Planet X Town Hall

Socrates & R.R. Book - PERMACULTURE, and methods for gathering food and water => Animal Husbandry => Topic started by: R.R. Book on April 24, 2019, 06:57:31 AM

Title: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on April 24, 2019, 06:57:31 AM
Every homestead needs a cat or two to keep rodents away from food supplies, as well as keeping their fleas and droppings away from the house.

This thread is dedicated to that important member of the family  :)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on April 24, 2019, 07:09:50 AM
There has been much debate and experimentation in our household as to whether to apply off-the-shelf flea and tick medication to our two cats.

We've suffered a few times in the past with indoor flea outbreaks for lack of more diligent attention to this issue.  It seems that we can get away without chemicals for a while, and then boom, we're infested.

While we've tried various herbal solutions, we're not completely sold on the results yet.  One historic B & B in the area grows catmint amidst pennyroyal in the garden, in hopes that its numerous cats will roll on both and not bring fleas and ticks indoors.  They have had mixed results.

Having a childhood friend who awoke one morning to discover that her dog had died after becoming hung on a fence by his flea collar, I'm reluctant to use collars on the cats.

Chemical "topspots" lose their effectiveness every now and then, and need to be reformulated, meaning stronger in some cases.  We have found the Frontline Plus to be too strong for our smaller cat, burning her neck so severely that she loses fur and blisters badly.  The larger kitty can tolerate it, but it seems to make him tired for a day or two. 

So in the interest of keeping fleas and ticks out of the house, and the many diseases which they harbor, we have opted to apply topspot only to the larger cat, and only from April 1 through October 1.  Because the drug is effective for a distance from the medicated cat, he is able to walk throughout the house killing the blood suckers wherever they may be hiding, meaning that the smaller cat is protected without needing to be dosed.

As flea and tick control will be crucial in the Aftertime, we may need to be stocking some sort of prevention method ahead of time.

What have others experienced?

(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/9296cfdc-83ac-40e2-bcb6-58aa44e26f21_1.cd237ce0b5a4c32d5178abd565ada9c6.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)
This brand is identical to Frontline, but much less expensive.
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on April 24, 2019, 07:22:19 AM
Both of our cats came down with a skin rash beneath their fur after receiving vaccinations last year, and nothing seemed to clear the condition up until we planted chives indoors in the autumn in a sunny window, which the cats enjoy looking out of.

We were surprised to discover that the cats took an immediate liking to the chives, and would eat them down to the bare soil throughout the winter.  Fortunately the plants would bounce back quickly.

Am guessing that not only did the chives provide the nutrients of fresh greens, but also all of the medicinal qualities of alliums.  We have not seen any toxic effects, but their coats are sleek and the cats no longer have skin rashes.

Will be interested to see what happens with the next set of vaccinations.  We only permit rabies and feline distemper shots, and have requested that they be given separately, one at a time, in the future.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/46982104794_9aa1b08fe2.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2ezDyVy)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: Jimfarmer on April 24, 2019, 12:36:45 PM
Quote
We've suffered a few times in the past with indoor flea outbreaks for lack of more diligent attention to this issue.  It seems that we can get away without chemicals for a while, and then boom, we're infested.

Here is an interesting experience:  An owner of a Spooky2-Scalar device took one flea from his cat, crushed it, and put it on the plate of the S2S transmitter.  He said that immediately the cat had no fleas.

S2S is expensive as a one-time outlay,  but usage requires only minor electrical power thereafter.  I have one and sleep in it's scalar field.  That, or something, is working for me.  (Age 85 and no meds nor MD visits in last 20 years - ever since I got back to USA and took charge of my own health.)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on April 24, 2019, 02:12:37 PM
Awesome Jim!  And spooky as the name implies, regarding the way the field conveyed the intent of the squished flea from the unit to the cat...

