Planet X Town Hall

ilinda - SURVIVAL HEALTH => SURVIVALIST HEAL THYSELF => Topic started by: Yowbarb on November 01, 2017, 09:17:47 AM

Title: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 01, 2017, 09:17:47 AM
This new Topic whill be a place for Alzheimers and brain health posts.

I just ran across a video, still watching...posting it...

https://memoryrepairprotocol.com/?aff_id=17000&subid=d0TNL4DUI1JU88C9HJJD5KDS

Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 01, 2017, 09:29:52 AM
Yowbarb Note: Anybody here have any benefits from taking Prevagen? Memory med Prevagen.
...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aequorin#Applications    Aequorin  (Redirected from Prevagen)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Apoaequorin is an ingredient in "Prevagen", which is marketed by Quincy Bioscience as a memory supplement. The US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has charged the maker of false advertising, because they claim marketing statements are not supported by scientific studies. Quincy says it will fight the charges.[38][39][40]
 
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 01, 2017, 01:00:11 PM
Barb, I've spent some years now perusing NIH studies on supplements for cognitive health. 
Will post a short list of the most promising supplements here, and then add study results as time permits.  I will not include botanicals (except resveratrol), just molecules that are an essential part of normal human biochemistry and may decline with age or not be ingested in large enough amounts in the diet:

Alpha lipoic acid + acetyl L carnitine combination
Carnosine
Creatine
Taurine
L-arginine
Lecithin / phosphatidyl choline
Phosphatidyl serine
B complex -100
Glutathione
NADH
Pyrroloquinoline Quinone (PQQ)
Methyl cobalamin
Vitamin C
Resveratrol
Proteolytic enzymes
Magnesium
Vitamin D3
Co-Q10
A multi-vitamin with micro-nutrients








Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 01, 2017, 01:09:42 PM
Here's a summary of studies on acetyl-l carnitine for cognitive support (especially in combination with alpha lipoic acid):

Acetyl-L-Carnitine is the bioavailable form of carnitine. Carnitine is a compound of the amino acids lysine + methionine. Methionine is a sulfur-based molecule, so it provides a high electrical charge. The following studies are mostly on animals, with a few notable human trials and new ones pending:

Spanish researchers concluded in 1989 that a "drastic" age-related decline in carnitine levels existed, citing a "strong reverse correlation between age and carnitine levels." Abstract here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2742580?dopt=Citation .

An American study in 2002 concluded that when acetyl carnitine is taken in conjunction with alpha lipoic acid, the master anti-oxidant glutathione is generated, improvements to mitochondria membranes yield metabolism improvements, and vitamin C (also a brain anti-oxidant) levels stored in the liver are raised to levels typical of a young person:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11854487?dopt=Citation .

Another American study in 2002 further demonstrated that the combination of the two supplements also restored damaged mitochondria, reduced genome oxidation, and improved memory performance: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11854529?dopt=Citation .

A 2004 American study, in collaboration with Japan, compared regular carnitine with acetyl-L-carnitine, and found several benefits from supplementation with the acetyl-L form that did not exist with ingestion of the regular form of carnitine: http://www.juvenon.com/pdfs/489car_vs_alcar.pdf .

A 2008 American study that addressed different types of aging-related mental decline concluded that use of carnitine and other neurological supplements is safer than pharmaceuticals while matching or exceeding their benefits, and should begin at the very earliest sign of cognitive decline, well in advance of a possible diagnosis of dementia: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18590347 .

A 2009 American study acknowledged the body of evidence existing to-date on benefits of carnitine supplementation in the aging, specifically upon mitochondrial functioning, and questioned by what mechanism this benefit occurred. The conclusions were that supplementation increased mitochondrial gene expression and protein synthesis: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19720100 .

A 2009 study at the University of Texas found that an age-related decrease in the number of surviving neuron mitochondria and presence of damaged surviving neuron mitochondria was reversed after continuous supplementation of three-months' duration: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18373733 .

A 2010 American study utilizing a coctail of known neuroprotective substances including carnitine found that cognition improved in all but those over 74 years of age. It was postulated that the reason those most advanced in age did not respond to supplementation was that they suffered from malabsorption of nutrients due to being deficient in certain micronutrients, a vicious cycle believed by the researchers to be correctable with further supplementation to bring aged subjects up to baseline: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20191258 .

A 2010 American study found that dual supplementation with ALA and acetyl-L-carnitine optimizes metabolism and delays aging and diseases of aging. It further concluded that much of the population at any given time is marginally deficient in micronutrients, and that even such slight deficiencies accelerate aging at the mitochondrial level. B-vitamin therapy was another treatment modality that proved to be effective against aging-related disease: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20420847 .

A 2010 Italian study and a 2012 American study concluded that carnitine is also cardio-protective, even able to regenerate cardiac mitochondria: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20370498 and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22322067 .

A 2010 study in humans found that supplementation improved reaction time, focus and alertness: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21156078 .

A 2011 Italian study of acetyl-L-carnitine's ability to reverse aging-related damage to mitochondria associated with protein metabolism found that supplementation corrected 26 out of 31 abnormal protein levels: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21672642 .

In 2012, Norwegian researchers demonstrated that regular supplementation with acetyl-L-carnitine increased energy production in the brain and supported neurotransmitter levels: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22549035 .

A 2014 American study used modern radiographic imaging techniques to demonstrate that acetyl-L-carnitine is not only neuroprotective, but conserves other brain anti-oxidants under stress: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25461739 .

A 2015 study of acetylcarnitine as part of a nutritional formula given to patients with Alzheimer's Disease found improvement within 3 months, and at worst found that they maintained baseline without losing further ground to the disease: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25589719

A 2016 study suggested that serum levels of acetylcarnitine could be a valuable marker in distinguishing between pre-Alzheimer's Disease and actual onset, helping to identify patients who could benefit from acetylcarnitine therapy: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27196316

Another 2016 study recommended inclusion of acetylcarnitine as part of a nutritional coctail used to prevent further decline in patients already suffering from early onset of AD: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26967219

A 2017 study found "a high efficacy" in use of acetylcarnitine for a variety of aging-related diseases: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28980618 .

Another 2017 study suggested use of acetylcarnitine as a strategy for preventing or delaying onset of diseases of cognitive decline in the aging: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28807823

This general fact sheet from the NIH confirms that endogenous production of carnosine declines with age (see discussion under "aging").  It is therapeutic in high doses of more than a gram per day, and suggested for use in both mild cognitive decline and Alzheimer's Disease.
https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Carnitine-HealthProfessional/

The University of Maryland Medical Center suggests supplementation with 1-3 grams per day of acetyl-L-carnitine here: http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/carnitine-lcarnitine . The Linus Pauling Institute of Oregon State University recommends 500-1,000 mg instead: http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/othernuts/carnitine/ , and says that an additional benefit of supplementing with the acetyl-L-carnitine form is that extra acetyl groups become bioavailable for the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. The website further says that toxic effects have not been reported.

I have edited the Wikipedia page on this topic tonight to bring it up to date, as the most recent citations there were for studies from 2003 and prior.  We'll see if an editorial battle ensues, or if an editorial robot automatically reverts my changes (both can happen). 


Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 01, 2017, 01:32:18 PM
Here's a summary of studies on taurine for cognitive support:

Taurine is a compound of the amino acids methionine and cysteine, but is not used by the body to build proteins the way other amino acid molecules are used. Instead, it is used by the body in large quantities for numerous other purposes. It is especially concentrated in central nervous system and cardiac tissues, as well as muscle and retinal tissue.

In 1987, a group of American researchers first proposed that taurine functioned as a neurotransmitter in its own right. Their findings were published in 2003: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0165017387900129 .

In 1991, Chilean researchers concluded that although younger humans were known to be able to synthesize their own taurine endogenously, aging humans had increasingly less ability to do so. Abstract here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1811446 .

A detailed 63-page 1992 description of taurine's functions in the human body is here: http://physrev.physiology.org/content/72/1/101.full-text.pdf+html . Some of the highlights of that primer include:

* the high electro-conductivity of taurine due to its sulfur content (p.4)
* its presence in the animal kingdom, but not in plants
* the odd fact that taurine is used in large quantities in the human body but excreted unchanged by any of the reactions (p.7)
* by the time humans are able to synthesize taurine endogenously through oxidation, the amino is already well on its way to being excreted. Therefore, the body must grab what it can of taurine waste on its way out of the system, and attempt to make the best possible use of it while it still can.
* evolutionary specialization is causing carnivores to lose their ability to synthesize taurine on their own, forcing them to consume it increasingly in meat.
* Though taurine's electricity does not directly translate into ATP, it is used indirectly to activate ATP pumps (p. 19), keeping neurons and other cells alive
* Taurine behaves as a neurotransmitter of a different type than previously named (p. 23)
* Taurine is able to influence inhibitory muscle control without directly binding to those neuron sites (p.29), (possibly preventing tremors)

As far back as 1970, notation in the Italian medical literature can be found for the use of taurine as a nutritional supplement for those suffering from Alzheimer's Disease: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5421986

In 1999, American researchers concluded that a correlation existed between reduction of dopamine (as with Parkinson's Disease) and reduction of taurine: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0361923099000039 .

In 2001, Venezuelan researchers concluded that taurine is necessary both for initial formation of the human central nervous system, and for its regeneration later in life: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11843263 . They conclude that taurine is an essential, rather than either a non-essential or conditionally essential, amino acid. A more recent American study along similar lines from 2008 is here: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0079612308606937 .

A 2004 study demonstrated that high concentrations of taurine protect the brain from damaging beta-amyloid peptides by blocking glutamate receptors (i.e. blocking excitotoxins):
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15003996

In 2007, taurine was listed as an experimental therapy for Alzheimer's Disease: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17539055

In 2009, American researchers concluded that taurine mitigates side effects of brain plaques (p. 3) (excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, cell death): abstract here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19239147 , paraphrased in this longer article here: http://download.springer.com/static/pdf/610/art%253A10.1007%252Fs00726-013-1632-8.pdf?auth66=1423524204_dbd35000c5f4a08ddab0352e48efa9df&ext=.pdf .

A 2013 study of cerebro-spinal fluid in patients with Alzheimer's found a correlation between the presence of taurine and absence of depression and behavioral disturbances associated with AD (in other words, taurine may have lessened the severity of the disease): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23159046

2013 research, published in 2014, confirmed neuroprotectivity of taurine, as well as an effect on functioning of neurotransmitters, in addition to anti-oxidant / anti-inflammatory functions: http://download.springer.com/static/pdf/610/art%253A10.1007%252Fs00726-013-1632-8.pdf?auth66=1423524204_dbd35000c5f4a08ddab0352e48efa9df&ext=.pdf . The study further proposed specific mitigation of taurine upon Parkinson's Disease, via inhibiting the excitatory response causing tremors, and the accompanying neuron cell death caused by the excitotoxicity.

Another 2013 study concluded that taurine supplementation produces effects that are in direct opposition to aging related cognitive dysfunction: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00726-013-1544-7 .

A 2014 study describes how Alzheimer's Disease and adult-onset diabetes are essentially one and the same disease, noting that the brain responds to a severe drop in blood sugar by releasing a whole cluster of excitotoxins, followed by a flood of taurine - to the extent that it is available - to protect the brain from injury from the excitotoxins: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4086025/

A 2017 study recommended 1000 mg daily to reverse cognitive deficits caused by Alzheimer's Disease by binding directly to beta-amyloid placques: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28849459

Another 2017 study also found that by introducing taurine as part of a supplemental carbohydrate, the taurine would bind to beta-amyloid placques and prevent them from mis-folding, and thus from obstructing neurons and causing their death: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28849458

A patented supplement called Taurizine (taurine + zinc), which has existed since at least 1985, was developed for the prevention of aging-related dementia: https://chem.nlm.nih.gov/chemidplus/rn/130007-55-5

and: http://www.reference.md/files/C048/mC048332.html


Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on November 01, 2017, 06:42:05 PM
This new Topic whill be a place for Alzheimers and brain health posts.

I just ran across a video, still watching...posting it...

https://memoryrepairprotocol.com/?aff_id=17000&subid=d0TNL4DUI1JU88C9HJJD5KDS
Thanks for starting this, Barb.  It is a much-needed topic.  As soon as I dig out my notes from the multi-part series on Alzheimer's Disease, I'll post a few things here as well.  A lot of what is in the video you linked, is/was also discussed in the series I watched, narrated by Peggy Sarlen (sp). 

And especially important is the narrator's commentary on how BigPharma doesn't want anyone to know the truth--that their drugs do little or nothing, while there are many natural foods, herbs and spices that have the capacity to help reverse dementia of several types.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 02, 2017, 04:10:18 PM
Notes on Carnosine:

Carnosine is a combination of beta-alanine and histidine with the potential to suppress a number of different aging-related brain changes.  Normally found in high concentrations in the brain.  Exerts anti-oxidant activity by chelating metals and scavenging free-radicals, according to PubChem: https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/L-Carnosine#section=Top

A 2000 study of zinc and copper toxicity was among the earliest on record to suggest neuroprotectivity of carnosine.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10661495

Another 2000 study refers to carnosine as "a natural anti-senescence drug" capable of extending the lifespan of cells in vitro.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10951108

A 2001 study lists numerous benefits of carnosine, echoed in other studies below.  It delays aging and rejuvenates cells by:
1. anti-oxidation
2. heavy metal scavenging
3. free-radical scavenging
4. neutralizes toxins
5. suppresses diabetic rise in blood pressure
6. prevents sugars from attaching to proteins
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11470131

A 2005 study extolled the benefits of a carnivorous diet, partly for its carnosine content.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15955546

A 2009 study postulates a link between Alzheimer's Disease and type 2 diabetes, saying that there exists no pharmaceutical solution to the problem and that supplementation is needed to address a broad range of needs:
1. anti-inflammation
2. anti-oxidant able to chelate metals
3. prevention of sugars binding to proteins
The study suggests that carnosine might answer all of those needs, and additionally is able to neutralize a high-fructose diet.  Furthermore it both prevents aging of cells and is capable of rejuvenating aged cells.  Acetylcarnosine is more likely to survive biodegradation intact and be useful than plain carnosine.  In spite of carnosine's many known benefits, including virtual non-toxicity, the study concludes that clinical trials will remain sparse due to the pharmaceutical industry's lack of ability to patent and profit from it.  Thus experimentation with it will need to be made independently.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19402768
and http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/ern.09.32?scroll=top&needAccess=true

A 2010 study stated plainly that protection of the mitochondria helps to prevent aging by maintaining regular production of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD+), a derivitive of vitamin B-3 which:
1.  prevents the genesis of altered proteins that can cause neurological damage,
2. makes efficient use of glucose, and
3. increases production of the master anti-oxidant glutathione. 
Carnosine protects the mitochondria by
1. suppressing toxins,
2. supporting creation of healthy proteins that are protective against stress, and
3. decreasing telomere shortening. 
The study regards carnosine as non-toxic.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2874395/

A 2010 study lists, among other benefits of carnosine, stimulation of micro-circulation in the brain as well as pH buffering.  The study concludes that carnosine is highly effective in geriatric medicine with no side effects.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20017611

A 2011 study lists these benefits of carnosine:
1. anti-oxidation
2. prevents sugars from sticking to proteins
3. chelation
4. wound healing
5. free-radical scavenging
6. effective in treatment of both brain damage and brain degeneration
7. catalyzes beneficial biochemical processes
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22020110

A 2013 study concluded that carnosine has a double benefit in the aged: it eliminates aberrant proteins, and it regulates their correct structure and use in the body: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3602167/

The Wikipedia article on Carnosine was updated tonight to include more study citations.

 

Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 02, 2017, 04:47:24 PM
This new Topic whill be a place for Alzheimers and brain health posts.

I just ran across a video, still watching...posting it...

https://memoryrepairprotocol.com/?aff_id=17000&subid=d0TNL4DUI1JU88C9HJJD5KDS
Thanks for starting this, Barb.  It is a much-needed topic.  As soon as I dig out my notes from the multi-part series on Alzheimer's Disease, I'll post a few things here as well.  A lot of what is in the video you linked, is/was also discussed in the series I watched, narrated by Peggy Sarlen (sp). 

And especially important is the narrator's commentary on how BigPharma doesn't want anyone to know the truth--that their drugs do little or nothing, while there are many natural foods, herbs and spices that have the capacity to help reverse dementia of several types.

ilinda your post is very heartening! I love the thought that natures phamacy can reverse so many brain diseases!
:)
Oh I see the name is there, Oh! Maybe this is the one you had referred to? Found this one:   

Peggy Sarlin Interview - Awakening From Alzheimer's

https://youtu.be/tNXxSw6dMZQ

Sep 18, 2017 - Uploaded by WOCA The Source Radio
Peggy Sarlin Interview - Awakening From Alzheimer's - Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/american-radio 
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 02, 2017, 04:54:28 PM
RR: Referring back to your wonderful post, Reply #6 about Carnosine.
Pretty new subject to me, I think!


Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on November 02, 2017, 05:21:10 PM
This new Topic whill be a place for Alzheimers and brain health posts.

I just ran across a video, still watching...posting it...

https://memoryrepairprotocol.com/?aff_id=17000&subid=d0TNL4DUI1JU88C9HJJD5KDS
Thanks for starting this, Barb.  It is a much-needed topic.  As soon as I dig out my notes from the multi-part series on Alzheimer's Disease, I'll post a few things here as well.  A lot of what is in the video you linked, is/was also discussed in the series I watched, narrated by Peggy Sarlen (sp). 

