Planet X Town Hall

Solani - PREPPER'S CORNER => Survival Tools To Better Your Odds => Topic started by: Yowbarb on August 08, 2013, 10:18:36 PM

Title: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 08, 2013, 10:18:36 PM
Although there are many other topics and lists, I just wanted to share some thoughts on
some of the most immediate items or goods to get together to help a person get through an emergency.
Whether the person is going to stick it out where they are or leave to a safer location, many of the items would be the same.
Obviously if there is already a survival place stocked with supplies there wouldn't be much need to haul a bunch of goods. If it is time to bug out, and there is enough room for some supplies, take as many as you can particularly water.
•   A sturdy vehicle if you are driving
•   Extra Identification for each group member kept in the glove compartment of the vehicle.
•   Cash. ATMs might not work.
•   "jerry cans" of gasoline -the European type cans have a more secure lid.
•   Cover up the cans with a tarp etc.
•   Water bottles for each person
•   any food you still need to take to the survival location
•   individual backpacks for each person, which have water and juice in them.
•   adults will have their ID and their prescriptions.
•   Baby supplies, diapers, books and toys for children
•   tools for the vehicle such as jacks, spare tires, ropes, winches. A shovel.
•   Fire extinguisher
•   Weapons hidden.
•   carry permits if that will work.
•   larger packs if the group ends up having to walk into the location
•   rain ponchos
•   space blankets
•   fire starting supplies
•   walky talkies
•   whistles.
•   food and water for your pets.
•   Carrier for a cat.
................


Add your ideas here,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 09, 2013, 11:19:35 AM
Yowbarb Note, RE Survival tools to better your odds:

Whether you are on the move with a big backpack - or at your shelter location getting things together, these items should always be on hand:

Water, nutrition and warmth
•   Bottled water
•   A container to catch water or get it from a stream/Water purification tablets
•   Emergency food bars
•   Space blankets
•   Fire starting items [ http://www.practicalsurvivor.com/fireintherain ]

Campground hygiene area:
•   Hand sanitizing wipes
•   Body wipes
•   TP and Kleenex       

Campground cooking:
•   Small campground pot and tiny grill to put it on
•   Instant coffee, soups cocoa, etc.
•   A few MREs

Clothes washing:
•   Twine to make temporary clothesline
•   A bar of hand laundry soap

Med kit
•   Iodine,  bandaids etc.
•   Mosquito spray
•   Benedryl capsules
•   Aspirin, etc.

Sleep area
•   Space blanket
•   Small tarp
•   Small tent
•   Inflatable tiny pillow

Defense
•   Big sharp knife
•   Pepper spray or mace
•   Weapon of some kind
•   Taser

Direction  compass, map, etc.
...........   
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 24, 2014, 11:40:42 AM
A cloak of invisibility would come in handy too, eh? Costs too much, though.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: steedy on July 17, 2014, 12:18:31 PM
How many times could I have used a cloak of invisibility?!  But seriously, one thing that I have found very helpful in any type of emergency is the ability to keep a cool head.  You don't know you can do this until some event happens to you.  For instance, a number of years ago I was alone and choked on something.  I had no way to get help and I knew I only had minutes before I died.  This quiet calm of very clear thinking took over and I got myself out of that jam.

Whatever that ability is called, it has come in handy over the years.  One of the worst things that people can do in emergencies is panic.  Once that takes over, it's pretty much over for you.  If I knew how people could practice staying calm, and cool headed, I would encourage everyone to do it.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 22, 2014, 04:52:05 PM
How many times could I have used a cloak of invisibility?!  But seriously, one thing that I have found very helpful in any type of emergency is the ability to keep a cool head.  You don't know you can do this until some event happens to you.  For instance, a number of years ago I was alone and choked on something.  I had no way to get help and I knew I only had minutes before I died.  This quiet calm of very clear thinking took over and I got myself out of that jam.

Whatever that ability is called, it has come in handy over the years.  One of the worst things that people can do in emergencies is panic.  Once that takes over, it's pretty much over for you.  If I knew how people could practice staying calm, and cool headed, I would encourage everyone to do it.

Your story brought tears to my eyes. One night, all by myself I choked on a batch of homemade cold med. I had concocted... baked lemon etc. Just too much lemon fiber for my type of throat (chronic bronchitis) I went forward onto the top of a hard chair with my solar plexus area - and managed to get my throat opened up. Then with some water it was OK. PS I always strain the pulp out but I must have tasted a raw batch. It was just for me...My kids arely even had the sniffles but I had long term bronchitis with the choking risk that goes with it... (The back of the throat gets rough and catches food particles.) I learned to be cvareful if I was eating chips etc.

