Planet X Town Hall

MadMax - GLOBAL SIGNS &TRENDS - INTERNET, ALL MEDIA => What's Lurking in the Future => Topic started by: R.R. Book on May 10, 2018, 05:34:56 AM

Title: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on May 10, 2018, 05:34:56 AM
Starting a new thread to monitor food prices and availability:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-9m7SZqBmM @ 9:14

A news channel in Canada reports that real vanilla extract may no longer be used to make baked goods and ice cream, as the price has risen from $50/gallon recently to $550 ($800 Canadian).  Rather than using artificial vanilla or charging $12 per scoop of vanilla ice cream, some vendors plan to just remove the flavor entirely from the menu.

(https://www.kingarthurflour.com/item-img/1842_06_08_2015__09_18_48_700)
Title: Food shortages materializing: Making your own vanilla extract from vanilla beans
Post by: R.R. Book on May 10, 2018, 07:46:43 AM
https://draxe.com/vanilla-extract/

A number of consumers find it simple and cost-effective to make their own vanilla extract from vanilla beans.  While it is not difficult to do, the waiting time for the finished product to sit brewing is 8 weeks.

Pure vanilla extract has numerous health benefits:
(https://draxe.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/VanillaGraphic.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on May 10, 2018, 03:46:23 PM
Starting a new thread to monitor food prices and availability:
Excellent idea.  Hope to add to it.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on May 12, 2018, 04:38:06 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxS21Te1LSY

Ice Age Farmer says that the end is in sight to artificially low grocery prices in the U.S. created by a price war among grocers that occurred when Amazon entered the grocery marketplace.  In the wake of recent global crop losses and inflation of freight delivery prices, one food manufacturer has announced that it intends to pass along rising costs to consumers, breaking the trend of food distributors absorbing costs themselves.  Narrator says this will set off a chain reaction in which others in the food industry will follow suit.

Quote
I give it 18 months at the most...

Quote
We should all be taking steps every day to position ourselves in a more self-sufficient, resilient and antifragile community.  "Antifragile" describes a system that external disturbances don't actually cause trouble for.  In fact it benefits from them.

Quote
Most of these threats wouldn't exist if we weren't living in a way that made us dependent on the system.

Quote
I was able to work towards a dream, rather than run from a set of fears.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Jimfarmer on May 25, 2018, 10:58:16 AM
Good Youtube video "NASA data confirms Global Cooling * Buildings Collapse * Crop Losses * Food Shortages"  at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IIz18z5-bQ   Dated 23/May/18.   Duration 7:55.
" NASA official data confirms 2 years of #GlobalCooling -- yet media is silent. Meanwhile, buildings collapsing under snow, infrastructure failing, crops lost, food shortages -- welcome to the #GrandSolarMinimum. Are you taking steps today to thrive tomorrow? - "Not suitable for most advertisers" - please consider donating. "
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on May 25, 2018, 01:11:03 PM
That's one of my favorite channels Jim - such a well-informed young farmer who thinks outside the box and speaks directly from the heart.  :)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 09, 2018, 04:04:12 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AlMcIw42-ew

@ around 11:12 narrator says that crop failures in the UK are causing that country to rely upon imports to feed its population.  However, numerous other countries who have in the past been agricultural exporters have failed to produce a surplus this year, and will not be putting their crops on the international market.  If the UK fails to source food to import, it will run out of food in one year.

(https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/newpix/2018/03/04/19/49D22E6E00000578-5460545-Bare_aisles_and_notices_warning_customers_that_stocks_of_some_it-a-18_1520190593771.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on August 09, 2018, 05:33:55 PM
If the UK has enough food for its people for an entire year, they are way ahead of other countries!
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 10, 2018, 04:41:09 AM
You may be right, and in any case, my guess is that the announcement in their media probably stirred a good many of their citizens to begin prepping, or at least start a garden, though the Brits are known for their sumptuous kitchen gardens:

(https://i.pinimg.com/736x/a3/89/b1/a389b1457ea65dbab76c368cee48d663--dream-garden-garden-art.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 11, 2018, 11:25:44 AM
From Jim's "Daily Headlines" thread today:

Quote
Price of potatoes to soar 900% in Belgium as drought and high temps kill crops
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 13, 2018, 03:15:22 PM
Here's a useful website called the Famine Early Warning Network:
http://fews.net/

Data concentrates upon Central America/Caribbean, Central Asia and Africa.  Africa has the most widespread food insecurity.  Details are provided location by location as to what caused / is causing famine.

(https://s3.amazonaws.com/homemap.fews.net/ml1-en.png)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 13, 2018, 04:23:26 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYEtYTSY2PM

@ around 9:30, narrator remarks that farmers in drought-stricken locations who have lost both their crops and their livestock are being forced now to eat the seeds intended for the next harvest.

Quote
They are literally eating their future.

(https://ak8.picdn.net/shutterstock/videos/16091188/thumb/6.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on August 13, 2018, 07:30:07 PM
Truly sad, and we could all be next.  Add this to one of the links in Jim Farmer's Latest Headlines post today about how Denmark will lose about 40% of their crops this year, worth about $1 billion.

After clicking on the "Denmark drought" link, saw yet another drought story--this time Germany.  Maybe there isn't any area that is guaranteed to escape conditions of drought.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 14, 2018, 08:25:54 AM
The crop losses in Europe are pretty scary.  I read an article this morning which said that French fries in Belgium may now be found for 25 Euros a serving, due to the potato crop failure there. 

Re: the Famine Early Warning Network, I didn't see India listed, which would seem to be a glaring omission.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 21, 2018, 01:35:48 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wi6dzzcsfYU

Narrator quotes British-owned bank HSBC (partly owned by China/Hong Kong), as well as a report from the Global Footprint Network, saying that as of August 1, the world had already used a full normal year's worth of natural resources.  Last year, 2017's estimated resources were not used up until December 29.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing: Wheat, Oats, Hay
Post by: R.R. Book on August 23, 2018, 09:09:37 AM
https://electroverse.net/global-wheat-supply-falls-to-crisis-levels/

Article published yesterday says that wheat reserves of major grain exporters have dwindled down to levels last seen in 2007/2008, which triggered food riots across Africa and Asia.  Half of all wheat reserves are located in China, and China is not expected to release any onto the global marketplace, and in fact is likely to add to its own supply. 

By the end of the season, the large grain exporters are expected only to have a 26-day supply of wheat left.  It is further expected that wheat exporting nations will withhold supplies from international markets, leaving nations that depend upon grain imports with nothing.

All of the world's major wheat producers have been hit hard by unpredictable weather this year:
Argentina
Australia
Canada
the European Union
Kazakhstan
Russia
Ukraine
the U.S.

Germany is anticipating its lowest grain harvest in almost a quarter century.

Meat producers in Russia are complaining that exportation of the nation's grain is driving up prices of livestock feed, as would be the case in any country that exports.

This might be a good time for homesteaders to put away flour in the freezer, or buy loaves of good bread to double-bag and freeze while they are still affordable.  Ditto for bagels, English muffins, tortillas, pitas, buns, etc. if you don't plan on making them from scratch.  Better yet purchase hard wheat berries that store infinitely in lidded buckets or trash cans with DE and oxygen absorbers.

The same website also posted an article yesterday about the price of hay doubling in Canada. 

https://electroverse.net/canadas-cattle-herds-at-risk-as-hay-costs-double/

Here in PA, our family has been advised by Amish neighbors to buy all the local hay we can this month, because farmers are about to take it completely off the market so that their own animals will have enough for winter.  Town Hall readers who have livestock on small homesteads might want to grab some extra bales for the winter while they're still available @ around $5 each for 2-twine bale size.  Those who don't have a large enough barn to store it in can get Hefty 55-gallon contractor bags and double bag the bales, or throw a tarp over your stack.  Might want to plan on at least enough to get part-way through the 2019 hay-growing season, if not further, as we cannot predict what next year's weather will bring.