And especially important is the narrator's commentary on how BigPharma doesn't want anyone to know the truth--that their drugs do little or nothing, while there are many natural foods, herbs and spices that have the capacity to help reverse dementia of several types.

ilinda your post is very heartening! I love the thought that natures phamacy can reverse so many brain diseases!
:)
Oh I see the name is there, Oh! Maybe this is the one you had referred to? Found this one:   

Peggy Sarlin Interview - Awakening From Alzheimer's

https://youtu.be/tNXxSw6dMZQ

Sep 18, 2017 - Uploaded by WOCA The Source Radio
Peggy Sarlin Interview - Awakening From Alzheimer's - Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/american-radio
I hadn't seen that interview with her, but she had recently revised her book, second edition I think, and she narrated a nine-part or seven-part series on Alzheimer's Disease, which was sponsored by (trying to recall whether greenmedinfo.com, or thetruthabout cancer, or ??).

I took copious notes for the episodes I watched, missing only one or two.  Will find those notes asap. and post some here.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 02, 2017, 05:29:16 PM
I'll be really excited to read your notes Ilinda! :)

Barb, I don't think many people are familiar with carnosine, as it probably would get confused with carnitine.  Even the NIH / NCBI database sometimes confuses the two when a search is done!
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 03, 2017, 10:45:48 AM
Notes on L-arginine:

L-arginine is the biologically active form of the amino acid arginine. 

In 2008, a study concluded that L-arginine is involved in the endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO), which is necessary in order to reverse underlying metabolic causes of diabetes.  NO is able to do important tasks such as clear sugar-alcohols (polyols) out of muscle tissue, preventing diabetic ketoacidosis and removing toxic by-products of the polyols.  The study did not directly address Alzheimer's Disease, but addresses the underlying cause, as the connection between AD and diabetes had not yet been widely understood in 2008 at the time of this study.  Recall from earlier posts why Alzheimer's Disease is considered now to stem from diabetes: excess sugars adhere to protein structures in the brain, causing them to become sticky and fold improperly.   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2709283/

In 2009, a more direct connection was made between L-arginine and Alzheimer's Disease.  The study found L-arginine to be helpful in a broad spectrum of aging-related degeneration, includine "neurotransmitter dysregulation" and brain glucose metabolism.  The study notes that there are no pharmaceutical interventions that show more than a very limited effect in ameliorating AD, and no drugs target the underlying mechanism of AD (which is metabolic).  In the previously mentioned study, it was noted that L-arginine produces NO.  This 2009 study states that the combination of L-arginine and NO together can actually function as a variety of neurotransmitters.  Also involved in the vicious metabolic diabetes-AD cycle is oxidative damage and inflammation.  The study notes that NO itself briefly causes a type of stress, as it is a stimulant (some men actually have more success in taking over-the-counter NO than drugs for erectile dysfunction because of this), but that the body quickly clears it away after making use of it.  Incidentally, while we eschew dietary sources of glutamate, NO actually produces glutamate as a memory stimulant in healthy brains; AD brains lack glutamate as a stimulant.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2600464/

A 2014 study in aged humans with and without AD examined metabolic profiles for arginine iin three different areas of the brain, concluding that "arginine metabolism was dramatically altered."  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24746363

A 2015 investigation of AD in mice found two anomalies.  First, the exterior of central nervous system cells contained an overabundance of arginase, a catabolic enzyme that degrades arginine down into other molecules, reducing the amount of arginine available for neuroprotection.  Secondly, there was an overabundance of microglia, phagocytes which explode in population in response to injuries, suggesting one or more possibly ongoing insults had occurred to the CNS (insults can be the result of excitotoxins, substance abuse, etc.).  The conclusions of the study suggest that a therapeutic agent be identified to suppress the arginine-degrading enzyme (or perhaps a simple arginine supplement might provide sufficient extra arginine that the catabolysis of a portion of it might not matter?).  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25878270

Another 2015 study of arginine safety in pigs was extrapolated by body weight to humans, and it was found that the highest dose trialed, which was 573 mg/kg body weight in humans was safe for "at least" 3 months' duration.  The study further found that significant improvements in body mass were achieved in the reduction of fat and increase of lean protein.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25655382

Another 2015 study found that, in the wake of lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory brain  damage, L-arginine was able both to restore spatial memory and reverse memory deficit, but was unable to restore lost flexibility to the synapse.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4620614/

A 2016 study of altered arginine metabolic enzymes in AD found over-expression of two genes causing a suppression or degradation of anabolic (inferred from text) enzymes involved in the synthesis of arginine (in other words the genes were preventing endogenous arginine production).  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26971935

Far more studies exist on cerebrovascular protection offered by L-arginine due to its ability to preserve the elasticity of blood vessels.



Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 03, 2017, 01:26:33 PM
This new Topic whill be a place for Alzheimers and brain health posts.

I just ran across a video, still watching...posting it...

https://memoryrepairprotocol.com/?aff_id=17000&subid=d0TNL4DUI1JU88C9HJJD5KDS
Thanks for starting this, Barb.  It is a much-needed topic.  As soon as I dig out my notes from the multi-part series on Alzheimer's Disease, I'll post a few things here as well.  A lot of what is in the video you linked, is/was also discussed in the series I watched, narrated by Peggy Sarlen (sp). 

And especially important is the narrator's commentary on how BigPharma doesn't want anyone to know the truth--that their drugs do little or nothing, while there are many natural foods, herbs and spices that have the capacity to help reverse dementia of several types.

ilinda your post is very heartening! I love the thought that natures phamacy can reverse so many brain diseases!
:)
Oh I see the name is there, Oh! Maybe this is the one you had referred to? Found this one:   

Peggy Sarlin Interview - Awakening From Alzheimer's

https://youtu.be/tNXxSw6dMZQ

Sep 18, 2017 - Uploaded by WOCA The Source Radio
Peggy Sarlin Interview - Awakening From Alzheimer's - Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/american-radio
I hadn't seen that interview with her, but she had recently revised her book, second edition I think, and she narrated a nine-part or seven-part series on Alzheimer's Disease, which was sponsored by (trying to recall whether greenmedinfo.com, or thetruthabout cancer, or ??).

I took copious notes for the episodes I watched, missing only one or two.  Will find those notes asap. and post some here.

OK as soon as you post the newer video I will delete my other post... since it refers to an older video...
I can help locate the newer video if you like...
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 03, 2017, 02:21:36 PM
Barb, I've spent some years now perusing NIH studies on supplements for cognitive health. 
Will post a short list of the most promising supplements here, and then add study results as time permits.  I will not include botanicals, just molecules that are an essential part of normal human biochemistry and may decline with age or not be ingested in large enough amounts in the diet:

Alpha lipoic acid + acetyl L carnitine combination
Carnosine
Creatine
Taurine
L-arginine
Lecithin / phosphatidyl choline
Phosphatidyl serine
B complex -100
Glutathione
NADH
Pyrroloquinoline Quinone (PQQ)
Methyl cobalamin
Vitamin C
Resveratrol
Proteolytic enzymes
Magnesium
Vitamin D3
Co-Q10
A multi-vitamin with micro-nutrients

RR - I didn't acknowledge your posts...really good info... Going to write some reminders about foods for me old brain. :) Currently working on this month's Battleplan-Journal format. May add some of this info U and ilinda are posting.
Foods, health programs...I tend to keep a list within my formats.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 03, 2017, 02:34:15 PM
I do consume a few things on that list:
•   the CO Q10 (coenzyme Q10, 300 mg per day.) Have taken CoQ10 on and off since 1988.
•   B complex -100;
•   Carnosine (just whatever I may get from my diet mainstay - Atlantic wild-caught salmon
•   and a small amt of poultry during the  month.)
•   Vitamin C complex
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 03, 2017, 02:50:44 PM
Not sure where the post is that includes mention of glycation.
Came across this little tidbit about a few foods that lead to glycation (which is not a good thing.)
This is glycation from external sources, something that happened outside the body then was caused when the person ate it. Also info on advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and how people end up consuming them.

More on Endogenous glycations in another post.
...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycation 

Excerpt
Exogenous

Exogenous, meaning outside the body, may also be referred to as dietary or pre-formed. Exogenous glycations and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are formed when sugars are cooked with proteins or fats. Temperatures over 120 °C (~248 °F) greatly accelerate the reactions, but lower temperatures with longer cooking times also promote their formation.[citation needed]

These compounds are absorbed by the body during digestion with about 10% efficiency.[citation needed] Browning reactions (usually Maillard type reactions) are evidence of pre-formed glycations. Indeed, sugar is often added to products such as french fries and baked goods to enhance browning. Glycation may also contribute to the formation of acrylamide, a potential carcinogen, during cooking. Until recently, it was thought that exogenous glycations and AGEs were negligible contributors to inflammation and disease states, but recent work has shown that they are important.

Food manufacturers have added AGEs to foods, especially in the last 50 years, as flavor enhancers and colorants to improve appearance. Foods with significant browning, caramelization, or directly added preformed AGEs can be high in these compounds. A very partial listing of foods with very high exogenous AGEs includes donuts, barbecued meats, cake, and dark colored soda pop.
...
Endogenous

"Endogenous glycations occur mainly in the bloodstream to a small proportion of the absorbed simple sugars: glucose, fructose, and galactose. It appears that fructose has approximately ten times the glycation activity of glucose, the primary body fuel..."
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 03, 2017, 02:52:26 PM
Quote
I do consume a few things on that list:
•   the CO Q10 (coenzyme Q10, 300 mg per day.) Have taken CoQ10 on and off since 1988.
•   B complex -100;
•   Carnosine (just whatever I may get from my diet mainstay - Atlantic wild-caught salmon
•   and a small amt of poultry during the  month.)
•   Vitamin C complex

Great!  I wouldn't necessarily recommend taking everything on the list at once anyway, as it would be costly unless done on a rotating basis except for one that you wouldn't want to be without.

Also, good explanation of glycation sources.  I did notice in the literature that I read, that even sugar alcohols such as sorbitol were not as good for us as we might have been led to believe by those marketing supposedly dietetic sweets to us. :)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 03, 2017, 02:54:11 PM
Great!  I wouldn't necessarily recommend taking everything on the list at once anyway, as it would be costly unless done on a rotating basis except for one that you wouldn't want to be without. :)

Well anyway I surely appreciate the list you posted...
Let us know if you find a good combination supplement  for example one that has the required amino acids and some other combos...
True it is expensive... I am glad I take at least part of that...
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 03, 2017, 02:59:45 PM
Barb, for an easy combination product, you might want to investigate body-building supplements, which the stores are full of nowdays.  They are pricey though! :)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 03, 2017, 03:15:52 PM
Notes from Yowbarb: Here's few interesting excerpts about carnosine and the fact trials have gone on, administering carnosine into the nose, since this might be a good way to help alzheimer's patients (who are ravaged by glycosylation and oxidative damage in the brain. Also, the next excerpt discusses a promising new combo of zinc and carnosine. (The bioavailability of zinc is part of what helps a person make use of this substance, carnosine.)
...
http://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/carnosine

"...there are questions about the efficacy of oral supplementation with carnosine. Most carnosine absorbed from the gut is destroyed in the bloodstream by enzymes called carnosinases. These enzymes readily split carnosine back into its two constituent amino acids, alanine and histidine.

This fact has led to trials of intranasal administration of carnosine. This might be a very clever way to get it into areas of the brain, such as the olfactory lobes, that are ravaged by glycosylation and oxidative damage in sufferers of Alzheimer's Disease. Nonetheless, there is evidence from human studies that supplementing with carnosine can increase carnosine levels in muscle tissue. Supplying people with the amino acids the body uses to make carnosine also increases carnosine levels in muscle. Therefore, even if enzymes do break carnosine apart in the blood, the pieces can be put back together in the cells.

Unless one is a strict vegetarian, carnosine supplementation is likely unnecessary. Carnosine levels in the blood increase after a person has a meal of beef. Whereas a 1000 mg of carnosine a day has been recommended as a supplement, there is about 1500 mg of carnosine in a pound of beef, and close to 2000 mg in similar amounts of pork or chicken. Most fish, such as salmon, are low in carnosine, but high in a substance called anserine. Anserine is also found in the human body, and has actions in cells quite similar to those of carnosine."
...
"Good intracellular zinc ion bioavailability, which is required for the maintenance of the immune system in ageing people, may be largely due to metallothionein homeostasis [49], and to the positive antioxidant effect of carnosine, which are exerted via the zinc pool."

...intriguing findings show the positive effects of zinc complex of L-carnosine (generic name: Polaprezinc), which is capable of increasing spermatogenesis in a mouse experimental model of accelerated ageing (SAMP1) [50] and it also reduces the inflammation during the course of gastric ulcer [44]. This gives further support to the relevance of carnosine and zinc (like a complex) as a potential new anti-ageing factors related to neuroendocrine-immune interactions.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 03, 2017, 03:23:02 PM
OK last post for now..something to think about. The previous thing I posted made me think of the zinc in oysters. (Zinc helps the body use carnosine, that is my new, rudimentary understanding of that.) Maybe if a person is craving some canned smoked oysters in an oil such as sunflower oil, they do not need to resist the craving.
...
Adults need 8 to 11 milligrams of zinc each day.
A serving of smoked oysters contains 28.25 milligrams. Sunflower oil does not contribute any additional iron or zinc.

https://www.livestrong.com/article/557397-are-smoked-oysters-in-sunflower-oil-good-for-you/
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 03, 2017, 03:32:14 PM
Great additions to the topic Barb!
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 03, 2017, 08:27:18 PM
Great additions to the topic Barb!

It's good to be learning as I go along...
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 06, 2017, 01:35:32 PM
Choline is vitamin B-4, and is found in the food emulsifier lecithin as phosphatidylcholine, which is uniquely able to mix oils into the watery blood plasma.  Egg yolks are another rich source of choline.  Beef liver, peanuts and wheat germ are also good sources, but may be increasingly shunned by segments of the population choosing to eat less beef for health reasons, disliking liver, allergic to peanuts or avoiding wheat germ due to leaky gut syndrome or a gluten-free diet.  Therefore, choline is an essential nutrient that has a narrow range of rich sources, causing inexpensive supplementation to be a serious option.

An early 1982 British study found that a reduction in choline was "significantly correlated with the severity of dementia."  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7161627

A 1985 study by American researchers found that Alzheimer's patients lose choline neurons at a rate of 25% more than healthy patients and explores potential reasons for the loss.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4047285

A 1986 American study found abnormalities in the transport system of choline in AD patients.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3945172

A 1994 Spanish study is important not only in the study of AD, but allergy sufferers might also want to take note:  The study discovered a positive correlation between a high blood-histamine content and Alzheimer's Disease, as well as changes in both phospholipid (choline, serine and inositol) metabolism and neuroimmunity.  The study concluded that one gram of choline given by mouth almost immediately reduced the blood-histamine levels (within 2 hours) and continued to reduce histamine levels over a 30-day period, confirming the positive benefits of choline and a correlation between histamine and AD. Allergy sufferers reading this might want to consider that a possible vicious cycle may be in motion with our constant popping of antihistimines and their potential anti-cholinergic effect (i.e. drying up slimy brain neurotransmitters along with runny noses, while possibly encouraging higher histamine levels). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8051988

A Mexican study in 2003 found measurable improvements in all AD testing parameters after 90 and 180 days on a choline supplement, while a placebo group showed no comparable improvement.  This was a landmark study, because some of the earliest trials prior to this had found no benefit from taking lecithin, and this study made it clear that lecithin must be consumed in a high enough dose and regularly over a long period of time, rather than as a single dose experiment.  Unfortunately, Wikipedia only references two of the older studies, and not the more recent study finding significant benefit.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12637119

A 2009 U.S. meta-analysis found a recommended daily minimal intake of choline to be 425 mg for women and 550 mg for men - and that was termed "Adequate Intake."  It was further discovered that ten percent of the population or less actually achieved this minimal intake on a daily basis.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2782876/

A 2010 Italian study sought to select an ester (artificial form) of choline that demonstrated cholinergic effects against AD, and succeeded.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20388079

A 2011 American study of a variety of lipids affected by AD singled out choline from other fats as being significant, and found a 73% reduction specifically of choline in plasmalogen, a substance making up 20% of the brain fatty structure.  Because choline affects membrane formation, the study suggested a correlation with changes in membrane structure in AD, further suggesting an answer to questions by earlier studies as to where neuron loss is occurring (i.e. leaky brain syndrome?): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=choline+alzheimer+dha+postmortem

A PubChem article on choline suggests that as an added benefit of increasing our choline intake, we may be able to lower our risk of one of the most lethal diseases, liver cancer. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/choline#section=Top

If possible, some thought should be given to the best form of lecithin to take.  High-quality supplements include those made from either sunflower oil or egg yolks.  Lecithin made from soy is more affordable, but likely to be GMO.  If choosing this less-expensive option, it can be improved by selecting non-bleached soy lecithin over bleached.

Have updated Wikipedia, and will see if the edit is permitted to remain.



Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 07, 2017, 05:11:45 AM
Addenda:

Last night I woke up with a sneezing attack, and instead of taking an antihistimine, took 2 g lecithin and went back to bed.  In 5 minutes, the sneezing and sniffling stopped.  In 10 minutes my sinuses opened up and I was able to get back to sleep.

Also came across this link by accident this a.m. saying that a few g lecithin will unblock milk ducts of lactating women.  (Been there too!) :)

https://kellymom.com/nutrition/vitamins/lecithin/
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 07, 2017, 09:54:00 AM
Phosphatidyl Serene is one of three major phospho-lipids needed by the human body.  The other two are phosphatidyl choline, which we've already discussed, and phosphatidyl inositol.  Serene occurs naturally as L-serene, synthesized in the body mostly from glycine.  It plays numerous roles in the body, and is concentrated in membrane tissue.    https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/L-serine#section=Top

PS has been long studied in humans, including a few well-designed clinical trials, and is a basic component of the neurotransmitter serotonin.