(http://www.leermiddelen.be/images/photolib/27842_400x400.jpg)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: Socrates on April 25, 2019, 03:18:06 PM
(https://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/daily/vulture/2018/10/25/25-bill-hicks.w330.h330.jpg) (https://youtu.be/fnfWsNd-Fa4?t=74)

I'm still not sold on cats. I once got me one and it refused to hunt. And then i learn about all of the destruction cats have caused, in fact wiping out entire ecosystems in some cases.
Just as rabbits that were introduced into Australia, goats on Rapa Nui, etc. etc., but being on the top of the food chain, cats are even more destructive when they go out hunting every night taking out lizards and the like (that might otherwise be eating insects).

I have to wonder whether they're worth the trouble. My allergy to their hair is another issue. And aside from hay fever i used to get, it's the only allergy i've ever had to contend with.
I wonder if a 'brave new world' would be better off with or without cats. Their existence could very well threaten variety in the ecosystem surrounding where they live, thereby leading to subtle but real imbalances (that weaken the system's ability to withstand incidents like drought or disease).
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on April 25, 2019, 04:00:57 PM
Very interesting perspective Soc. :)

Perhaps mostly-indoor felines might have less of a negative impact on the environment?  Mine do all of their mice-catching in the root cellar, though they have brought in a few young snakes and a chipmunk...

I used to be extremely allergic to cats until I got my first one some years back.  Am usually allergic to subsequent new cats at first, as well.  But there seems to be a mysterious and relatively quick adaptation to each new one after a brief period of acclimation, in which cat + human love somehow neutralizes the immune response.

As long as I don't smooch them too much and end up with fur in my eyes ::)

I suppose such conquest on the part of the cats makes me their vassal in some respects... 8)

(https://www.cat-world.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/kissing-a-cat.jpg)
Title: Re: indoor cats
Post by: Socrates on April 27, 2019, 11:23:53 PM
Perhaps mostly-indoor felines might have less of a negative impact on the environment?
Some always will go feral [cats aren't actually tame so that's not accurate: they're wild already and therefore cannot become feral] but even those attached to human household might breed in the wild. But forget the wild, they will breed and what to do with all those kittens?
Their breeding cannot be contained like that of dogs since they'll always be going out at night doing their cat thing.

Cat lovers are of course biased but common sense and logic suggest they are a real environmental hazard.
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on April 28, 2019, 04:38:02 AM
Totally agree about feral breeders.  We keep our fixed cats indoors at night, and only allow them out briefly in the daytime with supervision (for exposure to sunlight, fresh air, and exercise). 

I'm a big proponent of spaying and neutering, unless an owner wants to allow two house cats to produce one litter so that the mother can fulfill her maternal instincts and complete her life cycle (I believe The Natural Cat suggested this way back when that book was published).

(https://pictures.abebooks.com/isbn/9780452265172-us.jpg)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on May 02, 2019, 11:55:16 AM
(https://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/daily/vulture/2018/10/25/25-bill-hicks.w330.h330.jpg)

BTW, That's a really nice portrait Soc!  :)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: ilinda on June 01, 2019, 06:22:30 PM
Here is an interesting experience:  An owner of a Spooky2-Scalar device took one flea from his cat, crushed it, and put it on the plate of the S2S transmitter.  He said that immediately the cat had no fleas.

S2S is expensive as a one-time outlay,  but usage requires only minor electrical power thereafter.  I have one and sleep in it's scalar field.  That, or something, is working for me.  (Age 85 and no meds nor MD visits in last 20 years - ever since I got back to USA and took charge of my own health.)
Amazing, Jim.  You're obviously doing something (or a lot of things) right.  You go!
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: ilinda on June 01, 2019, 06:45:18 PM
There has been much debate and experimentation in our household as to whether to apply off-the-shelf flea and tick medication to our two cats.

We've suffered a few times in the past with indoor flea outbreaks for lack of more diligent attention to this issue.  It seems that we can get away without chemicals for a while, and then boom, we're infested.

While we've tried various herbal solutions, we're not completely sold on the results yet.  One historic B & B in the area grows catmint amidst pennyroyal in the garden, in hopes that its numerous cats will roll on both and not bring fleas and ticks indoors.  They have had mixed results.

