Planet X Town Hall

Marshall Masters (admin) => Research Resources => Topic started by: fred_heyer on September 26, 2014, 02:06:47 PM

Title: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: fred_heyer on September 26, 2014, 02:06:47 PM
hi Marshall,

Can you please refer me to a discussion of how far away the planetX constellation is now.

I roughly calculated that at 300km/sec for two years (until 2016) it might be about 11 billion kms away.

With great appreciation of your work,
Fred Heyer

Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on September 26, 2014, 03:38:16 PM
Hey Fred,

Glad I saw your post. I posted something vaguely similar around 3 days ago in the Newbie board (it was my first post too) and while I had 2-3 lookers, perhaps all me because I don't know how it counts, I did not have one reply. Needless to say I was/am disappointed since I believe the question(s) to be pertinent.

So just hang in there, or not....  :-\ :-\

GenericUser aka Pete
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: Jimfarmer on September 26, 2014, 08:20:45 PM
PX speed varies significantly when it is near to its two foci.  Search for "Planet X speed" (without quotation marks) in http://www.zetatalk5.com/ (http://www.zetatalk5.com/).
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on September 27, 2014, 09:50:07 AM
JimFarmer,

Thank you for that web site which I never would have guessed at, much less found!

g'usr
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: ilinda on September 27, 2014, 05:02:38 PM
In Carlos Ferrada's video he states there are three velocities, but the main ones we are concerned with at present are the two in our solar system:  76km/sec at perihelion, and an average of 66km/sec while still in solar system, but not at perihelion (entering and exiting solar system).   At least that is my understanding.  Someone might need to correct me.  I obtained these velocities from either/or the Ferrada video or the accompanying text.  Even if we knew very little about PX/Hercolubus, if someone told us its velocity would be 76km/sec as it is in perihelion, we would know from consulting any astronomy or physics book that the body would be closer to the sun than is Mercury.

I compared that velocity to those of the planets' average velocities around our sun, according to an astronomy book.  And I might add that Ferrada refers to PX as Hercolubus.

Here are the velocities, which seem to say when PX is in perihelion, it will be closer to our sun that is Mercury.  I have not accurately extrapolated PX distance from Sol at perihelion but it would have to be closer to Sol than is Mercury.  And when it is its closest to Earth, it will be (according to ZetaTalk and ??) 14 million km from Earth and passing between Earth and Mars, so I added our distance from Sol of 149.6 X 10(6) to the 14 X 10 (6) km to come up with 163.6 X 10 (6) km  as the distance of PX from Sol as it passes near Earth.
Gee, I hope I haven't confused anybody and certainly hope someone will correct any glaring errors.  I notice that newer astronomy books have slightly different figures than some of mine, because computers were not used in the original book I consulted.

Body:                                   Velocity around Sol       Distance from Sol in km                Distance from Sol in AU
Hercolubux@ perihelion          76km/sec                     <57.9X10(6)                             <0.3871
Mercury                                47.8 km/sec                  57.9 X 10(6) (to the sixth power)  0.3871
Venus                                   35 km/sec                    108.2 X 10(6)     "                        0.7233
Earth                                    29.8 km/sec                 149.6 X 10(6)    "                         1.0
Hercolubus-closest to Earth    66 km/sec                    163.5 X 10(6)    "                         1.093
Mars                                     24.2km/sec                  227.9 X 10(6)     "                        1.5237
Jupiter                                  13.1 km/sec                 778.3 X 10(6)      "                        5.2028
Saturn                                    9.7 km/sec                1426   X 10(6)    "                          9.5388
Uranus                                    6.8 km/sec                2876   X 10(6)    "                        19.182
Neptune                                  5.4 km/sec                4497   X 10(6)     "                       30.058
Pluto                                       4.7 km/sec                 5913  X 10(6)    "                        39.439



Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: Jimfarmer on September 28, 2014, 08:20:07 AM
Quote
Here are the velocities, which seem to say when PX is in perihelion, it will be closer to our sun that is Mercury.  I have not accurately extrapolated PX distance from Sol at perihelion but it would have to be closer to Sol than is Mercury.  And when it is its closest to Earth, it will be (according to ZetaTalk and ??) 14 million km from Earth and passing between Earth and Mars, so I added our distance from Sol of 149.6 X 10(6) to the 14 X 10 (6) km to come up with 163.6 X 10 (6) km  as the distance of PX from Sol as it passes near Earth.


