calories. I drank it about two hours after each workout, and also the first day after each workout.

Here’s the recipe:

12 ounces raw, homemade almond milk
2-3 tablespoons raw, homemade almond butter
1 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon coconut oil
1 tablespoon flax seed oil
2 tablespoons chia seeds
2 scoops soy-free veggie protein powder (about 22 grams of protein)
1 teaspoon maca powder
1 banana
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon wheat grass powder, just to be a granola-crunching hippie badass
Blend all ingredients together in a blender.

Supplements

I also added a few supplements, in addition to the multivitamin I usually take. Each day, I added to one of my smoothies:

5 grams creatine
5 grams glutamine
1000 IU tablet of Vitamin D3
And right before I got hurt, I realized that I was missing one thing from my earlier mass-gaining days, which was a proper post-workout carbohydrate drink. I had been using apple juice, but in hindsight I wish I would have used something that was designed to deliver quick, post-workout carbs.

Conclusion

It worked. Maybe with not staggering results, although if I didn’t have any experience with gaining muscle from the past, then perhaps I would have found a 17-pound gain to be staggering. I did start to gain some fat towards the end: my overall body fat increased by 1-2% throughout the process (that’s as accurate as I can get with my cheap body fat scale), so I probably would have stopped within a few more weeks anyway had I not gotten injured.

Just to restate, I wouldn’t recommend a diet like this long-term. I’m sure consuming that many calories (and that much fat) isn’t healthy. If you’re looking to gain weight on a vegan diet, then sure, you can look at my experience as one example, but I highly recommend checking out Robert Cheeke’s book, Vegan Bodybuilding and Fitness, for diet advice from someone more experienced than I am, and Tim Ferris’ book 4-Hour Body for the details of the lifting regimen (which I have nothing but good things to say about, with the results I got in so little gym time).

And now, three weeks after my injury, I’m happy to say that the torn disc in my back is healed. I probably won’t do deadlifts for a little while, and I’m done with weight gain for the foreseeable future. But I’ve got lots more planned, and I’m excited about what’s next.

http://www.nomeatathlete.com/gain-weight-vegan/
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: jrobert69 on July 15, 2012, 05:05:39 PM
Thank you. I had gained over 20 pounds after surgery last year. Since March Ive lost 26 as of this morning. Unhappily both fat and muscle. I weight less now than when I got out of boot camp back in 86. Time to put a little muscle back on....
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on July 18, 2012, 09:25:52 AM
Thank you. I had gained over 20 pounds after surgery last year. Since March Ive lost 26 as of this morning. Unhappily both fat and muscle. I weight less now than when I got out of boot camp back in 86. Time to put a little muscle back on....

Hello are you vegan? Well even if not, maybe some of the ideas will help? Let us know...
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: jrobert69 on July 18, 2012, 01:19:55 PM
I was vegan for close to 15 years now more of a macrobiotic. Nothing like a pan seared coriander encrusted tuna, fresh asparagus and a solid cigar with chianti.
Though I think the tuna thing is over given the state of our oceans......
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on July 18, 2012, 01:45:30 PM
I was vegan for close to 15 years now more of a macrobiotic. Nothing like a pan seared coriander encrusted tuna, fresh asparagus and a solid cigar with chianti.
Though I think the tuna thing is over given the state of our oceans......

Sounds wonderful! 
Well, with any luck you will have some fish without any problems.  :)
All The Best,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: jrobert69 on July 22, 2012, 02:41:08 PM
Started protein shakes yesterday. A mix I picked up at gnc. Doing some curls and sit-ups. Wife and kids already members at local health club for pool and kids things. Going to join this week and work out with wife. See what the trainer says. They give you hour and half with him/her when you join to come up with workout plan. Lets see what happens.
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: enlightenme on July 22, 2012, 02:54:39 PM
Started protein shakes yesterday. A mix I picked up at gnc. Doing some curls and sit-ups. Wife and kids already members at local health club for pool and kids things. Going to join this week and work out with wife. See what the trainer says. They give you hour and half with him/her when you join to come up with workout plan. Lets see what happens.

Excellent jrobert and good luck with your new plan of action!  Will look forward to hearing updates from you on your progress.
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: JKB on July 22, 2012, 04:01:52 PM
I'm not sure where this is going, but I thought I might chime in...  I used to be into bodybuilding and knew everything about all of the supplements at the time, back then.  As for being a vegan, it should still work, in theory.  Please keep in mind that the supplement industry is huge and they all promise exceptional gains.  Few actually deliver. 
 
Adding muscle is a simple mathmatic equation, really...  Sure, high protien shakes help, taking chromium picolinate helps even more.  Creatine is a temporary solution, and a short cut, to getting big.  As soon as you stop taking it you lose all of the gains you had.
 
