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Solani - PREPPER'S CORNER => Videos => Topic started by: Yowbarb on November 03, 2012, 11:56:35 AM

Title: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on November 03, 2012, 11:56:35 AM
http://www.bepreparedtosurvive.com/Simple%20Swiss%20Fences%20for%20the%20Homestead.htm

Simple Swiss Fences for the Homestead..   9:52
   
VIDEO Link: http://youtu.be/76zWu5s9E-w

Published on Aug 21, 2012 by survivalresources
This video shows how to make simple Swiss type fences with nothing but some poles and a mallet. Very interesting and shows various other types of simple fences used in Switzerland, as well as by pioneers in America.
....
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on January 26, 2013, 06:31:52 PM
Rubber tire fences,
Yowbarb
...

Battering Tires for a Wall Made of Rammed Earth Encased in Steel Belted Rubber.   1:31

Link:  http://youtu.be/pwLvtuF4qnc

earthship


Tire Fence Project, Phase 2     5:36

Link:  http://youtu.be/dLneiFwdulY

.................................................................
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Survival101 on January 27, 2013, 07:24:29 AM
http://www.bepreparedtosurvive.com/Simple%20Swiss%20Fences%20for%20the%20Homestead.htm

Simple Swiss Fences for the Homestead..   9:52
   
VIDEO Link: http://youtu.be/76zWu5s9E-w

Published on Aug 21, 2012 by survivalresources
This video shows how to make simple Swiss type fences with nothing but some poles and a mallet. Very interesting and shows various other types of simple fences used in Switzerland, as well as by pioneers in America.
....

This is interesting, I've not seen this exact style before. All thru the UK, there are living fences or hedgerows (Plashing) that are sometimes hundreds of years old. To me, it would be worth the effort to make a living fence that will last at least 30 years, before fooling with almost any other fence. The Wattle (Pleached) fence with the weaving & braiding can be quite a site, but like this example, they are dead wood. To make even a simple living willow fence is better, for livestock using Black Locust, Hawthorne to make use of the thorns to deter livestock, using Pollarded trees as fence posts that don't rot out.
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on January 30, 2013, 10:13:45 AM
http://www.bepreparedtosurvive.com/Simple%20Swiss%20Fences%20for%20the%20Homestead.htm

Simple Swiss Fences for the Homestead..   9:52
   
VIDEO Link: http://youtu.be/76zWu5s9E-w

Published on Aug 21, 2012 by survivalresources
This video shows how to make simple Swiss type fences with nothing but some poles and a mallet. Very interesting and shows various other types of simple fences used in Switzerland, as well as by pioneers in America.
....

This is interesting, I've not seen this exact style before. All thru the UK, there are living fences or hedgerows (Plashing) that are sometimes hundreds of years old. To me, it would be worth the effort to make a living fence that will last at least 30 years, before fooling with almost any other fence. The Wattle (Pleached) fence with the weaving & braiding can be quite a site, but like this example, they are dead wood. To make even a simple living willow fence is better, for livestock using Black Locust, Hawthorne to make use of the thorns to deter livestock, using Pollarded trees as fence posts that don't rot out.

True it would not hold us well, the Swiss fence which is illustrated above. ...
I like those ideas...can you tell us more or post illustrations.. if not I can find some...
 :)
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Survival101 on January 30, 2013, 10:31:25 AM

I have many articles and pic's, but I can't seem to load them on your format. People may easily Google, the terms and find a wealth of info on the 'Net'...just ask 'What is a Wattle fence', 'Pleaching', 'Plashing', 'Hedgerow Laying' and ask for pic's. You can find the 'where's & how-to's' and everything imaginable...
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on January 30, 2013, 10:32:37 AM
http://www.bepreparedtosurvive.com/Simple%20Swiss%20Fences%20for%20the%20Homestead.htm

Simple Swiss Fences for the Homestead..   9:52
   
VIDEO Link: http://youtu.be/76zWu5s9E-w

Published on Aug 21, 2012 by survivalresources
This video shows how to make simple Swiss type fences with nothing but some poles and a mallet. Very interesting and shows various other types of simple fences used in Switzerland, as well as by pioneers in America.
....

This is interesting, I've not seen this exact style before. All thru the UK, there are living fences or hedgerows (Plashing) that are sometimes hundreds of years old. To me, it would be worth the effort to make a living fence that will last at least 30 years, before fooling with almost any other fence. The Wattle (Pleached) fence with the weaving & braiding can be quite a site, but like this example, they are dead wood. To make even a simple living willow fence is better, for livestock using Black Locust, Hawthorne to make use of the thorns to deter livestock, using Pollarded trees as fence posts that don't rot out.

So Survival101 - thanks for the ideas... :)
Posting here some info on living tree fences...
This excerpt from the article is about Hawthorn, Blackthorn, etc.

- Yowbarb
http://www.themodernhomestead.us/article/Multifunctional+Living+Fences.html 

Fences with Defenses

Depending on species, a mature living fence becomes a stout barrier, impenetrable by larger animals. But suppose the fence is exposed to browsing by deer, or must contain their domesticated cousins, goats? A fence with stout thorns will provide the best deterrent to excessive browsing.