From "ZetaTalk Chat Q&A for July 3, 2010" at http://www.zetatalk.com/ning/03jy2010.htm (http://www.zetatalk.com/ning/03jy2010.htm) :

" Early in the ZetaTalk saga we gave what is known as the passage triangle, describing where Planet X, the Earth, and the Sun would be at the Point of Passage. We also gave a statement during the search for Planet X in the night skies on how close the Earth and Planet X would come to each other at the point of passage -14 million miles. We have also stated that the Earth is drawn in toward Planet X during the week of rotation stoppage, by some 30 million miles. But we did not state that the Earth was drawn 30 million miles closer to the Sun. What is not clear is where Planet X is during this drama. It is clear that the Earth will have pulled as far to the left as possible, to escape the magnetic hosing coming from the N Pole of Planet X which is otherwise pointed toward the Earth. This hosing is what drives the Earth to flop on its side, lean to the left, and swing away into 3 days of darkness prior to rotation stoppage. Presumably Planet X continues outbound, as prior to the week of rotation stoppage Venus has escaped from the cup. Today, Planet X is within the orbit of Venus, so clearly it will make progress prior to the last week. Simple math would lead one to believe that Planet X remains at the point where it is today, as 44 million miles is halfway between the Earth and Sun, and 30 million miles and 14 million miles equates to that distance. But Planet X is to the side, so the movement toward Planet X is not directly toward the Sun. It is toward a Planet X which is far to the right! This is one reason for the visibility of Planet X during the last weeks, particular the last week - rotation stoppage. There is less distance to Planet X than ever before.  "
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on September 28, 2014, 02:31:17 PM
Sorry, but I am compelled to interject a comment to the effect that I'm blown away with where y'all are in both the astronomical and nonhuman areas of content. When I filled out the application for membership one question was to the affect of what I had to offer and my reply was 'nothing, too old' or some such thing. Well, as I digest exactly where you are so as not to waste your time, I will be jumping in with something meaningful (like the 2013-4' blood' rain with non-DNA cells currently reproducing as it is being studied not far from http://www.zetatalk.com/ning/03jy2010.htm ) to offer.
Until then and when I figure out where the best place is to post (this site is so multifaceted, so diverse in topic, etc.) I'll be just reading, playing catchup and enjoying the notion that there are other folks out there like me. Sorry for the drivel but sometimes I get excited....
( wow, what a super spell-checker you have :D  )
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: ilinda on September 28, 2014, 08:19:02 PM
Jim, thanks for the correction from 14 million km to 14 million miles.

It is my understanding from some of the various skymaps people have drawn, seen on Zetatalk and here I believe, that as PX exits our solar system, it will pass between Earth and Mars during the time it is going to be only 14 million miles away from us.

Now the main question I am not seeing answered anywhere with conviction is this:  Is PX already past perihelion and is it now beginning its outbound journey?
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: Jimfarmer on September 28, 2014, 09:54:50 PM
Quote
Now the main question I am not seeing answered anywhere with conviction is this:  Is PX already past perihelion and is it now beginning its outbound journey?

Here is the best that I could find: 
"THE SLING ORBIT OF PLANET X"  at  http://www.zetatalk.com/index/blog0510.htm

[start extract]
In 2003 Planet X did indeed zoom into the solar system, roaring up to the Sun, as was seen from Earth during the Summer of 2003.
Earth was on the opposite side of this drama, and the sunlight bouncing off the dust cloud shrouding Planet X created dramatic Second Sun sightings during that Summer.
Then it slowed, crept past the S Pole of the Sun, and is close to the Ecliptic now, fighting the particle flows coming back toward the Sun, fighting this headwind.