Having a childhood friend who awoke one morning to discover that her dog had died after becoming hung on a fence by his flea collar, I'm reluctant to use collars on the cats.

Chemical "topspots" lose their effectiveness every now and then, and need to be reformulated, meaning stronger in some cases.  We have found the Frontline Plus to be too strong for our smaller cat, burning her neck so severely that she loses fur and blisters badly.  The larger kitty can tolerate it, but it seems to make him tired for a day or two. 

So in the interest of keeping fleas and ticks out of the house, and the many diseases which they harbor, we have opted to apply topspot only to the larger cat, and only from April 1 through October 1.  Because the drug is effective for a distance from the medicated cat, he is able to walk throughout the house killing the blood suckers wherever they may be hiding, meaning that the smaller cat is protected without needing to be dosed.

As flea and tick control will be crucial in the Aftertime, we may need to be stocking some sort of prevention method ahead of time.

What have others experienced?

(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/9296cfdc-83ac-40e2-bcb6-58aa44e26f21_1.cd237ce0b5a4c32d5178abd565ada9c6.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF)
This brand is identical to Frontline, but much less expensive.
Years ago, possibly 20 or more, we found a product called GREEN BAN, and came as a powder in a 4 oz. container with bold green lid and the name GREEN BAN was also in bold green on a beige background with other text being black.  I say this in the event someone sees it somewhere!  When our container was empty, I/we tried for the longest time to find more, but never could.  But "just in case" I have saved the empty container as a reminder of what the bottle looks like.

This powder shakes out of the inner lid which contains four longitudinal slots, and seems to effectively dust the animal.  This stuff really helped repel fleas and other biting insects.  According to the label it is "for cats and dogs".

The label says, "this soothing, pleasant-smelling natural powder for cats and dogs contains fresh-ground mint, the finest quality asbestos-free talc, and the pure, natural essential oils of cajuput, peppermint, eucalypt, and myrrh."

It is dusted on, and we usually dusted it along the length of the spine, and legs as well.  The cat would always hate being held down and dusted with anything, but that's tough!  LOL   We may have to make our own version, as not only did it work, but was not toxic.
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: ilinda on June 01, 2019, 07:03:12 PM
(https://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/daily/vulture/2018/10/25/25-bill-hicks.w330.h330.jpg) (https://youtu.be/fnfWsNd-Fa4?t=74)

I'm still not sold on cats. I once got me one and it refused to hunt. And then i learn about all of the destruction cats have caused, in fact wiping out entire ecosystems in some cases.
Just as rabbits that were introduced into Australia, goats on Rapa Nui, etc. etc., but being on the top of the food chain, cats are even more destructive when they go out hunting every night taking out lizards and the like (that might otherwise be eating insects).

I have to wonder whether they're worth the trouble. My allergy to their hair is another issue. And aside from hay fever i used to get, it's the only allergy i've ever had to contend with.
I wonder if a 'brave new world' would be better off with or without cats. Their existence could very well threaten variety in the ecosystem surrounding where they live, thereby leading to subtle but real imbalances (that weaken the system's ability to withstand incidents like drought or disease).
Your mention of "wiping out entire ecosystems" is excellent and here is why:

We are clearing rainforests to feed our carnivore pets.  Not only that but CAFO's (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations, AKA factory farms) are also the result of the voracious appetite for meat.  All one has to do is read the labels of pet food and realize that for every puppy or kitten born, who is to be fed from a bag, there will be more and more rainforest acreage cleared, and/or CAFO's built.  Some rainforest s cleared to make way for cattle.  Others, for growing GM soy or GM corn. 

There are a few exceptions, for example organic petfood, or the fact that some people actually make their own pet food, but still where did the meat come from that goes into that homemade cat- or dogfood?  Unless someone is living as many farm families did back in the 1930's and before, where their dog or cat was fed table scraps, but nothing from a bag, it is unlikely that today's carnivore pet food is even remotely sustainable.