All other times I have choked I did need some assistance...My kids and I have used the Heimlich maneuver a few times on people to help them... no one perished on  my watch...
I am so glad you managed to stay calm and get through that...
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: steedy on July 23, 2014, 07:35:49 AM
Choking is probably the scariest thing I've gone through.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 26, 2014, 09:52:47 PM
Choking is probably the scariest thing I've gone through.

Me, too.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: PXSpring on August 05, 2014, 11:28:52 AM
A good pair of hiking boots - I bought a pair of Keen's and they fit my foot like a glove and also good socks.  Clothes that are light that can allow you to perspire and let that out but also hold in heat when it gets cold - and even in rainy situations - clothes that will dry quickly. 

Dehy or freeze dried food to put in your backpack, a good water filter (although you can make your own with coal, rocks and sand) in a quick type of additive to cleanse the water is better than filtering your water over a couple of hours or even days.  Prison planet has a straw type of water filter and drops - I'm sure there are other places too. 

Iodine because you don't know if these nuclear plants are going to hold up... which I highly doubt it.  The nascent iodine is best to use - again prison planet offers this and I actually use daily because I live on the west coast and Fukushima.

Rope, tarp and a good knife.  A good climbing rope may get you out of some tough situations.  Bungee cords are very useful as well - tying things down.

Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: steedy on August 05, 2014, 04:42:06 PM
I've got to learn how to dehydrate food.  I have a dehydrator, but just never have gotten around to using it.  I think it's because I focus more on canning. 
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: ilinda on August 05, 2014, 06:46:00 PM
I've got to learn how to dehydrate food.  I have a dehydrator, but just never have gotten around to using it.  I think it's because I focus more on canning.
We also have a dehydrator, Excalibur, IIRC, but I prefer to sun-dry food when possible.  A neighbor gave us two stainless steel scraps, each about 4' long by about 1 1/2' wide and I lay cheesecloth or other thin cotton fabric on it, preferably sheer, then the slices or cubes of veggies such as tomatoes, okra, peppers, squash, watermelon, etc., and the list is endless of what you can dry. 

The only downside to sundrying these days is chemtrail fallout.  But if you are without power, that will be your only way, so it might be good to get the knack of it now.  I put the stainless steel "trays" on sawhorses, or on the engiine compartment of a pickup truck, or on top of a vehicle--car or truck.  Works best if sunny all day, and get the trays out early and bring them in as sun goes down, keeping them safe from raccoons, etc., at night by keeping indoors till next morning.  I have found tomatoes if cut small and thin enough, will dry in two days, and peppers the same, although they are almost dry in one day if the thin-walled type.  Learn by experience.
 
Hope this helps.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: steedy on August 06, 2014, 11:04:09 AM
I was wondering how to dry veges and stuff without electricity.  I've dried parsley and other herbs using cooling racks and putting them in my car for a couple days.  It works great for that stuff, but then again, I just crush up the dried leaves and store them like that.  I hadn't tried drying in the sun yet.  Maybe I will experiment using my car again.  That should keep critters out.  Thanks.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: probe64322 on August 06, 2014, 09:26:27 PM
http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/shaffer58.html

http://www.rootsimple.com/2012/08/how-to-dry-food-with-the-sun/

http://www.homesteadanywhere.com/kitchen/dehydrating-foods-to-preserve/

P.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 07, 2014, 09:52:13 PM
I was wondering how to dry veges and stuff without electricity.  I've dried parsley and other herbs using cooling racks and putting them in my car for a couple days.  It works great for that stuff, but then again, I just crush up the dried leaves and store them like that.  I hadn't tried drying in the sun yet.  Maybe I will experiment using my car again.  That should keep critters out.  Thanks.

steedy - sounds good. It seems like it should get hot enough in a parked car to dry veges.
I would suggest - as with any drying - to put some kind of fine screen or mesh over the box of sliced fruits and veges.
Good Luck,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on October 26, 2014, 12:32:56 AM
http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/shaffer58.html

http://www.rootsimple.com/2012/08/how-to-dry-food-with-the-sun/

http://www.homesteadanywhere.com/kitchen/dehydrating-foods-to-preserve/

P.