The best way is to to do it the right way.  Seems like that applies to pretty much everything in life.  Protein is a key though, as that is food for your muscles.  The awesome thing about lifting weights is that you are using all kinds of muscles everytime you lift, and those muscles burn fat and consume energy.
 
If you want to get big, use as much weight as you can lift while doing 5 to 6, maybe 7 repetitions.  Doing 3 sets of that will rip your muscles and scar tissue will grow on top of it.  Hense, your muscles will get bigger. 
 
My wife and I are doing the exact opposite at present.  Neither one of us needs to add any muscle but we both need to lose some fat.  Therefore, we are lifting light (relatively) amounts of weight and doing high repetitions, which still burns a ton of calories but doesn't rip the muscles.  The end effect is that we are toning our muscles, burning calories, and we have both lost weight.
 
Someone was talking about running and weightlifting and I can verify that.  If you run more than a few miles per week your mucles will not get any bigger, no matter how much you lift.  Your muscles need to be smaller in order to provide oxygen to the rest of your body while you are running.  Therefore, if you want to get big you have to stop running.
 
I know it sucks but that is just the way it is.  It works out fine for me though as getting big is not my goal. 
 
I strongly encourage everyone reading this to keep up with any physical activity program you may be using as you never know when you will actually need it.  It seems fate doesn't give us a heads up as to what is coming down the pike. 
 
At any rate, I hope this helps and if anyone wants anymore information, please contact me
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: jrobert69 on July 22, 2012, 06:18:59 PM
thanks man, Ill check that stuff out. Im not looking to get to much bulk. More interested to see what and how the protein works with my body. Not just the shakes, tofu, beans,nuts etc.
Maybe a little ripped ;D
since the neck surgery I cant run anymore anyway so that wont be holding me back.
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: jrobert69 on August 04, 2012, 08:31:20 AM
I started the chromium stuff yesterday. Just 1- 200mg tablet a day. Had my initial workout, kinda different than what I thought a workout was. Its always been curls, bench, situps crunches and things like that. this was much more of a core exercise routine. Had a little bit of rubber band legs, kinda weak after. Was good this morning till the tenth hole, my freakin thighs got some real burn going now. I think its going 5to take a bit to get those muscles back into action.  Im such a puss now. Have not gained a pound yet, the shakes almost taste good at this point. time will tell. Added a vitamin powder to the shakes. The difference was noticeable right away on some things, which my wife can attest to....
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: steedy on August 05, 2012, 07:44:49 AM
I'm more of a lacto-ovo vegetarian.  I will occasionally eat meat for now because my mom wants more protein in her diet to help with illness.  I'm not planning on continuing like that and will become more lacto-ovo later.  I never had problems keeping muscle when I was a strict lacto-ovo a number of years ago.  I think that's because I was getting more regular exercise.  Today, I'll have to do more exercises to maintain my muscles.
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on August 06, 2012, 08:56:25 AM
I'm more of a lacto-ovo vegetarian.  I will occasionally eat meat for now because my mom wants more protein in her diet to help with illness.  I'm not planning on continuing like that and will become more lacto-ovo later.  I never had problems keeping muscle when I was a strict lacto-ovo a number of years ago.  I think that's because I was getting more regular exercise.  Today, I'll have to do more exercises to maintain my muscles.

I'm lacto-ovo again after many years of eating meat. I can't drink milk, lactose intolerant, and do need to limit dairy. I do have the natural greek yogurt and some cheddar, light mozarella, light provolone, etc. moderation. Eggs - will be eating them more regularly again...
I feel people should do whatever works for them to make them more capable of survival...and/or what they believe in and what feels best.

BTW if your mother feels she needs the meat, beefheart and organ meats are the highest in coenzyme Q10, and are very strenghtening for many people. Other CoQ10 - rich foods are broccoli, what germ etc. Q10 is found in every healthy cell. It is anti - aging and especially good for the heart, lungs, gums and also wherever there is disease in the body.
Not that it matters so much what I do...but to share that,
     1)  I take the 100 mg a day supplement of Q10 and also B12 and
     2)  recently got my liquid vitamin and minerals again (with blue green algae
          and chlorella, garlic etc.)
     3)  We have protein powder in the house again too...