So when we talk about destroying entire ecosystems, we'd be wise to look in the mirror.

Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on June 02, 2019, 06:35:33 AM
Please let us know if you ever find Green Ban again Ilinda.  Our local health food store used to carry herbal collars at one time, but no longer does. 
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: ilinda on June 02, 2019, 02:27:17 PM
I looked up cajeput/cajuput, and apparently it is in the genus Melaleuca, which IIRC is something pushed by some of the alternative or traditional health care practitioners.
One search yielded:   noun: cajuput; noun: cajeput; noun: cajuput oil; plural noun: cajuput oils; noun: cajeput oil; plural noun: cajuputs; plural noun: cajeputs
    1.
    an aromatic medicinal oil that is similar to eucalyptus oil, obtained from a tree of the myrtle


Am betting that "mint, asbestos-free talc, and essential oils of cajuput, peppermint, eucalypt, and myrrh" might be a combination someone could concoct in the home.  In fact, since cajuput/cajeput it similar to eucalyptus, maybe it isn't even needed.  I wonder about a combination of peppermint, spearmint, eucalyptus, and myrrh, or possibly some other equally aromatic combo.  I even wonder of the necessity for talc.  It isn't noted for its smell, so what purpose would it serve?  Well, these and many other questions will have to wait.  Back to the research and if anything looks promising, will post it here.
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: ilinda on June 02, 2019, 03:04:25 PM
Here is an interesting experience:  An owner of a Spooky2-Scalar device took one flea from his cat, crushed it, and put it on the plate of the S2S transmitter.  He said that immediately the cat had no fleas.

S2S is expensive as a one-time outlay,  but usage requires only minor electrical power thereafter.  I have one and sleep in it's scalar field.  That, or something, is working for me.  (Age 85 and no meds nor MD visits in last 20 years - ever since I got back to USA and took charge of my own health.)
Amazing, Jim.  You're obviously doing something (or a lot of things) right.  You go!
More thoughts on your amazing story of not having seen an MD in 20 years!  I have thought a lot about those I know and cannot think of more than one person who comes close. 

We have a 96 year old friend, Bill, who was like you for the longest time.  He was always rather lean, tall and lanky, and in spite of having had polio as a child, he was agile and very active until he had a stroke about 7 years ago.  Prior to that, he grew a huge garden, studied herbs, along with many other helpful things, and avoided doctors where possible.  But when he had his stroke, his partner knew the exact problem.  His partner said, "you never drink water!  You sit there and drink 5 or 6 cups of coffee every day, but no water!"

Long story short, instead of drinking the water he needs, he soon began taking a long list of BigPharma meds, and never stopped.  The list grew, occasionally contracted with a new doctor, but grew again with yet another doctor.  Right now he has hypertension, congestive heart failure, and a number of other problems.   To this day, according to his partner, he refuses to drink water because, "it doesn't taste good", and instead drinks sugary drinks.  Now he's in a nursing home/hospice for his end stage CHF.

I'm not saying I know the exact cause of his current dilemma, but if only he had listened to his partner (who seems to often know more than the doctors), he might be in much better shape today than he is.  By drinking adequate water, his blood would have thinned considerably and probably not clotted in his brain, as it did.  Rather than dwell on what could have been, though, I find it refreshing to hear of someone who has taken control over his/her own body and no doubt done a much better job than any MD could.

So, Jim, if you have any words of wisdom to dish out, there may be many people eager to listen.  Am betting you avoid processed foods, vaccines, and GM food.
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: ilinda on June 02, 2019, 03:06:09 PM
Just realized how I accidentally co-opted this "Cats" subject and hope to place further posts of the nature of my previous one in a different Subject area!  Sorry everyone.
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on June 03, 2019, 04:10:40 AM
Thanks Ilinda!  It sounds almost as if the local B & B that encourages its cats to roll on its herb garden might have had the right idea then!  :)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: ilinda on June 03, 2019, 07:59:47 PM
Speaking of catnip, our previous cat was not interested, but this one, Hudson, we found out by accident, does like it.  I had a tiny planting way back behind the barn in a rather tightly enclosed (three sides are concrete block walls 4' high) herb garden.