Belated thanks for your postings,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on October 26, 2014, 12:44:22 AM
Miscellaneous ideas:
A few things which IMHO would increase a person's odds of surviving are:
•   A vehicle with enough room to carry some things in the back.
•   A luggage rack in top. Cover belongings with a tarp with fire-retardant spray on the top.
•   In the back of the SUV, van, truck, whatever:  Put bungees, tarps, ropes to cover things in the rack.
•   Keep bulletproofing spray and fireproofing spray in the back - and use these when you do have to bug out.
•   Kevlar skirts over the tires – at least the back tires but all four if you can.
•   Waterproof any papers, IDs, maps and important docs.
•   First aid kits in car.
•   Some army-style cans of gas.
•   Backpacks, bicycles ready in vehicle -  in case roads are impassable and vehicles fail.
•   Flotation jackets in vehicle.
•   Ropes, pulleys, shovels to help with bad roads.
•   Flashlights, lanterns etc.
•   Water, food, flashlight, jacket and space blanket in backpack for each person.
•   Sanitary hand wipes and –
•   bathroom wipes.
•   Walky-talkies.
•   Something to quickly make a travois out of, for pulling supplies and people.
•   Extra Drivers Licenses, IDs, maps, lights in glove compartment.
•   Guns and knives hidden from view.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 10, 2015, 11:20:38 PM
A good pair of hiking boots - I bought a pair of Keen's and they fit my foot like a glove and also good socks.  Clothes that are light that can allow you to perspire and let that out but also hold in heat when it gets cold - and even in rainy situations - clothes that will dry quickly. 

Dehy or freeze dried food to put in your backpack, a good water filter (although you can make your own with coal, rocks and sand) in a quick type of additive to cleanse the water is better than filtering your water over a couple of hours or even days.  Prison planet has a straw type of water filter and drops - I'm sure there are other places too. 

Iodine because you don't know if these nuclear plants are going to hold up... which I highly doubt it.  The nascent iodine is best to use - again prison planet offers this and I actually use daily because I live on the west coast and Fukushima.

Rope, tarp and a good knife.  A good climbing rope may get you out of some tough situations.  Bungee cords are very useful as well - tying things down.

PXSpring - belated acknowledgement of your post.
You have some good suggestions.
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 01, 2016, 02:08:20 AM
There are a few items which would increase a person's chances of surviving an emergency.
Note - this is for surviving on the move, bugging out to another location. I put together a brief recap from previous posts:
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 01, 2016, 03:06:40 AM
PS fire extinguisher in car and trunk both.
At least two large mountain back packs in case of vehicle failure  - or - if you have to pack in to the location.
Note: Camo car covers on car if have to leave it.
Drive it or push it under some trees.
Canteens which fasten to belt.
Hunting knives.
Kerchief, bandana for each person.
Gas masks in car.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: enlightenme on January 01, 2016, 04:40:27 AM
Excellent reminders!!  Thanks Barb!!  ;D
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 08, 2016, 12:17:03 PM
What no comments on the Norm Reedus pic. Hehe.
One of my faves.
:)
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 10, 2016, 09:40:18 PM
Excellent reminders!!  Thanks Barb!!  ;D

Come back! We need you!
:)
Title: most important items, shortlist
Post by: Socrates on June 12, 2017, 10:39:35 PM
Sometimes ya have to make do since you have to go on foot and heavy bags will slow you down when speed may be of the essence... So what would be BEST to take along if you only have a chance to pick a few things?
So this is not a 72-hour list that's based on the expectation that things will 'get back to normal' after a while; this is about surviving a 'stone-age-event'.

I say your best survival tools, if i had to name 3, would be:
- your dog
- a tent
- hatchet/tomohawk head [i.e. handle is good to have but can be replaced]

Why these?
- if you don't get dog, i can't explain it...
- you can find things to insulate against cold, but stopping wind is paramount to keeping out weather (as well as critters)
- a knife is great but a tomahawk or hatchet in many ways more versatile.

Next, let's say you can carry a few more items; how about:
- a guinea pig
- creditcard-sized fresnel lense
- a small stash of essential seeds [like corn, beets, etc.]
- magnesium fire starter

What else should we be thinking of that won't slow you down and increase your chances for survival and starting a new life from scratch? But only well-considered choices, not long lists (that are probably wishful thinking anyway...).
Title: Re: most important items, shortlist
Post by: Yowbarb on June 12, 2017, 11:18:50 PM
Sometimes ya have to make do since you have to go on foot and heavy bags will slow you down when speed may be of the essence... So what would be BEST to take along if you only have a chance to pick a few things?
So this is not a 72-hour list that's based on the expectation that things will 'get back to normal' after a while; this is about surviving a 'stone-age-event'.

I say your best survival tools, if i had to name 3, would be:
- your dog
- a tent
- hatchet/tomohawk head [i.e. handle is good to have but can be replaced]

Why these?
- if you don't get dog, i can't explain it...
- you can find things to insulate against cold, but stopping wind is paramount to keeping out weather (as well as critters)
- a knife is great but a tomahawk or hatchet in many ways more versatile.