Now is also a good time to stock up on oats in large 25# sacks which are still a bargain @ around $12 each.  Oats have a natural vitamin E content that protects them from peroxidation, and store well for the long-term in a dry location.  I'm finding that granaries and co-ops in our area are running low on the large sacks, so availability is hit-or-miss right now, and it might be necessary to visit several locations in order to lay in a good supply.

Referred by:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmszbyCNNj0
(This Youtube channel is predicting a hard grain crop failure in autumn of 2019)

(https://i.pinimg.com/736x/3a/01/d1/3a01d11bce1032bcd3f8ae5f012d8e9e--amish-country-country-life.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 23, 2018, 01:32:51 PM
Adding special prayers for those nations that depend upon imported grain in order to feed their people, and which may be denied the opportunity to purchase grain in the international marketplace soon and in years to come.  May healthy alternatives be found, and may the ever-shifting weather patterns bring new crops to market from countries benefiting from improved growing conditions, as we hear of rain and snow in places that were dry, and warmth in places that were cold.  May we find the right balance between the impulse to ensure our own national food security and the impulse to share with those less fortunate.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 26, 2018, 01:13:42 PM
https://news.un.org/en/story/2018/08/1017712

The drought in Mexico this summer has wiped out 280,000 hectares (a little under 700,000 acres) of beans and maize in Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras according to a report just released from the U.N.  Millions of people are at risk of hunger as a result. 

Shortages are expected to drive up the cost of food purchased in stores, making it less affordable to subsistence farmers and their families. 

In the warmer climate of Central America, there is a chance for another November crop, but an anticipated El Nino weather pattern is predicted to compromise harvests.

Referred by: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfQ2k6bluag

(https://global.unitednations.entermediadb.net/assets/mediadb/services/module/asset/downloads/preset/assets/2016/06/24805/image350x235cropped.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Yowbarb on August 27, 2018, 02:13:47 AM
Adding special prayers for those nations that depend upon imported grain in order to feed their people, and which may be denied the opportunity to purchase grain in the international marketplace soon and in years to come.  May healthy alternatives be found, and may the ever-shifting weather patterns bring new crops to market from countries benefiting from improved growing conditions, as we hear of rain and snow in places that were dry, and warmth in places that were cold.  May we find the right balance between the impulse to ensure our own national food security and the impulse to share with those less fortunate.

Amen.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing: Wheat, Oats, Hay
Post by: Yowbarb on August 27, 2018, 02:15:32 AM
https://electroverse.net/global-wheat-supply-falls-to-crisis-levels/

Article published yesterday says that wheat reserves of major grain exporters have dwindled down to levels last seen in 2007/2008, which triggered food riots across Africa and Asia.  Half of all wheat reserves are located in China, and China is not expected to release any onto the global marketplace, and in fact is likely to add to its own supply. 

By the end of the season, the large grain exporters are expected only to have a 26-day supply of wheat left.  It is further expected that wheat exporting nations will withhold supplies from international markets, leaving nations that depend upon grain imports with nothing.

All of the world's major wheat producers have been hit hard by unpredictable weather this year:
Argentina
Australia
Canada
the European Union
Kazakhstan
Russia
Ukraine
the U.S.

Germany is anticipating its lowest grain harvest in almost a quarter century.

Meat producers in Russia are complaining that exportation of the nation's grain is driving up prices of livestock feed, as would be the case in any country that exports.

This might be a good time for homesteaders to put away flour in the freezer, or buy loaves of good bread to double-bag and freeze while they are still affordable.  Ditto for bagels, English muffins, tortillas, pitas, buns, etc. if you don't plan on making them from scratch.  Better yet purchase hard wheat berries that store infinitely in lidded buckets or trash cans with DE and oxygen absorbers.

The same website also posted an article yesterday about the price of hay doubling in Canada. 

https://electroverse.net/canadas-cattle-herds-at-risk-as-hay-costs-double/

Here in PA, our family has been advised by Amish neighbors to buy all the local hay we can this month, because farmers are about to take it completely off the market so that their own animals will have enough for winter.  Town Hall readers who have livestock on small homesteads might want to grab some extra bales for the winter while they're still available @ around $5 each for 2-twine bale size.  Those who don't have a large enough barn to store it in can get Hefty 55-gallon contractor bags and double bag the bales, or throw a tarp over your stack.  Might want to plan on at least enough to get part-way through the 2019 hay-growing season, if not further, as we cannot predict what next year's weather will bring.

Now is also a good time to stock up on oats in large 25# sacks which are still a bargain @ around $12 each.  Oats have a natural vitamin E content that protects them from peroxidation, and store well for the long-term in a dry location.  I'm finding that granaries and co-ops in our area are running low on the large sacks, so availability is hit-or-miss right now, and it might be necessary to visit several locations in order to lay in a good supply.

Referred by:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmszbyCNNj0
(This Youtube channel is predicting a hard grain crop failure in autumn of 2019)
...............................
R.R. thanks for posting this info, so important...
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 27, 2018, 05:23:26 AM
Quote
wheat reserves of major grain exporters have dwindled down to levels last seen in 2007/2008, which triggered food riots across Africa and Asia

Just a note of clarification:

In 2008, when food supplies were already inadequate, the population was roughly one billion people fewer than it is today. 

http://www.worldometers.info/world-population/
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing: First Major Casualty Predicted
Post by: R.R. Book on October 21, 2018, 04:56:56 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=naCZlGzaXKo

@ around 6:00, David Dubyne of Adapt 2030 collates the crop loss data and feels confident in forecasting that South Africa is poised to experience the first societal breakdown as a result of a bleak future.  He explains that the main reason for projected hunger is not so much weather, but a race-based struggle to repossess land by killing off farmers, with farms being left fallow afterward due to lack of agricultural knowledge on the part of the new owners.  Hopefully the steep learning curve will be quickly mastered.

He further posits that the current civil unrest in that country may have been instigated by agents provocateurs in an effort by PTB to distract the populace from the food-price inflation and scarcity that are about to hit them.  If the people become inured to the constant presence of rioting in the streets for another reason, perhaps they will not blame the government when food insecurity is merely one contributing factor of several?

How much simpler, one wonders, might it have been to simply enlist the help of an informed populace and encourage every vacant lot to be repurposed as a community garden while there is still time to plant food?  Such lots, divided into small patches that even children and the elderly might enjoy tending, would also serve to:

*decentralize the burden of farming
*remove agribusiness chemical inputs
*teach the value of recycling waste
*make healthier food available to the masses
*redirect energy otherwise available for unrest
*encourage community cohesiveness
*reduce the harm of monoculture cropping to the ecosystem
*raise the well-being of each individual via reconnection to the earth
*encourage innovation by more experimenters

Which makes one wonder whether PTB really want any of the above?

Meanwhile, elsewhere in Africa, the deserts are greening because of all the rain!

(http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/46067000/jpg/_46067444_abuminqaroasis,saharadesert.jpg)
A desert turning green in Northern Africa
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on October 21, 2018, 06:34:51 PM
That list reads more like aspects of Michael Tellinger's Ubuntu idea, and it seems would be the exact opposite of anything TPTB would favor.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on October 22, 2018, 06:43:44 AM
I had to look that up Ilinda, and discovered these resources:

https://michaeltellinger.com/ubuntu/

https://ubuntuplanet.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubuntu_Party
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on October 25, 2018, 11:10:57 AM
David Dubyne (Adapt 2030) says to keep an eye on which foods are being recalled in contamination scares.  He suspects that more and more of these warnings will be published in MSM. 