ZetaTalk: Dead on and Deadly, written Apr 3, 2006
    Since the Earth encountered Planet X in her orbit on Dec 25, 2003, her orbit has stalled, as she encountered an elephant in the road at this point and could not pass. Planet X had been plunging toward the Sun, rapidly entering the solar system in the short years prior to 2003 at a speed close to the speed of light. As Planet X approached the Sun in early 2003, brilliant Second Sun sightings and photos were possible because the Earth was on the opposite side of the Sun from the approaching Planet X, and thus sunlight was reflected off the dust cloud and bounced back toward Earth. Then came the encounter with Planet X in Earth's orbit, and things changed. As Planet X was moving, still, toward the Sun, sunlight now was at its back, bouncing back toward the Sun, and visibility of this dust shrouded planet changed from brilliant and dramatic Second Sun sightings to puzzlement. Like an object in a fog bank, it was lost to view except for those times when its swirling tail and moons caught sunlight and deflected this to Earth. Evidence of the presence of Planet X in the inner solar system, slowly passing the S Pole of the Sun, was reduced to taking the pulse of Earth herself - increased earthquakes, volcanic activity, an Earth wobble evident to those astute enough to take note, and erratic weather accompanying the wobble.
[end extract]
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on October 01, 2014, 03:07:51 AM
Jim,

If I could put a slight twist to iLinda's question, it was my understanding from Marshall's videos that the PX Family would cross the plane of the ecliptic twice, the first when entering the solar system and the second when exiting. It is the second that is of interest because that part of it's orbit is predicted to occur in proximity to us.

Is it currently:
a) still in the approach of the first cross
b) past the approach of the first cross
c) in the approach of the second cross
d) past the approach of the second cross
e) we do not know

I am thinking b or c but have no idea which....

Thanks much
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: Jimfarmer on October 01, 2014, 10:24:19 AM
Quote
it was my understanding from Marshall's videos that the PX Family would cross the plane of the ecliptic twice, the first when entering the solar system and the second when exiting.  It is the second that is of interest because that part of it's orbit is predicted to occur in proximity to us.

I might not have watched that video, but here is what I understand at the moment.

There are two different versions of PX's orbit.

*  Sitchin's version considers PX to orbit the Sun only, therefore following Kepler's laws about planets.  In the case of PX, it's elliptical trajectory could be so elongated that the perigee is not at the minimum distance from the Sun.  See attachment.

*  The Zeta's version is that PX orbits both the Sun and the Sun's binary partner in a very narrow "sling" trajectory.  Kepler's laws do not apply to this case.  In this case also, there are two points of nearest approach to the Sun, and between them, the trajectory goes far out from the Sun before turning around to come back in.

In both versions, PX crosses the ecliptic twice per orbit if the plane of it's orbit is not parallel to the ecliptic.  Those points are not necessarily the points of nearest approach to the Sun nor to the Earth.

Could you provide a link to any source that states that "It is the second that is of interest because that part of it's orbit is predicted to occur in proximity to us."?  Thanks
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on October 01, 2014, 01:44:23 PM
Yes Jim, I'd be happy too. Just give me a little time to find it again then I'll post the link and information to send you exactly to the spot. It's in one of the 5 videos by Marshall and last night I found the exact coordinates to my first question last week regarding the North Carolina sighting so that made me really happy  :)
I am limited by a 'condition' in how much time I can tolerate in a single sitting before having to take a break. That diagram of yours was good; wish I could do the same.
Also, either later today, tomorrow or Friday I'll know if my credit card company is going to reimburse me for this machine and go after the manufacturer; if they do, I'll be immediately wiping the disk and sending it, then have to find a replacement, get it set up, etc. etc. so it may appear I've dropped out of sight ... but NOT.