Next, let's say you can carry a few more items; how about:
- a guinea pig
- creditcard-sized fresnel lense
- a small stash of essential seeds [like corn, beets, etc.]
- magnesium fire starter

What else should we be thinking of that won't slow you down and increase your chances for survival and starting a new life from scratch? But only well-considered choices, not long lists (that are probably wishful thinking anyway...).

Socrates: The list I had posted -  Reply #16 - is pretty basic stuff.
To be loaded into a vehicle. ID, gas cans etc.
Obviously not a list for a bugout on foot...
I get it that bugging out on foot may happen for many people...
Surviving on the Move may have some lists of a shorter variety...
Your short list is good...
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: R.R. Book on June 13, 2017, 04:19:47 AM
I love your list, Socrates, especially the dog as #1.  Totally get that. :)

Lots of reasons to have dog as #1:
Protection
Hunting
Companionship
Warmth
Small load carrier

Quote
What else should we be thinking of that won't slow you down and increase your chances for survival and starting a new life from scratch? But only well-considered choices, not long lists (that are probably wishful thinking anyway...).

Water dish for dog and canteen for U maybe?
Title: Re: Water
Post by: Socrates on June 13, 2017, 06:12:33 AM
Water dish for dog and canteen for U maybe?
Thinking survival, the dog can fend for itself. I plan to be feeding mine rabbit, but will also be about teaching it to kill the rabbit him-/herself, as well as getting used to it as a common source of food.

Again, a wonderful source once taught me that a dog can live to be 3 times older than is considered average if their diet consists of:
- raw meat [especially organ meat]
- fermented vegetables
- seaweed

Wonderful story about a Rhodesian Ridgeback that once was separated from it's owner for weeks, having to fend for itself in the wild; when reunited with his dog, it surprised the owner that his Ridgeback looked none the worse for wear...

About water, you make a valid point; i have one of these:
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51BFR-KPMPL._SY355_.jpg) and keep it at the ready. Holds 1.5 liter.
Title: Re: Surviving on the move
Post by: Socrates on June 13, 2017, 07:37:37 AM
Surviving on the Move may have some lists of a shorter variety...
Checked out Surviving on the move (https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?board=126.0) since i missed it looking for a place to put my post.
No posts on minimalist lists to mention.

I do love my jeleba:
(https://whymorocco.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/img_1485.jpg)
It's a sleeping bag, coat, rain coat [rain just runs off the wool] and cover all rolled into one. There's a reason they are still in fashion in Morocco...

Also, a (small) crossbow would be nice:
- protection and deterrent
- hunting
It may not be a gun, but no one's gonna mess with you if you have a loaded crossbow at your side... 50 bucks'll get you one and as long as you carry it dismantled, few rules and regulations apply.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 13, 2017, 01:45:19 PM
:)
Title: Re: stone age TEOTWAWKI short list
Post by: Socrates on June 14, 2017, 05:10:55 AM
the copper/brass garden trowel...

One website selling these things quotes:
"If my house were burning down, i would go into it to save my brass trowel"...
Is that a legitimate quote? Who knows; but it sure sounds true and cool.

I have put myself out there and experienced first-hand that digging in the dirt is a real and daily thing. I once owned this one-piece aluminum garden trowel and i still miss it; no handle to come loose, no oxidation and tough as all hell.
I'm looking at ordering these brass/copper garden trowels, but i'm also still looking out for aluminum tools that should be as indifferent to time as any brass.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: MadMax on June 14, 2017, 07:32:08 AM
HAM communications gear will be “essential” in the aftertime, I have posted extensively about this elsewhere on the forum (especially HF gear that can be battery operated with low current draw). The 80M HAM band will probably serve us best for “local” (200-300 kilometers range) with just a long wire for an antenna.

Don’t focus on all of the fancy HAM gear on the various websites, get something small portable with a low current draw. If you can handle a soldering iron (and if not get involved with your local HAM radio group and learn) so you can fix it yourself if something goes wrong. Something with 5-10 watts output is ideal.

I have built a couple of these, very good kit to get started on, it has ~50ma current draw on receive and could run for days on a 35AH Gel Cell battery. I have one “EMP Protected” in an empty paint can from the local hardware store they cost about $6.00 each:

KD1JV Survivor 75m SSB transceiver
http://qrpkits.com/survivor.html

I have written more about all of this other places on the forum..
Max.
Title: Re: stone age TEOTWAWKI short list
Post by: ilinda on June 14, 2017, 11:49:47 AM
the copper/brass garden trowel...

One website selling these things quotes:
"If my house were burning down, i would go into it to save my brass trowel"...
Is that a legitimate quote? Who knows; but it sure sounds true and cool.