One day I happened to glance into the herb garden and noticed Hudson appearing to be almost upside down between a group of boulders, and remembered that's where I started the catnip.  He was having himself a ball, but decimating catnip leaves in the process.

No matter how many times you see a cat get his kicks with catnip, it's still fun to watch.
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on June 04, 2019, 05:28:36 AM
It is  :)

One of my gardening books always makes me laugh.  It gives the various diseases for each species, and then under "diseases" for catmint ( as opposed to catnip), it says "cats may roll on it."

 ;)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: ilinda on June 04, 2019, 10:05:10 AM
Your reference to catmint prompted me to check the difference between catnip and catmint.  Apparently they are in same genus, Nepeta, but catnip is Nepeta cataria and catmint is Nepeta mussinii.  However there are other species, but those are listed first.

Is it a general rule that they both are aromatically attractive to cats, but that catmint is much more eye-appealing to humans due to its beautiful flowers.

Do you have both?  Do you notice one more potent that the other, regarding its effect on cats?
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on June 04, 2019, 11:08:04 AM
All of the fancy breeding work has been done with Mussinii, such that so many lovely named cultivars now exist.

So I have live Mussinii outdoors, and dried catnip indoors  :)

(http://mousebreath.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/catmint-cat-white.jpg)
This is not my kitty or my garden  :)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: Yowbarb on June 04, 2019, 05:21:37 PM
Every homestead needs a cat or two to keep rodents away from food supplies, as well as keeping their fleas and droppings away from the house.

This thread is dedicated to that important member of the family  :)

R.R. thks, great Topic,

:)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: Yowbarb on June 04, 2019, 05:22:21 PM
Just realized how I accidentally co-opted this "Cats" subject and hope to place further posts of the nature of my previous one in a different Subject area!  Sorry everyone.

ilinda your catnip, etc. posts are fine, here, just speaking for myself. :)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: ilinda on June 05, 2019, 02:04:54 PM
Just realized how I accidentally co-opted this "Cats" subject and hope to place further posts of the nature of my previous one in a different Subject area!  Sorry everyone.

ilinda your catnip, etc. posts are fine, here, just speaking for myself. :)
Thank you.  It was actually post #15 which went far astray.  Well, it's history now.  But now that RR has posted that beautiful pic of catmint, I want some!  It is gorgeous. 

And as an aside, the cat in that the catmint pic looks to be a Turkish Van.  We had one onetime and that is a very unusual cat in that they like to play in water.  When hubby would be in the shower, Buford our Turkish Van would get in there too, and at times when one of us would be using the bathroom sink, for brushing teeth, or handwashing, Buford would leap up and try to be part of the action.  Hilarious.
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: Yowbarb on June 12, 2019, 01:17:34 AM
Quote
We've suffered a few times in the past with indoor flea outbreaks for lack of more diligent attention to this issue.  It seems that we can get away without chemicals for a while, and then boom, we're infested.

Here is an interesting experience:  An owner of a Spooky2-Scalar device took one flea from his cat, crushed it, and put it on the plate of the S2S transmitter.  He said that immediately the cat had no fleas.

S2S is expensive as a one-time outlay,  but usage requires only minor electrical power thereafter.  I have one and sleep in it's scalar field.  That, or something, is working for me.  (Age 85 and no meds nor MD visits in last 20 years - ever since I got back to USA and took charge of my own health.)