Still finding my balance. Had a big salad along with two vegeburgers and cheese for brunch...olive oil and liquid aminos for flavoring and to make it more moist. I get bulk natural olive oil from COSTCO; the Bragg Liquid Aminos is a staple I get at a local health food store.
Beginning tomorrow will make a protein shake with some green veges in it, a dab of fruit and the liquid vites with chlorella and algae. Daughter cannot tolerate fruit juice or much fruit (too much sugar) so I need to concoct something she will like, too and she can take it to work...
Also going to get the Korean seasoned kelp for snacks next time I go to shop.
The last time I was vegetarian I hardly got any dairy or seaweed or algae and now I will make sure I do get these into my diet.
I'm not selling algae  :) Info below,
Yowbarb

chlorella a complete high quality protein:
   http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/custom/569428/2 

Blue-green algae protein:

   http://www.klamathbluegreen.com/information-about-klamath-blue-green-algae/information-about-algae-klamath-lake-blue-green-algae-afa-blue-green-algae-blue-green.html
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on August 08, 2012, 07:52:36 AM
http://www.livestrong.com/article/526531-how-many-grams-of-protein-does-a-vegetarian-need/
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: steedy on August 08, 2012, 10:46:09 AM
I ordered resistance bands to help maintain muscle tone.  I think it would really work if I spent more time using them!  :P
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on August 08, 2012, 04:26:10 PM
I ordered resistance bands to help maintain muscle tone.  I think it would really work if I spent more time using them!  :P

Sounds good tell us more...
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: JKB on August 10, 2012, 10:04:04 AM
Any kind of resistence will work Steedy.  It doesn't matter if you are lifting weights, slinging kettle bells, or using resistence bands.  For the longest time I maintained a pretty decent physique just doing push ups, pull ups, dips, and crunches... plus running.  Your muscles don't really know the difference.
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: jrobert69 on September 26, 2012, 01:32:22 PM
10 pound gain. .3% increase in body fat. So far anyway. Working out 6 days a week. Missed two weeks for vacation and sick motherinlaw issues. Going to try one more addition next week to see if I can gain another 9 healthy pounds.

Taking
Curcumin
Chromium Picilate
Extra Virgin Coconut oil- i teaspoon in coffee and dab on toothpaste for brushing.
CoQ10
Promasil protien powder. Taste great less filling :)
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on September 26, 2012, 02:39:15 PM
10 pound gain. .3% increase in body fat. So far anyway. Working out 6 days a week. Missed two weeks for vacation and sick motherinlaw issues. Going to try one more addition next week to see if I can gain another 9 healthy pounds.

Taking
Curcumin
Chromium Picilate
Extra Virgin Coconut oil- i teaspoon in coffee and dab on toothpaste for brushing.
CoQ10
Promasil protien powder. Taste great less filling :)

That sounds like wonderful progress, jrobert69! Thanks for sharing the successful actions.
I hope your mom in law is feeling better.
All The Best,
Barb Townsend
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: JKB on September 26, 2012, 04:43:05 PM
Try "Ripped Freak" from GNC.  I know what it sounds like and I am as tired as you probably are of taking over-the-counter supplements.  However, this stuff does not "jack-you-up" like most of the stuff out there does, and my wife and I are both sick and tired of taking.  We have both been taking it for almost two months now and I have to say, we are both pleased with the results.  My wife has dropped over 20 lbs and I am getting downright skinny again.  I have not changed my diet at all, which, honestly, wasn't helping me all that much to begin with since we are having this conversation in the first place...  Check it out.  By the way, I was eating lot's of sushi and chicken noodle soup and wasn't losing any weight at all.  Getting old sucks...
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: jrobert69 on September 26, 2012, 06:05:06 PM
I saw that one. Ill try in another month or so. This rivalus stuff works pretty good and doesn't taste like cake mix and is pretty cost effective per usage. Im going to give their anabolic prescription a try.

I had no idea how big of a business this kinda stuff is. Going to grab some calipers as well. I guess the machines for bmi/fat are not that accurate.

What can you do- the whole human experience is way overrated. My guess is we all volunteered thinking it would be great, Im leaving with a nice place to visit mentality....
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on September 26, 2012, 06:34:01 PM
Try "Ripped Freak" from GNC.  I know what it sounds like and I am as tired as you probably are of taking over-the-counter supplements.  However, this stuff does not "jack-you-up" like most of the stuff out there does, and my wife and I are both sick and tired of taking.  We have both been taking it for almost two months now and I have to say, we are both pleased with the results.  My wife has dropped over 20 lbs and I am getting downright skinny again.  I have not changed my diet at all, which, honestly, wasn't helping me all that much to begin with since we are having this conversation in the first place...  Check it out.  By the way, I was eating lot's of sushi and chicken noodle soup and wasn't losing any weight at all.  Getting old sucks...

JKB thanks for the ideas...shopping around for a protein powder too.
Sounds like you are making fine progress.  :)
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: enlightenme on September 28, 2012, 04:48:53 PM
Try "Ripped Freak" from GNC.  I know what it sounds like and I am as tired as you probably are of taking over-the-counter supplements.  However, this stuff does not "jack-you-up" like most of the stuff out there does, and my wife and I are both sick and tired of taking.  We have both been taking it for almost two months now and I have to say, we are both pleased with the results.  My wife has dropped over 20 lbs and I am getting downright skinny again.  I have not changed my diet at all, which, honestly, wasn't helping me all that much to begin with since we are having this conversation in the first place...  Check it out.  By the way, I was eating lot's of sushi and chicken noodle soup and wasn't losing any weight at all.  Getting old sucks...