I have put myself out there and experienced first-hand that digging in the dirt is a real and daily thing. I once owned this one-piece aluminum garden trowel and i still miss it; no handle to come loose, no oxidation and tough as all hell.
I'm looking at ordering these brass/copper garden trowels, but i'm also still looking out for aluminum tools that should be as indifferent to time as any brass.
I've only had my copper/bronze trowels for a few years but now feel like they are part of me.  I recommend them to anyone who is serious about digging in the Earth, planting stuff, etc.  An added bonus is that their use in the soil leaves microscopic bits of copper in the soil, which repels slugs.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: R.R. Book on June 14, 2017, 02:43:21 PM
Those tools sound wonderful y'all - I'm still using an old kitchen spoon!  ::)
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 14, 2017, 04:04:54 PM
HAM communications gear will be “essential” in the aftertime, I have posted extensively about this elsewhere on the forum (especially HF gear that can be battery operated with low current draw). The 80M HAM band will probably serve us best for “local” (200-300 kilometers range) with just a long wire for an antenna.

Don’t focus on all of the fancy HAM gear on the various websites, get something small portable with a low current draw. If you can handle a soldering iron (and if not get involved with your local HAM radio group and learn) so you can fix it yourself if something goes wrong. Something with 5-10 watts output is ideal.

I have built a couple of these, very good kit to get started on, it has ~50ma current draw on receive and could run for days on a 35AH Gel Cell battery. I have one “EMP Protected” in an empty paint can from the local hardware store they cost about $6.00 each:

KD1JV Survivor 75m SSB transceiver
http://qrpkits.com/survivor.html

I have written more about all of this other places on the forum..
Max.

Excellent stuff, MadMax. I'm glad you have posted this in other places on the forum, too.
- Barb T.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 28, 2017, 12:15:12 PM
One thing I would add is a stash of prescriptions meds.
Not always so easy to afford an extra stash, but they will likely be needed.
Online purchasing possible...

Also antibiotics.  Have a short  med profile for your family, friends, group or potential group. If a person does not have a penicillin allergy and you are all out in the survival land with no doc, and a red line is running up the leg (blood poisoning from an infected sore on foot) then you go on and give an antibiotic. You don't wait that long...

Blood poisoning can kill a person in a matter of ___ days, weeks (I couldn't find the exact amt of time.) Google search ____s lately.
I could not verify that penicillin is the most used antibiotic. I thought that was gneerally known info, but not finding verification of that. Not finding that info.

Yowbarb Note, continued - Not everyone is aware of blood poisoning or even know what it is.
Back in the 1960s in my college days:
One of my brother's friends, Bob had a slight, not-easy-to-see-himself, red line running from his foot up his leg about 1/3 of the way. I pointed it out to him and said, "that is blood poisoning! Go over to the college med center now and get it treated." Bob said, "OH! Thanks."  (Bob went to the nearby college, like i did.) Bob had no idea what that was or the symptoms, went there and got treated.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: ilinda on December 28, 2017, 04:40:09 PM
One thing I would add is a stash of prescriptions meds.
Not always so easy to afford an extra stash, but they will likely be needed.
Online purchasing possible...

Also antibiotics.  Have a short  med profile for your family, friends, group or potential group. If a person does not have a penicillin allergy and you are all out in the survival land with no doc, and a red line is running up the leg (blood poisoning from an infected sore on foot) then you go on and give an antibiotic. You don't wait that long...

Blood poisoning can kill a person in a matter of ___ days, weeks (I couldn't find the exact amt of time.) Google search ____s lately.
I could not verify that penicillin is the most used antibiotic. I thought that was gneerally known info, but not finding verification of that. Not finding that info.

Yowbarb Note, continued - Not everyone is aware of blood poisoning or even know what it is.
Back in the 1960s in my college days:
One of my brother's friends, Bob had a slight, not-easy-to-see-himself, red line running from his foot up his leg about 1/3 of the way. I pointed it out to him and said, "that is blood poisoning! Go over to the college med center now and get it treated." Bob said, "OH! Thanks."  (Bob went to the nearby college, like i did.) Bob had no idea what that was or the symptoms, went there and got treated.
You probably saved his life!
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 28, 2017, 05:23:37 PM
One thing I would add is a stash of prescriptions meds.
Not always so easy to afford an extra stash, but they will likely be needed.
Online purchasing possible...

Also antibiotics.  Have a short  med profile for your family, friends, group or potential group. If a person does not have a penicillin allergy and you are all out in the survival land with no doc, and a red line is running up the leg (blood poisoning from an infected sore on foot) then you go on and give an antibiotic. You don't wait that long...