Hawthorns (Crataegus spp.) are small trees with stout thorns for a self-defense fence. They produce berries that are edible (by wild birds and people), and are used medicinally. (Modern research has born out the efficacy of both flowers and berries as a heart tonic, for example.) When managed as a living fence, hawthorn can make a completely stock-proof barrier which deters browsing. Its wood makes good tool handles, turned items, and fuel.

Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa) was traditionally used in Britain and northern Europe to make a hedge whose “savage thorns” contained cattle while preventing destructive browsing. The fruits, called sloes, are similar to damson plums and can be used to make jams and preserves, or wine. The hard wood is used for tool handles and canes and makes an excellent slow-burning firewood. The traditional Irish walking stick or club, the shillelagh, is made from a blackthorn stem.

Other thorny species that could be used in living fences are pyracanthas and hollies (which provide birds and other wildlife nesting sites, shelter, and berries as food), black locust (also sets nitrogen), honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos, whose high-protein seeds and pods make excellent livestock feed, and can be eaten by people as well), prickly ash (Zanthoxylum americanum, whose seeds are used medicinally and as a pepper substitute), and rugosa rose (whose fruits or “hips” are so high in Vitamin C that herbalists sometimes classify them as medicinal, sometimes as a “superfood”). Jujube, already mentioned, is thorny as well.
 I’ve read claims that the right choice of species yields a fence that deters even cats and raccoons!
....
See full article at:
http://www.themodernhomestead.us/article/Multifunctional+Living+Fences.html
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on January 30, 2013, 10:35:11 AM

I have many articles and pic's, but I can't seem to load them on your format. People may easily Google, the terms and find a wealth of info on the 'Net'...just ask 'What is a Wattle fence', 'Pleaching', 'Plashing', 'Hedgerow Laying' and ask for pic's. You can find the 'where's & how-to's' and everything imaginable...

That's OK.
All I do is capture images in My Pictures, sorted by Day. Then I go to attachments and browse and it goes to my Pictures and there it is. Every system a bit different probably...
I have to do trial and error on everything...
 :)
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Survival101 on January 30, 2013, 11:15:09 AM
http://www.bepreparedtosurvive.com/Simple%20Swiss%20Fences%20for%20the%20Homestead.htm

Simple Swiss Fences for the Homestead..   9:52
   
VIDEO Link: http://youtu.be/76zWu5s9E-w

Published on Aug 21, 2012 by survivalresources
This video shows how to make simple Swiss type fences with nothing but some poles and a mallet. Very interesting and shows various other types of simple fences used in Switzerland, as well as by pioneers in America.
....

This is interesting, I've not seen this exact style before. All thru the UK, there are living fences or hedgerows (Plashing) that are sometimes hundreds of years old. To me, it would be worth the effort to make a living fence that will last at least 30 years, before fooling with almost any other fence. The Wattle (Pleached) fence with the weaving & braiding can be quite a site, but like this example, they are dead wood. To make even a simple living willow fence is better, for livestock using Black Locust, Hawthorne to make use of the thorns to deter livestock, using Pollarded trees as fence posts that don't rot out.

So Survival101 - thanks for the ideas... :)
Posting here some info on living tree fences...
This excerpt from the article is about Hawthorn, Blackthorn, etc.

- Yowbarb
http://www.themodernhomestead.us/article/Multifunctional+Living+Fences.html 

Fences with Defenses

Depending on species, a mature living fence becomes a stout barrier, impenetrable by larger animals. But suppose the fence is exposed to browsing by deer, or must contain their domesticated cousins, goats? A fence with stout thorns will provide the best deterrent to excessive browsing.

Hawthorns (Crataegus spp.) are small trees with stout thorns for a self-defense fence. They produce berries that are edible (by wild birds and people), and are used medicinally. (Modern research has born out the efficacy of both flowers and berries as a heart tonic, for example.) When managed as a living fence, hawthorn can make a completely stock-proof barrier which deters browsing. Its wood makes good tool handles, turned items, and fuel.

Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa) was traditionally used in Britain and northern Europe to make a hedge whose “savage thorns” contained cattle while preventing destructive browsing. The fruits, called sloes, are similar to damson plums and can be used to make jams and preserves, or wine. The hard wood is used for tool handles and canes and makes an excellent slow-burning firewood. The traditional Irish walking stick or club, the shillelagh, is made from a blackthorn stem.

Other thorny species that could be used in living fences are pyracanthas and hollies (which provide birds and other wildlife nesting sites, shelter, and berries as food), black locust (also sets nitrogen), honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos, whose high-protein seeds and pods make excellent livestock feed, and can be eaten by people as well), prickly ash (Zanthoxylum americanum, whose seeds are used medicinally and as a pepper substitute), and rugosa rose (whose fruits or “hips” are so high in Vitamin C that herbalists sometimes classify them as medicinal, sometimes as a “superfood”). Jujube, already mentioned, is thorny as well.
 I’ve read claims that the right choice of species yields a fence that deters even cats and raccoons!
....
See full article at:
http://www.themodernhomestead.us/article/Multifunctional+Living+Fences.html

This article is very good, but there are also others that have more pic's of actually making and the final look of the project. There is much more detail, available...I'd suggest to keep searching, I usually look at 10 'search' pages to be sure that I thourghly understand a/the subject and have all that is available on it.
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Survival101 on January 30, 2013, 01:18:04 PM



Pleaching or plashing was common in gardens from the late-Middle Ages until the 18th century. This technique is a kind of weaving of the branches of deciduous trees or shrubs to form a living fence. Sometimes branches woven together grow together, a natural grafting known as inosculation. Sir Walter Scott brought the technique back to popularity in England when he described such a fence in The Fortunes of Nigel. (The above pic, shows a Pleached fence, kinda like a diamond espalier that you'd do with a fruit tree. And, you could...then you'd have a strong fence and, eventually a food source, too. Perfect example of Permaculture.)