Possible underlying reason:

Whichever category of food is allegedly contaminated at the moment may have really been most severely impacted by climate change, which PTB are trying to disguise.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iVUE2lITJgE

Quote
I think they're trying to reduce consumption.

(http://westchesterfoodsafety.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/CautionFood.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Yowbarb on October 25, 2018, 10:38:07 PM
Quote
wheat reserves of major grain exporters have dwindled down to levels last seen in 2007/2008, which triggered food riots across Africa and Asia

Just a note of clarification:

In 2008, when food supplies were already inadequate, the population was roughly one billion people fewer than it is today. 

http://www.worldometers.info/world-population/

R.R. excellent post...
sobering thought...
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on December 03, 2018, 02:29:05 PM
Adapt 2030 lists the most commonly stolen foods now in these hard times, in order:

1. Nutella
2. Cheese
3. Maple syrup
4. Walnuts
5. Restaurant food (leaving without paying)
6. Chocolate
7. Caviar
8. Honey
9. Meat, especially beef
10. Tomatoes
11. Cucumbers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8_H-09BjrE

(http://sipplssugarbush.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Maple-Syrup-Bottle-With-Handle.png)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on December 15, 2018, 01:57:05 PM
David Dubyne of Adapt 2030 made a startling announcement of the stats on Australia's wheat crop decline:

Normal annual wheat harvest: 12,000,000 tons

Current projected wheat harvest: 3,000,000 tons, not accounting for massive frost destruction last week in what is their equivalent of the month of June in the Northern Hemisphere.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_xmMyV5nFQ @ around 25:30

(https://d2gg9evh47fn9z.cloudfront.net/800px_COLOURBOX33842539.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on December 15, 2018, 07:35:23 PM
Australia is perhaps the third or fourth country, this year, in which they have announced huge losses in their wheat crops.  IIRC, Canada was one, and another was either Russia or one of the Eastern European countries near Russia.  It doesn't take much in these crazy climate changes to ruin a wheat crop, as it is very sensitive in its later stages, which could be cut short just like that.  It seems more than one crop was ruined by a snowfall at the wrong time.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on February 02, 2019, 12:50:41 PM
Logic Before Authority presents a film clip of the head of our government negotiating with China to provide them 5 million tons of soybeans per day, when the total tonnage grown in the U.S. is 320,000 per day, in a year with somewhat normal weather patterns. 

GMO concerns aside, how would that leave anything at all for U.S. citizens?

Is the U.S. beholden to China to such a degree that our crops are being put up as collateral?

Or maybe this was just a communication snafu?

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/2nhbGrswvuo/hqdefault.jpg)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9q8YQE38JM (Logic Before Authority)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nhbGrswvuo (Original film of the negotiation)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Yowbarb on February 02, 2019, 03:46:20 PM
Logic Before Authority presents a film clip of the head of our government negotiating with China to provide them 5 million tons of soybeans per day, when the total tonnage grown in the U.S. is 320,000 per day, in a year with somewhat normal weather patterns. 

GMO concerns aside, how would that leave anything at all for U.S. citizens?

Is the U.S. beholden to China to such a degree that our crops are being put up as collateral?

Or maybe this was just a communication snafu?

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/2nhbGrswvuo/hqdefault.jpg)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9q8YQE38JM (Logic Before Authority)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nhbGrswvuo (Original film of the negotiation)

So much ____ going on behind the scenes, we wil have to look out for our own survival...
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on February 02, 2019, 07:00:34 PM
Just double-checking the stats given in the story:

Here are USDA stats expressed in "tonnes," or metric tons, which are defined here:

Quote
The British ton is the long ton, which is 2240 pounds, and the U.S. ton is the short ton which is 2000 pounds.

Both tons are actually defined in the same way. 1 ton is equal to 20 hundredweight. It is just the definition of the hundredweight that differs between countries. In the U.S. there are 100 pounds in the hundredweight, and in Britain there are 112 pounds in the hundredweight. This causes the actual weight of the ton to differ between countries.

To distinguish between the two tons, the smaller U.S. ton is called short, while the larger British ton is called long.

There is also an third type of ton called the metric ton, equal to 1000 kilograms, or approximately 2204 pounds. The metric ton is officially called tonne. The SI standard calls it tonne, but the U.S. Government recommends calling it metric ton.

(http://biodieselmagazine.com/uploads/posts/web/2018/08/resize/18_33_EN_Global_soy_bean_production_15344248163337-300x300-noup.jpg)

https://www.iowafarmbureau.com/Article/File/get?path=Files%2Farticle-89866%2FSOYBEAN%20PROD%20EXPORTS-%2010062016%20.pdf

Page 24 of this document from the USDA shows 120 million metric tons of soybeans produced in the U.S. for the 2017/2018 fiscal year:
https://apps.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/circulars/production.pdf

So Logic's statement of there being 320,000 tons of soybeans produced per day in the U.S. equates to about 116 million tons in a year, which was correct for the 2016/2017 fiscal year, and would agree with the chart.  So the Chinese statesman's request of 5 million tons of soybeans per day from the U.S. is indeed impossible, and perhaps he meant per year instead?  However, he did place emphasis on "per day" in the film, which the President did not balk at, but maybe being agreeable on camera was a diplomatic tactic designed not to embarrass the Chinese negotiator in public?
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Yowbarb on February 02, 2019, 08:05:48 PM
Just double-checking the stats given in the story:

Here are USDA stats expressed in "tonnes," or metric tons, which are defined here:

Quote
The British ton is the long ton, which is 2240 pounds, and the U.S. ton is the short ton which is 2000 pounds.

Both tons are actually defined in the same way. 1 ton is equal to 20 hundredweight. It is just the definition of the hundredweight that differs between countries. In the U.S. there are 100 pounds in the hundredweight, and in Britain there are 112 pounds in the hundredweight. This causes the actual weight of the ton to differ between countries.

To distinguish between the two tons, the smaller U.S. ton is called short, while the larger British ton is called long.

There is also an third type of ton called the metric ton, equal to 1000 kilograms, or approximately 2204 pounds. The metric ton is officially called tonne. The SI standard calls it tonne, but the U.S. Government recommends calling it metric ton.

(http://biodieselmagazine.com/uploads/posts/web/2018/08/resize/18_33_EN_Global_soy_bean_production_15344248163337-300x300-noup.jpg)

https://www.iowafarmbureau.com/Article/File/get?path=Files%2Farticle-89866%2FSOYBEAN%20PROD%20EXPORTS-%2010062016%20.pdf

Page 24 of this document from the USDA shows 120 million metric tons of soybeans produced in the U.S. for the 2017/2018 fiscal year:
https://apps.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/circulars/production.pdf

So Logic's statement of there being 320,000 tons of soybeans produced per day in the U.S. equates to about 116 million tons in a year, which was correct for the 2016/2017 fiscal year, and would agree with the chart.  So the Chinese statesman's request of 5 million tons of soybeans per day from the U.S. is indeed impossible, and perhaps he meant per year instead?  However, he did place emphasis on "per day" in the film, which the President did not balk at, but maybe being agreeable on camera was a diplomatic tactic designed not to embarrass the Chinese negotiator in public?

ilinda thanks for doing some fact checking...
to me, this seems far-fetched, i will try to look at it again and dig deeper.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on February 03, 2019, 09:36:25 AM
Thank you Barb, but it was actually RR Book who did all the research.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on February 13, 2019, 06:40:03 PM
What was missing from the grocery store this morning (Wednesday), perhaps because of the winter storm earlier this week:

Potatoes
Bananas

Other items barely stocked.