Blood poisoning can kill a person in a matter of ___ days, weeks (I couldn't find the exact amt of time.) Google search ____s lately.
I could not verify that penicillin is the most used antibiotic. I thought that was gneerally known info, but not finding verification of that. Not finding that info.

Yowbarb Note, continued - Not everyone is aware of blood poisoning or even know what it is.
Back in the 1960s in my college days:
One of my brother's friends, Bob had a slight, not-easy-to-see-himself, red line running from his foot up his leg about 1/3 of the way. I pointed it out to him and said, "that is blood poisoning! Go over to the college med center now and get it treated." Bob said, "OH! Thanks."  (Bob went to the nearby college, like i did.) Bob had no idea what that was or the symptoms, went there and got treated.
You probably saved his life!

I think so...
Funny now when I google blood poisoning it doesn't mention the red line from the wound...
I had thought that was common knowledge back then... Why it's not easily found with a google search, not sure.
Like I mentioned, Bob had no idea of the infection or the blood poisoning... he didn't mention the treatment but he said he went to the student clinic and got it taken care of.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: ilinda on December 29, 2017, 12:00:50 PM
One thing I would add is a stash of prescriptions meds.
Not always so easy to afford an extra stash, but they will likely be needed.
Online purchasing possible...

Also antibiotics.  Have a short  med profile for your family, friends, group or potential group. If a person does not have a penicillin allergy and you are all out in the survival land with no doc, and a red line is running up the leg (blood poisoning from an infected sore on foot) then you go on and give an antibiotic. You don't wait that long...

Blood poisoning can kill a person in a matter of ___ days, weeks (I couldn't find the exact amt of time.) Google search ____s lately.
I could not verify that penicillin is the most used antibiotic. I thought that was gneerally known info, but not finding verification of that. Not finding that info.

Yowbarb Note, continued - Not everyone is aware of blood poisoning or even know what it is.
Back in the 1960s in my college days:
One of my brother's friends, Bob had a slight, not-easy-to-see-himself, red line running from his foot up his leg about 1/3 of the way. I pointed it out to him and said, "that is blood poisoning! Go over to the college med center now and get it treated." Bob said, "OH! Thanks."  (Bob went to the nearby college, like i did.) Bob had no idea what that was or the symptoms, went there and got treated.
You probably saved his life!

I think so...
Funny now when I google blood poisoning it doesn't mention the red line from the wound...
I had thought that was common knowledge back then... Why it's not easily found with a google search, not sure.
Like I mentioned, Bob had no idea of the infection or the blood poisoning... he didn't mention the treatment but he said he went to the student clinic and got it taken care of.
A few years ago when I had a flesh-eating bacterial infection on my arm, one of the things I noticed in the progression (the lesion changed daily, and seemingly by the hour) was a very thin reddish-purple line emanating from it.  Like you, I'm old enough to remember when they used to warn people about that red line "that might go toward the heart" and if it does, your infection becomes systemic.

Initially I had many different signs and symptoms, but the red line was the most scary, and since I didn't have the nausea and vomiting, knew it hadn't become systemic yet.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 29, 2017, 01:49:02 PM
One thing I would add is a stash of prescriptions meds.
Not always so easy to afford an extra stash, but they will likely be needed.
Online purchasing possible...

Also antibiotics.  Have a short  med profile for your family, friends, group or potential group. If a person does not have a penicillin allergy and you are all out in the survival land with no doc, and a red line is running up the leg (blood poisoning from an infected sore on foot) then you go on and give an antibiotic. You don't wait that long...

Blood poisoning can kill a person in a matter of ___ days, weeks (I couldn't find the exact amt of time.) Google search ____s lately.
I could not verify that penicillin is the most used antibiotic. I thought that was gneerally known info, but not finding verification of that. Not finding that info.

Yowbarb Note, continued - Not everyone is aware of blood poisoning or even know what it is.
Back in the 1960s in my college days:
One of my brother's friends, Bob had a slight, not-easy-to-see-himself, red line running from his foot up his leg about 1/3 of the way. I pointed it out to him and said, "that is blood poisoning! Go over to the college med center now and get it treated." Bob said, "OH! Thanks."  (Bob went to the nearby college, like i did.) Bob had no idea what that was or the symptoms, went there and got treated.
You probably saved his life!