Thanks JKB!!  I'm going to try it!  Heaven knows, nothing else seems to be working...and I second that, Getting Old Truly Sucks....
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: jrobert69 on November 10, 2012, 09:34:47 AM
Since july 21st Ive gained 25 pounds. body fat went from 22.4 to 22.8. Still have that bump in the belly. Another 7 pounds and Im going to cut to get bf down in the 12% area without loosing too much muscle.

Physically I have not felt this good in years. My neck alone increased almost 2 inches. Kinda sucks as I cant get the top button on my dress shirts anymore.
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: JKB on November 10, 2012, 02:54:27 PM
We have switched from Ripped Freak to Cellucor "Super HD" and are showing good progress.  Amanda is really doing well and I'm somewhere in the mid-170's.  We have a weigh in next Wednesday and I'm actually looking forward to it.  (Damn the torpedoes!)
 
We played golf on base last Thursday and for the first time, I noticed there is a dirt track that runs all the way around the entire golf course.  I am guessing it is in the neighborhood of six miles or so, to make it all the way around.  I am going to run it tomorrow and I can't wait. 
 
I know I am changing because the whole time we were playing golf, I was much more interested in just checking out nature and watching the birds than how I was hitting the little white ball from hell.  I did hit one, really sweet shot though...  I curved a ball around a tree, underneath the branches and landed it on the green 180 yards out.  We were all like, "Daaaammmnnnn..."  I'm really not very good though.  Seriously...
 
Anyway, my biggest problem running is I get bored with it if I am just running over the same old ground I have already run 100 times before.  So, I'm really jacked to go run around the golf course and be out in nature.  I will let you know how it goes.  Peace, JKB
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: enlightenme on November 10, 2012, 05:09:17 PM
Do you have any more information, or a link for the Super HD?  Or do you purchase it just at any health food store?  Thanks....
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: JKB on November 10, 2012, 07:30:56 PM
Here you go...  I got ours at GNC but aparrently you can get it just about anywhere...
 
http://reviews.bodybuilding.com/Cellucor/Super_HD (http://reviews.bodybuilding.com/Cellucor/Super_HD)
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on November 11, 2012, 09:11:46 PM
Here you go...  I got ours at GNC but aparrently you can get it just about anywhere...
 
http://reviews.bodybuilding.com/Cellucor/Super_HD (http://reviews.bodybuilding.com/Cellucor/Super_HD)

Thanks, JKB!
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: enlightenme on November 12, 2012, 04:17:12 AM
Here you go...  I got ours at GNC but aparrently you can get it just about anywhere...
 
http://reviews.bodybuilding.com/Cellucor/Super_HD (http://reviews.bodybuilding.com/Cellucor/Super_HD)

Thanks JKB, greatly appreciated!
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on March 28, 2014, 10:21:00 AM
I am a mainly vegetarian person now, again - cutting back even more on animal protein.

When I was nearly completely vegan for quite a long while my weight went steadily down until I added these things to my diet. (At the time I needed to get it up to a normal range again.)

•   Avocadoes
•   malt syrup
•   Small amt. of maple or honey candy - bought at health food stores...
•   such as Macrobiotic Yinnies, etc.
•   Cooked millet with a dab of oil and some salt
•   Ghee (ghi) clarified butter.
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on March 28, 2014, 10:32:01 AM
I added ghee to my post, which is of course not vegan. At that time I had gone down to 89 pounds so I added the ghee. That helped get a bit more weight on me. Walking, pushing the baby buggy, carrying loads of laundry; schlepping groceries these activities put a bit of muscle on me. I should have pumped some iron but didn't have a way to do that , at the time.
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: NativeMom72 on April 06, 2014, 03:19:18 PM
I am a mainly vegetarian person now, again - cutting back even more on animal protein.

When I was nearly completely vegan for quite a long while my weight went steadily down until I added these things to my diet. (At the time I needed to get it up to a normal range again.)

•   Avocadoes
•   malt syrup
•   Small amt. of maple or honey candy - bought at health food stores...
•   such as Macrobiotic Yinnies, etc.
•   Cooked millet with a dab of oil and some salt
•   Ghee (ghi) clarified butter.


That sounds Great Barb!

I found this article that lists vegan/vegetarian substitutions for many foods that we eat on a daily basis :)

*source http://www.sunwarrior.com/news/healthifying-food-with-substitutes/ (http://www.sunwarrior.com/news/healthifying-food-with-substitutes/)

Healthy Food Substitutes for a Vegan or Vegetarian Lifestyle

Vegan Substitutions

Milk

Milk is easier to replace than you think, whether it be in cooking, baking, cereal, or a tall glass of refreshment. Almond, rice, and coconut milk are all good choices. Freshly made is always the best, but you can also buy them at health food and grocery stores. These come in natural, vanilla, or chocolate flavors depending on your needs or preferences. Soy milk is a less desirable vegan substitute due to its allergen and phytoestrogen content and with most soybeans being genetically modified in the United States.