An early 1985 animal study found that phosphatidyl serene facilitated the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine from the cerebral cortex. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4088427

A 2003 study in the Netherlands iterated that although serene can be synthesized by the human body, not enough quantity can be produced to adequately cover all its uses.  The study summarized previous studies, saying that it is known that both altered levels of serene and defects in its synthesis from glycine account for numerous psychiatric and neurological disorders, and that the brain cannot develop normally without serene.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12534373

 In a 2010 Japanese double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of serene's impact upon an elderly population, researchers reported a marked increase in cognitive functioning particularly of the lowest-scoring group on a standardized mental functioning exam.  The greatest mental improvement was in the area of verbal recall - in other words, the ability to find the correct words to express thoughts.   Some past studies had demonstrated poor or mixed results, but they were shorter term trials of up to 12 weeks.  The Japanese trial lasted twice that duration, and found that after the 6-month trial and 3-month follow-up period without supplementing, only the non-placebo groups (both 100 mg and 300 mg dose alike) showed marked increase in cognitive functioning compared with baseline tests. The study was the first to demonstrate that the soy form of serene could safely and positively affect mild cognitive decline, and recommended it for the earliest stage of dementia, in which verbal dysfunction and delayed recall are beginning to become evident.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2966935/

A 2014 analysis of two previously unpublished studies:
First, a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of phosphatidyl serene on functioning aged individuals with mild memory deficits, and second, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled self-reported inventory of daily functioning in Alzheimer's Disease patients. In the study of the well-elderly, memory was "significantly improved," while the AD sample taking serene managed not to lose further ground from baseline, vs. the placebo group that did lose ground.  These studies showed positive effects in shorter amounts of time, 3 and 2 months respectively, and further showed that oral administration was effective. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25414047

Have updated Wikipedia on this topic, and will see if the update is permitted to stand.



Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 08, 2017, 06:04:16 PM
Glutathione is considered to be the master anti-oxidant, and under normal circumstances is found abundantly in most cells, especially in the liver and brain. 

There have been very few good studies of glutathione's use as a neuroprotective supplement useful for Alzheimer's Disease, but studies do show that endogenous glutathione is both neuroprotective and lacking in patients with AD.  More neurological studies of glutathione have focused upon its usefulness in Parkinson's Disease, due to the remarkable absence of the anti-oxidant in the substantia nigra portion of the brains of those afflicted with the illness.  Wikipedia states reasons why supplementation might not guarantee delivery of glutathione where it is most needed in the body, and recommends attempting to supply the substrates instead: glutamine, n-acetylcysteine, and glycine (available in lecithin), as well as the micronutrient selenium.

An early 1997 American study stated that glutathione is stored cysteine which protects against oxidative damage as well as a variety of toxic chemicals in the CNS which lead to age-related neuro-degenerative diseases.  Cell death occurs due to "marked reduction" of glutathione levels in both the mitochondria and the cell itself.   The study concludes that increasing glutathione levels could have therapeutic benefits both for aging populations and those with inborn errors of glutathione metabolism.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9377474

A 2008 large-scale randomized Johns Hopkins study selected 601 moderately disabled older women from a test pool of over 32,000 individuals.  The investigation found age to be "strongly and significantly" inversely associated with the amount of glutathione peroxidase present in the body.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2964084/

A 2015 controlled study in India sought to use MRI to analyze brain glutathione levels in order to distinguish between mild cognitive dysfunctioning, Alzheimer's Disease and normal brains of a healthy older control population. Two regions of the brain were studied in each individual: hippocampus and frontal cortex.  A reduction in glutathione was discovered in both regions of Alzheimer's-affected brains, while a notable difference specifically in hippocampus GP levels was discovered in comparing the mild cognitive dysfunctioning population sample with the control sample.  An overall direct correlation was found between brain glutathione levels and cognitive functioning.  The study concluded that the evidence was "compelling" that MRI analysis of brain glutathione could provide a useful diagnostic bio-marker to help distinguish between AD and mild cognitive dysfunctioning.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26003861
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 08, 2017, 09:34:25 PM
Addenda:

Last night I woke up with a sneezing attack, and instead of taking an antihistimine, took 2 g lecithin and went back to bed.  In 5 minutes, the sneezing and sniffling stopped.  In 10 minutes my sinuses opened up and I was able to get back to sleep.

Also came across this link by accident this a.m. saying that a few g lecithin will unblock milk ducts of lactating women.  (Been there too!) :)

https://kellymom.com/nutrition/vitamins/lecithin/

Wow! I had never heard of this use for lecitihin... Our little Florida family could use some of this now...
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 09, 2017, 02:40:17 AM
Been dozing at the computer and editing and re doing, 'scuse it.
Going to re-post and finish this now. Last version.

Yowbarb Note: I sat here half awake and remembered a schoolteacher Mrs. Garcia mentioning this in passing that some foods which people say are bad for you are not bad.  I remember her being my teacher when I was pretty young it was like 1949 and she was a very memorable person. She talked about all sorts of things, about dire poverty in MX and people digging earthworms and washing and frying them up for food, how all parts of the animal were used, brains etc. - things many Americans did not consume.
Mrs. Garcia talked about far into the future when the oceans would be receding way back.

For some reason we met with Mrs. Garcia years later for a field trip day during Jr. High school age. Perhaps 1958. She toured us through her beautiful Spanish-style home. It wasnt in a real expensive district but the home was beautiful with big  Spanish style pottery and plants around. She herself was an upper classtruly genteerl, very special lady.  She shared about Mx-Spanish cultural ideas including how she and her husband had a second family. "Segunda familia," I believe she said.
I believe it was during the field trip she mentioned yet again, many people say mayonnaise is so bad for you, but it gives you important fats you need. She said something about fats in colloidal suspension, and good fats.

This is not real scientific on my part, just sharing some ideas.  Posting this because of the discussions here (a lot more technical) about various actions in the body involving fat and how important they are. Indirectly related to the lipids needed, the brain, etc.

wikipedia:
"Eating mayonnaise in moderation then ensures that the fat-soluble nutrients you take in daily through your diet do not get wasted and instead be absorbed efficiently by your body."

Barb Note: I have noticed over the years, feeling better when I do include mayo in my diet and in general not worrying much about fat consumption. I don't consume pork or beef anyway, and don't worry much about fats oils. I avoid consuming a lot of refined products which have transfats;  just take in any kind of veg fat or oil or what is in fish and a small amt poultry during the months. The good fats ghee, chicken fat, avocados are good for the liver...
This is pretty subjective but I can say one thing for sure, feel better and weight under better control and lab work better.  Blood sugar not a problem and my cholesterol count was in a much better range and my food blood fat range was way up. I do not count calories or fat grams and just a little mindful of bad fats and of the hard animal fats except butter.

I am not advocating people necessarily give up pork. For me that is a health basic and my way to honor (who I imagine were) my ancient ancestors who never ate pork and who were forced to give up their religion or die. That is just a preference for me but I surely feel better with no pork at all.

I don't use beef either.

Was a vegetarian but a few months ago added the omega rich fish and some chicken, back to my diet, partly because of the brain and things I have learned here, reading here in this forum. Brain, immune system skin problems I felt like I needed the nutrition from the fish and some poultry and more butter again and things like coconut fat.

Last year: My MD made a speech to me about how bad the coconut fat was for people but then I have continued it and added even more fat (butter, ghee, omega rich fish; mayo and natural oils.) Over all health better, brain seems better and lab tests much better. She was surprised and pleased with my progress.
Just wanted to share this...  I am sure many people would say mayo is not good and you have to have a special kind but I just use a good brand of regular mayo..
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 09, 2017, 05:53:08 AM
Maybe we should think about starting a whole thread about how doing the opposite of what the MD says has been good for our health.

One example that I can recall:  I was hospitalized 8 years ago when my esophagus swelled shut, and given two bad pieces of advice by the attending in-house physician:

1. plan to do off-label oral use of albuterol inhalers in which the mist is swallowed instead of being inhaled (he was hoping to put me in a clinical trial without my permission I later discovered)
2. don't bother getting an allergy test

I visited an allergist instead and after 18 months of process of elimination, the swelling was attributed to GMO corn.  Apparently I'm sensitive to the Bt inserted into the corn genes.

So glad I disobeyed Dr.'s orders :)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 09, 2017, 07:19:10 AM
Some examples off-hand of questionable advice broadly disseminated:

1. Salt is bad, including sea salt

2. Eggs are bad

3. Whole grains should be eaten exclusively.

4. Fructose as a sugar-substitute is good

5. Fats are bad

6. Cholesterol is bad

7. Cholesterol tests measure cholesterol

8. Bt is good for the soil of gardens that grow food

9. Butter is bad

10. Gelatinized broth is bad

11. Store-bought broth is the same as home-made

12. Expect to get all the minerals you need from food

13. Chocolate is mostly healthy

14. Sugar-alcohols are good

15. Unpasteurized milk is bad

16. All the iodine we need is in salt.

17. Lard is bad

18. Bt is a good idea to insert into papaya genes

19. Soy is good

20. Soy is even better genetically modified

Will probably get hate mail from #13 :)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Jimfarmer on November 09, 2017, 10:26:11 AM
Quote
13. Chocolate is mostly healthy
...
Will probably get hate mail from #13 :)

*#!   >:(

Well, I understood that the cocoa component is healthful.  Do you have some contrary info?
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 09, 2017, 02:56:08 PM
Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA, not to be confused with alpha-linolenic acid which is also abbreviated ALA) has been shown to influence brain functioning via at least two mechanisms: direct effect upon the nervous system, and via prevention of diabetes, which as we discussed earlier is a primary cause of Alzheimer's Disease.

An early 1995 German study found that ALA supplementation resulted in a "significant increase" of glucose disposal due to improved insulin sensitivity: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7575750
 
 A 2005 Korean animal study says that ALA prevents the onset of diabetes: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15913551

A 2005 animal study by American researchers reviewed the correlation between free-radical damage and Alzheimer's Disease.  The study concluded that ALA restores normal proteins in the brain, leading to improved learning and memory.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15627516

A 2006 German animal study using three dosing levels vs. an un-dosed control group determined that mortality was lower for all three groups receiving ALA when compared to the control set.  The study also found that the treated groups thrived on less food by their own choice.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Long-term+safety+of+alpha-lipoic+acid+(ALA)+consumption%3A+A+2-year+study.

A 2009 animal study by American investigators found that ALA increases anti-oxidant defenses in aging brain mitochondria, concluding that the supplement "partially or completely" restored mitochondrial health, suggesting that supplementation might be "an effective strategy for delaying brain aging." https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2790461/

A 2014 Korean study stated that levels of endogenous alpha-lipoic acid "significantly decline with age."  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25005184

A 2014 Chinese study found that ALA enhances insulin sensitivity in the liver and assists with glucose metabolism (which as we've seen elsewhere is at the root of protection from AD).  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4186984/

A 2014 American study demonstrated protective neurological effects of ALA, as well as possible use of the supplement in lieu of anti-viral drugs for viral diseases of the CNS.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24269587/

Another 2014 American study that was randomized and placebo-controlled, utilizing both omega-3 essential fatty acids and ALA, found that both cognitive and functional decline were slowed in mild to moderate levels of AD impairment.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3886557/

A 2014 Russian study abstract summarized that ALA showed anti-oxidant and neuroprotective effects against diseases of the central nervous system.  The abstract further stated that it was well-tolerated by patients, concluding that there were "grounds for wide application...in neurological practice."  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25632426

As an unrelated post-script, this 2010 Korean study found ALA to suppress allergies and even anaphylactic responses:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3026184/

Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 09, 2017, 03:17:21 PM
Quote
Quote

    13. Chocolate is mostly healthy
    ...
    Will probably get hate mail from #13 :)


*#!   >:(

Well, I understood that the cocoa component is healthful.  Do you have some contrary info?

Sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings Jim, but inflammation indexes rate chocolate as highly inflammatory, though it does contain anti-oxidants :)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 10, 2017, 03:11:38 PM
NADH, short for the reduced form of Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), is the metabolically active form of vitamin B3, also sometimes called NAD(P)H.  CoQ10 is an enzyme form of NADH.  PubChem explains that NADH is converted into ATP energy which is necessary for life, and is part of the electron transport chain. 

Studies have found supplementation of NADH may be useful in addressing dementia accompanying Alzheimer's Disease as well as Parkinson's Disease, which can have some aspects in common with AD. A disambiguation of the two diseases should precede discussion of supplementation:

A 2004 British MRI study which sought to distinguish biometrically between the two diseases mentioned above found that both illnesses at their worst involved brain atrophy, but with differing locations affected:
Parkinson's Disease without dementia: loss of frontal gray matter (balance and movement center), no atrophy
Parkinson's Disease with Dementia: loss of gray matter progressing front to rear, with occipital lobe (the visual cortex) atrophy in the rear.
Alzheimer's Disease: temporal lobe atrophy (memory/language/emotion processing center) at the sides
Dementia with Lewy Bodies: Closely accompanies some early Parkinson's Disease diagnoses, while alternatively Parkinson's Disease with Dementia follows at least one year after PD diagnosis. DLB resembles AD in several aspects, and is distinguished by abnormal spherical protein deposits
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14749292
(http://brainmadesimple.com/uploads/7/8/8/5/7885523/_5203909.jpg)
(http://brainmadesimple.com/uploads/7/8/8/5/7885523/_2323569.jpg)
(https://alzheimersnewstoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/shutterstock_227273575-1024x971.jpg)

An early 1985 study further breaks down Alzheimer's Disease into AD vs. Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type (SDAT). AD patient brains had normal levels of an NADH enzyme (coQ10), while SDAT patient brains had abnormally high levels plus abnormally high numbers of astrocytes in the forebrain, causing researchers to suspect a difference in energy metabolism between the two diseases (see photo).  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3838807
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/63/Astrocyte5.jpg/500px-Astrocyte5.jpg)
Astrocytes
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A 1996 small-scale Austrian study in Alzheimer's Disease patients found supplementation with NADH to improve assessment scores across the board.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8834355

A 2009 Italian study stated that AD is the most common form of dementia in the elderly.  It also asserted that Alzheimer's Disease is primarily not disease of genetic predisposition, but that it is caused by epigenetic switching affecting production of the enzyme form of NADH (coQ10).  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2925259/

A 2011 Swiss study of late-stage Alzheimer's Disease found that beta-amyloid placques invade both the interior and exterior of mitochondrial cells, limiting the ability of NADH to provide electrons, stalling the electron transport chain and altering the electrical potential of the mitochondrial membrane, in a vicious cycle.  Neurons differ from other cells in that non-neuron cells are able to produce energy from dietary glucose.  Since neurons can't feed themselves the same way, they depend entirely upon energy from ATP via NADH in the mitochondria.  https://openi.nlm.nih.gov/detailedresult.php?img=PMC3226305_alzrt74-1&req=4

A 2013 American study stated that NADH can influence epigenetic switching.   https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arcr351/6-16.htm

A 2014 American study said that NAD+ (the precursor of NADH) levels decline during the aging process, leading to a cascade of aging-related diseases, including decreased expression of longevity genes called sirtuins.  Researchers concluded that supplementation with substrates of NAD+ could positively impact a variety of age-related diseases.  Such substrates might include nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMT) or nicotinamade riboside (NR), both forms of vitamin B3.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4112140/

Parenteral supplementation studies in the 1990's proved the NADH of that period to be ineffective, due to shelf-life instability of NADH tablet processing methods in that era (they literally lost all potency within a few weeks of being produced) and due to lack of bio-availability via the digestive tract.  Then beginning in 2002, a new method of processing oral NADH  to protect it from the digestive tract and endow it with a stable shelf-life, called the Enada method, produced the first usable supplement on the market, and several supplement companies have copied the method.  Dosages range from 5-25 mg, with 10 mg daily being considered safe for longer term usage.  The higher range is best taken in the morning, as it may cause insomnia.

Later in 2015 two small companies further improved oral supplementation by attaching the NADH molecule to ADP-ribose under the supervision of several Nobel Laureates, according to Scientific American (David Stipp, March 11, 2015: "Beyond Resveratrol: The Anti-Aging NAD Fad.").  The two new supplements are marketed under the names of Niagen by ChromaDex and Basis by Elesium Health. 

Finally an actual clinical trial of this new kind of NADH on humans was also completed in 2015 - this was the first human clinical trial since the parenteral trial in the 1990's.  It demonstrated statistically significant increases in endogenous NAD+ levels in healthy subjects from a single dose of the ribose form of supplemental nicotinamide.  No safety issues  appeared, and the effective dosage range was found.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=niagen&cmd=correctspelling




Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 12, 2017, 06:49:41 AM
Maybe we should think about starting a whole thread about how doing the opposite of what the MD says has been good for our health.

One example that I can recall:  I was hospitalized 8 years ago when my esophagus swelled shut, and given two bad pieces of advice by the attending in-house physician:

1. plan to do off-label oral use of albuterol inhalers in which the mist is swallowed instead of being inhaled (he was hoping to put me in a clinical trial without my permission I later discovered)
2. don't bother getting an allergy test

I visited an allergist instead and after 18 months of process of elimination, the swelling was attributed to GMO corn.  Apparently I'm sensitive to the Bt inserted into the corn genes.

So glad I disobeyed Dr.'s orders :)

Wow, RR! I am so glad you survived that...
I also think some of my worst episodes in the past might  have been from some GM food.
Back about 2005 I sat up all night and traced articles back...two Japanese scientists determined that for some people consuming GM products (bacteria, rat, bug genes spliced in, etc.) some people that is enough to cause their bodies to generate killer T cells. Enough to kill the person.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 12, 2017, 06:55:24 AM
Maybe we should think about starting a whole thread about how doing the opposite of what the MD says has been good for our health.