Jimfarmer, wow so glad to hear you have a Spooky! That is so impressive, 85 and no illnesses.
We have one in the family currently being used by my second oldest daughter and her fiance, they use it all the time...
I think they might have heard about it from me, I had posted about it on FB too. There are FB groups of spooky users...
I will be making use of it soon...
I had started a Spooky topic awhile ago, related to the technology...
Topic: Royal Rife - his Rife machine technology and advancements upon...Spooky2
Link: https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,5968.msg85707.html#msg85707

All the best!
Barb T.
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: Yowbarb on June 12, 2019, 01:39:27 AM
OK my bad, noticed Jim's fascinating post, just had to comment and post a couple things, done now,
back to cats. :)  ;D 

Re-posting this     Awwwww on Twitter:
Twitter "Do they still worship us, child?" "Well, I sh*t in a box and they clean it." "Good. Good." pic.twitter.com/PF3bJfSZkJ
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on November 18, 2019, 06:50:45 AM
Here are some long-storage pet probiotics in foil packs dated to "expire" a decade from now.  There's a feline version and a canine one:

(https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fimages-its.chemistdirect.co.uk%2Fpurina-veterinary-diet-feline-fortiflora-nutritional-supplement.jpg%3Fq%3D75%26o%3DiyJHwu3EsaUNipQihPoC7HrtejYj%26V%3Dwgse%26w%3D297%26h%3D297&f=1&nofb=1) (https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fimages-its.chemistdirect.co.uk%2Fpurina-veterinary-diet-canine-fortiflora-nutritional-supplement.jpg%3Fq%3D75%26o%3DmZCs6InSDtIf8ShHhWZwFIu9QA0j%26V%3DSrlM%26w%3D297%26h%3D297&f=1&nofb=1)

In normal times, pet owners whose animals are prescribed an antibiotic might want to insist on being given a supply of these to equal or exceed the number of days in which the antibiotic is to be taken.  In hard times, a stash might be kept as a follow up to whenever pets are given your home-made colloidal silver.  They don't need refrigeration, which makes them all the more valuable.

Dose is one packet per day, mixed with food at the opposite time of the day that an antibiotic is given (or silver).
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on December 17, 2019, 06:00:28 AM
Getting a female kitty through the post-spay recovery period:

There are so many good reasons to have an older kitten (around 6 months of age) spayed:

*Elimination of the possibility of mammary and gynecological cancers

*Elimination of heat cycle mating behavior

*Elimination of the possibility of unwanted pregnancies

But the recovery period from spaying for a female cat is more intensive than for a neutered male.  Unless one opts for ovaries-only removal via the European laparoscopic oophorectomy, which is uncommon in the U.S., the incision may be several inches long, the pain more intense, and the need for greater supervision / intervention for the next two weeks.  That means preventing kitty from climbing on furniture or stairs, preventing her from going outdoors, confinement in a recovery room with access to food, water and litter, and preventing her from licking, scratching or biting the post-surgical area.

The vet will likely send her home in a cone-shaped Elizabethan collar in order to prevent kitty from having access to the surgical site.  This may make finding a comfortable sleeping position difficult for kitty, as well as impede her from self-grooming, and throw off her already-anaesthesia-and-post-op-opioid-disturbed balance as she ambulates. 

A possibly better safeguard is to take a tube sock (or crew sock for a small kitten), minus the toe part, and snip arm and leg holes, as well as an opening part-way up the back (one end of the sock) so as not to apply pressure to the incision.  This also lets the tail out and keeps everything clean in the litter box.  The sock-sweater is then pulled over her head, then front legs inserted in holes, then back legs inserted.  It should be snug enough not to come off, but have plenty of stretch for proper circulation and range of motion. 

In addition, kitty can be made significantly more comfortable if a couple of drops of Bach Flower Rescue Remedy on a cotton ball are wiped inside of each ear once every few hours for the first week of recovery.

(https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Fimages-na.ssl-images-amazon.com%2Fimages%2FI%2F51vHmoTwLOL._SY300_QL70_.jpg&f=1&nofb=1)



Title: Re: Cats
Post by: ilinda on December 17, 2019, 10:57:04 AM
Thanks for that wonderful suggestion.  I did not know how to administer Rescue Remedy to animals, so the few times it was used here on goats, it was mixed with a tiny bit of water, and squirted into the side of the mouth. 