What shortages have you noticed in your own market?  Please share.

(https://nunatsiaq.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/northmart_empty_digi.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Jimfarmer on February 13, 2019, 08:26:40 PM
Quote
What shortages have you noticed in your own market?  Please share.

Roma tomatoes
Pecan pies
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Yowbarb on February 14, 2019, 02:50:18 AM
Thank you Barb, but it was actually RR Book who did all the research.

OK, just saw this. :)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on February 14, 2019, 05:16:33 AM
Quote
pecan pies

The priority of a true Southerner!  :)

Nearly 1,000 calories per slice!

(https://www.edwardsdesserts.com/images/singles-slices/img-products-indiv-singles-slices-pecan.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on February 22, 2019, 06:09:00 AM
Linking a valuable "boots on the ground" post from Solani as to how the grocery stores in Canada are looking right now:

https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,7054.msg110003.html#msg110003
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on March 04, 2019, 12:03:05 PM
David Dubyne reports that for the first time in recent history, the worldwide demand for wheat has increased simultaneously with a double decrease in other wheat statistics: less being successfully grown and harvested, and less remaining in storage from the previous growing season.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xdM089X-LbA

He also urges everyone to experiment with growing a portion of their diet, as some of what we grow will fail, and we need to learn from those failures now before the time comes that we are more dependent upon what we grow ourselves for surival.

David provides a link to "20 vegetables with the most protein content."
https://www.eatthis.com/vegetables-protein-content/

These range from roughly .8 grams of protein per serving to 8 grams.  In contrast, a college nutrition professor will typically insist that protein content needs to be in the double digits in order to count as one full serving of protein, with 50 or 60 grams needed daily by adults.

Ranking, most to least protein:

1. peas
2. potatoes
3. collard greens
4. squash
5. spinach
6. asparagus
7. corn
8. sweet potato
9. Brussels sprouts
10. mushrooms
11. broccoli
12. beet greens
13. broccoli rabe
14. avocado
15. cauliflower
16. zucchini
17. kale
18. red bell pepper
19. carrots
20. eggplant

I was really surprised about collard greens being so high in protein, and pleasantly surprised that the northern permaculture crop asparagus is also somewhat high.

(https://edge.bonnieplants.com/www/uploads/20180920011936/asparagus-stalks-lo.jpg)

Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on March 04, 2019, 02:42:28 PM
I did specifically look last weekend at the shelves at Walmart Supercenter,  Farmington, MO, and saw full shelves, except for some brand of electrolyte drink sort of like Gatorade?  Those shelves were nearly empty with a few cartons. 
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on March 04, 2019, 04:39:18 PM
Thanks for the report Ilinda!

We visit Walmart about 4 times a year to stock mineral-infused sunflower seeds in bulk for the hens, and are planning to do so again soon.  Will check how the shelves in general look and report back.

Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on March 05, 2019, 11:27:43 AM
Just following up with a report on how the Walmart looked today, as it was our first time visiting that store since some time in 2018:

Meats were very spotty, with one of the large horizontal open freezers almost completely empty.

Otherwise, the store seemed fairly well stocked here as well.

I did notice that the friendly greeters were missing, and that a number of staffed check-out lanes had been replaced with more and larger self-checkout stations with full-sized conveyor belts.  So staff seem to have been down-sized.

Hope you all keep up the good reporting!  :)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on March 07, 2019, 11:17:36 AM
Ice Age Farmer quoted economist Martin Armstrong today as making a startling statement:

Quote
The [creators of] indexes put out by the banks on commodities were told to remove agricultural products...
~Martin Armstrong in his blog, March 6, 2019

https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/markets-by-sector/agriculture/government-ordering-agriculture-be-removed-from-commodity-indexes/

That is shocking to anyone who studies economic trends, as agricultural production has historically comprised one of three legs of the commodities marketplace, with the other two being metals and energy.

So from this point forward, all aggregated commodities stats will be not only hollowed out, but also incomparable with historic commodities data, meaning that newer data can no longer be used to study longer-term economic trends.

My thought on that: Data itself is one of the most valuable commodities in the Information Age, though sale of it isn't included on the Commodities Price Index.  Statistics provide a foundation upon which important decisions affecting contemporary society are made.  If data is being suppressed or outright gutted in the 21st Century, then one wonders what PTB know that they are not sharing with us...in other words:

Are PTB indicating that they are no longer interested in studying long-term trends, because something is about to take place in which all of that meticulously accumulated information is about to become meaningless, or possibly dangerous?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wKn2TQAI-g @ around 8:00

See also:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodity_price_index

(https://www.xm.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Commodities-3merged.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on March 07, 2019, 04:32:41 PM
This surely could be the first year we see shortages of some of the crops we import, and maybe even some grown here.  Thinking of how the winter wheat was damaged not that many months ago in the northern U.S. by IIRC too much rain at planting time?  Or was it some other reason?  Anyway, it was problematic for certain.

It will get worse.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: MadMax on March 12, 2019, 03:04:29 PM
Quote
It will get worse.

A bit of an “understatement” me thinks ..

Venezuela in Complete Societal Collapse; Widespread Looting, Armed People attacking neighbors to get food . . ."We're Going to Start EATING EACH OTHER!"  :o

https://halturnerradioshow.com/index.php/en/news-page/world/venezuela-in-complete-societal-collapse-widespread-looting-armed-people-attacking-neighbors-to-get-food-we-re-going-to-start-eating-each-other

The country of Venezuela is in complete societal collapse after 119 hours without electricity in most of the country.

Below are bullet points of information coming out of Venezuela.  They need no context for the situation to be clearly understood:

 "NOTHING TO EAT, EVERYTHING HAS BEEN LOOTED IN MARACAIBO, I CANNOT BUY ANYTHING"

 "PEOPLE ARE LOOTING EVERYTHING IN LA CURVA DE MOLINA"

 
- MARACAIBO IS COLLAPSING

- 100 HOURS WITHOUT POWER/WATER SUPPLY

- WIDESPREAD LOOTING IS REPORTED EVERYWHERE

- THE ARMY IS OVERWHELMED, CLASHING WITH PROTESTERS IN SOME PARTS OF THE CITY, SOME MEMBERS HAVE JOINED THE LOOTING

BANDS OF ARMED PEOPLE ARE BREAKING INTO BUILDINGS AND APARTMENTS TO GET FOOD/THEY ARE THREATENING THE NEIGHBORS


“We’re going to arrive at a moment when we’re going to eat each other,” said Zuly González, 40, a resident of Caracas’s Chacao neighborhood.


Meanwhile, another electrical sub-station goes up in smoke . . .

DRINKING SEWER WATER

The video below shows just how desperate things have become; people are collecting SEWER WATER running into a river, to drink . . .


IT CAN HAPPEN HERE . . .

No one in Venezuela ever imagined their country could literally fall apart in days.  That's precisely what is taking place.

As much as we might dislike having to admit this; the same thing can happen here.

NONE of us is expecting any of this . . . just like the people in Venezuela did not expect decades of bad design and poor maintenance to come together in one fell swoop to wreck their national power grid.  Yet right now, Venezuela is 119 hours into grid failure and ANARCHY is taking over.


Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on March 12, 2019, 03:54:41 PM
Is there a sense as to what proportion of the population has evacuated?

Seems that a year ago we rec'd word that businesses were shuttered because no one was left to run them...

We've also heard reports of "brain drain" in which the well-educated have already left.