One example that I can recall:  I was hospitalized 8 years ago when my esophagus swelled shut, and given two bad pieces of advice by the attending in-house physician:

1. plan to do off-label oral use of albuterol inhalers in which the mist is swallowed instead of being inhaled (he was hoping to put me in a clinical trial without my permission I later discovered)
2. don't bother getting an allergy test

I visited an allergist instead and after 18 months of process of elimination, the swelling was attributed to GMO corn.  Apparently I'm sensitive to the Bt inserted into the corn genes.

So glad I disobeyed Dr.'s orders :)

RR, just to understand better did the doctor have you using albuterol, (and did you do that with the swallowing of the mist?)
If you were on albuterol, were you able to put it down, go off it at a later time?
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 12, 2017, 07:30:13 AM
Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA, not to be confused with alpha-linolenic acid which is also abbreviated ALA) has been shown to influence brain functioning via at least two mechanisms: direct effect upon the nervous system, and via prevention of diabetes, which as we discussed earlier is a primary cause of Alzheimer's Disease.

An early 1995 German study found that ALA supplementation resulted in a "significant increase" of glucose disposal due to improved insulin sensitivity: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7575750
 
 A 2005 Korean animal study says that ALA prevents the onset of diabetes: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15913551

A 2005 animal study by American researchers reviewed the correlation between free-radical damage and Alzheimer's Disease.  The study concluded that ALA restores normal proteins in the brain, leading to improved learning and memory.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15627516

A 2006 German animal study using three dosing levels vs. an un-dosed control group determined that mortality was lower for all three groups receiving ALA when compared to the control set.  The study also found that the treated groups thrived on less food by their own choice.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Long-term+safety+of+alpha-lipoic+acid+(ALA)+consumption%3A+A+2-year+study.

A 2009 animal study by American investigators found that ALA increases anti-oxidant defenses in aging brain mitochondria, concluding that the supplement "partially or completely" restored mitochondrial health, suggesting that supplementation might be "an effective strategy for delaying brain aging." https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2790461/

A 2014 Korean study stated that levels of endogenous alpha-lipoic acid "significantly decline with age."  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25005184

A 2014 Chinese study found that ALA enhances insulin sensitivity in the liver and assists with glucose metabolism (which as we've seen elsewhere is at the root of protection from AD).  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4186984/

A 2014 American study demonstrated protective neurological effects of ALA, as well as possible use of the supplement in lieu of anti-viral drugs for viral diseases of the CNS.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24269587/

Another 2014 American study that was randomized and placebo-controlled, utilizing both omega-3 essential fatty acids and ALA, found that both cognitive and functional decline were slowed in mild to moderate levels of AD impairment.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3886557/

A 2014 Russian study abstract summarized that ALA showed anti-oxidant and neuroprotective effects against diseases of the central nervous system.  The abstract further stated that it was well-tolerated by patients, concluding that there were "grounds for wide application...in neurological practice."  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25632426

As an unrelated post-script, this 2010 Korean study found ALA to suppress allergies and even anaphylactic responses:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3026184/

RR what an eye opener your post is...
I had heard of the ALA Alpha Lipoic Acid but not read up on it.
It turns out, the ALA along with high omega 3 diet is great for the brain and slows degenerative diseases of the brain.
In this article it did state, not easy to get enough in foods, the amount in regular meats is negligible and they are not so sure about the bio-availability of the plant sources.
Supplementation is suggested with several ideas on this... The site suggests stabilized R-Lipoic Acid, and it is cheap, available Amazon prime. (PLS Note I do not know if this is good, feel it probably is, feel free to comment or post a product you use.) 

All that said, may as well include some foods regularly which are known to have some ALA:  

https://www.superfoodly.com/top-10-list-of-foods-high-in-alpha-lipoic-acid-ala/

Top 10 List of Foods High In Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)
SuperfoodlySeptember 21, 2017

Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 12, 2017, 08:01:06 AM
Quote
13. Chocolate is mostly healthy
...
Will probably get hate mail from #13 :)

*#!   >:(

Well, I understood that the cocoa component is healthful.  Do you have some contrary info?

Jim, RR, I'm going to weigh in on this, not claiming to be an expert.  ;)
After years of having gone off substances such as coffee, chocolate, thinking it was bad then going back on it, I feel chocolate (the cacao) is a medicine and small regular amounts of it are indeed good.
Studies in Sweden show particularly good for women's cardiovascular health...
My cardio health is good and for whatever reason since I have allowed these things back into my lifestyle, I haven't had sudden health emergencies... This is very subjective, I realize...
For anyone who does feel chocolate it is bad, that's OK. I am not saying you are wrong... it just doesn't appear to be bad for me...
Chocolate will be a part of my world as long as I can get my hands on it.
 8)

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-CgEPnwYzezQ/UPOhpeBvebI/AAAAAAAAIKY/PQUziGwRF8I/s1600/Cowboy_Coffee+_1022_full.jpg)
 


Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 12, 2017, 09:20:24 AM
Power to you and Jim both Barb!  Am guessing that many things are probably fine to eat in smaller amounts that might otherwise pose some people a health challenge.   :)

For those with cystic ovaries who may want to shrink the cysts without having them surgically removed, chocolate is eliminated from the diet.  Several websites cover this info.  Chocolate is also contraindicated for those prone to forming stones, particularly oxalate stones, and in those cases, even small amounts can create problems.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 12, 2017, 09:31:35 AM
Barb, thanks for the food list for ALA - I'm a big fan of buttered Brussels sprouts, though others might not like them! :)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 12, 2017, 09:48:41 AM
Quote
RR, just to understand better did the doctor have you using albuterol, (and did you do that with the swallowing of the mist?)
If you were on albuterol, were you able to put it down, go off it at a later time?

Barb, Shortly after the attending in-house physician left that prescription with the nursing station and departed, two members of the hospital respiratory therapy staff came into my room and rather vehemently advised me not to follow his orders, saying that swallowing the mist would cause it to be sent to the liver for processing, and no studies had been done on that application of the inhaler.  So I followed their advice, and when the swelling had gone down enough, I was released to go home and then sought the allergist's help instead.  Because the esophageal swelling was not a direct allergy, his tests were unhelpful at first, as allergies to things that I didn't eat were the only test results.  However, the elimination diet did eventually reveal GMO corn as the root of the problem, when I tested negatively to a corn allergy but my esophagus would clearly swell within hours of eating non-organic corn products.  The name of the diagnosis was "Eosinophilic Esophagitis."

Interestingly, another more knowledgeable physician on duty in the hospital had mentioned to me that a number of patients were presenting themselves for treatment of a swollen esophagus, and he did say that it was known that something relatively new had been introduced into the environment which was suspected of causing the reaction.  He did not elaborate, and at that early date, probably not enough data was available on specific health hazards of GMO products.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 12, 2017, 10:42:32 AM
Quote
RR, just to understand better did the doctor have you using albuterol, (and did you do that with the swallowing of the mist?)
If you were on albuterol, were you able to put it down, go off it at a later time?

Barb, Shortly after the attending in-house physician left that prescription with the nursing station and departed, two members of the hospital respiratory therapy staff came into my room and rather vehemently advised me not to follow his orders, saying that swallowing the mist would cause it to be sent to the liver for processing, and no studies had been done on that application of the inhaler.  So I followed their advice, and when the swelling had gone down enough, I was released to go home and then sought the allergist's help instead. 

That is very fortunate that those hospital staff intervened...
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 12, 2017, 10:45:13 AM
Quote
RR, just to understand better did the doctor have you using albuterol, (and did you do that with the swallowing of the mist?)
If you were on albuterol, were you able to put it down, go off it at a later time?

...when the swelling had gone down enough, I was released to go home and then sought the allergist's help instead.  Because the esophageal swelling was not a direct allergy, his tests were unhelpful at first, as allergies to things that I didn't eat were the only test results.  However, the elimination diet did eventually reveal GMO corn as the root of the problem, when I tested negatively to a corn allergy but my esophagus would clearly swell within hours of eating non-organic corn products.  The name of the diagnosis was "Eosinophilic Esophagitis."

Interestingly, another more knowledgeable physician on duty in the hospital had mentioned to me that a number of patients were presenting themselves for treatment of a swollen esophagus, and he did say that it was known that something relatively new had been introduced into the environment which was suspected of causing the reaction.  He did not elaborate, and at that early date, probably not enough data was available on specific health hazards of GMO products.

RR I would imagine there are lots of medical practitioners who really have no clue the root cause of some of the problems occurring...

Thankfully you yourself have the intelligence to help protect your self..
It's not so easy and for many they are not able to get the medical intervention and/or figure it out on time. So  they lose their lives due to some unknown carcinogen radiation or GM... 

So glad you are still here.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 12, 2017, 02:39:13 PM
Creatine is an amino acid that binds to phosphorus to contribute toward production of ATP energy , while creatinine is the waste product excreted in urine.  It is synthesized in the body if adequate substrates are present, including arginine, glycine, and methionine. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/creatine#section=Top

A 2003 Australian double-blind, placebo-controlled study supplementing oral creatine to young adults found "significant positive effect" on working memory and intelligence tests requiring speed.  Consumption of meat in the diet contributes positively to adequate creatine levels in the body, but vegetarians who supplement may also achieve high enough levels.   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1691485/pdf/14561278.pdf  and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1691485/

A 2004 Italian study established the safety of creatine use even at high doses.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15758854

A 2007 British placebo-controlled trial gave a high dose of creatine (20 g / day) to an aged test pool, and found "a significant effect," concluding that creatine supplementation was cognitively beneficial to the elderly.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17828627/

A 2011 South Korean study on the safety of creatine found that neither liver nor kidney side-effects were found in either young or old test subjects following several months of supplementation.  As a safety measure, upper dosage recommendations were set at under 3-5 grams per day for anyone with impaired renal functioning, but persons with normal kidneys need not be concerned.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21399917
 
A 2011 American study said that creatine protects the CNS against both beta-amaloid toxicity and excitotoxicity.  It further found that creatine "produced an extension of survival," as well as enhancing motor performance and preventing neuron loss.  In addition, it was discovered that combining creatine with coQ10 prevented several types of neurodegeneration associated with aging, theoretically by stabilizing the mitochondria. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21448659
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 12, 2017, 02:46:35 PM
Quote
So glad you are still here.

Thanks Barb! :)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on November 12, 2017, 05:30:17 PM
Maybe we should think about starting a whole thread about how doing the opposite of what the MD says has been good for our health.

One example that I can recall:  I was hospitalized 8 years ago when my esophagus swelled shut, and given two bad pieces of advice by the attending in-house physician:

1. plan to do off-label oral use of albuterol inhalers in which the mist is swallowed instead of being inhaled (he was hoping to put me in a clinical trial without my permission I later discovered)
2. don't bother getting an allergy test

I visited an allergist instead and after 18 months of process of elimination, the swelling was attributed to GMO corn.  Apparently I'm sensitive to the Bt inserted into the corn genes.

So glad I disobeyed Dr.'s orders :)
Excellent, RR.  How did you discover you could have been a human guinea pig (secret clinical trial w/o your knowledge)?

Good thing you saw the allergist, and who knows, s/he may have known about the Bt toxin causing such problems?  It's probably true that a number of doctors and scientists know the potential dangers in ingesting gm foods, but they are silenced by fear of repercussions from the big gm giants.

And I love the idea of starting a new thread about disobeying doctor's orders, orders which we know or suspect of being potentially harmful.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 12, 2017, 05:41:35 PM
Hi Ilinda,

The renegade pair of respiratory therapists who came into my room to warn me were the ones who told me that I was being enrolled in a clinical trial and advised me to refuse.  Fortunately I didn't learn their names, because later the in-house MD pressed me for details about them, and I was able to honestly say I didn't know who they were.

The information about the Bt toxin didn't become completely clear until I began reading about other people's experiences with the the same reaction to GMO corn on-line, confirming the results of the elimination diet vs. the fact that I'm not allergic to normal corn. 
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on November 14, 2017, 06:27:32 PM
Hi Ilinda,

The renegade pair of respiratory therapists who came into my room to warn me were the ones who told me that I was being enrolled in a clinical trial and advised me to refuse.  Fortunately I didn't learn their names, because later the in-house MD pressed me for details about them, and I was able to honestly say I didn't know who they were.

The information about the Bt toxin didn't become completely clear until I began reading about other people's experiences with the the same reaction to GMO corn on-line, confirming the results of the elimination diet vs. the fact that I'm not allergic to normal corn.
Bravo to those brave respiratory therapists, obviously having plenty of integrity.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on November 15, 2017, 04:54:44 PM
There is no direct evidence from clinical trials suggesting that supplemental enzymes might have a preventive or therapeutic effect upon Alzheimer's Disease, but inferential evidence does exist.  In another thread on Town Hall, we discussed the best sources of supplemental proteolytic enzymes. Am substituting the word "protein" for "tumors" for the sake of the Alzheimer's thread:

The Wobenzym N in his protocol is an important key to eroding protein structures, as it consists mostly of proteolytic enzymes (5 of the 6 ingredients listed are proteolytic enzymes, with trypsin and chymotrypsin being especially important in digesting proteins):

Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 3 Tablets
Servings per Container: 266
Amount Per Serving    %DV
   Pancreatin** 56,000 USP units protease (pancreas) Sus scrofa    300 mg    †
   Papain** 492 FIP-unit*** Carica papaya    180 mg    †
   Bromelain** 675 FIP-units Ananas comosus    135 mg    †
   Trypsin** 2,160 FIP-units (pancreas) Sus scrofa    72 mg    †
   Chymotrypsin** 900 FIP-units (pancreas) Bos taurus    3 mg    †
   Rutoside trihydrate** (Rutin) Sophora japonica    150 mg    †
†Daily Value not established

However, it's labeled by weight, rather than being posted in the internationally standardized unit, which is HUT's ( (Hemoglobin Units, Tyrosine basis).  It's important to know if you're getting enough total proteolytic enzymes both to digest food and to break down proteins - need a surplus to do both.  The John Barron Report recommends at least 200,000 HUT's per capsule, preferably 300,000.  He further recommends that they be of plant / fungal origin. https://jonbarron.org/article/proteolytic-enzyme-formula

There are only a couple of formulas on the market that meet or exceed this on a per capsule basis, when all the pertinent line items are added up.  Most don't even have 100,000 HUT's.  The ones that do are, in order:

Transformation Protease, 375,000 HUT's per capsule
Enzymedica, Enzyme Defense, Extra Strength (formerly ViraStop 2X), 300,000 HUT's per capsule
Transformation PureZyme, 185,000 HUT's per capsule
Enzymedica Enzyme Defense (formerly regular strength ViraStop) 150,000 HUT's per capsule
Renew Life Digest Smart Senior Care 133,900 HUT's
Renew Life, Extra Care Digest Smart 122,500 HUT's
Garden of Life Raw Enzymes for women 50+  116,630 HUT's per capsule
Garden of Life Raw Enzymes for men 50+ 116,630 HUT's per capsule
Garden of Life Raw Enzymes for women, 108,500 HUT's per capsule
Digest Smart Women's Care 103,500 HUT's per capsule
Houston Enzymes, AFP-Peptizyde with DPP IV Activity 100,000 HUT's per capsule

This 1984 study is suggestive that lipase should be supplemented at the same time as proteolytic enzyme supplementation: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6199274

An early 1986 Russian study found that certain supplements interfere with proteolytic enzymes, suggesting that they be taken at a different time: vitamins B1, B2 and E.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2422816

A 1991 study correlates the presence of a trypsin-inhibitor with Alzheimer's Disease.  Trypsin and chymotrypsin are both common protease enzymes widely used in the body for a variety of purposes, and play a role in the prevention of brain plaques.  http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/54/5/469.1.long and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1713952

A 2004 Argentinian study noted that an array of brain diseases were caused by beta-amyloid plaques. The mechanism of degeneration was attributed to alterations to the protein sequence, accumulations of the protein in small vessels of the brain, and a defect in the protein clearance system. A 44% increase in un-cleared insulin protein levels was discovered in the brains of patients with Alzheimers, and it was found that the effectivness of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme was "significantly reduced" due to defectiveness.  A key aggregation place in the brain for these accumulating proteins is in the smallest blood vessels or capillaries.  Three necessary pathways for disposing of beta-amyloid proteins were further described:
First, proteins must be degraded both within and outside of cells.
Second, they must be sent to a drainage system that extends to blood vessels.
Third, the fragments for disposal must be reduced small enough to be able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in order to exit the cerebral cortex.
It was noted that in healthy brains, this degradation and disposal process is done with great speed and efficiency. 
http://www.jbc.org/content/279/53/56004.long and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15489232

A 2007 Swedish study found that substances inhibiting the action of ordinary proteolytic enzymes were elevated in both AD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB).  (Note that when enzyme inhibitors are ingested in certain foods they are referred to as anti-nutrients, and unsprouted grains are particularly likely to block some of the important enzymes mentioned in this study.  See #7 on this list: https://draxe.com/antinutrients/ , while a shortage of phosphatidyl serine might explain blockage of another necessary enzyme, and a shortage of gut probiotics might explain both).  The study found that the correlation between these enzyme inhibitors in the brain and Alzheimer's Disease was statistically strong enough to be used as a biological marker of AD.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17761554
 
A 2012 American study noted that it only takes a small amount of any of several proteolytic enzymes to degrade a large amount of beta-amyloid plaque, and that the reaction leaves the enzymes unchanged and intact, so therefore re-usable.  The study further found that there is strong reason to suspect a deficiency of proteolytic enzymes in Alzheimer's Disease, because the vast majority of AD cases occur spontaneously (meaning there is no familial predisposition), likely caused by drugs, toxins and cumulative oxidative damage in aging.  Generation of beta-amyloid plaques was determined to be a normal constant, on-going process, as well as their elimination, with no room for storage of any excess plaque while awaiting the replenishment of proteolytic enzymes.  An increase in the presence of antigens associated with AD also exists, suggesting a possible inflammatory response.  Remarkably, an enzyme need not cross the blood-brain barrier in order to exert a positive influence upon degrading brain plaques.  The enzymes that degrade beta-amyloids tend to have many other functions in the body as well, rather than being limited to just a single purpose; hence it's easy to understand how a transient deficiency might come about.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3367539/ 






Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on November 21, 2017, 01:18:50 AM
Yowbarb Note: Definition, microbiome (in article, Microbiome restoration diet improves digestion, cognition and physical and emotional wellbeing.)

noun
the microorganisms in a particular environment (including the body or a part of the body).
"we depend on a vast army of microbes to stay alive: a microbiome that protects us against germs, breaks down food to release energy, and produces vitamins"
the combined genetic material of the microorganisms in a particular environment.
"understanding the microbiome—human, animal, and environmental—is as important as the human genome"
...
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/search/?term=Probiotics+%27aid+memory+in+people+with+Alzheimer%27s+disease

Results found in 10 databases for "Probiotics 'aid memory in people with Alzheimer's disease"

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Probiotics%20%27aid%20memory%20in%20people%20with%20Alzheimer%27s%20disease

Microbiome restoration diet improves digestion, cognition and physical and emotional wellbeing.