Pleaching is the weaving or braiding of flexible branches or vines and also the placement of sticks/poles like you would see in vertical or horizontal Wattle fences. Where as Plashing is the slanting, partially-cut and bent trees as in Hedgerow Laying. Both can be quite impressive and depending on your use and expectations.
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Survival101 on January 30, 2013, 01:19:06 PM

I thought, I had a new way of posting it for the pic to come thru...sorry.
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on January 30, 2013, 05:53:28 PM

I thought, I had a new way of posting it for the pic to come thru...sorry.
Well we will figure it out...
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: JKB on January 30, 2013, 07:51:29 PM
I like the tire idea and that could be handy.  I have 200 empty sandbags that I have been thinking about how I will employ.  200 is not enough to build anything significant with but could be used in conjunction with some 2X4's, plywood sheets, and maybe some fence posts.  I keep walking outside and looking at this mass of razor wire I would love to have, but, in reality there is no sensible way for me to transport it long distances.  ...not with all of our other stuff.
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on January 31, 2013, 07:08:51 AM
http://www.bepreparedtosurvive.com/Simple%20Swiss%20Fences%20for%20the%20Homestead.htm

Simple Swiss Fences for the Homestead..   9:52
   
VIDEO Link: http://youtu.be/76zWu5s9E-w

Published on Aug 21, 2012 by survivalresources
This video shows how to make simple Swiss type fences with nothing but some poles and a mallet. Very interesting and shows various other types of simple fences used in Switzerland, as well as by pioneers in America.
....

This is interesting, I've not seen this exact style before. All thru the UK, there are living fences or hedgerows (Plashing) that are sometimes hundreds of years old. To me, it would be worth the effort to make a living fence that will last at least 30 years, before fooling with almost any other fence. The Wattle (Pleached) fence with the weaving & braiding can be quite a site, but like this example, they are dead wood. To make even a simple living willow fence is better, for livestock using Black Locust, Hawthorne to make use of the thorns to deter livestock, using Pollarded trees as fence posts that don't rot out.

So Survival101 - thanks for the ideas... :)
Posting here some info on living tree fences...
This excerpt from the article is about Hawthorn, Blackthorn, etc.

- Yowbarb
http://www.themodernhomestead.us/article/Multifunctional+Living+Fences.html 

Fences with Defenses

Depending on species, a mature living fence becomes a stout barrier, impenetrable by larger animals. But suppose the fence is exposed to browsing by deer, or must contain their domesticated cousins, goats? A fence with stout thorns will provide the best deterrent to excessive browsing.

Hawthorns (Crataegus spp.) are small trees with stout thorns for a self-defense fence. They produce berries that are edible (by wild birds and people), and are used medicinally. (Modern research has born out the efficacy of both flowers and berries as a heart tonic, for example.) When managed as a living fence, hawthorn can make a completely stock-proof barrier which deters browsing. Its wood makes good tool handles, turned items, and fuel.

Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa) was traditionally used in Britain and northern Europe to make a hedge whose “savage thorns” contained cattle while preventing destructive browsing. The fruits, called sloes, are similar to damson plums and can be used to make jams and preserves, or wine. The hard wood is used for tool handles and canes and makes an excellent slow-burning firewood. The traditional Irish walking stick or club, the shillelagh, is made from a blackthorn stem.

Other thorny species that could be used in living fences are pyracanthas and hollies (which provide birds and other wildlife nesting sites, shelter, and berries as food), black locust (also sets nitrogen), honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos, whose high-protein seeds and pods make excellent livestock feed, and can be eaten by people as well), prickly ash (Zanthoxylum americanum, whose seeds are used medicinally and as a pepper substitute), and rugosa rose (whose fruits or “hips” are so high in Vitamin C that herbalists sometimes classify them as medicinal, sometimes as a “superfood”). Jujube, already mentioned, is thorny as well.
 I’ve read claims that the right choice of species yields a fence that deters even cats and raccoons!
....
See full article at:
http://www.themodernhomestead.us/article/Multifunctional+Living+Fences.html

This article is very good, but there are also others that have more pic's of actually making and the final look of the project. There is much more detail, available...I'd suggest to keep searching, I usually look at 10 'search' pages to be sure that I thourghly understand a/the subject and have all that is available on it.

Good.
Survival101 the info you find and post here will be much appreciated, with or without  photos...
Just the link and or an outline of the info will help...
You will notice most of the fence ideas I have posted are really more sturdy such as the tires rammed earth, or with concrete etc. I really do like your ideas of the living fences - thorned bushes
If a person had a lot of acres the living fences would really be good and also provide some fencing and partition of areas with pets, domestic animals, gardens and so many other uses...
- Yowbarb :)

...
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on January 31, 2013, 07:17:25 AM
I like the tire idea and that could be handy.  I have 200 empty sandbags that I have been thinking about how I will employ.  200 is not enough to build anything significant with but could be used in conjunction with some 2X4's, plywood sheets, and maybe some fence posts.  I keep walking outside and looking at this mass of razor wire I would love to have, but, in reality there is no sensible way for me to transport it long distances.  ...not with all of our other stuff.