I think so...
Funny now when I google blood poisoning it doesn't mention the red line from the wound...
I had thought that was common knowledge back then... Why it's not easily found with a google search, not sure.
Like I mentioned, Bob had no idea of the infection or the blood poisoning... he didn't mention the treatment but he said he went to the student clinic and got it taken care of.
A few years ago when I had a flesh-eating bacterial infection on my arm, one of the things I noticed in the progression (the lesion changed daily, and seemingly by the hour) was a very thin reddish-purple line emanating from it.  Like you, I'm old enough to remember when they used to warn people about that red line "that might go toward the heart" and if it does, your infection becomes systemic.

Initially I had many different signs and symptoms, but the red line was the most scary, and since I didn't have the nausea and vomiting, knew it hadn't become systemic yet.

Wow ilinda! So you do remember that old warning. Yes, that is really scary.
I am so glad the infection was caught on time!!
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: R.R. Book on December 29, 2017, 02:43:32 PM
Quote
A few years ago when I had a flesh-eating bacterial infection on my arm

Ilinda, Do you know how you might have acquired it? 
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 30, 2017, 02:48:41 AM
I knew this young couple, the wife was from an Indian Reservation.
She told me she got bit by a brown recluse and she wasn't sure that would ever heal...
I think someone must have donated their services as a plastic surgeon because she lost a small hunk of flesh on her leg... I think she was in and out of the hospital...
She also mentioned the Hanta Virus... that was back about 1993.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: R.R. Book on December 30, 2017, 08:02:22 AM
Hanta may be an issue in poorly ventillated buildings with animals leaving droppings, such as bats and mice.  Examples would be barns and abandoned houses.  We once considered buying an older home that had been vacant and closed up for a long time, and discovered that it was occupied by bats when we walked through it with a realtor.  Everyone in the family took colloidal silver as a precaution, and we never became ill.

https://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/pdf/hps_brochure.pdf
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: ilinda on December 30, 2017, 06:20:26 PM
Quote
A few years ago when I had a flesh-eating bacterial infection on my arm

Ilinda, Do you know how you might have acquired it?
I had gone to the beach with a bunch of friends and remembered having carried someone's bag across the river.  We waded to the "better" side and had to lug all our stuff across the knee-deep to waist-deep river.

The bag I carried was old and it rested on my left forearm for the trek across the water.  That spot where the bag rested is exactly where the lesion appeared, about a day later. 

The assumption is that the bag had been placed somewhere, or sat somewhere where it picked up the bacteria on the bottom of the bag.  The owner had a dog at the time and I wondered if the bag had been set down on the ground one or more times on locations where dog poo was.  It was here and there in the yard.  It's my best guess, as I tried to think about where a bad Strep. variety could originate.  Just a guess.

The very first and most memorable thing about the lesion's development was the intense pain, but never an iota of itching.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 30, 2017, 09:10:15 PM
Quote
A few years ago when I had a flesh-eating bacterial infection on my arm

Ilinda, Do you know how you might have acquired it?
I had gone to the beach with a bunch of friends and remembered having carried someone's bag across the river.  We waded to the "better" side and had to lug all our stuff across the knee-deep to waist-deep river.

The bag I carried was old and it rested on my left forearm for the trek across the water.  That spot where the bag rested is exactly where the lesion appeared, about a day later. 

The assumption is that the bag had been placed somewhere, or sat somewhere where it picked up the bacteria on the bottom of the bag.  The owner had a dog at the time and I wondered if the bag had been set down on the ground one or more times on locations where dog poo was.  It was here and there in the yard.  It's my best guess, as I tried to think about where a bad Strep. variety could originate.  Just a guess.

The very first and most memorable thing about the lesion's development was the intense pain, but never an iota of itching.

I think you are probably right about the origin of that infection...
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: R.R. Book on December 31, 2017, 06:26:58 AM
How scary that the infection could be passed that easily.  So glad you got good care right away!
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: ilinda on December 31, 2017, 02:11:50 PM
How scary that the infection could be passed that easily.  So glad you got good care right away!
I had posted about it somewhere here on the TH and the funny thing is Barb had asked about "before" and "after" pictures, but all I had was
"during" pictures!  So long after, I did post some "after" pics.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: R.R. Book on December 31, 2017, 05:25:35 PM
Found it here: https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=5401.msg79264#msg79264

Great photos!
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: MadMax on February 15, 2018, 03:56:13 PM
Low-tech transportation tools for the prepper: Do you have a wagon, wheelbarrow or yard cart?

http://bugout.news/2018-02-13-low-tech-transportation-tools-for-the-prepper-do-you-have-a-wagon-wheelbarrow-or-yard-cart.html

When SHTF, do you have an efficient way of carrying your supplies? Have you considered getting a wagon or a yard cart as a form of manual transportation? Anything with wheels can help you carry things. Don’t forget that as a prepper, you also need to get ready for when you have to move your gear and supplies from one location to another.