That would seem to leave the most vulnerable populations behind...
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on March 12, 2019, 03:58:49 PM
Suggested research project:

We might want to begin taking note as to how grocers react to any attempt on our part to stock up.

I was surprised to get a reaction from our local grocer for purchasing 3 whole bags of popcorn for my family of 4, to last a week:

Quote
Those are awfully large bags...

I left the store with the impression, not the first time, that they will have difficulty restocking that item...

And heaven forbid attempting to really stock up at that location!  :-X
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on March 30, 2019, 09:45:47 AM
Here's Ice Age Farmer's current global crop loss map:

http://iceagefarmer.com/map/

(screenshot below)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on March 30, 2019, 09:59:30 AM
Here's a map reposted by Ice Age Farmer of vegetation zones during the last ice age (please click link for larger view):

http://wiki.iceagefarmer.com/images/7/7c/Map_-_Global_Last_Glacial_Maximum_Vegetation_Map_with_Ecosystem_Type_Classification_v2_%282011%29.png

(http://wiki.iceagefarmer.com/images/7/7c/Map_-_Global_Last_Glacial_Maximum_Vegetation_Map_with_Ecosystem_Type_Classification_v2_%282011%29.png)

http://wiki.iceagefarmer.com/wiki/Strategic_Relocation:_Maps#Map_of_Vegetation_and_Climate_Ecosystem_types_from_last_Glacial_Maximum_.2825_000_-_15_000_years_ago.2C_2011.29_.28World.29
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on April 17, 2019, 03:49:27 PM
Christian of Ice Age Farmer reports that we should expect a shortage of onions and cauliflower by late spring due to crop failures.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MWTFJdIjNk

Those readers who root-cellared onions this past autumn, whether store-bought or home-grown, may still have a number of them left over to tide them through this hopefully temporary issue.  Kudos if you do!

Just a reminder that the following raw foods can be purchased while available and root cellared in bins or on shelves in a cool, dark room, at least for a few months at a time, as a hedge against temporary shortages:

Potatoes, onions, tart apples, butternut squash, cabbage heads.

These items can be root cellared in boxes of sand or soil and kept even longer:

Quote
Potatoes, carrots, turnips, radishes, beet root, Jerusalem artichokes, onions, leeks and shallots can all be sand stored with excellent results. They will keep for up to 6 months. Ginger and cauliflower will also sand store well.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/vgen/storing-root-crops-in-sand.htm

Also a reminder that the following raw foods can be kept for several months in a pantry in a warmer part of the house:

Pumpkins, acorn squash, whole garlic.

All of these foods are easy to store away in bulk, as they need no processing, but good air circulation is helpful for anything not buried in sand.

Others items to add to the list?

(https://www.almanac.com/sites/default/files/users/AlmanacStaffArchive/how-to-store-onions_full_width.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on April 17, 2019, 07:25:25 PM
Garlic is one of those crops that don't need much but shelf space or a place to hang from a hook.  It should not freeze, but can be kept cold, cool, almost room temp.

That was very informative, as I keep having to slice the penicillin off my raw ginger in the fridge.  I will try storing it in sterile sand for comparison. 

Good idea to give everyone a head's up about food shortages and how now is the time to be gathering and/or growing some of those crops that are so easy to store in sand. 
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on April 18, 2019, 07:25:18 PM
Christian of Ice Age Farmer invites Dr. Anita Bailey, farmer, back for a subsequent interview. 

She discusses some areas in which farming has become more challenging that are off MSM's radar, among which are:

*A warning circulating among farmers not to place pregnant cows up for auction, because acute shortages mean they are being sent straight to slaughter for meat, rather than to a good home for mother and calf

*An inexplicable drop in the hatch rate of fertilized eggs (5-7% hatch-rate now, down from 50+%), regardless of poultry breed

*Farmers finding it to be less expensive to graze and feed grains to livestock at least part-time than to feed hay

*Decisions on whether to keep or sell off livestock are being based upon availability of hay

*Farmers are collectively aware that major changes are taking place directly affecting them and their livelihoods, but they are awaiting a formal explanation from PTB on which to base decisions about the future

More here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFujRyCjNhQ

(https://cdn-02.independent.ie/business/farming/article29659465.ece/dd750/AUTOCROP/w620/FAR_20131015_BUS_008_29234798_I1.JPG)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on April 26, 2019, 04:32:19 AM
Spiking food prices are affecting even those in the developed world:

(https://infographic.statista.com/normal/chartoftheday_17813_uk_foodbank_use_n.jpg)
https://www.statista.com/chart/17813/uk-foodbank-use/
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on May 13, 2019, 05:33:47 AM
The Associated Press news outlet has reported that Cuba is now forced to ration several foods in the wake of extreme shortages:

Among the restricted sales are chicken, eggs, rice, beans, powdered milk, sausage, peas, cooking oil, soap and other basic products.  The rationing of cooking oil has occurred in spite of previous government assurances that it would not happen.

Long-lines form as soon as these items appear in stores.  Some basic items may be absent for days or weeks from shops. 

The entire wholesale market, including imports and exports, is under government control, and all Cubans receive ration coupon books.  Anyone who circumvents rationing is labeled a "hoarder,"  though at the moment, anyone willing to pay a higher price for food can have free access to anything available.

Shortages have occurred sporadically ever since the fall of the Soviet Union, though for a period of time, subsidized fuel from Venezuela prior to that country's collapse allowed Cuba to produce more of its own food.  Cuba's food import program has been hampered most recently by spiraling international food prices, including from the U.S. as each country addresses its own agricultural crisis, lately often due to unpredictable weather.

The severity of the egg shortage mentioned by the AP article strongly suggests that Cuba's recent efforts to leave no vacant land untilled would benefit from being taken a step further: every household or apartment building with a courtyard big enough for a coop and chicken run needs to have its own hens on the premises.

Watch for a similar situation to occur in other places as the Grand Solar Minimum continues to progress...

https://www.apnews.com/42b62f24be9b4e0d9f764f1a3fa9647a

Referred by Mary Greeley News:
https://marygreeley.com/?p=85459

(https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/media:63dbd3b788f54411a63f6bb48f746705/800.jpeg)

Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on May 20, 2019, 10:49:55 AM
ZeroHedge reported this weekend that only 30% of the spring corn crops in the U.S. have been planted so far due to inclement weather, echoing Marshall's recent concerns about imminent food scarcity and price inflation:

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-05-16/farmageddon-looms-only-30-us-corn-fields-have-been-planted-5-year-average-66

Quote

    Iowa: 48 percent planted – 5 year average 76 percent

    Minnesota: 21 percent planted – 5 year average 65 percent

    North Dakota: 11 percent planted – 5 year average 43 percent

    South Dakota: 4 percent planted – 5 year average 54 percent

Referred by Dahboo77:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=diEpXZhML_g

(https://media.giphy.com/media/efDARmgfFkoM5nOJ6S/giphy.gif)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Yowbarb on May 20, 2019, 03:26:28 PM
R.R. thanks for your updates. Those are some real indicators of dire situations to come.
MadMax thanks for your posts...
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Yowbarb on May 20, 2019, 03:28:12 PM
Garlic is one of those crops that don't need much but shelf space or a place to hang from a hook.  It should not freeze, but can be kept cold, cool, almost room temp.

That was very informative, as I keep having to slice the penicillin off my raw ginger in the fridge.  I will try storing it in sterile sand for comparison. 