Peace,
Peter
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on October 02, 2014, 08:28:53 PM
Jim,
Thank you for your patience. I have not forgotten; just dealing with a couple of impediments, and BTW, the whole computer thing I hope I mentioned just totally fell apart today.....
Pete
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on October 02, 2014, 08:53:31 PM
Quote
it was my understanding from Marshall's videos that the PX Family would cross the plane of the ecliptic twice, the first when entering the solar system and the second when exiting.  It is the second that is of interest because that part of it's orbit is predicted to occur in proximity to us.

I might not have watched that video, but here is what I understand at the moment.

There are two different versions of PX's orbit.

*  Sitchin's version considers PX to orbit the Sun only, therefore following Kepler's laws about planets.  In the case of PX, it's elliptical trajectory could be so elongated that the perigee is not at the minimum distance from the Sun.  See attachment.

*  The Zeta's version is that PX orbits both the Sun and the Sun's binary partner in a very narrow "sling" trajectory.  Kepler's laws do not apply to this case.  In this case also, there are two points of nearest approach to the Sun, and between them, the trajectory goes far out from the Sun before turning around to come back in.

In both versions, PX crosses the ecliptic twice per orbit if the plane of it's orbit is not parallel to the ecliptic.  Those points are not necessarily the points of nearest approach to the Sun nor to the Earth.

Could you provide a link to any source that states that "It is the second that is of interest because that part of it's orbit is predicted to occur in proximity to us."?  Thanks

So I first went to 00skywatch's final YT video which hung 1/2 way through, then went to planetx101,com, the video called "Niebuhr Nearing" and that came to a complete standstill just a couple of minutes ago. It's not on my end because I can watch streaming movies from DISH network no problem and the web pages here are loading really fast. So? I don't know but I'll try again tomorrow/Saturday/etc until I get it; I know what I want because it's riveted in my head..
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: ilinda on October 03, 2014, 07:57:16 AM
I cannot add much at this point, but I do agree with the general idea that the PX grouping/constellation (or whatever we want to call that assemblage of planetoid/planet-comet, bolides, dust, etc.), in order to make its pass around our sun, Sol, this time, must make a first crossing as it enters the solar system, then after perihelion, it must make its second crossing as it is leaving the solar system.

And from all the videos I've seen, it exhibits a very very long elliptical orbit.  Carlos Ferrada's hand-sketched mapping of the intersecion of orbit of sun/solar system with that of  Hercolubus (his name for PX) and company shows a nearly perpendicular intersection.  However I don't think the orbit of Hercolubus/Nibiru/PX is perpendicular to that of our solar system because mainly of one reason. 

Our solar system, when viewed on edge would appear as a rather thin disk-like thing, sort of like a Frisbee.  So entering and leaving would not take much at all if that entering and leaving were totally perpendicular to the plane of our solar system.   However if PX comes in at a sharp angle, it could be very long, taking a very long time because much of the travel INTO the solar system would/could be nearly parallel to the plane of our solar system.  But once in, and around the sun, leaving would/could be relatively short.  All of this depends on many factors, but the plane of orbit of PX compared to plane of solar system would be key factors.  Problem is, nobody seems to know enough details.  Well, maybe Dr. Harrington did.
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: Jimfarmer on October 03, 2014, 09:59:29 AM
Quote
, in order to make its pass around our sun, Sol, this time, must make a first crossing as it enters the solar system, then after perihelion, it must make its second crossing as it is leaving the solar system.

Perihelion: the point in the orbit of a planet, asteroid, or comet at which it is closest to the sun.  (dictionary.com)

For all the planets that orbit  the Sun only, the perihelion is also one of the endpoints of the major axis of the elliptical orbit because their eccentricities are so small.

However, in general, the points of minimum distance from the foci of an elliptical orbit are not necessarily the endpoints of the major axis.  That would be the case for a long, narrow orbit (large eccentricity).

Also however, the Zetas say that PX orbits both the Sun and the Sun;s binary partner in a very long and narrow "sling" orbit.  The distance from the Sun to it's end point nearest to the Sun is fully one quarter of the distance between the Sun and the Sun's binary partner (if I remember that detail correctly).  That is much greater than it's minimum distance from the Sun.