Lawrence K1, Hyde J2.
Author information
Abstract
Manipulating gut bacteria in the microbiome, through the use of probiotics and prebiotics, has been found to have an influence on both physical and emotional wellbeing. This study uses a dietary manipulation 'The Gut Makeover' designed to elicit positive changes to the gut bacteria within the microbiome. 21 healthy participants undertook 'The Gut Makeover' for a four week period. Weight and various aspects of health were assessed pre and post intervention using the Functional Medicine Medical Symptoms Questionnaire (MSQ). Paired sample t-tests revealed a significant reduction in self-reported weight at the end of the intervention. Adverse medical symptoms related to digestion, cognition and physical and emotional wellbeing, were also significantly reduced during the course of the dietary intervention. The intervention, designed to manipulate gut bacteria, had a significant impact on digestion, reducing IBS type symptoms in this non-clinical population. There was also a striking reduction in negative symptoms related to cognition, memory and emotional wellbeing, including symptoms of anxiety and depression. Dietary gut microbiome manipulations may have the power to exert positive physical and psychological health benefits, of a similar nature to those reported in studies using pre and probiotics. The small sample size and lack of control over confounding variables means that it will be important to replicate these findings in larger-scale controlled, prospective, clinical trials. This dietary microbiome intervention has the potential to improve physical and emotional wellbeing in the general population but also to be investigated as a treatment option for individuals with conditions as diverse as IBS, anxiety, depression and Alzheimer's disease.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on December 25, 2017, 12:45:51 AM
Mark Hyman, MD

Broken Brain is a ground breaking docuseries on the cutting edge research on Alzheimer's, dementia, ADD, autism, brain fog, depression, anxiety, MS, and more. Sign up for the free series

http://products.drhyman.com/brokenbrain/
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on December 25, 2017, 12:44:18 PM
Mark Hyman, MD

Broken Brain is a ground breaking docuseries on the cutting edge research on Alzheimer's, dementia, ADD, autism, brain fog, depression, anxiety, MS, and more. Sign up for the free series

http://products.drhyman.com/brokenbrain/
Have you signed up or seen any of it?  Sounds like a must-see series and thanks for posting.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on December 29, 2017, 01:46:01 PM
Mark Hyman, MD

Broken Brain is a ground breaking docuseries on the cutting edge research on Alzheimer's, dementia, ADD, autism, brain fog, depression, anxiety, MS, and more. Sign up for the free series

http://products.drhyman.com/brokenbrain/
Have you signed up or seen any of it?  Sounds like a must-see series and thanks for posting.

Have not seen...Past few days a bit hectic. Wanted to post it before I forgot. Randomly found it. :)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on January 14, 2018, 10:44:10 PM
ilinda sent a group message and mentioned a book, The Rhodiola Revolution. Rhodiola helps some people recover from Alzheimers.

Will look for more articles on this...

https://www.alzheimers.net/2013-11-14/rhodiola-rosea-for-alzheimers/
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on January 15, 2018, 10:45:22 AM
ilinda sent a group message and mentioned a book, The Rhodiola Revolution. Rhodiola helps some people recover from Alzheimers.

Will look for more articles on this...

https://www.alzheimers.net/2013-11-14/rhodiola-rosea-for-alzheimers/
I bought it as a "remaindered" book from Edward R. Hamilton.  You can often find some really valuable books from ERH for a fraction of the list price.  I'll dig out the book which I started re-reading a month or so ago and post the authors' names, husband and wife M.D.'s.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on January 15, 2018, 10:52:28 AM
Authors of The Rhodiola Revolution are by Richard P. Brown M.D.;Patricia L. Gerbarg M.D..
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on January 15, 2018, 11:27:47 AM
Wow, I was unfamiliar with that flower/herb, and yet it's a perennial that's hardy in the north...

Common names: Rose Root, Arctic Root, Golden Root

PFAF link: http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rhodiola+rosea

(https://www.annmariegianni.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Rhodiola-Rosea.jpg)

Thanks Ilinda!  :)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on January 15, 2018, 07:41:36 PM
ilinda sent a group message and mentioned a book, The Rhodiola Revolution. Rhodiola helps some people recover from Alzheimers.

Will look for more articles on this...

https://www.alzheimers.net/2013-11-14/rhodiola-rosea-for-alzheimers/
I bought it as a "remaindered" book from Edward R. Hamilton.  You can often find some really valuable books from ERH for a fraction of the list price.  I'll dig out the book which I started re-reading a month or so ago and post the authors' names, husband and wife M.D.'s.

ilinda, thanks for bringing forth this info on rhodiola!
Also I had not heard of ERH as a source for books, thanks,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on January 15, 2018, 07:42:48 PM
Wow, I was unfamiliar with that flower/herb, and yet it's a perennial that's hardy in the north...

Common names: Rose Root, Arctic Root, Golden Root

PFAF link: http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rhodiola+rosea

(https://www.annmariegianni.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Rhodiola-Rosea.jpg)

Thanks Ilinda!  :)

R.R. - wow! Thanks for posting this lovely image.
Time for us all to learn how to make tinctures from it...

:)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on January 17, 2018, 07:51:48 PM
As a result of the book, Rhodiola Revolutionand Rhodiola's mention in the Alzheimer's series I recently watched, I found a source of seed and am going to try planting some.  The packet of Rhodiola seed is from https://strictlymedicinalseeds.com and IIRC, they weren't expensive.

They DO like cold weather, but remember, many plants have some adaptive capabilities, and this one is really worth the try!
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on January 17, 2018, 08:47:39 PM
As a result of the book, Rhodiola Revolutionand Rhodiola's mention in the Alzheimer's series I recently watched, I found a source of seed and am going to try planting some.  The packet of Rhodiola seed is from https://strictlymedicinalseeds.com and IIRC, they weren't expensive.

They DO like cold weather, but remember, many plants have some adaptive capabilities, and this one is really worth the try!
ilinda that's awesome!
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on January 18, 2018, 04:41:03 AM
Thanks for the link Ilinda!  I ordered more hyacinth bean seed, and if anyone is serious about starting a patch of Russian comfrey for livestock feed, they have mature crowns available for mail-order!
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on January 20, 2018, 02:34:36 PM
Thanks for the link Ilinda!  I ordered more hyacinth bean seed, and if anyone is serious about starting a patch of Russian comfrey for livestock feed, they have mature crowns available for mail-order!
BTW, I've ordered from https://strictlymedicinalseeds.com before and have always had good luck and highly trust them.

Also, in Rhodiola Revolution, we learn that the herb has been scientifically proven to:
1) maximize energy;
2) fight effects of stress and aging;
3) sharpen memory and concentration;
4) protect against heart disease and cancer;
5) ease anxiety and depression;
6) improve sexual function;
7) enhance physical performance; and
8) block fat for lasting weight loss.

And here's a tiny excerpt, that is so tiny, it should not violate any copyrights:

"we were climbing in the Sayan Mountains, the eastern continuation of the Altai range, on the northern border of Mongolia, searchcing for Rhodiola rosea growing in the wild.  Our journey already had taken us 6,000 feet above sea level in just 3 hours. After scrambling for miles on slippery rocks in a cold glacial river, we followed our guide, Pavel, through subarctic terrain to an altitude of 10,000 feet.  Our last hurdle was a 200-foot sheer rock cliff, which we somehow managed to scale.  When we got to the other side, we were greeted by the bright golden flowers of Rhodiola rosea growing everywhere in the walls of a craggy ravine."

Somewhere in the book and/or in the video series featuring Dr's Brown and Gerbarg, is a discussion of astronauts and how the Soviet astronauts would return from space looking fit and standing tall, whereas the American astronauts were so weak they could barely walk, if at all, and needed a lengthy recovery period.  What Americans did not know at that time was that the Soviets had full awareness of this herb and its the studies; plus they used the herb in preparation for space missions, as they knew the benefits.

Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on February 22, 2018, 06:20:59 AM
Yowbarb Note: Cross-referencing some of this info here: https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=2142.msg102755#msg102755
Gingerkane's Topic: Essential Oils to heal the unhealable

sesquiterpenes are substanes found in some foods. Pure essential oils, Care not to over do it, find your way... some sources you eat, some sniff...they are anti inflammatory, antiarasitic 'bring more blood to the brain, improve emotional well being," many life-giving functions. This is just a bit of info...if using essential oils for these brain and emotional benefits or any other benefits, the oils must be created right...pure...

Just a very partial list, sources: Carotenoids found in colored foods, Essential oils of plants, foods including citrus, cinnamon, cloves, oregano and thyme oil, basil, eucalyptus
...
Sesquiterpene

British Dictionary definitions for sesquiterpene Expand
sesquiterpene
/ˌsɛskwɪˈtɜːpiːn/
noun
1.
any of certain terpenes whose molecules contain one and a half times as many atoms as a normal terpene. Formula: C 15 H 24
terpene
/ˈtɜːpiːn/
noun
1.
any one of a class of unsaturated hydrocarbons, such as the carotenes, that are found in the essential oils of many plants. Their molecules contain isoprene units and have the general formula (C 5 H 8) n [that's an 8 not a smiling animated face]
...

The primary structures within the limbic system include the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, basal ganglia, and cingulate gyrus. The amygdala is the emotion center of the brain, while the hippocampus plays an essential role in the formation of new memories about past experiences.
https://courses.lumenlearning.com/boundless-psychology/chapter/structure-and-function-of-the-brain/

High levels is sesquiterpenes, found in the essential oils of frankincense and sandalwood, help increase the amount of oxygen in the limbic system of the brain, particularly around the pineal and pituitary glands. ... The only way to stimulate this gland is with fragrance or the sense of smell.Jul 25, 2016
Emotional Release with Essential Oils: Lotus Integrative Medicine ...
https://www.lotussm.com/blog/emotional-release-with-essential-oils

http://www.teamessence.com.my/sesquiterpenes/An article by Nancy Sanderson

"Now some of you that are new to essential oils may be wondering what are Sesquiterpenes?"

Well it is just one of the constituents in essential oils. Sesquiterpenes, which are found in some essential oils, are:

anti-septic
anti-inflammatory
soothing to inflamed tissue
can produce profound effects on emotions and hormonal balance
work on the liver
are a gland stimulant
increase oxygen around the pineal and pituitary gland
have the ability to go beyond the Blood Brain Barrier (meaning they can cross the blood brain barrier increasing the oxygen to the brain)

What are terpenes ?
http://www.food-info.net/uk/qa/qa-fi69.htm

Terpenes are one of the most widespread group of natural products. They have many different functions in plants and animals, but for food they are mainly important as aroma components. The aroma of for example citrus, cinnamon and many other spices is characterised by several terpenes. Common terpenes (and terpenoids, see below) are limonene and citral (both in lemons), camphor, pinene (pine trees), eugenol (cloves), anethol (fennel, anise), thymol (thyme, oregano), geraniol (roses) and menthol.

As terpenes are largely found in essential oils, they were used in the Ancient Egypt for various religions aims. Camphor was introduced in Europe from the East by the Arabs around the 11th century.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on April 02, 2019, 12:41:16 AM
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2191814-we-may-finally-know-what-causes-alzheimers-and-how-to-stop-it/

We may finally know what causes Alzheimer’s – and how to stop it

January 2019 , updated 30 January 2019

By Debora MacKenzie

AFTER decades of disappointment, we may have a new lead on fighting Alzheimer’s disease. Compelling evidence that the condition is caused by a bacterium involved in gum disease could prove a game-changer in tackling one of medicine’s biggest mysteries, and lead to effective treatments or even a vaccine.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on April 02, 2019, 12:43:59 AM
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2191814-we-may-finally-know-what-causes-alzheimers-and-how-to-stop-it/

We may finally know what causes Alzheimer’s – and how to stop it

January 2019 , updated 30 January 2019

By Debora MacKenzie

AFTER decades of disappointment, we may have a new lead on fighting Alzheimer’s disease. Compelling evidence that the condition is caused by a bacterium involved in gum disease could prove a game-changer in tackling one of medicine’s biggest mysteries, and lead to effective treatments or even a vaccine.

As populations have aged, dementia has skyrocketed to become the fifth biggest cause of death worldwide. Alzheimer’s constitutes some 70 per cent of these cases (see “What is Alzheimer’s disease”), yet we don’t know what causes it. The condition, which results in progressive loss of memory and cognitive function, usually over a decade or so, is devastating both to those who have it and to their loved ones.

The condition often involves the accumulation of two types of proteins – called amyloid and tau – in the brain. As these are among the earliest physical signs of the disease, the leading hypothesis since 1984 has been that the condition is caused by the defective control of these proteins, especially amyloid, which accumulates to form large, sticky plaques in the brain.

The bulk of research into understanding and treating Alzheimer’s has centred on this “amyloid hypothesis”. Huge sums of money have been invested in experiments involving mice genetically modified to produce amyloid, and in developing drugs that block or destroy amyloid proteins, or sometimes degraded tangles of tau.

It has become clear that this approach isn’t working. In 2018 alone, the US National Institutes of Health spent $1.9 billion on Alzheimer’s research. But according to a recent study, the failure rate of drug development for Alzheimer’s has been 99 per cent.

Some have begun to question the amyloid hypothesis. The lack of results has been compounded by the discovery that people – including some in their 90s with exceptional memories – can have brain plaques and tangles without having dementia. In a review of the research to date last year, Bryce Vissel at the University of Technology Sydney, Australia, concluded that there isn’t sufficient data to suggest that “amyloid has a central or unique role in Alzheimer’s”.

“The bacteria in the brain are not the result of Alzheimer’s, but they could be the cause”
In 2016, researchers discovered that amyloid seems to function as a sticky defence against bacteria. They found that the protein can act as an anti-microbial compound that kills bacteria, and when they injected bacteria into the brains of mice engineered to make Alzheimer’s proteins, plaques developed round bacterial cells overnight.

At the time, the team said it still believed that amyloid itself went on to cause the brain damage of Alzheimer’s, not bacteria. But a spate of subsequent studies have looked at microbes. Bacteria have been found in the brains of people who had Alzheimer’s when they were alive. But it hasn’t been clear whether the bacteria caused the disease or were simply able to enter brains damaged by Alzheimer’s.

Multiple teams have been researching Porphyromonas gingivalis, the main bacterium involved in gum disease, which is a known risk factor for Alzheimer’s. So far, teams have found that P. gingivalis invades and inflames brain regions affected by Alzheimer’s; that gum infections can worsen symptoms in mice genetically engineered to have Alzheimer’s; and that it can cause Alzheimer’s-like brain inflammation, neural damage and amyloid plaques in healthy mice.

A whole new hypothesis
“When science converges from multiple independent laboratories like this, it is very compelling,” says Casey Lynch of Cortexyme, a pharmaceutical firm in San Francisco.

Now researchers from Cortexyme and several universities have reported finding the two toxic enzymes that P. gingivalis uses to feed on human tissue in 99 and 96 per cent of 54 human Alzheimer’s brain samples taken from the hippocampus – a brain area important for memory (Science Advances, doi.org/gftvdt). These protein-degrading enzymes are called gingipains, and they were found in higher levels in brain tissue that also had more tau fragments and thus more cognitive decline.

The team also found genetic material from P. gingivalis in the cerebral cortex – a region involved in conceptual thinking – in all three Alzheimer’s brains they looked for it in.

[ continued:  https://www.newscientist.com/article/2191814-we-may-finally-know-what-causes-alzheimers-and-how-to-stop-it/  ]
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on April 02, 2019, 03:53:09 AM
Very interesting Barb. 

Would also link this prion discussion for consideration:
https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,6984.msg108019.html#msg108019

And this proteolytic enzyme discussion:
https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,6752.msg99113.html#msg99113
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on April 02, 2019, 08:18:25 AM
Very interesting Barb. 

Would also link this prion discussion for consideration:
https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,6984.msg108019.html#msg108019

And this proteolytic enzyme discussion:
https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,6752.msg99113.html#msg99113

Thks
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on April 02, 2019, 05:44:30 PM
Barb, thanks for posting this, which looks at yet another possible cause of Alzheimer's Disease.

If it were to be found to be that simple--one cause, bacteria from gum disease, it would certainly make prevention a lot easier!
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on April 02, 2019, 09:05:30 PM
Barb, thanks for posting this, which looks at yet another possible cause of Alzheimer's Disease.

If it were to be found to be that simple--one cause, bacteria from gum disease, it would certainly make prevention a lot easier!