Buttermilk

Simply add 1 tablespoon lemon juice to one cup almond, coconut, or rice milk, stir, and then let it stand for 30 minutes to thicken to make a buttermilk substitute. Soy works too, but, once again, you may want to avoid soy.

Cream

Coconut milk is an excellent replacement for heavy cream in recipes. Most of us automatically think sweet when coconut milk is mentioned because it is often used with fruits and sweeter dishes. It isn’t really sweet, but has a thick, creamy, rich flavor that works well in savory and sweet dishes. You can also blend one part cashews with one part water for a slightly sweeter cream.

Cheese

Crumbled tofu works well as a cottage or feta type cheese in recipes, but it will not melt and comes from soy. Nutritional yeast offers a yellow nutty cheesy flavor that can be sprinkled over vegetable tacos, on popcorn, or mixed with pasta sauce for a cheesy kick. You can buy vegan cheeses that are more similar to traditional cheese, but these are more expensive and more processed.

Butter

Coconut oil provides the saturated fats we are used to and can be substituted directly for butter in most recipes. It is very healthy and delicious. One cup butter can be replaced with 2/3 cup oil in most recipes. Applesauce or prune puree works well in baking for a fiber rich alternative, especially in denser breads like zucchini and banana. Nut butter and avocado puree can also be used in place of butter. They provide the fat a recipe needs, though healthier fats, and are exceptional in things like chocolate icing where oil wouldn’t work.

Mayo

Avocado mash or puree works well in most applications that call for mayo. Try blending one with a touch of lime and olive oil for a creamy dressing or spread that blows mayo out of the water anyway.

Eggs

Eggs can be a little tricky to replace. They are used in different ways depending on the recipe. In baking they provide moisture, flavor, texture, color, emulsifying properties, and thickening agents. In some recipes eggs are used only as a binder to hold all the ingredients together.


Ice Cream
Banana ice cream offers the same creamy texture without all the added fats and sugars. Just blend frozen bananas. Add frozen berries or fruits for sweet sorbet flavors or nut butters and dark chocolate for a heartier, more decadent ice cream.

Honey

Maple syrup and coconut syrup make good alternatives to honey in any recipe. They have their own unique flavors though. Many vegans and vegetarians may still use honey.

Healthier Substitutions

Flour

Choose whole wheat over white wheat that has been stripped of fiber and nutrients. Cooked black beans can be used as flour in some baking recipes, like brownies, for extra protein and fiber. Nut flours are also higher in protein and fiber than regular flour, but be aware they do not rise. Coconut flour can be used to replace a portion of regular flour too. Just don’t go overboard with coconut or other gluten free flours, they can have a bitter aftertaste in larger doses and don’t always react the same as flour in recipes.

Sugar

Sugar is another thing that’s easier to replace than people think. Applesauce has about seven times fewer calories than sugar, but still provides sweetness to any recipe. Vanilla extract, cinnamon, and/or nutmeg can add sweetness and flavor to foods that don’t really require more sugar or to cut the amount of honey, maple, or coconut sugar you are using. Stevia is a calorie free sweetener derived from the leaves of an herb that is far sweeter than sugar, requiring very small amounts to be added to food.

Salt

Seaweed crumbled into dishes is a great alternative to salt. It has a strong salty flavor, but is fairly low in sodium and full of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Sometimes salt isn’t needed when just looking for more flavors in food. This can be supplied by herbs and spices like garlic, onions, leeks, basil, oregano, or even citrus instead of large amounts of sodium.

White rice, like white flour, has been stripped of fiber and nutrients. Choose brown rice over white. For more healthy alternatives to white rice, use quinoa which is richer in protein and antioxidants or cauliflower, grated and steamed, which is lower in calories and carbohydrates while providing a similar texture and a mild flavor.

Breads

Once again, choose whole wheat over white. The whole grains are better for your heart. Use whole wheat tortillas too, or use lettuce leaves instead for even fewer calories, carbohydrates, and fat. Replace croutons in salad with nuts for that crunch you desire while cutting sodium and carbohydrates. Rolled oats, crushed flax, or fiber cereal makes for a healthier alternative to bread crumbs. Pick vegetables over a pita for dips and hummus.