Sitchin's version of the orbit, which considers that PX orbits the Sun only, puts the point of minimum distance from the Sun at the endpoint of the major axis which is nearest to the Sun, just like all the other planets that orbit the Sun only.

So, to avoid interpretations that might be false, if might be better to avoid use of the word "perihelion".

In general: pericenter (plural pericenters)
    (astronomy) The periapsis, the point of closest approach of an astronomical object in an elliptical orbit to its center of attraction.
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pericenter (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pericenter)

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longitude_of_the_periapsis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longitude_of_the_periapsis) :
"  In celestial mechanics, the longitude of the periapsis (symbolized ϖ) of an orbiting body is the longitude (measured from the point of the vernal equinox) at which the periapsis (closest approach to the central body) would occur if the body's inclination were zero. For motion of a planet around the Sun, this position could be called longitude of perihelion. The longitude of periapsis is a compound angle, with part of it being measured in the plane of reference and the rest being measured in the plane of the orbit. Likewise, any angle derived from the longitude of periapsis (e.g. mean longitude and true longitude) will also be compound.

Sometimes, the term longitude of periapsis is used to refer to ω, the angle between the ascending node and the periapsis. That usage of the term is especially common in discussions of binary stars and exoplanets.[1] However, the angle ω is less ambiguously known as the argument of periapsis. "
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on October 03, 2014, 10:40:46 AM
I cannot add much at this point, but I do agree with the general idea that the PX grouping/constellation (or whatever we want to call that assemblage of planetoid/planet-comet, bolides, dust, etc.), in order to make its pass around our sun, Sol, this time, must make a first crossing as it enters the solar system, then after perihelion, it must make its second crossing as it is leaving the solar system.

And from all the videos I've seen, it exhibits a very very long elliptical orbit.  Carlos Ferrada's hand-sketched mapping of the intersecion of orbit of sun/solar system with that of  Hercolubus (his name for PX) and company shows a nearly perpendicular intersection.  However I don't think the orbit of Hercolubus/Nibiru/PX is perpendicular to that of our solar system because mainly of one reason. 

Our solar system, when viewed on edge would appear as a rather thin disk-like thing, sort of like a Frisbee.  So entering and leaving would not take much at all if that entering and leaving were totally perpendicular to the plane of our solar system.   However if PX comes in at a sharp angle, it could be very long, taking a very long time because much of the travel INTO the solar system would/could be nearly parallel to the plane of our solar system.  But once in, and around the sun, leaving would/could be relatively short.  All of this depends on many factors, but the plane of orbit of PX compared to plane of solar system would be key factors.  Problem is, nobody seems to know enough details.  Well, maybe Dr. Harrington did.

I agree. Last night when falling asleep I was thinking about my reply to Jim. I envisioned a dinner plate with a couple of peas on it and a potato in the center. It was held at eye level with my arm outstretched. There was a not perpendicular but a skewed perpendicular 'line' going up through the botton of the plate on the far side, beyond the potato, in a skew toward my eyes; it continued out the top side for about 4-5 inches and then curved back down and proceeded through the plate between the potato and the edge closest to my eyes.
So of course the plate is the plane of the ecliptic viewed edge-on, the peas are planets and the potato is the Sun. The tilt of the 'earth' pea points to the 'south' on the bottom.
This describes the diagram I saw and am looking for again for Jim. In that diagram there was a mini-cluster of corn 'nuggets' just below the plate on the far side. Now, depending on the velocity of that cluster, it is either in what I labeled "b)" or "c)" in my post above, the one Jim referred to. That describes what I saw. Now I just have to find it again....
Pete
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on October 03, 2014, 10:55:03 AM
Looking 'down' on the plate, showing from the px101.com page photo which has the 5 video links.
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on October 03, 2014, 01:56:42 PM
Quote
it was my understanding from Marshall's videos that the PX Family would cross the plane of the ecliptic twice, the first when entering the solar system and the second when exiting.  It is the second that is of interest because that part of it's orbit is predicted to occur in proximity to us.