JKB I know you are going to be really inventive when you do get to relocate...I'm sure you are looking forward to that.  :)
At first I was thinking you could haul that but you may need to just sell it all off on ebay or something and use the funds at your new location...
Well Best of Luck with it and keep us posted...
- Barb T.
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: JKB on February 01, 2013, 06:44:21 PM
Will do.  Razor wire is some tricky stuff Barb.  I don't know if you have had any experience with it or not but, I've seen Marines just walking along and get a little to close to a roll of razor wire and, next thing you know, they are completely entangled in it and have to be cut out of it.  Almost like the razor wire swallowed them or something.  I would have to get a trailer I think before I could entertain hauling rolls of it all the way to Texas.  Would be nice under the right circumstances though...
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on February 01, 2013, 07:56:53 PM
Will do.  Razor wire is some tricky stuff Barb.  I don't know if you have had any experience with it or not but, I've seen Marines just walking along and get a little to close to a roll of razor wire and, next thing you know, they are completely entangled in it and have to be cut out of it.  Almost like the razor wire swallowed them or something.  I would have to get a trailer I think before I could entertain hauling rolls of it all the way to Texas.  Would be nice under the right circumstances though...

That sounds so hazardous. Well good luck selling it, U know what you are doing.  :)
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: JKB on February 01, 2013, 08:46:51 PM
Shame on me for laughing at the Marines who got tangled into it... We helped them, of course, but then we made fun of them again for doing it.  Boys never really grow up.
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on February 02, 2013, 12:46:26 PM
Shame on me for laughing at the Marines who got tangled into it... We helped them, of course, but then we made fun of them again for doing it.  Boys never really grow up.

Ah - what wonderful comraderie.  ;D
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on February 02, 2013, 12:52:53 PM



Pleaching or plashing was common in gardens from the late-Middle Ages until the 18th century. This technique is a kind of weaving of the branches of deciduous trees or shrubs to form a living fence. Sometimes branches woven together grow together, a natural grafting known as inosculation. Sir Walter Scott brought the technique back to popularity in England when he described such a fence in The Fortunes of Nigel. (The above pic, shows a Pleached fence, kinda like a diamond espalier that you'd do with a fruit tree. And, you could...then you'd have a strong fence and, eventually a food source, too. Perfect example of Permaculture.)

Pleaching is the weaving or braiding of flexible branches or vines and also the placement of sticks/poles like you would see in vertical or horizontal Wattle fences. Where as Plashing is the slanting, partially-cut and bent trees as in Hedgerow Laying. Both can be quite impressive and depending on your use and expectations.

This is all new to me, thanks for posting..
So I looked up an image... Pleached fencing...
Then it's the plashing...
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Survival101 on February 02, 2013, 01:05:57 PM

Yes, that's what I was trying to do & show...!!!
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on February 02, 2013, 01:33:54 PM

Yes, that's what I was trying to do & show...!!!

It popped up toward the top of google... :)
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: JKB on February 03, 2013, 12:44:56 PM
Shame on me for laughing at the Marines who got tangled into it... We helped them, of course, but then we made fun of them again for doing it.  Boys never really grow up.

Ah - what wonderful comraderie.  ;D

I will miss it so...  What other job in the world can you make fun of your "co-worker" for getting tangled up in a roll of razor wire...  plus about a 1000 other things I can think of.  I will miss it, no doubt.
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on February 04, 2013, 06:06:42 AM
Semper Fi.

Well our backfround is Navy but at least I know "Semper Fi." 
:)
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: JKB on February 04, 2013, 05:09:38 PM
I stand up for "Anchors Away" the same as I do for "The Marines Hymn."  The Navy-Marine Corps team is not to be taken lightly.
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on February 05, 2013, 01:29:22 PM
I stand up for "Anchors Away" the same as I do for "The Marines Hymn."  The Navy-Marine Corps team is not to be taken lightly.

 :)

Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on February 05, 2013, 01:42:57 PM

I have many articles and pic's, but I can't seem to load them on your format. People may easily Google, the terms and find a wealth of info on the 'Net'...just ask 'What is a Wattle fence', 'Pleaching', 'Plashing', 'Hedgerow Laying' and ask for pic's. You can find the 'where's & how-to's' and everything imaginable...

Well I just found an informative article to add to the collection...

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2107511/The-home-guard-Police-suggest-30-thorny-bushes-homeowners-plant-discourage-lazy-garden-thieves.html

The home guard: Police suggest 30 thorny bushes homeowners could plant to discourage 'lazy' garden thieves

By Tom Gardner
UPDATED:06:02 EST, 28 February 2012

It seems when the thin blue line just isn't enough in the fight against crime, a prickly green one might be just the thing.
 
Police have begun issuing gardening tips to householders designed to help cut back burglary rates.
The Metropolitan Police guidelines on 'How to stop garden thieves' says  that people can 'make their home more secure' by planting giant rhubarb - which has 'abrasive foliage' - and 'spiny' gooseberry bushes.
 