Good idea to give everyone a head's up about food shortages and how now is the time to be gathering and/or growing some of those crops that are so easy to store in sand.

ilinda, that is so very true. You and R.R. have been setting some good examples for awhile, now.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on June 06, 2019, 12:09:27 PM
Dave DuByne posted this informative chart of how U.S. corn production was distributed last year, with the purpose of discovering where any wiggle room might exist, if any, for 2019's dismal output:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrqxHLeqN8Y (video)
 
http://www.worldofcorn.com/#corn-usage-by-segment (chart and please see screenshot below)

The abbreviation "DDG's" at the top right-hand corner segment of corn indicates "Distillery Dried Grains." 

The largest un-subdivided category is "Feed and Residual," indicating all of the harvest kept behind on the farm or farm co-op, both for livestock and as the carryover cushion for the following year.  The carryover cushion of numerous farms in the Midwest was destroyed in this year's floods, leaving the U.S., and those specific farms in a very precarious position.  There is absolutely no wiggle room in this category.

Nor is there wiggle room remaining in corn for fuel, food and beverage processing, or agricultural seed for next year (the blue dots).

"Exports" and "DDG's (alcohol production)" may be the only two categories with any discretionary slack remaining.  Thoughts about those categories:

Am guessing that in difficult times, people who are stressed and depressed may turn even more heavily to alcohol as a comfort item, and that although prices may go through the ceiling, the demand will remain proportionate.  So no wiggle room there.

That leaves "Exports."  Only as recently as January did we see China's Vice Premier in the Oval Office receiving promises of more grain in exports than our nation even produces:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1P-BUEaH3U @ around 9:45

This chart showing the optimistic U.S. soybean tonnage projection of 123 million metric tons for 2019 was probably published before the floods:
https://www.statista.com/statistics/263926/soybean-production-in-selected-countries-since-1980/

FYI: All international agriculture is negotiated in metric tons, which are about 10% heavier than our U.S. short ton.

So China's Vice Premier asked for 5 million tons per day (1.8 billion tons per year) of our soybeans, when we only produce 123 million tons per year.  That's Million with an "M", rather than Billion with a "B."  Granting China's impossible request would divert 100% of America's soybeans for their use.  Of course, this oral discussion in front of the press may differ significantly from what actually ended up in the official contract.

Large amounts of U.S. farmland are now already owned outright by Chinese interests, who are free to export crops back to their homeland.  The total acreage owned by Chinese nationals in 2017 was over 23 million, per Modern Farmer:
https://modernfarmer.com/2017/07/theres-foreign-owned-american-farmland-size-tennessee-know/

(https://modernfarmer.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/amfarm.jpg)

More disturbing is that the U.S. is indebted to China for over $1 trillion, and may find itself in an awkward or even compromising position in order to satisfy that debt:
https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/080615/china-owns-us-debt-how-much.asp

Yet most disturbing of all is DuByne's side-by-side presentation of graphs (@ around 13:17) of estimated world corn production vs. world corn consumption for 2019.  A dire picture emerges, as the growing world population suddenly finds itself not fully fed - at least not on corn. 
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on June 06, 2019, 02:00:53 PM
Ice Age Farmer has documented the dire shortage of hay in Ohio:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-nlkUWt7adA

This is from spring hay auctions in one location:

Normal average number of monthly small bales brought for auction: 300-500

April: 439 bales which sold for an average of $5.64 each (depending upon type and cutting)

May: 195 bales which sold for an average of $6.91 each

June: 15 bales which sold for an average of $65.00 each, split between two desperate farmers.  No one else got any.

Moral: Those with livestock may want to begin stocking up now for the coming winter, as local farmers may begin withdrawing their hay from the market, or inflating the price, this haying season.

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTF8M_01sbAMa_dNB0ahnPHpn5MCVMEZuwTEU-Hcku6T6w53xCg)


Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on June 14, 2019, 03:02:38 PM
Dahboo77 reports on yet another stanza of the song that we're hearing regularly in the news lately: Massive food recall due to some safety issue.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVwAfrZaKO8

This time it's 14,000 cases of King Arthur flour, allegedly due to E. coli.

This is becoming increasingly suspicious.

First, it would be exceedingly difficult for such a microbe to survive in that dry an environment in enough quantity to do harm, especially to a functioning adult GI tract.

Secondly is the timing issue.  Just as we're on the brink of a massive global famine that is likely to begin showing up within months from now, wouldn't the story be more credible if they simply stated outright that wealthy PTB are taking today's dollars, which will be worth less tomorrow, and purchasing commodities at today's less inflated prices, likely placing them in cold storage underground somewhere?

Perhaps the flour will be used exclusively for their own consumption, or perhaps it will be trotted out a few years down the road in a profound shortage and sold for a fortune, making the investor rich beyond his wildest dreams.

Incidentally, King Arthur is the one commonly available commercial brand that produces high-quality organic unbleached pastry flour for people who are slightly choosier and more health-conscious, so once again one detects a discriminating clientelle here...

Alternative theories are welcome!  :)

(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/ddaf0f0d-c7dd-49fc-a074-16f2a4141cdb_1.9806fd8d8aba5e63ec84a69a6fa81c56.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/208a9f97-113c-4c66-8586-8f9d6f3408ce_1.41e135104d1b5788d4c0e687c4c86170.jpeg?odnWidth=undefined&odnHeight=undefined&odnBg=ffffff)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/128a8555-e320-4328-91d2-a5309f690264_1.6df96ef983f5935fe78a9d0a26ca24a9.jpeg?odnWidth=undefined&odnHeight=undefined&odnBg=ffffff)
(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/23ad1b60-f27d-431b-9a2e-81e9a4cf0f43_1.55f224afb33f7cb2f35d479bf0e63727.jpeg?odnWidth=undefined&odnHeight=undefined&odnBg=ffffff)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/20dea423-e289-4c6a-bd4e-4bf1014eae26_1.26ae15d896d2223791c7974bf255fa31.jpeg?odnWidth=undefined&odnHeight=undefined&odnBg=ffffff)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/a65a0a59-813f-46d2-9b94-60cae714b2f0_2.71e777a990b8eaef5c419d89fa419dd4.png?odnWidth=undefined&odnHeight=undefined&odnBg=ffffff)
(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/7b2c946f-7f08-4d38-ac83-a0fe47440d90_1.fd2caae565f9bf7846ee6603f95edf5d.png?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/e23b3a61-7c1d-4126-b8d7-c0b393c77c42_1.e37eaec5692fe7236ce2ff5602a0cdc6.jpeg?odnWidth=undefined&odnHeight=undefined&odnBg=ffffff)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/f383e524-07f3-4a1e-8780-ee2ca87ef9a8_1.ea8a0c3ccf1885e9d4bc3e7847fc1bc8.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)
(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/1ab59186-f758-434d-a968-9c703a5aa779_1.446c2d78376fea9b3451b6d5aa2eb581.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/fa345f5b-5846-4dc7-a291-0c9f2bac319d_1.5b20520cc175eb77827c46322b36427e.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/df74c587-8684-406e-97c4-0b2f086285e2_1.4f23c126c0fac45a0f8b949079503347.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Yowbarb on June 18, 2019, 01:38:12 AM
Dahboo77 reports on yet another stanza of the song that we're hearing regularly in the news lately: Massive food recall due to some safety issue.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVwAfrZaKO8

This time it's 14,000 cases of King Arthur flour, allegedly due to E. coli.

This is becoming increasingly suspicious.

First, it would be exceedingly difficult for such a microbe to survive in that dry an environment in enough quantity to do harm, especially to a functioning adult GI tract.

Secondly is the timing issue.  Just as we're on the brink of a massive global famine that is likely to begin showing up within months from now, wouldn't the story be more credible if they simply stated outright that wealthy PTB are taking today's dollars, which will be worth less tomorrow, and purchasing commodities at today's less inflated prices, likely placing them in cold storage underground somewhere?