I might not have watched that video, but here is what I understand at the moment.

There are two different versions of PX's orbit.

*  Sitchin's version considers PX to orbit the Sun only, therefore following Kepler's laws about planets.  In the case of PX, it's elliptical trajectory could be so elongated that the perigee is not at the minimum distance from the Sun.  See attachment.

*  The Zeta's version is that PX orbits both the Sun and the Sun's binary partner in a very narrow "sling" trajectory.  Kepler's laws do not apply to this case.  In this case also, there are two points of nearest approach to the Sun, and between them, the trajectory goes far out from the Sun before turning around to come back in.

In both versions, PX crosses the ecliptic twice per orbit if the plane of it's orbit is not parallel to the ecliptic.  Those points are not necessarily the points of nearest approach to the Sun nor to the Earth.

Could you provide a link to any source that states that "It is the second that is of interest because that part of it's orbit is predicted to occur in proximity to us."?  Thanks

Jim, here goes:

----------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9szmVIqhV8

Click at the 1:05:05 point of the timeline
----------------------------------------------------------------

I believe that to be the source I had remembered and referred to and I appreciate any feedback....

On another note, my computer 'case' has been reopened and as soon as I receive a shipping box from Lenovo it will be packed and gone. Ergo, for some unknown period of time I'll be computerless, other than when I can borrow or otherwise get my hands on one. I will occupy myself with pulling out my packed-away 130 mm reflector scope and getting it back in working order; I hope the sun screen cover is still in good shape....

GenericUser Pete
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on October 03, 2014, 03:44:00 PM
Quote
it was my understanding from Marshall's videos that the PX Family would cross the plane of the ecliptic twice, the first when entering the solar system and the second when exiting.  It is the second that is of interest because that part of it's orbit is predicted to occur in proximity to us.

I might not have watched that video, but here is what I understand at the moment.

There are two different versions of PX's orbit.

*  Sitchin's version considers PX to orbit the Sun only, therefore following Kepler's laws about planets.  In the case of PX, it's elliptical trajectory could be so elongated that the perigee is not at the minimum distance from the Sun.  See attachment.

*  The Zeta's version is that PX orbits both the Sun and the Sun's binary partner in a very narrow "sling" trajectory.  Kepler's laws do not apply to this case.  In this case also, there are two points of nearest approach to the Sun, and between them, the trajectory goes far out from the Sun before turning around to come back in.

In both versions, PX crosses the ecliptic twice per orbit if the plane of it's orbit is not parallel to the ecliptic.  Those points are not necessarily the points of nearest approach to the Sun nor to the Earth.

Could you provide a link to any source that states that "It is the second that is of interest because that part of it's orbit is predicted to occur in proximity to us."?  Thanks

Jim, here goes:

----------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9szmVIqhV8

Click at the 1:05:05 point of the timeline
----------------------------------------------------------------

I believe that to be the source I had remembered and referred to and I appreciate any feedback....

On another note, my computer 'case' has been reopened and as soon as I receive a shipping box from Lenovo it will be packed and gone. Ergo, for some unknown period of time I'll be computerless, other than when I can borrow or otherwise get my hands on one. I will occupy myself with pulling out my packed-away 130 mm reflector scope and getting it back in working order; I hope the sun screen cover is still in good shape....

GenericUser Pete

PS You need to continue watching from that point through the interview with Sergeant Major Bob Dean (begins at 1:10:48) to get the "... in proximity to us." part but as Marshall states up front in the beginning, 'this is the video we've been waiting for" and I think it's the better of the best and therefor the one to watch in it's entirety. Three years to go the distance he outlines and that is given acceleration due to the gravitational pull of the sun then ? years due to deceleration from the sun ... all in all an excellent analysis given the constraints!
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: ilinda on October 04, 2014, 07:27:13 AM
Now after re-reading two of Jim's posts, I can see that "perihelion" is not the most appropriate term for our PX family, because of the two bodies around which PX revolves.  And also it was a good reminder about the great distance that the PX grouping will travel as it/they go around Sol in periapsis.  This exercise was a good reminder about Kepler's laws not exactly describing the motion of a family/grouping of planetoid with hangers-on revolving around two widely distant bodies.