Pasta

You know the drill: choose whole grain over regular white pasta. Use quinoa in place of couscous for the same texture with more protein and nutrition and without the gluten or processed flour. Some vegetables make delicious pasta too. Zucchini can be cut into strips or ribbons and treated like spaghetti or lasagna, or even rolled and stuffed like cannelloni. Eggplant, cut thin and grilled, makes an excellent lasagna or cannelloni as well with a meaty texture and unique flavor. Spaghetti squash, when cooked and pulled through with a fork, produces thin spaghetti-like noodles with a sweet squash flavor that goes well with any pasta sauce.

Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are lower in carbohydrates and calories and richer in antioxidants and fiber than white potatoes. Turnips or cauliflower make a creamy, healthy alternative to mashed potatoes in general. Kale chips, lightly tossed in olive oil, herbs, and spices then baked, make a crispy replacement for potato chips that is high in iron, vitamins, and antioxidants. Popcorn, a whole grain, is another healthier alternative to chips. Lightly dust popcorn with herbs, garlic powder, citrus, or even cinnamon instead of oils and salt.

Beans

Use dry beans over canned whenever possible. They take longer, soaking and boiling, but are lower in sodium and higher in nutrients than their canned kin. Canned foods also contain BPA, a known toxin that imitates hormones. BPA free cans aren’t any better. They use BPS, a nearly identical bisphenol molecule.

Lettuce

There are more greens out there than iceberg and the greener the better. Choose arugula, romaine, spinach, kale, turnip greens, and/or dandelion leaves for more antioxidants, chlorophyll, minerals, and variety.

Tomatoes

Use fresh, organic varieties over canned when possible, especially when making sauces. Canned sauces are higher in sodium and sugar. Tomatoes also leech more BPA into them due to the high acidity. Pick up sauces and tomatoes in glass bottles when fresh aren’t in season or you need to make something more quickly.

Peanut Butter

Reach for natural nut butters, including peanut, in place of the processed brands. Many grocery stores make their own in-house or you can easily make them at home with a good blender and a little time.

Chocolate


Dark chocolate chunks make a healthy choice in trail mix instead of the candy-coated chocolates that often come mixed in commercially. Use cacao nibs in place of chocolate chips in cookies. A little dark chocolate can actually help you release stress and give your mood a boost, just go easy.

Oatmeal

Quinoa, mixed with almond milk and cinnamon, makes an even healthier hot breakfast that’s high in protein, fiber, and antioxidants.

Syrup

Pureed fruits heated in a sauce pan make a low calorie alternative to sugary syrups while providing antioxidants and valuable enzymes. For even more flavor add vanilla and/or cinnamon.

Cooking Methods

Use your oven or panfry food over deep frying foods to get less fat, calories, and cell damaging free radicals. Steam your food over boiling it to keep valuable nutrients inside those vegetables and for a crisper flavor. If you are boiling your food, it should be in soups and teas where you actually eat or drink the liquid parts where many nutrients end up.

Supplements

Not all supplements are vegan, vegetarian, or even healthy. You have to look closely at labels and learn to spot the hidden health risks. Most multivitamins use synthetics, which are not the same form we find in nature. Most proteins rely on whey, which can cause digestive problems, or soy, which is an allergen. Sunwarrior offers whole-food raw vitamins and vegetable protein from healthier sources like brown rice, hemp seed, and pea protein.

(http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/content/2013/0515/0515_food_vegansloppyjoes/15798449-1-eng-US/0515_Food_VeganSloppyJoes_full_600.jpg)
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Jimfarmer on April 06, 2014, 06:33:18 PM
Re. coconut milk, cream and oil:

Milk and cream often come sweetened, so check first.
Coconut oil for cooking and skin:  solidifies at room temperature.
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on May 06, 2014, 08:43:22 AM
Good ideas, Jim.
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: steedy on May 07, 2014, 05:08:44 PM
Real coconut milk (straight from the coconut), is great! It looks like water.
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on May 08, 2014, 07:44:10 PM
Real coconut milk (straight from the coconut), is great! It looks like water.

It is great stuff...
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on April 09, 2017, 01:56:30 PM
I am a mainly vegetarian person now, again - cutting back even more on animal protein.

When I was nearly completely vegan for quite a long while my weight went steadily down until I added these things to my diet. (At the time I needed to get it up to a normal range again.)

•   Avocadoes
•   malt syrup
•   Small amt. of maple or honey candy - bought at health food stores...
•   such as Macrobiotic Yinnies, etc.
•   Cooked millet with a dab of oil and some salt
•   Ghee (ghi) clarified butter.


That sounds Great Barb!

I found this article that lists vegan/vegetarian substitutions for many foods that we eat on a daily basis :)

*source http://www.sunwarrior.com/news/healthifying-food-with-substitutes/ (http://www.sunwarrior.com/news/healthifying-food-with-substitutes/)

Healthy Food Substitutes for a Vegan or Vegetarian Lifestyle

Vegan Substitutions

Milk

Milk is easier to replace than you think, whether it be in cooking, baking, cereal, or a tall glass of refreshment. Almond, rice, and coconut milk are all good choices. Freshly made is always the best, but you can also buy them at health food and grocery stores. These come in natural, vanilla, or chocolate flavors depending on your needs or preferences. Soy milk is a less desirable vegan substitute due to its allergen and phytoestrogen content and with most soybeans being genetically modified in the United States.