The list of officially approved defensive plants also includes the fearsome sounding Firethorn.

The advice - which even gives the Latin name for the plants and bushes - states: ‘Your garden, as well as your house, has valued possessions that thieves would love to steal.

‘It also has equipment that could help them break into your house.
 
‘Most burglars are lazy. They look for easy ways of getting into a house or garden and by taking a few simple precautions you can reduce the risk of being burgled and make your house and garden more secure.’
 
It adds: ‘One of the best ways to keep thieves out is to use nature's own defence mechanisms to stop intruders.
 
‘A barrier of prickly hedge may be all the protection you need around your property.’

But the advice comes with a tongue in cheek warning: 'We have tried to identify the plants mentioned by their correct botanical name, but we cannot guarantee that the plant you buy will not grow into a small, fragrant flowering shrub with no more thorns than a daisy.’
 
It continues: ‘Although they will take some time to grow, the end result justifies the effort. They should deter even the most determined burglar.
 
‘Hedges and shrubs in the front garden should be kept to a height of no more than three feet in order to avoid giving a burglar a screen behind which he can conceal himself.’
 
One police officer said: ‘It's quite something when police start handing out gardening advice - and even giving the names of the plants in Latin.
 
‘If it helps prevent crime, then wonderful, but I can't help wondering how much time has been put into this.’

NATURE'S 30 BURGLAR PREVENTING PLANTS
Creeping Juniper - Juniperis horizontalis 'Wiltonii' - Also known as 'Blue Rug', has a thorny stem and foliage.
 
Blue spruce has dense, spiky needles

Blue Spruce - Picea pungens 'Globosa' - Rigid branches, irregular dense blue, spiky needles.
 
Common Holly - Ilex agulfolium - Large evergreen shrub, dark green spiked leaves.

Giant Rhubarb - Gunnera manicata - Giant rhubarb-like leaves on erect stems, abrasive foliage. Can grow up to 2.5m high. [ Yowbarb Note: I do not believe this would be much of a deterrent. ]
 
Golden Bamboo - Phyllostachys aurea- Very graceful, forming thick clumps of up to 3.5m high. Less invasive than other bamboos.
 
Chinese Jujube - Zizyphus sativa - Medium sized tree with very spiny pendulous branches.

Firethorn - Pyracantha 'Orange Glow' - Flowers white in June, with bright orange-red berries. Thorny stem.
 
Shrub Rose - Rosa 'Frau Dagmar Hastrup' - Excellent ground cover, pale pink flowers, very thorny stem. May to September.

Firethorn, or pyracantha, is a tough, very spiky ornamental evergreen shrub that has creamy-white flowers in spring
 
Pencil Christmas Tree - Picea abias 'Cupressina' - Medium-sized tree of columnar habit, with ascending spiky branches.
 
Juniper - Juniperus x media 'Old Gold' - Evergreen. Golden-tipped foliage. Prickly foliage.
 
Purple Berberis - Berberis thunbergil 'Atropurpurea'- Has a thorny stem.
 
Mountain Pine - Pinus mugo 'Mughus'- Is a very hardy, large shrub or small tree, with long sharp needles.
 
Blue Pine - Picea pungens 'Hoopsii'- Small to medium-sized tree, spiky needled stem, densely conical habit, with vividly glaucous blue leaves. Likes moist, rich soil.
 
Oleaster - Elaeagnus angustifolia - Small deciduous tree, about 4.5 to 6 m (15 to 20 feet) that is hardy, wind resistant, tolerant of poor, dry sites, and thus useful in windbreak hedges.

Blackthorn, or Prunus spinosa, is a native deciduous plant which makes a dense hedge with thick, long thorns
 
Blackthorn - Prunus spinosa - Also called Sloe; spiny shrub. Its dense growth makes it suitable for hedges.
 
Fuschia-flowered Gooseberry - Ribes speciosum - Fruit bush, spiny, produces greenish to greenish-pink flowers in clusters of two or three.

The following thorny plants can also be considered: Aralia, Chaenomeles, Colletia, Crataegus (including hawthorn/may), Hippophae (sea buckthorn), Maclura, Mahonia, Oplopanax, Osmanthus, Poncirus, Rhamnus, Rosa (climbing & shrub roses), Rubus (bramble), Smilax Prickly ash (Zanthoxylum).
.

Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on February 05, 2013, 03:00:01 PM
Yowbarb Note: I edited my previous post. I put that the Oreastus is very poisonous...
I read it wrong I thought it was Oleander.
...................................................................................................
Oreastus aka Russian olive...
The fruits are edible and sweet, though with a dryish, mealy texture.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elaeagnus_angustifolia

Elaeagnus angustifolia, commonly called silver berry,[1] oleaster,[1] Russian olive,[1] or wild olive,[1] is a species of Elaeagnus, native to western and central Asia, from southern Russia and Kazakhstan to Turkey and Iran. It is now also widely established in North America as an introduced species.
...............................................................
Yowbarb Note: 

Nerium oleander  is poisonous. Different.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nerium_oleander