America has lagged behind other western nations, as far as dental health and care...
It has been a problem for people I personally know... Lots of people all they can get is emergency extractions although some improvements...
I can see by the article there is likely a connection between the gingivitis bacterium and the plaque that forms in the brain... For people not able to totally handle the situation right away, at least they can make use of stevia, rubbed into gums, coconut oil technique, taking coenzyme Q10 and Vitamin C.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on April 03, 2019, 05:09:16 PM
Oil pulling should help as well.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on April 04, 2019, 04:34:53 AM
Ilinda, can you describe that?
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on April 04, 2019, 06:51:26 PM
Ilinda, can you describe that?
Oil pulling is an ancient technique where a person will take a spoon (recommendation is 1 TBSP., but I find that way too much, and use 1 tsp.) of coconut oil, or olive oil, sesame seed oil, in the mouth, first thing in the morning, and swish and "pull" it through the teeth, in and around the gums and teeth, more pulling and pushing than swishing.

The idea is that the oil will attach to and "capture" the pathogenic microorganisms and other toxins that are lurking in the gums, teeth, and mouth in general, and then after "pulling" for 15-20 minutes, you spit it out.  Then you rinse with warm water two or three times, spitting all out.  The last doctor I visited also said a bit of sea salt and baking soda could be added to the warm rinse water, as an added bonus.

Some people do this upon arising, and just before retiring at night, while others, in morning only.  Oil pulling has been known to reverse and prevent gum disease.

One caveat is that olive oil is so thick that it's easier to choke on it, whereas coconut oil quickly becomes "watery" once it has been swirled and pulled a bit.  If using olive oil, I recommend paying close attention to what you are doing while oil pulling just because of the oil's viscosity.

Most beginners start with 5 minutes, and as days pass they can work up to 15 or so minutes.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on April 04, 2019, 07:04:38 PM
Just a stray thought about Alzheimer's Disease.

While researching brain health during the recent bout of glioblastoma of my brother-in-law, I read about how the blood-brain barrier does not always function properly during certain illnesses and conditions of the brain, including stroke, post-stroke, brain cancer, multiple sclerosis, and other brain ailments.  When the blood-brain barrier is not functioning up to par, it allows substances into the brain it ordinarily would disallow.  It's compromised.

So in Alzheimer's Disease, when we find in brain tissue, certain microorganisms that derive from the mouth and gums, it might be possible that the Alzheimer's-compromised blood-brain barrier is what allowed their entry in the first place.  It's just a thought.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on April 05, 2019, 06:17:14 AM
Ilinda, I did a NIH search of "blood brain barrier" and "Alzheimer's" and came up with pages of studies - seems as if your hypothesis is correct, and that BBB dysfunction is both cause and effect.  A few are listed below.  All parenthetical comments below are my own:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3086010/ (very interesting study which says that caffeine protects the BBB)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2872930/ (LDL "bad" cholesterol is necessary in order to clear beta-amyloid plaques!)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5129651/ (inflammation caused by leaky gut causes BBB dysfunction)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16782234 (Early Alzheimer's is associated with an intracranial prothrombin [clotting factor] leak which causes BBB cells to shrink up [thus to widen the gate])

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22120145 (The pumps which remove beta-amyloid plaques are located in the endothelial cells which form the BBB gate)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4189524/ (The purpose of beta-amyloid plaques in the body is unknown, but healthy cells regulate production of it and a healthy BBB is constantly regulating the amount of it allowed to circulate)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4397873/ (Beta-amyloid plaques are toxic and under normal circumstances they should be cleared away by phagocytes in a healthy immune response; this mechanism fails due to inflammation injuries to the brain.)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2697631/ (This study was aimed at drug delivery, but contained important information about Alzheimer's: Under normal circumstances, the BBB is enzymatically active and allows only very small particles through the gate; however, in a diseased brain, very large immune complexes are passing through the gate intact.  Immune complexes are left over after the immune system deals with an infection if there are not enough proteolytic enzymes in circulation to degrade them.  In addition, humans gradually lose enzymatic ability to degrade sugars which accumulate in the brain, but supplemental epinephrine restores that functioning - maybe we should be supplementing with pseudoephedrine decongestants, both a brain stimulant and a similar molecule to epinephrine?)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK28180/ (The BBB is located in the capillaries themselves - hence vascular health impacts the BBB)

(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK28180/bin/ch32f1.jpg)
Cross-sectional diagram of the BBB within capillaries from the above study

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3359662/ (Test subjects with dysfunctional BBB also had high triglycerides and low cholesterol levels - hence it's not the cholesterol that we should be eliminating, it's the sugar).

(http://www.shortkidstories.com/onceupon/images/The%20Project%20Gutenberg%20eBook%20of%20Raggedy%20Andy%20Stories%20by%20Johnny%20Gruelle._files/illus-062.jpg)
Raggedy Ann and Andy cleaning out the French doll's head, which had become all sticky inside from being fed too much sugar-water at tea parties
(http://www.shortkidstories.com/onceupon/images/The%20Project%20Gutenberg%20eBook%20of%20Raggedy%20Andy%20Stories%20by%20Johnny%20Gruelle._files/illus-063.jpg)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on April 05, 2019, 06:49:06 AM
Thank you so much for that detailed explanation of oil pulling Ilinda.  Will give it a try! :)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on April 05, 2019, 01:56:40 PM
Back to the above studies which suggested dietary means of preventing plaque build-up in the brain:

It seems we should be including some saturated fats in our diet, as long as they are not trans-fats, and as long as they are not part of sweets.

Healthy saturated fats, which are naturally "fully hydrogenated" rather than "partially hydrogenated":

Eggs from free-ranged hens
Organic full-fat milk, butter and cream, especially raw/fermented
Coconut oil
Palm oil
Cocoa butter
Lard
For those who are not vegetarians, uncured meats of all kinds

In order to maintain cardiovascular health on such a high-fat diet, might want to supplement with:


a full-spectrum digestive enzyme including fat-dissolving lipase.  Enzyme supplementation is especially important for people born without the ability to metabolize homocysteine, as a number of them are lacking in the entire spectrum of enzymes.
https://draxe.com/homocysteine-levels/

a gram or so of lecithin daily to emulsify fats

Vitamin E if you don't bleed easily (ditto for the krill and flax oil)

Taurine to increase bile flow

Fiber

Antioxidants

Magnesium

Co-Q-10

PQQ

B-100 complex to prevent homocysteine formation (some of the B vitamins are also capable of switching bad genes off and switching good genes on, and excessive homocysteine formation is due to a faulty genetic switch)

Folate instead of synthetic folic acid

And to decrease inflammation and heal leaky gut:

Add a gram of flax oil, or flax seed, for strong anti-inflammatory properties

Add krill oil for anti-inflammatory properties

Avoid sugar (using 100% stevia without added dextrose, instead of chemical sweeteners)

Avoid preservatives

Add the amino acid glutamine (as opposed to the inflammatory additive glutamate)

Add probiotics or full-fat yogurt sweetened with fruit, stevia or a little all-fruit jam

Add unbleached/unbromated gluten-free grains and flour

Add curcumins

Avoid cigarette smoke and drugs such as statins, birth control pills, antibiotics, antacids, NSAIDS

Add gelatine

Add bone broth
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on April 05, 2019, 02:59:39 PM
Ilinda, can you describe that?

Some info here as well: 
Topic: "Oil pulling" ancient Indian technique kills strep, helps improve conditions  (Read 7586 times)
https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,5298.msg74829.html#msg74829 
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on April 05, 2019, 03:00:27 PM
Back to the above studies which suggested dietary means of preventing plaque build-up in the brain:

It seems we should be including some saturated fats in our diet, as long as they are not trans-fats, and as long as they are not part of sweets.

Healthy saturated fats, which are naturally "fully hydrogenated" rather than "partially hydrogenated":

Eggs from free-ranged hens
Organic full-fat milk, butter and cream, especially raw/fermented
Coconut oil
Palm oil
Cocoa butter
Lard
For those who are not vegetarians, uncured meats of all kinds

In order to maintain cardiovascular health on such a high-fat diet, might want to supplement with:


a full-spectrum digestive enzyme including fat-dissolving lipase.  Enzyme supplementation is especially important for people born without the ability to metabolize homocysteine, as a number of them are lacking in the entire spectrum of enzymes.
https://draxe.com/homocysteine-levels/

a gram or so of lecithin daily to emulsify fats

Vitamin E if you don't bleed easily (ditto for the krill and flax oil)

Taurine to increase bile flow

Fiber

Antioxidants

Magnesium

Co-Q-10

PQQ

B-100 complex to prevent homocysteine formation (some of the B vitamins are also capable of switching bad genes off and switching good genes on, and excessive homocysteine formation is due to a faulty genetic switch)

Folate instead of synthetic folic acid

And to decrease inflammation and heal leaky gut:

Add a gram of flax oil, or flax seed, for strong anti-inflammatory properties

Add krill oil for anti-inflammatory properties

Avoid sugar (using 100% stevia without added dextrose, instead of chemical sweeteners)

Avoid preservatives

Add the amino acid glutamine (as opposed to the inflammatory additive glutamate)

Add probiotics or full-fat yogurt sweetened with fruit, stevia or a little all-fruit jam

Add unbleached/unbromated gluten-free grains and flour

Add curcumins

Avoid cigarette smoke and drugs such as statins, birth control pills, antibiotics, antacids, NSAIDS

Add gelatine

Add bone broth

(https://rootcausemedicalclinic.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Dairy-fun-facts-223x300.jpg)

Awesome posts, R.R. and Ilinda!
Thanks so much!
:)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on April 06, 2019, 07:15:23 PM
Ilinda, can you describe that?

Some info here as well: 
Topic: "Oil pulling" ancient Indian technique kills strep, helps improve conditions  (Read 7586 times)
https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,5298.msg74829.html#msg74829
Barb, thanks for the reminder, as your link says that coconut oil is the only one which can stop the growth of Streptococcus bacteria.  That's important, because Strep. often live in oral and nasal cavities.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on April 06, 2019, 07:23:42 PM
Back to the above studies which suggested dietary means of preventing plaque build-up in the brain:

It seems we should be including some saturated fats in our diet, as long as they are not trans-fats, and as long as they are not part of sweets.

Healthy saturated fats, which are naturally "fully hydrogenated" rather than "partially hydrogenated":

Eggs from free-ranged hens
Organic full-fat milk, butter and cream, especially raw/fermented
Coconut oil
Palm oil
Cocoa butter
Lard
For those who are not vegetarians, uncured meats of all kinds

In order to maintain cardiovascular health on such a high-fat diet, might want to supplement with:


a full-spectrum digestive enzyme including fat-dissolving lipase.  Enzyme supplementation is especially important for people born without the ability to metabolize homocysteine, as a number of them are lacking in the entire spectrum of enzymes.
https://draxe.com/homocysteine-levels/

a gram or so of lecithin daily to emulsify fats

Vitamin E if you don't bleed easily (ditto for the krill and flax oil)

Taurine to increase bile flow

Fiber

Antioxidants

Magnesium

Co-Q-10

PQQ

B-100 complex to prevent homocysteine formation (some of the B vitamins are also capable of switching bad genes off and switching good genes on, and excessive homocysteine formation is due to a faulty genetic switch)

Folate instead of synthetic folic acid

And to decrease inflammation and heal leaky gut:

Add a gram of flax oil, or flax seed, for strong anti-inflammatory properties

Add krill oil for anti-inflammatory properties

Avoid sugar (using 100% stevia without added dextrose, instead of chemical sweeteners)

Avoid preservatives

Add the amino acid glutamine (as opposed to the inflammatory additive glutamate)

Add probiotics or full-fat yogurt sweetened with fruit, stevia or a little all-fruit jam

Add unbleached/unbromated gluten-free grains and flour

Add curcumins

Avoid cigarette smoke and drugs such as statins, birth control pills, antibiotics, antacids, NSAIDS

Add gelatine

Add bone broth

(https://rootcausemedicalclinic.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Dairy-fun-facts-223x300.jpg)
Thank you, RR, for posting the warning about high-fat diet, although I seriously think a lot of the good fat is really good for us.  One thing to add to the list of fatty foods is avocado, whose fat is about 15% saturated.  That's the really good kind of saturated fat, as is the fat in eggs and walnuts.   About 8% of the fat in eggs is saturated and about 24% of fat in walnut is saturated.  Think of how very delicious and good for us walnuts, eggs and avocados are!
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on April 06, 2019, 10:50:38 PM
Ilinda, can you describe that?

Some info here as well: 
Topic: "Oil pulling" ancient Indian technique kills strep, helps improve conditions  (Read 7586 times)
https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,5298.msg74829.html#msg74829
Barb, thanks for the reminder, as your link says that coconut oil is the only one which can stop the growth of Streptococcus bacteria.  That's important, because Strep. often live in oral and nasal cavities.

Yes, this is a good thing to remember...
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on April 07, 2019, 05:14:46 AM
From Ilinda:

Quote
One thing to add to the list of fatty foods is avocado, whose fat is about 15% saturated.  That's the really good kind of saturated fat, as is the fat in eggs and walnuts.   About 8% of the fat in eggs is saturated and about 24% of fat in walnut is saturated.  Think of how very delicious and good for us walnuts, eggs and avocados are!

Absolutely, and I will miss having avocadoes in SHTF, as they don't grow in most of the U.S., and their continued distribution to the North is heavily dependent upon the trucking industry.  They are, sadly, one of my favorite foods...
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on June 19, 2019, 02:51:08 AM
From Ilinda:

Quote
One thing to add to the list of fatty foods is avocado, whose fat is about 15% saturated.  That's the really good kind of saturated fat, as is the fat in eggs and walnuts.   About 8% of the fat in eggs is saturated and about 24% of fat in walnut is saturated.  Think of how very delicious and good for us walnuts, eggs and avocados are!

Absolutely, and I will miss having avocadoes in SHTF, as they don't grow in most of the U.S., and their continued distribution to the North is heavily dependent upon the trucking industry.  They are, sadly, one of my favorite foods...

When I lived in the "Inland Empire" of Los Angeles, Hemet, CA I had a really tall avocado tree. Whoever nurtured it did a good job, it was a really good avocado bearing tree. I had tons of them enough for holiday gift baskets and lots for salads in the wintertime.
Avocado trees need to be fertilized. There is some method to it which i do not know, getting avocados off to a good start. i was just fortunate enough to have avocado, plum, orange, navel orange on the property. Traded some oranges for lovely grapefruit from my neighbor.

It was an upper desert area but had underground water and the trees had deep roots. One or two times a neighbor saw me spraying the tall avocado tree with the hose and giving it a good soak from time to time. He said it was not necessary but I did that with all my trees. the temp showed at about 114 at times or higher. The trees seem to love the spray and flourished I had lots of fruit. I have not worked with plants or gardening much but on the rare occasion, I seemed to have a green thumb. people would say you don't have to do this or that, but the plants liked what I was doing. The pics look like my tree and my avocados.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on June 19, 2019, 02:58:23 AM
Ilinda, can you describe that?

Some info here as well: 
Topic: "Oil pulling" ancient Indian technique kills strep, helps improve conditions  (Read 7586 times)
https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,5298.msg74829.html#msg74829
Barb, thanks for the reminder, as your link says that coconut oil is the only one which can stop the growth of Streptococcus bacteria.  That's important, because Strep. often live in oral and nasal cavities.

ilinda, thanks for the reminder on that too...
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on June 19, 2019, 03:57:23 AM
What a beautiful tree Barb - I wonder how far north they grow? 
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on June 19, 2019, 08:38:20 PM
Barb, thanks for your avocado story.  You do have a green thumb, even if you're not growing much at this moment. 
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on June 20, 2019, 10:28:35 AM
Barb, thanks for your avocado story.  You do have a green thumb, even if you're not growing much at this moment.

Yep a rusty green thumb, haha.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on June 20, 2019, 10:33:20 AM
PS: I am quickly posting this. I am not the expert so I do not know if this is the best info or not, but looks good.
...
https://homeguides.sfgate.com/make-avocado-tree-bear-fruit-44718.html

How to Make an Avocado Tree Bear Fruit


Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on June 20, 2019, 10:34:49 AM
What a beautiful tree Barb - I wonder how far north they grow?

Hi R.R. amazingly enough this article says they have been grown as far north as Maryland!! I bet they needed a greenhouse to nurture them for the first few years?
...

Latitudes at the 0 degree latitudinal mark (right around the equator) grow the healthiest avocados. However, avocado trees can grow between the latitudes of 30 degrees north to 35 degrees south—as far north as Maryland and as far south as South Africa and Australia.
Avocado Tree Zones | Hunker
https://www.hunker.com/13427380/avocado-tree-zones
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on June 20, 2019, 04:23:11 PM
I'm right around 40 degrees North, so would be one or two planting zones too cold for them here. 

That's too bad for us, but lucky for everyone south of here  :)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on June 20, 2019, 10:10:56 PM
I'm right around 40 degrees North, so would be one or two planting zones too cold for them here. 

That's too bad for us, but lucky for everyone south of here  :)

I hear ya.
Well maybe start a small tree or ten in a greenhouse who knows what climate we might end up with. :)
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on June 20, 2019, 10:14:11 PM
Boost Brain Health with Avocados

As a monounsaturated fat, the avocado can lower blood pressure and increase blood flow — two factors that can reduce a person's risk for cognitive decline. ...
High in folate, avocados are thought to prevent the formation of brain tangles thought to cause Alzheimer's.
Oct 20, 2014

10 Avocado Recipes for Brain Health - Alzheimers.net

https://www.alzheimers.net/10-20-14-avocado-recipes-for-brain/
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on December 07, 2019, 06:55:02 PM
This new Topic whill be a place for Alzheimers and brain health posts.