Buttermilk

Simply add 1 tablespoon lemon juice to one cup almond, coconut, or rice milk, stir, and then let it stand for 30 minutes to thicken to make a buttermilk substitute. Soy works too, but, once again, you may want to avoid soy.

Cream

Coconut milk is an excellent replacement for heavy cream in recipes. Most of us automatically think sweet when coconut milk is mentioned because it is often used with fruits and sweeter dishes. It isn’t really sweet, but has a thick, creamy, rich flavor that works well in savory and sweet dishes. You can also blend one part cashews with one part water for a slightly sweeter cream.

Cheese

Crumbled tofu works well as a cottage or feta type cheese in recipes, but it will not melt and comes from soy. Nutritional yeast offers a yellow nutty cheesy flavor that can be sprinkled over vegetable tacos, on popcorn, or mixed with pasta sauce for a cheesy kick. You can buy vegan cheeses that are more similar to traditional cheese, but these are more expensive and more processed.

Butter

Coconut oil provides the saturated fats we are used to and can be substituted directly for butter in most recipes. It is very healthy and delicious. One cup butter can be replaced with 2/3 cup oil in most recipes. Applesauce or prune puree works well in baking for a fiber rich alternative, especially in denser breads like zucchini and banana. Nut butter and avocado puree can also be used in place of butter. They provide the fat a recipe needs, though healthier fats, and are exceptional in things like chocolate icing where oil wouldn’t work.

Mayo

Avocado mash or puree works well in most applications that call for mayo. Try blending one with a touch of lime and olive oil for a creamy dressing or spread that blows mayo out of the water anyway.

Eggs

Eggs can be a little tricky to replace. They are used in different ways depending on the recipe. In baking they provide moisture, flavor, texture, color, emulsifying properties, and thickening agents. In some recipes eggs are used only as a binder to hold all the ingredients together.

  • Baking (1 egg) – 1/3 cup applesauce, 1/3 cup pumpkin puree, 1/2 small banana mashed, or 1 tablespoon ground flax mixed with 2 tablespoons water all replace one egg in baking. The banana and pumpkin will add flavor to anything you use them in. A 1/4 cup tofu blended with a few tablespoons of water also work if you like soy.
  • Binding – Mashed potatoes, bread crumbs, blended tofu, cooked rice or oatmeal, nutritional yeast, flaxmeal, tomato paste, nut butter, corn starch, or soy flour can be used in place of egg in any recipe that uses them for binding purposes.

Ice Cream
Banana ice cream offers the same creamy texture without all the added fats and sugars. Just blend frozen bananas. Add frozen berries or fruits for sweet sorbet flavors or nut butters and dark chocolate for a heartier, more decadent ice cream.

Honey

Maple syrup and coconut syrup make good alternatives to honey in any recipe. They have their own unique flavors though. Many vegans and vegetarians may still use honey.

Healthier Substitutions

Flour

Choose whole wheat over white wheat that has been stripped of fiber and nutrients. Cooked black beans can be used as flour in some baking recipes, like brownies, for extra protein and fiber. Nut flours are also higher in protein and fiber than regular flour, but be aware they do not rise. Coconut flour can be used to replace a portion of regular flour too. Just don’t go overboard with coconut or other gluten free flours, they can have a bitter aftertaste in larger doses and don’t always react the same as flour in recipes.

Sugar

Sugar is another thing that’s easier to replace than people think. Applesauce has about seven times fewer calories than sugar, but still provides sweetness to any recipe. Vanilla extract, cinnamon, and/or nutmeg can add sweetness and flavor to foods that don’t really require more sugar or to cut the amount of honey, maple, or coconut sugar you are using. Stevia is a calorie free sweetener derived from the leaves of an herb that is far sweeter than sugar, requiring very small amounts to be added to food.

Salt

Seaweed crumbled into dishes is a great alternative to salt. It has a strong salty flavor, but is fairly low in sodium and full of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Sometimes salt isn’t needed when just looking for more flavors in food. This can be supplied by herbs and spices like garlic, onions, leeks, basil, oregano, or even citrus instead of large amounts of sodium.

White rice, like white flour, has been stripped of fiber and nutrients. Choose brown rice over white. For more healthy alternatives to white rice, use quinoa which is richer in protein and antioxidants or cauliflower, grated and steamed, which is lower in calories and carbohydrates while providing a similar texture and a mild flavor.