Now, back to reading and watching some of these videos again....and again.  And more reading.  Plus skywatching with telescope or binoculars and/or camera.  We will be anxiously awaiting any updates we hear from GenericUser re setting up his reflector scope.

Another stray thought.  In looking through spaceweather.com, there are many, many individuals who have contributed photos of the sun over the years and no doubt they have seen evidence of what we are all discussing.  Has anyone reading this ever tried to connect with any of those people (names are linked to their photos on that site)?
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on October 04, 2014, 06:36:51 PM
Now after re-reading two of Jim's posts, I can see that "perihelion" is not the most appropriate term for our PX family, because of the two bodies around which PX revolves.  And also it was a good reminder about the great distance that the PX grouping will travel as it/they go around Sol in periapsis.  This exercise was a good reminder about Kepler's laws not exactly describing the motion of a family/grouping of planetoid with hangers-on revolving around two widely distant bodies.

Now, back to reading and watching some of these videos again....and again.  And more reading.  Plus skywatching with telescope or binoculars and/or camera.  We will be anxiously awaiting any updates we hear from GenericUser re setting up his reflector scope.

Another stray thought.  In looking through spaceweather.com, there are many, many individuals who have contributed photos of the sun over the years and no doubt they have seen evidence of what we are all discussing.  Has anyone reading this ever tried to connect with any of those people (names are linked to their photos on that site)?

While I've always loved the spaceweather. com site I only heard about this subject matter(PX) twice, once in October, 2013 when a friend alerted me that there was an interesting subject being discussed on the Joyce Reilly internet radio show so I downloaded it and burned it to disk, it was Marshall, and then about three weeks ago when I stumbled on that same disk and listened to it again, so while I've enjoyed looking at sunspots I never strayed off of that object when my German cloth was over the objective lens. ilinda, I can't wait for this laptop 'to go' so I can get to the scope, etc.
I don't know if I've posted this, my plan, so if I did, just stop reading here. I'm going to get those lat/long coordinates for the North Carolina sighting last year then plug them in to my Chris Marriott's Skymap Pro 6 program (gee, I won't be able to do that while this machine is gone! Never a dull moment!!!) Well anyway, I'm going to extrapolate those sightings lat/long/time/alt/direction to where I am so I'll be able to program a go-to spot after triangulating the scope. I AM excited; I am not so excited that none of my few friends (I'm in on Saturday night) are in the least bit interested, other than one ... and forget my family.
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: ilinda on October 04, 2014, 08:08:51 PM
While I've always loved the spaceweather. com site I only heard about this subject matter(PX) twice, once in October, 2013 when a friend alerted me that there was an interesting subject being discussed on the Joyce Reilly internet radio show so I downloaded it and burned it to disk, it was Marshall, and then about three weeks ago when I stumbled on that same disk and listened to it again, so while I've enjoyed looking at sunspots I never strayed off of that object when my German cloth was over the objective lens. ilinda, I can't wait for this laptop 'to go' so I can get to the scope, etc.
I don't know if I've posted this, my plan, so if I did, just stop reading here. I'm going to get those lat/long coordinates for the North Carolina sighting last year then plug them in to my Chris Marriott's Skymap Pro 6 program (gee, I won't be able to do that while this machine is gone! Never a dull moment!!!) Well anyway, I'm going to extrapolate those sightings lat/long/time/alt/direction to where I am so I'll be able to program a go-to spot after triangulating the scope. I AM excited; I am not so excited that none of my few friends (I'm in on Saturday night) are in the least bit interested, other than one ... and forget my family.
Can your telescope setup allow for photography?

Not trying to be nitpicky, but even if you can manage to get co-ordinates from NC sighting last year, and then obtain extrapolated co-ordinates for your area, won't the  PX system have moved since then?  Of course it should be somewhere "nearby", and since we are told its velocity while in the Solar System is around 76km/sec, , maybe it is possible to find it?  So many questions--more questions than answers.