The nice thing about the ear routine is that it might be slightly fragrant around the animal for a while. 
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on December 17, 2019, 11:33:04 AM
Ilinda, there's more than one way to administer Rescue Remedy, with transdermally via the thin permeable ear tissue of animals being perhaps the simplest, least messy and invasive way of doing it. 

Regarding inhalation, yes, the open bottle can even be offered to an animal in pain for a lengthy sniff.

How are your goats doing, after your long home-ICU episode?
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: phil4468 on December 18, 2019, 10:18:34 AM
I have had cats for over 50 years.  I have tried to teach them to walk on a leash.  I do quite well with this.  I have found that fixed male cats walk on the leash the best.  I had a cat named Regal who I had to put down when he was 20 years old.  He walked better than some dogs.  He would walk a mile or so with me.  What a great cat.  I have his ashes on my mantel.  He was a shelter cat.  I never let my cats outside.  They only go out on a leash.  I don't want them to kill birds and I don't want to have to scrap one off the road after being hit by a car.
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on December 18, 2019, 10:56:57 AM
Phil, I'm so sorry that you lost your pet of 20 years, but how amazing that he would walk on a leash with you without getting all tangled up and refusing to budge until he won the leash battle!

What a beautiful cat in the photos - is he part Maine Coone or Norwegian Forest Cat?

We have 3 cats now, all rescues too.  We really only planned to have 2, but late this past summer a tiny kitten showed up in our hen yard.  She was severely underweight, and perhaps something had happened to her mother.  She also is mute.  She made it clear from the beginning that she had adopted us as her family, and would follow me wherever I went in the garden.

So as soon as temps began to dip down below 60oF, we decided to bring her indoors, and have never regretted it, as she is so sweet!

Will give the leash idea a try and report back... :)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: ilinda on December 18, 2019, 02:23:06 PM
I have had cats for over 50 years.  I have tried to teach them to walk on a leash.  I do quite well with this.  I have found that fixed male cats walk on the leash the best.  I had a cat named Regal who I had to put down when he was 20 years old.  He walked better than some dogs.  He would walk a mile or so with me.  What a great cat.  I have his ashes on my mantel.  He was a shelter cat.  I never let my cats outside.  They only go out on a leash.  I don't want them to kill birds and I don't want to have to scrap one off the road after being hit by a car.
It is always refreshing to hear from a cat owner who is totally against their killing birds or anything else for that matter.  And that is really nifty that you've developed a method of teaching them the leash. 

When we lived in the city our cats rarely went outside, except by sneaking out.  Now, our only cat, Hudson, only goes out if we force him out, EXCEPT when, in warm weather, he sees me starting out with the goats on our daily walk.  He then wants to come out and he walks through the woods on long walks with us and he thinks he is part of the goat herd.  It is a lovely sight, goats munching away, old goatherder standiing watch, and very short, somewhat rotund cat hovering, and always keeping up with us. 

That is touching that you have Regal's ashes on the mantel.
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: R.R. Book on December 18, 2019, 03:40:08 PM
Quote
he thinks he is part of the goat herd

Our cats are like that with the hens and ducks, too.

This tiny little kitten that we found thinks that she's a sheep dog, and enjoys herding much larger poultry into one corner of the henyard.  I've never seen another cat do that before.  The funny thing is that the poultry obey her  :)
Title: Re: Cats
Post by: Yowbarb on December 18, 2019, 10:32:14 PM
I have had cats for over 50 years.  I have tried to teach them to walk on a leash.  I do quite well with this.  I have found that fixed male cats walk on the leash the best.  I had a cat named Regal who I had to put down when he was 20 years old.  He walked better than some dogs.  He would walk a mile or so with me.  What a great cat.  I have his ashes on my mantel.  He was a shelter cat.  I never let my cats outside.  They only go out on a leash.  I don't want them to kill birds and I don't want to have to scrap one off the road after being hit by a car.
Phil4468, thanks for sharing these precious memories and pics here. Each pet is unique and special and unforgettable...
I enjoyed seeing your big cat on a leash. Yes, what a great cat he was...