Nerium oleander (pron.: /ˈnɪəriəm ˈoʊliː.ændər/)[2] is an evergreen shrub or small tree in the dogbane family Apocynaceae, toxic in all its parts. It is the only species currently classified in the genus Nerium. It is most commonly known as oleander, from its superficial resemblance to the unrelated olive Olea.[Note 1] It is so widely cultivated that no precise region of origin has been identified, though southwest Asia has been suggested. The ancient city of Volubilis in Morocco took its name from the old Latin name for the flower. Oleander is one of the most poisonous of commonly grown garden plants
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on August 27, 2015, 01:13:29 AM
I intend to put a blackthorn hedgerows in my survival land... Prunus spinosa

I found a good little blog about where to order the plants and seeds in the US, the lovely edible flowers, sloe berries, gin and etc.

http://www.idigmygarden.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13190

ALSO: http://fruitandnuttrees.com/blackthorn-prunus-spinosa
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on November 04, 2015, 12:29:39 AM
PS My idea of putting the blackthorn hedgerows is for certain areas. It would not be some impenetrable barrier to keep bad guys out, although it should definitely slow them down. This prickly thorn hedge should keep out a lot of predatory creatures of the four legged variety and some of the two legged variety.
What I would like to do is put it around areas where I have my home, dome, underground, whatever, and an enclosure where I could let cats and dogs out for awhile. A safe enough enclosure for a dairy cow, a goat, etc. maybe a chicken area. I would put a little gate between the home, pet area and the domestic animal area, most likely and it all enclosed with the hedgerow. Notice how dense and prickly it is at the bottom, especially.
The flowers seeds and berries are edible. People make jams and jellies, medicinal potions, etc. Must not be taken too much. Would need to do a proper study of it. It is medicinal but too much is not good... http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=prunus+spinosa

http://herbier.sesa-aude.fr/IMG/jpg/Prunus-spinosa-7265.jpg
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on November 04, 2015, 12:39:04 AM
Yowbarb Note: PS Just a few excerpts from this page: See the live links on page, and more info on growing, etc. Medicinal info. This plant (seeds, flowrs and berries does contain a form of cyanide. Walnuts have it too. It is beneficial in small quantities. A lot of medicinal benefits.
Small amounts... I found some as a homeopathic. Again, this takes some research.

http://www.smallflower.com/prodimages/3476-DEFAULT-m.jpg
...
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=prunus+spinosa

Habitats         
Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade; Hedge; 

Edible Uses                                           
Edible Parts: Flowers;  Fruit;  Seed.
Edible Uses: Tea.

Fruit - raw or cooked[2, 5, 7, 11, 12, 13, 34]. Exceedingly astringent, it is normally cooked but once the fruit has been frosted it loses some of its astringency and some people find they can enjoy it raw[183, K]. The fruit is more usually used in jellies, syrups, conserves etc and as a flavouring for sloe gin and other liqueurs[183]. Some fruits that we ate in December were fairly pleasant raw[K]. In France the unripe fruit is pickled like an olive[183]. The fruit is about 15mm in diameter and contains one large seed[200]. Seed - raw or cooked. Do not eat the seed if it is too bitter - see the notes above on toxicity. The leaves are used as a tea substitute[7, 183]. The dried fruits can be added to herbal teas[183]. The flowers are edible and can be crystallised or sugared[183]. 

Medicinal Uses 

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.
[See live links on page for explanations]

Antidiarrhoeal;  Antiflatulent;  Antispasmodic;  Aperient;  Astringent;  Depurative;  Diaphoretic;  Diuretic;  Febrifuge;  Laxative;  Stomachic.

The flowers, bark, leaves and fruits are aperient, astringent, depurative, diaphoretic, diuretic, febrifuge, laxative and stomachic[7, 9, 21]. An infusion of the flowers is used in the treatment of diarrhoea (especially for children), bladder and kidney disorders, stomach weakness et[9]. Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, all members of the genus contain amygdalin and prunasin, substances which break down in water to form hydrocyanic acid (cyanide or prussic acid). In small amounts this exceedingly poisonous compound stimulates respiration, improves digestion and gives a sense of well-being[238]. The German Commission E Monographs, a therapeutic guide to herbal medicine, approve Prunus spinosa Sloe - Blackthorn for inflammation of mouth and pharynx (see [302] for critics of commission E). 

Other Uses 
Cosmetic;  Dye;  Hedge;  Hedge;  Ink;  Pioneer;  Tannin;  Wood.

The bark is a good source of tannin[7]. It is used to make an ink[66]. The juice of unripe fruits is used as a laundry mark[66], it is almost indelible[115]. The pulped ripe fruit is used cosmetically in making astringent face-masks[7]. A green dye can be obtained from the leaves[168]. A dark grey to green dye can be obtained from the fruit[168]. The bark, boiled in an alkali, produces a yellow dye[66]. The sloe is very resistant to maritime exposure and also suckers freely. It can be used as a hedge in exposed maritime positions. The hedge is stock-proof if it is well maintained[1, 29], though it is rather bare in the winter and, unless the hedge is rather wide, it is not a very good shelter at this time[K]. Because of its suckering habit, the plant is a natural pioneer species, invading cultivated fields and creating conditions conducive to the regeneration of woodland. Wood - very hard. Used for turnery, the teeth of rakes etc[1, 13, 46, 66]. Suitable branches are used for making walking sticks and are highly valued for this purpose because of their twisted and interesting shapes[7]. 
 