Perhaps the flour will be used exclusively for their own consumption, or perhaps it will be trotted out a few years down the road in a profound shortage and sold for a fortune, making the investor rich beyond his wildest dreams.

Incidentally, King Arthur is the one commonly available commercial brand that produces high-quality organic unbleached pastry flour for people who are slightly choosier and more health-conscious, so once again one detects a discriminating clientelle here...

Alternative theories are welcome!  :)

(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/ddaf0f0d-c7dd-49fc-a074-16f2a4141cdb_1.9806fd8d8aba5e63ec84a69a6fa81c56.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/208a9f97-113c-4c66-8586-8f9d6f3408ce_1.41e135104d1b5788d4c0e687c4c86170.jpeg?odnWidth=undefined&odnHeight=undefined&odnBg=ffffff)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/128a8555-e320-4328-91d2-a5309f690264_1.6df96ef983f5935fe78a9d0a26ca24a9.jpeg?odnWidth=undefined&odnHeight=undefined&odnBg=ffffff)
(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/23ad1b60-f27d-431b-9a2e-81e9a4cf0f43_1.55f224afb33f7cb2f35d479bf0e63727.jpeg?odnWidth=undefined&odnHeight=undefined&odnBg=ffffff)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/20dea423-e289-4c6a-bd4e-4bf1014eae26_1.26ae15d896d2223791c7974bf255fa31.jpeg?odnWidth=undefined&odnHeight=undefined&odnBg=ffffff)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/a65a0a59-813f-46d2-9b94-60cae714b2f0_2.71e777a990b8eaef5c419d89fa419dd4.png?odnWidth=undefined&odnHeight=undefined&odnBg=ffffff)
(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/7b2c946f-7f08-4d38-ac83-a0fe47440d90_1.fd2caae565f9bf7846ee6603f95edf5d.png?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/e23b3a61-7c1d-4126-b8d7-c0b393c77c42_1.e37eaec5692fe7236ce2ff5602a0cdc6.jpeg?odnWidth=undefined&odnHeight=undefined&odnBg=ffffff)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/f383e524-07f3-4a1e-8780-ee2ca87ef9a8_1.ea8a0c3ccf1885e9d4bc3e7847fc1bc8.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)
(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/1ab59186-f758-434d-a968-9c703a5aa779_1.446c2d78376fea9b3451b6d5aa2eb581.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/fa345f5b-5846-4dc7-a291-0c9f2bac319d_1.5b20520cc175eb77827c46322b36427e.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/df74c587-8684-406e-97c4-0b2f086285e2_1.4f23c126c0fac45a0f8b949079503347.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)

R.R. I think your theory is probably right.
Ecoli in this flour does seem unlikely and -
I can see how some people would like to stockpile it, because they can.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on June 18, 2019, 12:42:28 PM
RR, I agree with Barb, in that your idea is probably right on.  Besides the fact that E.Coli is usually not found or worrisome in such dry foods, the other issue is that people use flour for baking. 

I know of no recipe I've ever used that calls for raw flour that is never baked or heated in some way.  So, even if E. Coli were present, once the flour is made into loaves and baked, the E. Coli would not survive the heat.  Yes, that "story" doesn't seem legit.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on July 06, 2019, 10:48:54 AM
Michael from Evolutionary Energy Arts contributed several food shortage articles yesterday:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJqCF10LDOg  @ around 5:05 -

Quote
FOOD SHORTAGES BEGIN IN U.S.A.

https://halturnerradioshow.com/index.php/en/news-page/news-nation/food-shortages-begin-in-u-s-a

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/OJqCF10LDOg/maxresdefault.jpg)

Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on July 06, 2019, 10:56:16 AM
More from the same link:

Quote
Taco Bell restaurants hit by tortilla shortage that is affecting burritos and quesadillas

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/food/2019/07/03/taco-bell-tortilla-shortage-burritos-quesadillas-tortillapocalypse/1644472001/

Imagine a Mexican restaurant without burritos and quesodillas?

(https://proxy.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com%2F-QVgeWSBdL6g%2FTbTdAdptrYI%2FAAAAAAAAAfs%2F7WaYEd7oPmE%2Fs1600%2FTaco%2BBell2.jpg&f=1)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on July 07, 2019, 04:05:47 PM
Dave Dubyne made the comment that 2019's corn acreage planted has been the lowest ever recorded in the history of the U.S., even 15 million less than in 1938 when the global population was only 2.21 billion.  As the #1 corn producer in the world, the U.S. has traditionally been expected to feed both itself and others via exports.

(https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/agupdate.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/ea/eea6d47e-fde0-11e6-a6f7-07c26df421e1/58b5bd3911c8b.image.jpg?resize=750%2C582)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixtRb1efk6E

There are 7.7 billion people on the earth now in 2019.

So the population in 1938 was only 29% of today's population, and the amount of corn planted this year would not have even been enough to feed those alive back in that era.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/75/Time_Between_Billions_in_World_Population_Growth.png)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on July 07, 2019, 08:07:24 PM

"So the population in 1938 was only 29% of today's population, and the amount of corn planted this year would not have even been enough to feed those alive back in that era."

Wow, food for thought.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on July 08, 2019, 04:52:21 AM
An even scarier thought is that Dave's comment only applies to corn planted this year.  Since the final harvest tallies remain to be seen, and since much of the corn was deliberately planted on water-logged ground in order to qualify for crop insurance (knowing the crops would fail), the situation could prove to be even more dire than he is stating.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on July 08, 2019, 03:19:35 PM
An even scarier thought is that Dave's comment only applies to corn planted this year.  Since the final harvest tallies remain to be seen, and since much of the corn was deliberately planted on water-logged ground in order to qualify for crop insurance (knowing the crops would fail), the situation could prove to be even more dire than he is stating.
It does get worse, doesn't it?  Even if everyone had planted with the idea of actually harvesting a good crop, weather--even in good times--is never reliable.  So nowadays, it's even less reliable, so acres planted will always be greater than acres harvested.  Tighten our belts everyone.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 03, 2019, 02:48:45 PM
Youtuber Full House Homesteaders W/ Homestead Mama discusses a pattern which some governments have used historically to gradually starve out their own populace:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVusSI0VuWs

(https://proxy.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftse3.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DOIP.bnCggcOloPAAn5RCLJK8ewHaFj%26pid%3DApi&f=1)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 03, 2019, 04:30:07 PM
Owner of the Freedom Acres Youtube channel discusses food shortages on her visit to Deep South Homestead.  You won't want to miss the gorgeous pantry located right in the dining room!  :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VFHXFDUVMY

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/m8wcbUGI3Is/maxresdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Yowbarb on August 04, 2019, 02:14:37 AM

"So the population in 1938 was only 29% of today's population, and the amount of corn planted this year would not have even been enough to feed those alive back in that era."

Wow, food for thought.

 :o
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Yowbarb on August 04, 2019, 02:15:23 AM
Owner of the Freedom Acres Youtube channel discusses food shortages on her visit to Deep South Homestead.  You won't want to miss the gorgeous pantry located right in the dining room!  :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VFHXFDUVMY

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/m8wcbUGI3Is/maxresdefault.jpg)

R.R. thanks for posting this, looks like a wealth of info.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 09, 2019, 05:40:56 AM
Howie from Cedar Creek Homestead in Oklahoma comments on prepping for food shortages:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qEYVdahpeCM

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/qEYVdahpeCM/hqdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on August 11, 2019, 11:20:03 AM
In pondering food shortages, I suddenly realized we may experience some of that right here this year and next, because of the intense wind storms that visited this area early this spring.