Breads

Once again, choose whole wheat over white. The whole grains are better for your heart. Use whole wheat tortillas too, or use lettuce leaves instead for even fewer calories, carbohydrates, and fat. Replace croutons in salad with nuts for that crunch you desire while cutting sodium and carbohydrates. Rolled oats, crushed flax, or fiber cereal makes for a healthier alternative to bread crumbs. Pick vegetables over a pita for dips and hummus.

Pasta

You know the drill: choose whole grain over regular white pasta. Use quinoa in place of couscous for the same texture with more protein and nutrition and without the gluten or processed flour. Some vegetables make delicious pasta too. Zucchini can be cut into strips or ribbons and treated like spaghetti or lasagna, or even rolled and stuffed like cannelloni. Eggplant, cut thin and grilled, makes an excellent lasagna or cannelloni as well with a meaty texture and unique flavor. Spaghetti squash, when cooked and pulled through with a fork, produces thin spaghetti-like noodles with a sweet squash flavor that goes well with any pasta sauce.

Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are lower in carbohydrates and calories and richer in antioxidants and fiber than white potatoes. Turnips or cauliflower make a creamy, healthy alternative to mashed potatoes in general. Kale chips, lightly tossed in olive oil, herbs, and spices then baked, make a crispy replacement for potato chips that is high in iron, vitamins, and antioxidants. Popcorn, a whole grain, is another healthier alternative to chips. Lightly dust popcorn with herbs, garlic powder, citrus, or even cinnamon instead of oils and salt.

Beans

Use dry beans over canned whenever possible. They take longer, soaking and boiling, but are lower in sodium and higher in nutrients than their canned kin. Canned foods also contain BPA, a known toxin that imitates hormones. BPA free cans aren’t any better. They use BPS, a nearly identical bisphenol molecule.

Lettuce

There are more greens out there than iceberg and the greener the better. Choose arugula, romaine, spinach, kale, turnip greens, and/or dandelion leaves for more antioxidants, chlorophyll, minerals, and variety.

Tomatoes

Use fresh, organic varieties over canned when possible, especially when making sauces. Canned sauces are higher in sodium and sugar. Tomatoes also leech more BPA into them due to the high acidity. Pick up sauces and tomatoes in glass bottles when fresh aren’t in season or you need to make something more quickly.

Peanut Butter

Reach for natural nut butters, including peanut, in place of the processed brands. Many grocery stores make their own in-house or you can easily make them at home with a good blender and a little time.

Chocolate


Dark chocolate chunks make a healthy choice in trail mix instead of the candy-coated chocolates that often come mixed in commercially. Use cacao nibs in place of chocolate chips in cookies. A little dark chocolate can actually help you release stress and give your mood a boost, just go easy.

Oatmeal

Quinoa, mixed with almond milk and cinnamon, makes an even healthier hot breakfast that’s high in protein, fiber, and antioxidants.

Syrup

Pureed fruits heated in a sauce pan make a low calorie alternative to sugary syrups while providing antioxidants and valuable enzymes. For even more flavor add vanilla and/or cinnamon.

Cooking Methods

Use your oven or panfry food over deep frying foods to get less fat, calories, and cell damaging free radicals. Steam your food over boiling it to keep valuable nutrients inside those vegetables and for a crisper flavor. If you are boiling your food, it should be in soups and teas where you actually eat or drink the liquid parts where many nutrients end up.

Supplements

Not all supplements are vegan, vegetarian, or even healthy. You have to look closely at labels and learn to spot the hidden health risks. Most multivitamins use synthetics, which are not the same form we find in nature. Most proteins rely on whey, which can cause digestive problems, or soy, which is an allergen. Sunwarrior offers whole-food raw vitamins and vegetable protein from healthier sources like brown rice, hemp seed, and pea protein.

(http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/content/2013/0515/0515_food_vegansloppyjoes/15798449-1-eng-US/0515_Food_VeganSloppyJoes_full_600.jpg)

NativeMom72, great post and article and pic! :)
Thanks  :)
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on October 19, 2018, 07:20:17 PM
Regarding one source of vegan protein, sesame.
I recommend it. This is used in japanese cooking and also Middle Eastern...the sesame,
You can combine it with miso, mix with boiling water to make a paste, gravy, add other ingredients to make a sandwich spread...
Use as soup base too.
Sesame butter spread on apples is a tasty fast snack...
Title: Re: Maintaining muscle/putting it back on/while on vegan diet - article/other ideas
Post by: ilinda on October 20, 2018, 06:48:52 PM
I second that.  Some years ago I was in the middle of a food-based quandary, sort of trying to transition from one way of eating to another, but still feeling something wasn't quite right yet.

Then I had a dream--cannot remember the details at the moment, but at the very end of the dream a voice said, "Open Sesame!".  So I interpreted that to mean it would be a good idea to include sesame seeds, sesame butter/tahini in my diet, and I did, and feel it was the right decision.