Don't feel too alone.  Many here experience the same "wall of silence" when they try to tell a loved one or friend about PX or anything related. 
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on October 05, 2014, 06:54:34 PM
ilinda, or should I say hilinda,

First the most important thing ... thanks for the consolation about not feeling alone. I can't even get close to the subject, or any subject not involving TV/iPad/etc. so at least I know I'm not alone and it does provide me with a challenge, that being not to bug out alone if I hear of something imminent.

I'm doing that little exercise only to verify I won't be wasting my time ... that it wouldn't be below the Earth's horizon at my point when dark enough to view. Since it should be pretty close to the sun I can lock on it with a wide field of view in here (http://www.skymap.com/smlite_main.htm (http://www.skymap.com/smlite_main.htm)) or out there. I run Pro 6 Demo.
Now, as far as a camera goes, to begin with I'm going to mount a 16 MP Nikon Telephoto camera I just got at Costco for $299 on to my camera tripod because given what I saw produced in NC with that Samsung 14 MP phone camera, this should do a whole lot better and the NC photos were not shabby by any means; in fact, I know you guys verified them, but they almost seemed 'too' good and given that back in 1998 I layered an image of the BVM with misty transparency over a bottle of booze a girl was drinking holding it up over her head (which blew her mind when I sent it) I figure if I can/can't duplicate it then my personal caution is put to rest. So that is a goal even before mounting on the scope ... which I have NOT done before, so that will be the very last thing on my to-do list this year.

At the end of the video where Marshall says the dissemination of information period is over and the transition period has just begun, well, that was a good line of logic and I'm going to follow it albeit not with my very, immediate family. I gotta tell you that the exact location I'm going to is one where a picture was taken in 1997, actually the late afternoon of 12/25/1997 and it has the time stamp. I am going to post that picture in the new thread I began last night when this computer is returned. IF I get 'the blue angel' it will be right where 'the angel of life' had been gotten (it came to me while falling asleep last night) but I'll call the blue object 'the angel of death'.... :-\
We'll see how all this pans out but sometimes lately, I've noticed one thing leading to another leading to another until there is a mini-cluster which defies 'rational probability' IMHO.
Ok, time for Spell Check and bed  :)ZZZzzzzz gu
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: ilinda on October 07, 2014, 07:53:56 PM
I am going to post that picture in the new thread I began last night when this computer is returned. IF I get 'the blue angel' it will be right where 'the angel of life' had been gotten (it came to me while falling asleep last night) but I'll call the blue object 'the angel of death'.... :-\
We'll see how all this pans out but sometimes lately, I've noticed one thing leading to another leading to another until there is a mini-cluster which defies 'rational probability' IMHO.
Ok, time for Spell Check and bed  :)ZZZzzzzz gu
What is the new thread you started?

Do you think what you have noticed lately is synchronicity?
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: GenericUser on October 08, 2014, 05:21:09 PM
going to answer by private message because this oversized web page has been driving me nuts; I was hoping it would go away or revert back to normal when Pages = 3 but that's not happened yet....
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: Lancer87 on November 10, 2014, 04:33:53 PM
A YouTube video posted Nov. 9 claims to show telescopic video evidence of Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and NIBIRU (Nemesis?)!!!     http://youtu.be/LZs2lfA2_Kw

Very compelling. Unsure if anything can be determined (distance, etc.) from the video if it is legitimate?
Title: Re: how far away is the planetX constellation now and what speed is it going?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 13, 2018, 01:21:29 AM
Signs 24 – Tracking the Tipping Point
Marshall Masters | May 13, 2018

In April 2018, we published Signs 23 – A Turn for the Worse, in which our tentative hopes for a statistical plateau were dashed.  With the current data for April 2018, we see that the overall trends for sustained or marginally increasing trends in the data are persistent. Another trend is exhaustion due to search.

Read On...  http://yowusa.com/2018/05/signs-24-tipping-point/