The wind was so intense that it literally blew many fruit blossoms from the trees, and at the same time collapsed/shredded our makeshift greenhouse.  Our four Shinko pear trees had been absolutely loaded with their usual masses of white blossoms.  When the several days of wind was over, most of the blossoms that had not fallen, were ready to drop soon.  We noticed a couple of months later a tiny handful of fruit apparently on the leeward side of the trees.  But these fruit are small and misshapen, and total fewer than 10 for all four trees.

The only tree we have not checked yet is our "conventional" pear, planted from seed and now after 20 years, finally producing.

Then there are the wild plums.  Hubby and I often go in different directions across the landscape in our various chores, and we both notice hardly any wild plum this year.   Yesterday I gathered four fruits from a tree that should have hundreds.

Persommon trees are sparsely populated with developing fruit, but there at least will be some, but certainly not the normal amount.

Our chestnut trees had finally begun to produce a few years ago, with last year giving a meager but genuine harvest of six chestnuts.  A good start.  This year there is only one serious chestnut forming, of all the dozen or so chestnut trees in our bottom area.

Pawpaws seem to be the only tree not affected, and my best guess is it's because the pawpaw develops flowers and fruit later than most around here, (similar to persimmon)  and when the wind was wreaking havoc, pawpaws were still "thinking" about starting their cycle.  In fact, when walking down the dirt road, one can see all the large and green pawpaw fruits hanging down and just waiting to ripen. 

Not sure what would have happened to apple or cherry trees if we had had any.  Nor not sure if acorns have been affected either but do recall studying one particularly productive oak tree and seeing no nuts anywhere.   As hubby commented, this may be a tough year for all the wildlife who depend on the wild fruit and nuts.

So with the climate behaving so erratically, it's best to remind ourselves that nothing is guaranteed.


Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 11, 2019, 03:41:25 PM
Agreed.  Nearly all of our apples, plums and grapes were taken by squirrels this year.  I actually saw one little fellow running away with a small apple in his mouth, one in his front left paw, and every few paces dropping that one to go back and pick up a third one that was left behind.

Am resorting to baby socks over the tree fruits next year - we'll see if it works. 

Meanwhile, all ideas for squirrel control are welcome!
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on August 12, 2019, 05:01:15 PM
The only thing I know about squirrel control involves cutting down all trees and vegetation, especially trees nearby which can be used as a "launching pad" to jump to your prized fruit/nut tree, if it is fenced in such a way as to discourage squirrels.

Rather than "fencing" the prized fruit/nut trees from squirrels (which rarely if ever works anyway), I envision a barrier that can be easily constructed each summer, then dismantled each fall. 

This barrier must be metal or very slick plastic, but I lean toward metal.  I'll try to describe it.  Picture a smoothe metal cylinder that you have placed around the tree from the ground upwards, that is at least 4-5' high, better yet 6'.  Now, slowly but surely reduce the diameter of the bottom of this cylinder, and possibly enlarge the diameter of the uppermost part, so that you have a cone-shaped barrier.  If this cone-shaped barrier made of ?flashing? or metal roofing panels or ? is held in place well, squirrels would have great difficulty scaling the cylinder-turned-cone, because they would have to not only go upward, but would be going upward and backward at the same time.  Squirrels can jump, there are limits to that and that's why the cylinder must be taller than they can jump.

Then if that's not totally reliable, electro-net or some other form of wildlife repellant using low-impedance charging could be added.  The only problem with this electric solution is that we bought the stuff to do it, then discovered a wide variety of wildlife can get caught and even electrocuted in these things.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on August 12, 2019, 06:17:33 PM
Thanks - Some interesting ideas to ponder Ilinda. 

One of our problems is that several of our most mature fruit trees are inside of the fenced henyard, with tall wooden posts that squirrels jump onto from adjacent tree tops which reach upward from a thicketed gully that would be difficult to navigate for felling, though we have cut back the slimmer ones nearest to the fence.

I've occasionally seen the Amish use metal caps on the fence posts, but suppose that they use their hunting rifles on the critters as well.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on September 21, 2019, 04:28:51 PM
Here we go again with one of those strange mass flour recalls, this time due to a dubious contamination with E. coli.   How is it possible that such an organism could be present in any threatening quantity in a product that is bone dry?

Nevertheless, 600,000 pounds of Gold Medal unbleached flour has been withdrawn from the marketplace.  Notice once again that only the better flour is affected...all the more reason to suspect that it has been ferreted away into elite underground bunkers?

My guess is that these ludicrous product recalls are necessary in order to satisfy regulatory bodies.  Perhaps someone doesn't want the Commodities Futures Trading Commission to think that someone was tampering with the wheat market, which a sudden tightening of the supply chain conceivably could accomplish...

Any other rationales?

https://www.nbcboston.com/news/health/General-Mills-Recalls-Gold-Medal-Flour-for-E-Coli-Risk-560566881.html

(https://media.nbcboston.com/images/652*367/gold-medal-flour.jpg)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Yowbarb on September 21, 2019, 07:41:46 PM
R.R. well, you may be right about this...
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on September 22, 2019, 10:40:48 AM
R.R. well, you may be right about this...
I think RR is right, and that the 600,000 pounds of flour is in storage for one or more elite groups.  And the oddity is why is it the higher quality flour that is affected?
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on September 22, 2019, 11:19:14 AM
Perhaps the 1% are well enough informed to know that bleached flour interferes with iodine uptake in the body, and that iodine will likely be of critical importance to health in the future, maybe even more so than now as earth becomes increasingly radioactive...
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on September 22, 2019, 12:44:30 PM
Good point.  Wonder what else is being "recalled" for the same reasons.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: Yowbarb on September 30, 2019, 11:46:05 PM
This may have already been posted months or years ago, but here you go:

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/un-warns-the-declining-be_b_9360274

U.N. Warns the Declining Bee Population Is Going to Devastate Our Food Supply
03/01/2016 05:36 pm ET Updated Dec 06, 2017
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on October 01, 2019, 03:15:14 AM
Am hoping more folks will take up beekeeping Barb, even if not living on a farm  :)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on October 01, 2019, 03:57:31 PM
Same here.  In the video, Queen of the Sun, one beekeeper lives in London or some UK town and it shows him climbing a ladder to get to his hives on the roof.  Looks like a great operation, and was featured in a wonderful video.   There are many links, but one is:
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1645852/

We want to get back to bees again.  I truly believe that because of honeybees' rather small range, (several mile radius, probably never more than 5), they have a chance of surviving only in pockets.  I'm thinking of "Bee Islands" possibly in a Sea of Neonics, but with a  good forested border, I think they have a chance--as long as there are enough thinking humans left in the Bee Islands who want to help our buzzy friends.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on October 02, 2019, 10:23:43 AM
Agreed.  Thank you so much for that link - I loved how the one fellow cared for his bees in his bare skin, and tickled them with his moustache.  Absolutely priceless!  Will rent the full film this weekend when the whole family is around.

(https://proxy.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.americancinemathequecalendar.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fstills_events_390_240%2Fqueenofbees390.jpg%3F1311109747&f=1&nofb=1)
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: ilinda on October 02, 2019, 01:53:50 PM
You will not be let down.  If you have a lot of free time (LOL) maybe you could post a review?  It's been a few years since I saw it, but it did blow my mind to learn of so many caring individuals out  there, working with their bees.  And IIRC Jacqueline Freeman is the one who is seen capturing a swarm.
Title: Re: Food shortages materializing
Post by: R.R. Book on October 03, 2019, 07:13:34 AM
Will do Ilinda.  :)