 
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on December 10, 2017, 10:42:57 AM
Hedge laying blackthorn  0:55

https://youtu.be/NLP9hpJWHts

Julia Drage
Published on Feb 28, 2012
SUBSCRIBED 15

Thick, old, parish boundary hedge laid successfully.
www.wildlife-workshops.co.uk
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on December 10, 2017, 10:48:27 AM
first image posted by Paul Wheaton master steward, 2 yrs ago

Permies forum, hedge plants - for a living fence and coppicing or laying a hedge

(https://permies.com/forums/imageCache/image/f92312f9e9e6ea48577f1cb7a3feacd4/brompton_hedgelaying_t.jpg)

https://permies.com/forums/imageCache/image/f92312f9e9e6ea48577f1cb7a3feacd4/brompton_hedgelaying_t.jpg

https://permies.com/t/43425/permaculture-projects/hedge-plants-living-fence-coppicing

Jocelyn Campbell
2 yrs ago

Note: on 2/23/15 I edited the subject line of this to better explain that we're wanting to plant a living fence, with coppicing trees that can be woven into a living fence ala the English "laying a hedge."

Following our plan to focus on food systems and aesthetics in 2015, we are planning hedge plantings inside our rock jack fencing, which will be inside the existing, decomposing barbed wire fencing.

Considering that we are in USDA hardiness zone 4 (or 5 sometimes), this is the list we've compiled so far:

common name   - botanical name - feature
thornless honeylocust - gleditsia triacanthos inermis - thorns, n-fixer
black locust - robinia pseudoacacia - thorns, n-fixer
hawthorn - crataegus (which one?) - thorns, pollinator, medicinal
black thorn/sloe gin - prunus spinosa - thorns, fruit
osage orange/hedge apples - maclura pomifera - thorns, hardwood
russian olive - eleagnus angustifolia - thorny, n-fixer, fruit
autumn olive - eleagnus umbellata - thorny, n-fixer, fruit
hornbeam - carpinus - "ironwood"
hazelnut - corylus americana? - nuts
black (red, white) mulberry - morus nigra - fruit

We're thinking all of these will coppice well and have woody enough stems to do hedge laying.

Threads that helped us come up with this list:
http://www.permies.com/t/39662/woodland/Steve-Transforming-Hedge
http://www.permies.com/t/38487/plants/hedge-laying-permaculture
http://www.permies.com/t/29975/forest-garden/Food-hedges
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on December 10, 2017, 10:57:11 AM
Yowbarb Note: This method uses electricity.
When grid fails, solar will be necessary...
...
Make Your Property Predator Proof ~ Keeping Predators OUT !  11:10   15,187 views

https://youtu.be/OpDjJfZzNWw

TexasPrepper2
Published on Dec 4, 2015
SUBSCRIBED 62K

Keeping small livestock can be challenging when there are predators around. I've found a method that works!
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on December 10, 2017, 11:23:18 AM
Blackthorn hedgerow.
What I read is, blackthorn serves as a good property division plant
good area security fence,
dividing off smaller areas.
I read it will keep predators like foxes out and keep domestic cats and dogs in.
Yields sloe berries to make sloe gin.
Flowers and berries for booze, jams, medicine compounds.
...
http://www.treesandhedging.co.uk/blackthorn-prunus-spinosa/p418

(http://www.treesandhedging.co.uk/prodzoomimg529.jpg)

http://www.treesandhedging.co.uk/prodzoomimg529.jpg
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: ilinda on December 10, 2017, 02:25:26 PM
first image posted by Paul Wheaton master steward, 2 yrs ago

Permies forum, hedge plants - for a living fence and coppicing or laying a hedge

(https://permies.com/forums/imageCache/image/f92312f9e9e6ea48577f1cb7a3feacd4/brompton_hedgelaying_t.jpg)

https://permies.com/forums/imageCache/image/f92312f9e9e6ea48577f1cb7a3feacd4/brompton_hedgelaying_t.jpg

https://permies.com/t/43425/permaculture-projects/hedge-plants-living-fence-coppicing

Jocelyn Campbell
2 yrs ago

Note: on 2/23/15 I edited the subject line of this to better explain that we're wanting to plant a living fence, with coppicing trees that can be woven into a living fence ala the English "laying a hedge."

Following our plan to focus on food systems and aesthetics in 2015, we are planning hedge plantings inside our rock jack fencing, which will be inside the existing, decomposing barbed wire fencing.

Considering that we are in USDA hardiness zone 4 (or 5 sometimes), this is the list we've compiled so far:

common name   - botanical name - feature
thornless honeylocust - gleditsia triacanthos inermis - thorns, n-fixer
black locust - robinia pseudoacacia - thorns, n-fixer
hawthorn - crataegus (which one?) - thorns, pollinator, medicinal
black thorn/sloe gin - prunus spinosa - thorns, fruit
osage orange/hedge apples - maclura pomifera - thorns, hardwood
russian olive - eleagnus angustifolia - thorny, n-fixer, fruit
autumn olive - eleagnus umbellata - thorny, n-fixer, fruit
hornbeam - carpinus - "ironwood"
hazelnut - corylus americana? - nuts
black (red, white) mulberry - morus nigra - fruit

We're thinking all of these will coppice well and have woody enough stems to do hedge laying.