I just ran across a video, still watching...posting it...

https://memoryrepairprotocol.com/?aff_id=17000&subid=d0TNL4DUI1JU88C9HJJD5KDS
I had mentioned in a post earlier tonight about wanting to start a new topic:  MEMORY.  But I re-discovered this "ALZHEIMERS  -- BRAIN HEALTH posts" and realized this is "THE PLACE"!   More details to follow...

Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on December 08, 2019, 12:23:05 PM
I had planned to do more organized postings here, but just saw this one today, so here goes. https://www.yahoo.com/finance/m/78ebda6c-6131-3f85-bc73-c7e2deb2bb4a/in-addition-to-helping-blood.html


In addition to helping blood pressure and cardiovascular health, deep sleep may play a role in preventing Alzheimer’s disease

Published: Dec 8, 2019 7:06 a.m. ET

A new study in the peer-reviewed journal Science says cerebrospinal fluid during non–rapid eye movement sleep clears metabolic waste products from the brain

 Wavebreakmedia/iStock

An increasingly large body of evidence demonstrates that sleep disturbance increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.


By
QuentinFottrell
Personal Finance Editor

Deep sleep may be critical for your heart — but it may also help clear the brain of toxins that play a role in Alzheimher’s disease. Sleep is essential for both cognition and maintenance of healthy brain function, and slow waves in neural activity contribute to memory consolidation, a study published Thursday in the peer-reviewed journal Science concluded. Cerebrospinal fluid during non–rapid eye movement sleep also clears metabolic waste products from the brain.

An increasingly large body of evidence demonstrates that sleep disturbance increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, a 2018 review of research in the medical journal JAMA concluded. One such study concluded that individuals with sleep problems had a 1.68 times higher risk for developing cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease and that 15% of Alzheimer’s disease cases may be directly attributable to sleep dysfunction.

Staying mentally and physically active also appears to play a role in preventing cognitive impairment. People age 66 and older who got a hearing aid shortly after being diagnosed with hearing loss were less likely to receive a first-time diagnosis of dementia or depression, or be injured by a fall, in the following three years, a study published recently by the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society and carried out by researchers from the University of Michigan found.

A bad night’s sleep can also result in a spike in blood pressure that night and the following day, according to recent research. The study, published in a recent edition of the peer-reviewed scientific journal Psychosomatic Medicine and led by scientists at the University of Arizona, offers one possible explanation for why sleep problems have been shown to increase the risk of heart attack, stroke and even death from cardiovascular disease.

Those participants who had lower “sleep efficiency” showed an increase in blood pressure during that restless night. They also had higher systolic blood pressure — the number in a person’s blood pressure reading — the next day. The researchers said getting a good night’s sleep is important for good long-term health, but so is getting quality sleep, and recommended keeping your smartphone in another room, and pulling down the shades if your bedroom faces east.

“Patients with sleep apnea often have compromised heart health,” according to the National Sleep Foundation. “This is because without long, deep periods of rest, certain chemicals are activated that keep the body from achieving extended periods in which heart rate and blood pressure are lowered.” This 2008 study in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine concluded that individuals with severe sleep apnea are at increased risk for coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and stroke.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on December 09, 2019, 10:40:50 AM
https://www.greenmedinfo.health/blog/turmeric-produces-remarkable-recovery-alzheimers-patients
(Editor's Note:  It's interesting that after only three months of treatment, beneficial changes were notes in one study....)

Turmeric Produces 'Remarkable' Recovery in Alzheimer's Patients

    "© [Article Date] GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here //www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter."
Views 278470
     
Posted on:
Monday, June 10th 2013 at 9:00 am
Written By:
Sayer Ji, Founder
This article is copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2019
Visit our Re-post guidelines

Turmeric has been used in India for over 5,000 years, which is likely why still today both rural and urban populations have some of the lowest prevalence rates of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the world. A study on patients with AD found that less than a gram of turmeric daily, taken for three months, resulted in 'remarkable improvements'
Alzheimer's Disease: A Disturbingly Common Modern Rite of Passage
A diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), sadly, has become a rite of passage in so-called developed countries. AD is considered the most common form of dementia, which is defined as a serious loss of cognitive function in previously unimpaired persons, beyond what is expected from normal aging.
A 2006 study estimated that 26 million people throughout the world suffer from this condition, and that by 2050, the prevalence will quadruple, by which time 1 in 85 persons worldwide will be afflicted with the disease.[1]
Given the global extent of the problem, interest in safe and effective preventive and therapeutic interventions within the conventional medical and alternative professions alike are growing.
Unfortunately, conventional drug-based approaches amount to declaring chemical war upon the problem, a mistake which we have documented elsewhere, and which can result in serious neurological harm, as evidenced by the fact that this drug class carries an alarmingly high risk for seizures, according to World Health Organization post-marketing surveillance statistics.[2]
What the general public is therefore growing most responsive to is using time-tested, safe, natural and otherwise more effective therapies that rely on foods, spices and familiar culinary ingredients.
Remarkable Recoveries Reported after Administration of Turmeric
Late last year, a remarkable study was published in the journal Ayu titiled "Effects of turmeric on Alzheimer's disease with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia." [ii] Researchers described three patients with Alzheimer's disease whose behavioral symptoms were "improved remarkably" as a result of consuming 764 milligram of turmeric (curcumin 100 mg/day) for 12 weeks. According to the study:
All three patients exhibited irritability, agitation, anxiety, and apathy, two patients suffer from urinary incontinence and wonderings. They were prescribed turmeric powder capsules and started recovering from these symptoms without any adverse reaction in the clinical symptom and laboratory data."
After only 3 months of treatment, both the patients' symptoms and the burden on their caregivers were significantly decreased.
The report describes the improvements thusly:
In one case, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was up five points, from 12/30 to 17/30. In the other two cases, no significant change was seen in the MMSE; however, they came to recognize their family within 1 year treatment. All cases have been taking turmeric for more than 1 year, re-exacerbation of BPSD was not seen."
This study illustrates just how powerful a simple natural intervention using a time-tested culinary herb can be. Given that turmeric has been used medicinally and as a culinary ingredient for over 5,000 years in Indian culture, even attaining the status of a 'Golden Goddess,' we should not be surprised at this result. Indeed, epidemiological studies of Indian populations reveal that they have a remarkably lower prevalence of Alzheimer's disease relative to Western nations, [3] and this is true for both rural and more "Westernized" urban areas of India.[4]
Could turmeric be a major reason for this?
Turmeric's Anti-Alzheimer's Properties
The GreenMedInfo.com database now contains a broad range of published studies on the value of turmeric, and its primary polyphenol curcumin (which gives it its golden hue), for Alzheimer's disease prevention and treatment.*
While there are 114 studies on our Turmeric research page indicating turmeric has a neuroprotective set of physiological actions, [5] 30 of these studies are directly connected to turmeric's anti-Alzheimer's disease properties.**
Two of these studies are particularly promising, as they reveal that curcumin is capable of enhancing the clearance of the pathological amyloid–beta plaque in Alzheimer's disease patients,[6] and that in combination with vitamin D3 the neurorestorative process is further enhanced.[7] Additional preclinical research indicates curcumin (and its analogs) has inhibitory and protective effects against Alzheimer's disease associated β-amyloid proteins.[8] [9] [10]
Other documented Anti-Alzheimer's mechanisms include:
   •   Anti-inflammatory: Curcumin has been found to play a protective role against β-amyloid protein associated inflammation.[11]
   •   Anti-oxidative: Curcumin may reduce damage via antioxidant properties.[12]
   •   Anti-cytotoxic: Curcumin appears to protect against the cell-damaging effects of β-amyloid proteins.[13] [14]
   •   Anti-amyloidogenic: Turmeric contains a variety of compounds (curcumin, tetrahydrocurcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin) which may strike to the root pathological cause of Alzheimer's disease by preventing β-amyloid protein formation.[15] [16] [17] [18]
   •   Neurorestorative: Curcuminoids appear to rescue long-term potentiation (an indication of functional memory) impaired by amyloid peptide, and may reverse physiological damage by restoring distorted neurites and disrupting existing plaques. [19] [20]
   •   Metal-chelating properties: Curcumin has a higher binding affinity for iron and copper rather than zinc, which may contribute to its protective effect in Alzheimer's disease, as iron-mediated damage may play a pathological role.[21] [22]
Just The Tip of the Medicine Spice Cabinet
The modern kitchen pantry contains a broad range of anti-Alzheimer's disease items, which plenty of science now confirms. Our Alzheimer's research page contains research on 97 natural substances of interest. Top on the list, of course, is curcumin. Others include:
   •   Coconut Oil: This remarkable substance contains approximately 66% medium chain triglycerides by weight, and is capable of improving symptoms of cognitive decline in those suffering from dementia by increasing brain-boosing ketone bodies, and perhaps more remarkably, within only one dose, and within only two hours.[23]
   •   Cocoa: A 2009 study found that cocoa procyanidins may protect against lipid peroxidation associated with neuronal cell death in a manner relevant to Alzheimer's disease.[24]
   •   Sage: A 2003 study found that sage extract has therapeutic value in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease.[25]
   •   Folic acid: While most of the positive research on this B vitamin has been performed on the semi-synthetic version, which may have unintended, adverse health effects, the ideal source for this B vitamin is foliage, i.e. green leafy vegetables, as only foods provide folate. Also, the entire B group of vitamins, especially including the homocysteine-modulating B6 and B12,[26] may have the most value in Alzheimer's disease prevention and treatment. 
   •   Resveratrol: this compound is mainly found in the Western diet in grapes, wine, peanuts and chocolate. There are 16 articles on our website indicating it has anti-Alzheimer's properties.[27]
Other potent natural therapies include:
   •   Gingko biloba: is one of the few herbs proven to be at least as effective as the pharmaceutical drug Aricept in treating and improving symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.[28] [29]
   •   Melissa offinalis: this herb, also known as Lemon Balm, has been found to have therapeutic effect in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease.[30]
   •   Saffron: this herb compares favorably to the drug donepezil in the treatment of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.[31]
As always, the important thing to remember is that it is our diet and environmental exposures that largely determine our risk of accelerated brain aging and associated dementia. Prevention is an infinitely better strategy, especially considering many of the therapeutic items mentioned above can be used in foods as spices. Try incorporating small, high-quality culinary doses of spices like turmeric into your dietary pattern, remembering that 'adding it to taste,' in a way that is truly enjoyable, may be the ultimate standard for determining what a 'healthy dose' is for you.
Notes:
*This statement is not meant to be used to prevent, diagnosis, treat, or cure a disease; rather, it is a statement of fact: the research indexed on our database indicates it
**Our professional database users are empowered to employ the 'Advanced Database Options' listed on the top of the Turmeric research page and after clicking the function "Sort Quick Summaries by Title Alphabetically" under "Available Sorting Options" they can quickly retrieve an alphabetical list of all 613 diseases relevant to the Turmeric research, and then choosing the "Focus" articles selection to the right of the "Alzheimer's disease" heading to see only the 30 study abstracts relevant to the topic.

References
[1] Ron Brookmeyer, Elizabeth Johnson, Kathryn Ziegler-Graham, H Michael Arrighi. Forecasting the global burden of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimers Dement. 2007 Jul ;3(3):186-91. PMID: 19595937


[2] Nozomi Hishikawa, Yoriko Takahashi, Yoshinobu Amakusa, Yuhei Tanno, Yosh*take Tuji, Hisayoshi Niwa, Nobuyuki Murakami, U K Krishna. Effects of turmeric on Alzheimer's disease with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Ayu. 2012 Oct ;33(4):499-504. PMID: 23723666


[3] V Chandra, R Pandav, H H Dodge, J M Johnston, S H Belle, S T DeKosky, M Ganguli. Incidence of Alzheimer's disease in a rural community in India: the Indo-US study. Neurology. 2001 Sep 25 ;57(6):985-9. PMID: 11571321


[4] GreenMedInfo.com, Declaring Chemical Warfare Against Alzheimer's.


[5] GreenMedInfo.com, Turmeric's Neuroprotective Properties (114 study abstracts)


[6] Laura Zhang, Milan Fiala, John Cashman, James Sayre, Araceli Espinosa, Michelle Mahanian, Justin Zaghi, Vladimir Badmaev, Michael C Graves, George Bernard, Mark Rosenthal. Curcuminoids enhance amyloid-beta uptake by macrophages of Alzheimer's disease patients. J Alzheimers Dis. 2006 Sep;10(1):1-7. PMID: 16988474


[7] Ava Masoumi, Ben Goldenson, Senait Ghirmai, Hripsime Avagyan, Justin Zaghi, Ken Abel, Xueying Zheng, Araceli Espinosa-Jeffrey, Michelle Mahanian, Phillip T Liu, Martin Hewison, Matthew Mizwickie, John Cashman, Milan Fiala. 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 interacts with curcuminoids to stimulate amyloid-beta clearance by macrophages of Alzheimer's disease patients. J Alzheimers Dis. 2009 Jul;17(3):703-17. PMID: 19433889


[8] Hongying Liu, Zhong Li, Donghai Qiu, Qiong Gu, Qingfeng Lei, Li Mao. The inhibitory effects of different curcuminoids onβ-amyloid protein, β-amyloid precursor protein and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 in swAPP HEK293 cells. Int Dent J. 1996 Feb;46(1):22-34. PMID: 20727383


[9] Shilpa Mishra, Mamata Mishra, Pankaj Seth, Shiv Kumar Sharma. Tetrahydrocurcumin confers protection against amyloidβ-induced toxicity. Neuroreport. 2010 Nov 24. Epub 2010 Nov 24. PMID: 21116204


[10] Xiao-Yan Qin, Yong Cheng, Long-Chuan Yu. Potential protection of curcumin against intracellular amyloid beta-induced toxicity in cultured rat prefrontal cortical neurons. Neurosci Lett. 2010 Aug 9;480(1):21-4. PMID: 20638958


[11] Hong-Mei Wang, Yan-Xin Zhao, Shi Zhang, Gui-Dong Liu, Wen-Yan Kang, Hui-Dong Tang, Jian-Qing Ding, Sheng-Di Chen. PPARgamma agonist curcumin reduces the amyloid-beta-stimulated inflammatory responses in primary astrocytes. J Alzheimers Dis. 2010;20(4):1189-99. PMID: 20413894


[12] G P Lim, T Chu, F Yang, W Beech, S A Frautschy, G M Cole. The curry spice curcumin reduces oxidative damage and amyloid pathology in an Alzheimer transgenic mouse. J Neurosci. 2001 Nov 1;21(21):8370-7. PMID: 11606625


[13] Xiao-Yan Qin, Yong Cheng, Long-Chuan Yu. Potential protection of curcumin against intracellular amyloid beta-induced toxicity in cultured rat prefrontal cortical neurons. Neurosci Lett. 2010 Aug 9;480(1):21-4. PMID: 20638958


[14] D S Kim, S Y Park, J K Kim. Curcuminoids from Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae) that protect PC12 rat pheochromocytoma and normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells from betaA(1-42) insult. Neurosci Lett. 2001 Apr 27;303(1):57-61. PMID: 11297823


[15] R Douglas Shytle, Paula C Bickford, Kavon Rezai-zadeh, L Hou, Jin Zeng, Jun Tan, Paul R Sanberg, Cyndy D Sanberg, Bill Roschek, Ryan C Fink, Randall S Alberte. Optimized turmeric extracts have potent anti-amyloidogenic effects. Curr Alzheimer Res. 2009 Dec;6(6):564-71. PMID: 19715544


[16] Fusheng Yang, Giselle P Lim, Aynun N Begum, Oliver J Ubeda, Mychica R Simmons, Surendra S Ambegaokar, Pingping P Chen, Rakez Kayed, Charles G Glabe, Sally A Frautschy, Gregory M Cole. Curcumin inhibits formation of amyloid beta oligomers and fibrils, binds plaques, and reduces amyloid in vivo. Neurochem Int. 2009 Mar-Apr;54(3-4):199-204. Epub 2008 Nov 30. PMID: 15590663


[17] Can Zhang, Andrew Browne, Daniel Child, Rudolph E Tanzi. Curcumin decreases amyloid-beta peptide levels by attenuating the maturation of amyloid-beta precursor protein. Gastroenterology. 2006 Jan;130(1):120-6. PMID: 20622013


[18] Ranjit K Giri, Vikram Rajagopal, Vijay K Kalra. Curcumin, the active constituent of turmeric, inhibits amyloid peptide-induced cytochemokine gene expression and CCR5-mediated chemotaxis of THP-1 monocytes by modulating early growth response-1 transcription factor. J Neurochem. 2004 Dec;91(5):1199-210. PMID: 15569263


[19] Touqeer Ahmed, Anwarul-Hassan Gilani, Narges Hosseinmardi, Saeed Semnanian, Syed Ather Enam, Yaghoub Fathollahi. Curcuminoids rescue long-term potentiation impaired by amyloid peptide in rat hippocampal slices. Synapse. 2010 Oct 20. Epub 2010 Oct 20. PMID: 20963814


[20] M Garcia-Alloza, L A Borrelli, A Rozkalne, B T Hyman, B J Bacskai. Curcumin labels amyloid pathology in vivo, disrupts existing plaques, and partially restores distorted neurites in an Alzheimer mouse model. J Neurochem. 2007 Aug;102(4):1095-104. Epub 2007 Apr 30. PMID: 17472706


[21] Larry Baum, Alex Ng. Curcumin interaction with copper and iron suggests one possible mechanism of action in Alzheimer's disease animal models. J Alzheimers Dis. 2004 Aug;6(4):367-77; discussion 443-9. PMID: 15345806


[22] Silvia Mandel, Tamar Amit, Orit Bar-Am, Moussa B H Youdim. Iron dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease: multimodal brain permeable iron chelating drugs, possessing neuroprotective-neurorescue and amyloid precursor protein-processing regulatory activities as therapeutic agents. Prog Neurobiol. 2007 Aug;82(6):348-60. Epub 2007 Jun 19. PMID: 17659826