Don’t make the mistake of solely relying on anything motorized because you might run out of fuel. Get something you can pedal, pull, push, or roll easily. Heavy supplies like water will be easier to carry with a wagon, so get something with wheels. (h/t to ModernSurvivalBlog.com.)

Uses for manual transportation when SHTF

When disaster strikes, you’ll need an easy way to transport water to your home or shelter. If you have a bicycle, yard cart, wagon, or a wheelbarrow, it will be easier to carry gallons of water.

A simple cart or wagon can let you transport five-gallon jugs of water, even if you’re alone. That’s 40 pounds overall since one gallon is eight pounds! You can use carts for other things, but when SHTF, hauling water will be easier with a wagon or two.

Max.

Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 02, 2019, 03:40:50 PM
Low-tech transportation tools for the prepper: Do you have a wagon, wheelbarrow or yard cart?

http://bugout.news/2018-02-13-low-tech-transportation-tools-for-the-prepper-do-you-have-a-wagon-wheelbarrow-or-yard-cart.html

When SHTF, do you have an efficient way of carrying your supplies? Have you considered getting a wagon or a yard cart as a form of manual transportation? Anything with wheels can help you carry things. Don’t forget that as a prepper, you also need to get ready for when you have to move your gear and supplies from one location to another.

Don’t make the mistake of solely relying on anything motorized because you might run out of fuel. Get something you can pedal, pull, push, or roll easily. Heavy supplies like water will be easier to carry with a wagon, so get something with wheels. (h/t to ModernSurvivalBlog.com.)

Uses for manual transportation when SHTF

When disaster strikes, you’ll need an easy way to transport water to your home or shelter. If you have a bicycle, yard cart, wagon, or a wheelbarrow, it will be easier to carry gallons of water.

A simple cart or wagon can let you transport five-gallon jugs of water, even if you’re alone. That’s 40 pounds overall since one gallon is eight pounds! You can use carts for other things, but when SHTF, hauling water will be easier with a wagon or two.

Max.

MadMax, excellent and very practical ideas,
thank you.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: R.R. Book on February 03, 2019, 06:10:54 AM
Have tried all three of those methods, and find the yard cart with two bicycle wheels to be the easiest to handle, by far:

(https://www.cpsc.gov/~/link/1361df86b13d43968b6ecd4470ec47fd.jpg)
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: ilinda on February 03, 2019, 09:43:05 AM
Max, I couldn't agree more about the need for non-motorized cart, wagon, or anything on wheels or skids that can carry considerable weight and/or bulk, but roll or move easily along the terrain.

If and when there were a huge CME or Solar Flash, all but the antique vehicles would be rendered inoperable.  I would suggest trying to haul some weight in both types:  things you pull such as a wagon, and things you push, such as wheelbarrow.

The interesting thing about things you push, is that you usually need two hands to guide/steer, whereas when pulling a cart or wagon, the person can at times pull with one hand and open a gate with the other.  It is food for thought--try using each to haul the same amount of cargo and see which feels better.
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 03, 2019, 09:51:27 PM
Have tried all three of those methods, and find the yard cart with two bicycle wheels to be the easiest to handle, by far:

(https://www.cpsc.gov/~/link/1361df86b13d43968b6ecd4470ec47fd.jpg)

R.R. this is good to know...
Thks
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 03, 2019, 09:53:35 PM
Max, I couldn't agree more about the need for non-motorized cart, wagon, or anything on wheels or skids that can carry considerable weight and/or bulk, but roll or move easily along the terrain.

If and when there were a huge CME or Solar Flash, all but the antique vehicles would be rendered inoperable.  I would suggest trying to haul some weight in both types:  things you pull such as a wagon, and things you push, such as wheelbarrow.

The interesting thing about things you push, is that you usually need two hands to guide/steer, whereas when pulling a cart or wagon, the person can at times pull with one hand and open a gate with the other.  It is food for thought--try using each to haul the same amount of cargo and see which feels better.

ilinda, that is a really good point, best to have a pull cart which is balanced so a person could use one hand to do something like open a gate or who knows,
Title: Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
Post by: ilinda on February 04, 2019, 06:02:24 PM
I run into this problem all the time here on the farm with animals.  I may be pushing a wheelbarrow loaded with hay or whatever, and am racing to a gate to get there before a couple of free-range goats catch up to me, and would have much better luck, and could work faster if I were pulling a cart full of hay, and undoing the gate latch at the same time.

As it is, I have to put down the wheelbarrow, reach over and undo latch, etc., etc. In thinking about this, I'm betting it takes about 2X the amount of time using a wheelbarrow, compared to cart, when trying to negotiate a closed, latched gate.