Threads that helped us come up with this list:
http://www.permies.com/t/39662/woodland/Steve-Transforming-Hedge
http://www.permies.com/t/38487/plants/hedge-laying-permaculture
http://www.permies.com/t/29975/forest-garden/Food-hedges
I made a stick-twig fence some years ago and it would definitely keep out dogs, coyotes, cattle, horses, and goats, but rabbits were always my downfall.  The smallest opening anywhere along the bottom was like a magnet.  With a tribe, though, I think this fence could be made, and be checked every day, but for one person it's a huge chore.

By filling in the smaller holes, or having thorn branches along the base of it, one could more easily deter rabbits.  We bought some special wire that looks just like chickenwire or poultrywire, but it has an "apron" at the bottom that gets buried, so nothing (supposedly) can get it.  Well, lo and behold, we saw rabbits go right through the holes.  The holes we discovered were "close" to the size of conventional chickenwire, but slightly larger!!  We had spent a lot of effort to install this fence, thinking that finally we'll have a rabbit-free garden.  Not. 

But later in a different garden we buried hardware cloth 8-10" down, and extended it upwards almost 4', and now rabbits cannot get in.  It's been several years of rabbit-free gardening.

But the stick/twig/wood fence idea is great as it costs no money and can be created from scraps found in the woods or along roadsides.
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: R.R. Book on December 10, 2017, 04:40:36 PM
Barb's suggestion of Siberian Pea was put in place as a young hedge here.  It's been slow to take off, but apparently becomes very dense as it matures.
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: ilinda on December 11, 2017, 03:33:04 PM
Barb's suggestion of Siberian Pea was put in place as a young hedge here.  It's been slow to take off, but apparently becomes very dense as it matures.
Does it have thorns?  If not thorns, do you think it might deter rabbits?
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: R.R. Book on December 11, 2017, 03:40:01 PM
They're not exactly thorns, but called "spines," located between the compound leaves.  You may be hoping for something a bit more pronounced if using it as a deterrent.  :)
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on December 14, 2017, 12:24:21 AM
Barb's suggestion of Siberian Pea was put in place as a young hedge here.  It's been slow to take off, but apparently becomes very dense as it matures.
Does it have thorns?  If not thorns, do you think it might deter rabbits?

I'm not sure if the blackthorn hedges would deter rabbits...

Here is a link which might help... i will be reading this info...Not fully understanding it, so far.

http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/services/environment/landscape/guidance-planting-and-establishing-hedges

7) If rabbits are a problem use shrub guards to protect plants – these are larger in diameter than spiral guards and so allow low lateral growth to develop. Use 60cm high shrub shelters with stakes
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on December 14, 2017, 12:29:39 AM
Barb's suggestion of Siberian Pea was put in place as a young hedge here.  It's been slow to take off, but apparently becomes very dense as it matures.

I had posted about Blackthorn, but maybe Siberian Pea was part of an article...
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on December 14, 2017, 12:34:14 AM
Barb's suggestion of Siberian Pea was put in place as a young hedge here.  It's been slow to take off, but apparently becomes very dense as it matures.
Does it have thorns?  If not thorns, do you think it might deter rabbits?
Posted by Richard Valley,

https://permies.com/t/39562/Thorny-Hedgerow-deer-exclusion

Two foot or higher chicken wire will keep out rabbits, with a small part of the wire into the soil.
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on June 11, 2018, 11:54:24 PM
Yowbarb Note: although the maker of this video admits the fence is not as secure as he could make it, yet - this is still a good concept, thorny bushes as a layer of defense for your home.
...Idea: How to use roses as thorny home security  0:42    240 views

video link: https://youtu.be/yKZsFQi6Pd8

Published on Jun 27, 2017
You can use roses, raspberries, and other thorny plants as organic razor wire to secure your home. If there is an area where someone could climb a fence or climb onto a roof or other area of your home where you don't want people to climb or be you can use roses effectively as deterrents and as a means to slow people down who would like to break into your yard or home. Roses are drought tolerant and easy to grow and very thorny. Raspberries are great and will spread and produce fruit you can eat but they need more water to grow
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on June 11, 2018, 11:59:54 PM
https://www.tripadvisor.co.nz/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g255677-d3845398-i243339879-Happy_Valley_B_B-Oamaru_Otago_Region_South_Island.html  The raspberry bushes

This photo of Happy Valley B&B is courtesy of TripAdvisor
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on June 12, 2018, 12:08:15 AM
Yowbarb Note: Rasberry bushes grow to 7 feet tall and are a little bit prickly.

How to Grow Raspberries
The University of Maine

https://youtu.be/KlKusr5t2eM
Title: Re: Fencing for your survival site, some simple ideas
Post by: Yowbarb on February 08, 2019, 01:50:30 PM
Worth a repeat:

Blackthorn hedgerow.
What I read is, blackthorn serves as a good property division plant
good area security fence,
dividing off smaller areas.
I read it will keep predators like foxes out and keep domestic cats and dogs in.
Yields sloe berries to make sloe gin.
Flowers and berries for booze, jams, medicine compounds.
...
http://www.treesandhedging.co.uk/blackthorn-prunus-spinosa/p418

http://www.treesandhedging.co.uk/prodzoomimg529.jpg