[23] Mark A Reger, Samuel T Henderson, Cathy Hale, Brenna Cholerton, Laura D Baker, G S Watson, Karen Hyde, Darla Chapman, Suzanne Craft. Effects of beta-hydroxybutyrate on cognition in memory-impaired adults. Neurobiol Aging. 2004 Mar;25(3):311-4. PMID: 15123336


[24] Eun Sun Cho, Young Jin Jang, Nam Joo Kang, Mun Kyung Hwang, Yong Taek Kim, Ki Won Lee, Hyong Joo Lee. Cocoa procyanidins attenuate 4-hydroxynonenal-induced apoptosis of PC12 cells by directly inhibiting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 activity. Free Radic Biol Med. 2009 May 15;46(10):1319-27. Epub 2009 Feb 25. PMID: 19248828


[25] S Akhondzadeh, M Noroozian, M Mohammadi, S Ohadinia, A H Jamshidi, M Khani. Salvia officinalis extract in the treatment of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease: a double blind, randomized and placebo-controlled trial. J Clin Pharm Ther. 2003 Feb;28(1):53-9. PMID: 12605619


[26] Celeste A de Jager, Abderrahim Oulhaj, Robin Jacoby, Helga Refsum, A David Smith. Cognitive and clinical outcomes of homocysteine-lowering B-vitamin treatment in mild cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled trial. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2011 Jul 21. Epub 2011 Jul 21. PMID: 21780182


[27] GreenMedInfo.com, Resveratrol's Anti-Alzheimer's properties


[28] S Yancheva, R Ihl, G Nikolova, P Panayotov, S Schlaefke, R Hoerr,. Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761(R), donepezil or both combined in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease with neuropsychiatric features: a randomised, double-blind, exploratory trial. Aging Ment Health. 2009 Mar;13(2):183-90. PMID: 19347685


[29] M Mazza, A Capuano, P Bria, S Mazza. Ginkgo biloba and donepezil: a comparison in the treatment of Alzheimer's dementia in a randomized placebo-controlled double-blind study. Eur J Neurol. 2006 Sep;13(9):981-5. PMID: 16930364


[30] S Akhondzadeh, M Noroozian, M Mohammadi, S Ohadinia, A H Jamshidi, M Khani. Melissa officinalis extract in the treatment of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease: a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled trial. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2003 Jul;74(7):863-6. PMID: 12810768


[31] Shahin Akhondzadeh, Mehdi Shafiee Sabet, Mohammad Hossein Harirchian, Mansoreh Togha, Hamed Cheraghmakani, Soodeh Razeghi, Seyyed Shamssedin Hejazi, Mohammad Hossein Yousefi, Roozbeh Alimardani, Amirhossein Jamshidi, Shams-Ali Rezazadeh, Aboulghasem Yousefi, Farhad Zare, Atbin Moradi, Ardalan Vossoughi. A 22-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind controlled trial of Crocus sativus in the treatment of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2010 Jan;207(4):637-43. Epub 2009 Oct 20. PMID: 19838862



Sayer Ji is founder of Greenmedinfo.com, a reviewer at the International Journal of Human Nutrition and Functional Medicine, Co-founder and CEO of Systome Biomed, Vice Chairman of the Board of the National Health Federation, Steering Committee Member of the Global Non-GMO Foundation.
Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: R.R. Book on December 09, 2019, 05:10:54 PM
Green Med Info is an excellent resource.  Thanks for sharing in such detail Ilinda!
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on December 17, 2019, 09:31:12 PM
Note from Barb: I happened to stumble upon this while posting something about one of my favorite herbs, Yerba Santa. it is known to help respiratory conditions including asthma.
What I had never heard of before - Yerba Santa is good for the brain and may help Alzheimer's sufferers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eriodictyon_californicum

Eriodictyon californicum

Excerpt:
Medical research
The flavonoid sterubin is the main active component of Yerba Santa and is neuroprotective against multiple toxicities of the aging brain, including possibly Alzheimer's disease.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on December 17, 2019, 09:36:12 PM
RR again, thanks for all the research and wonderful ideas about brain health! Readers: Please see RR's Reply #2, 3, 4, 6, 11 and possibly others.

RR and ilinda have both posted some items worth reading and re-reading.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on December 24, 2019, 02:59:46 PM
http://watch.awakeningfromalzheimers.com/

The above 12-part series is being rebroadcast this weekend, actually for four days, IIRC.  It is worth watching, if you have memory problems, or if you know someone with memory issues.  It's free so enjoy.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on January 09, 2020, 02:35:28 PM

https://foodrevolution.org/blog/food-and-health/prevent-reverse-alzheimers/
“90 Per Cent of Alzheimer’s Cases Are Preventable”


Learn all about the only scientifically proven solution to the international epidemic of Alzheimer’s disease.


By Dean and Ayesha Sherzai, M.D., Co-directors of the Brain Health and Alzheimer’s Prevention Program at Loma Linda University Medical Center
Excerpted from The Alzheimer’s Solution: A Breakthrough Program to Prevent and Reverse the Symptoms of Cognitive Decline at Every Age
If you would have told us fifteen years ago that we’d be writing the first book about the only scientifically proven solution to the international epidemic of Alzheimer’s disease, we never would have believed you.

Fifteen years ago, we were young neurologists practicing medicine the way we’d been taught. We were hopeful that the billions of dollars donated to fund Alzheimer’s research would soon result in a cure, some kind of pill that could affect the pathology we’d learned so much about. We pursued the most prestigious fellowships in our field—at the National Institutes of Health and University of California, San Diego—and worked with leading researchers at the forefront of the fight against Alzheimer’s. We wanted to find a solution. And we did, eventually—just not the solution we expected.

It was during those fifteen years that we conducted one of the most comprehensive studies on the incidence of dementia, and designed a groundbreaking protocol for Alzheimer’s treatment and prevention.

Our work began at Loma Linda University and then took us to Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles before we returned to Loma Linda to continue our research and serve communities throughout Southern California and beyond. And it was during those fifteen years that we treated thousands of patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s disease with our innovative NEURO Plan, helping them reverse symptoms, prevent further decline, add years to their lives, and change the trajectory of their health.

So many of these patients shared their stories with us. They told us that their parents or grandparents had Alzheimer’s and that developing the disease themselves was their single greatest fear. They told us about the humiliation of having to rely on caregivers to meet their basic needs.

They’d assumed there was no treatment, that they would be ostracized if others found out about their condition. Some of these patients were having trouble remembering names or had gotten lost in a familiar place. Some of them already had a formal Alzheimer’s diagnosis when they arrived at our clinic, unable to express themselves or recognize their loved ones.

If this sounds familiar to you, we want you to know there is hope. There is a way to prevent cognitive decline, to slow its progression and improve quality of life for those who already have a diagnosis.

What conventional medicine hasn’t told you or your loved ones, or any of the nearly six million people living with Alzheimer’s in the United States, or the forty-seven million people living with Alzheimer’s worldwide, is that within the normal life span, 90 percent of Alzheimer’s cases can be prevented.

This figure bears repeating: 90 percent of grandparents, parents, husbands, and wives should have been spared. Ninety percent of people living with Alzheimer’s or dementia didn’t have the resources or knowledge they needed to prevent this devastating disease.

Ninety percent of us can avoid ever getting Alzheimer’s, and for the rest of us, the 10 percent with strong genetic risk for cognitive decline, the disease can potentially be delayed by ten to fifteen years.

This isn’t just an estimate or wishful thinking: it’s a figure based on rigorous science and the remarkable results we’ve seen in our clinic.
As it turns out, the solution to Alzheimer’s has been hiding in plain sight. We now know that Alzheimer’s disease and overall cognitive health are deeply influenced by five main lifestyle factors represented by the acronym NEURO—Nutrition, Exercise, Unwind, Restore, and Optimize.
Direct links exist between poor nutrition, lack of exercise, chronic stress, poor sleep, the extent to which we challenge and engage our brains and neurodegenerative disease.

The truth is that the choices we make every day determine our cognitive fate—but there is almost no awareness of this crucial fact, despite the veritable crisis we’re in when it comes to Alzheimer’s.

The 5 aspects of a healthy lifestyle that form the heart of our unique NEURO Plan:
   •   Nutrition: A whole-food, plant-based diet low in sugar, salt, and processed foods.
 
   •   Exercise: An active lifestyle that incorporates movement every hour— not just a stop at the gym after an otherwise sedentary day.
 
   •   Unwind: Stress management in the form of meditation, yoga, mindful breathing exercises, time spent in nature, and the support of strong communities.
 
   •   Restore: Seven to eight hours of regular, detoxifying sleep through intensive sleep hygiene, treatment for sleep disorders, and management of medications and foods that adversely affect sleep.
 
   •   Optimize: Multimodal activities (like music) that challenge and engage many of the brain’s capacities, as well as meaningful social interaction.
 
While it may be easier to blame a devastating disease like Alzheimer’s on a single gene, this false belief is killing millions. The truth is much harder to accept—that we are bringing Alzheimer’s disease into our households through the choices we make every day. But the truth is also liberating because it puts control back in our hands.

There were also other findings at the clinic—results that were almost unbelievable. We worked with a patient who had a bad habit of eating cookies and cake. Her glycated hemoglobin level was 13 (as revealed by an HbA1c blood test, which measures average blood sugar over a period of three months); a score of 6.5 or above is considered diabetic. She was beginning to forget names and struggle with simple tasks at her job, both of which were creating great anxiety. We helped her reform her diet and after three months, her HbA1c had plummeted to 6. Even more shockingly, she said her brain fog had lifted.

Another patient started walking around his neighborhood each morning and reported that he was thinking more clearly than he had in decades. A follow-up neuropsychological test confirmed that his memory had in fact improved. One woman in the early stages of cognitive decline was suffering from white matter disease (deterioration of white matter, a type of brain tissue). One year after she adopted a plant-based diet, an MRI revealed improvements in the size of her hippocampus. Our patients were showing us over and over that lifestyle could not only slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, but even reverse cognitive symptoms. Lifestyle was not just prevention: it was a potential treatment.

As the co-directors of the Brain Health and Alzheimer’s Prevention Program at Loma Linda University, we’ve guided thousands of people through the highly personalized process of lifestyle change.

We now have hundreds of these remarkable stories.
Behind all the science, behind all the statistical analysis and the papers published year after year in well-respected journals, is the plate of food on the table. The biggest factor in our long-term health is what we choose to eat three to four times per day.

Food determines the fate of our bodies—how we grow, how we age, and how we die. What we eat every day creates and re-creates both our cells and their supporting structures. What we fail to eat causes deficiencies that stress and traumatize the body. Though the brain comprises only 2 percent of the body by weight, it uses up to 25 percent of the body’s energy, and because food is energy, our brains are especially vulnerable to each nutritional choice we make.

We can think of food as a type of environmental exposure through which we set up the potential for health or the potential for disease. What you choose to eat creates either an environment in which the brain can thrive and repair itself, or an environment that promotes decline.
Some researchers have argued that Alzheimer’s is essentially a garbage disposal problem, the brain’s inability to cope with what we feed it over a lifetime. Poor nutrition damages the brain in so many ways: it causes inflammation and the buildup of oxidative by-products, clogs blood vessels, and deprives your brain of the nutrients it needs to strengthen neurons, their connections, and critical support structures.

Because of its fundamental role in sustaining and regenerating the body, food is the single greatest tool we have in the fight against Alzheimer’s. As lifestyle physicians and researchers, we cannot overstate the importance of food for brain health: it is by far the most important lifestyle factor.

The dietary choices we make every day influence the prevention, delay, or progression of cognitive decline. Our clinical research has shown again and again, with patients of all ages and degrees of neurodegenerative disease, that adhering to a brain-healthy diet results in better cognition. It’s that simple.

Or is it? We all know we should eat “healthy.” We know that vegetables are a better choice than cake, that we should avoid sodas and sugary drinks and anything called “fast food.”  Most of us know that the steady increase in our consumption of processed foods over the past fifty years has led to an epidemic of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. But many of us don’t understand the direct connection between food and the brain.

There is an assumption—perpetuated by scientists, researchers, and even doctors—that the brain is too complex to be in influenced by our daily actions, that it’s somehow not part of the physical body. Many of our patients accept that alcohol consumption poisons the liver. Studies have proven that smoking causes lung cancer. Yet most patients have trouble accepting that the cognitive symptoms they’re experiencing could be the result of something as simple as food.

The brain is damaged exponentially by poor nutritional choices, more so than all other bodily systems given how hard it works, how much energy it consumes, and how much waste it’s responsible for clearing. Cognitive health is intrinsically linked to overall health, and when we fail to nourish our bodies, we also fail to nourish our brains. The inverse is true as well: giving our bodies the right foods protects and strengthens our brains.

Nutrition is unique in that it creates more anxiety and confusion than any other lifestyle factor in the NEURO Plan. With all of the overwhelming and contradictory information about nutrition, it might seem nearly impossible to come up with a plan that you feel confident is contributing to your overall health, let alone your brain health.

One website tells you to cut out carbohydrates. Your doctor, in a hurried appointment without much time for questions, says you should eat less meat—but how much is “less”?  Then you read a book that says some, but not all carbohydrates, are essential. A good friend tells you that fat is now considered healthy. A magazine article claims that vegetarian diets don’t provide all the protein you need.

Despite your frustrations and your very busy life, you do the best you can. You adopt a heart-healthy diet. You try to lose weight. You make a concerted effort to eat more vegetables and buy fewer pre-packaged foods, and hope that will be enough. If you’re in the midst of this struggle yourself, you’ve come to the right place.

Though current research points to an ideal diet for brain health—a whole-food, plant-based, low-sugar diet with little meat and dairy—numerous studies have also proven that incremental steps toward brain-healthy eating have tremendous benefits. Please keep this important concept in mind as you read. The goal is not necessarily to eat perfectly for the brain, but to figure out the best, most sustainable diet for you based on verified research and your unique circumstances.

Excerpted from The Alzheimer’s Solution: A Breakthrough Program to Prevent and Reverse the Symptoms of Cognitive Decline at Every Age. Get the whole book here.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on January 09, 2020, 02:40:00 PM
http://watch.awakeningfromalzheimers.com/

The above 12-part series is being rebroadcast this weekend, actually for four days, IIRC.  It is worth watching, if you have memory problems, or if you know someone with memory issues.  It's free so enjoy.
A main message I got from viewing the series is that there are many, many causes of dementia, and if not corrected, the condition will continue until it's too late to reverse it.  Memory loss is not a static thing, and that is why it is so critical to discover the specific cause(s) of a given case of dementia or Alz. Dis.

For example, some of the causes are vitamin B12 deficiency, ingestion of trans fats, exposure to wi fi, hypothyroidism, and many more.  Some of these doctors do really extensive testing to determine the cause, and once determined, it can nearly always be reversed, by eliminating the condition that is causing it.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on January 09, 2020, 06:07:40 PM

http://watch.awakeningfromalzheimers.com/

The above 12-part series is being rebroadcast this weekend, actually for four days, IIRC.  It is worth watching, if you have memory problems, or if you know someone with memory issues.  It's free so enjoy.


ilinda, thanks for posting this info, so very much needed by so many people...
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on February 09, 2020, 02:28:15 PM
https://www.medicinenet.com/healthy_eating_benefits_cinnamon/article.htm?ecd=mnl_spc_012820

Health Benefits of Cinnamon

Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on February 12, 2020, 12:40:42 AM
https://www.olivetomato.com/complete-guide-authentic-mediterranean-diet/

Complete Guide to The Authentic Mediterranean Diet

Excerpt:

Alzheimer’s Protection
Studies have shown that a Mediterranean Diet can reduce the risk of cognitive decline that may appear during the aging process. According to research, following a Mediterranean diet can slow some changes in the brain that may point to early Alzheimer’s disease
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: ilinda on February 12, 2020, 12:50:24 PM
The Mediterranean Diet does seem to have staying power, probably because it works.  It's not so much a "diet" but a way of life, and if people will remember to avoid the no-no's mentioned to avoid in the article, they have a good chance of following the "diet".  For example, commercially prepared cheese- or cheese & meat pizza would be an automatic "no", due to the type of fat, amount of meat, type of meat, synthetic chemicals in the crust, synthetic chemicals in the cheese, and more, which could include GM soy, GM canola oil, GM cottonseed oil, sugars of any type, etc.
Title: Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
Post by: Yowbarb on February 12, 2020, 08:24:02 PM
The Mediterranean Diet does seem to have staying power, probably because it works.  It's not so much a "diet" but a way of life, and if people will remember to avoid the no-no's mentioned to avoid in the article, they have a good chance of following the "diet".  For example, commercially prepared cheese- or cheese & meat pizza would be an automatic "no", due to the type of fat, amount of meat, type of meat, synthetic chemicals in the crust, synthetic chemicals in the cheese, and more, which could include GM soy, GM canola oil, GM cottonseed oil, sugars of any type, etc.

ilinda, I agree, it seems like it would be one of the easier lifestyles to follow. More of a lifestyle than a diet.
In past years I have gravitated toward those foods but also added foods not so well suited to me, or not good, perhaps. What I need to do is make a list of foods I eliminate because there are so many wonderful foods within the Mediterranean diet which I do love! 
I've tried several systems, this makes more sense than anything, lately.

It does include some grains, seeds nuts etc. but not  supposed to be refined. I suppose a small amt of refined would show up in these kinds of meals (like if someone shows up with a big loaf of italian bread)  ;D but the overall healthy portions of vegetables and fruits would probalby help overcome the bad effects. (Bad effects of the transgressions.)  ;D