Planet X Town Hall

Yowbarb - SURVIVING the CHANGES => SURVIVING the CHANGES => Topic started by: Yowbarb on November 21, 2009, 08:05:03 AM

Title: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on November 21, 2009, 08:05:03 AM
This Topic is for miscellaneous info that could help a person or family or survival group.
Some of the tips may involve technology that might not be present in the Aftertime. Meanwhile for now the tip will help.
Please post here your ideas on security, safety....it could just be ideas that pop into your head, or tried and true products
or methods for security and safety.

Yowbarb
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on November 21, 2009, 08:06:34 AM
Here's one my sis - in - law just sent me:

Subject: What to take to bed with you - not a joke
 

What to take to bed with you - not a joke
Pretty neat idea. Never thought of it before.

Put your car keys beside your bed at night


Tell your spouse, your children, your neighbors, your parents, your Dr's office, the check-out girl at the market, everyone you run across. Put your car keys beside your bed at night.

If you hear a noise outside your home or someone trying to get in your house, just press the panic button for your car. The alarm will be set off, and the horn will continue to sound until either you turn it off or the car battery dies.

This tip came from a neighborhood watch coordinator. Next time you come home for the night and you start to put your keys away, think of this:

It's a security alarm system that you probably already have and requires no installation. Test it.
It will go off from most everywhere inside your house and will keep honking until your battery runs down or until you reset it with the button on the key fob chain....

It works if you park in your driveway or garage. If your car alarm goes off when someone is trying to break into your house, odds are the burglar/rapist won't stick around.

After a few seconds all the neighbors will be looking out their windows to see who is out there and sure enough the criminal won't want that.

And remember to carry your keys while walking to your car in a parking lot. The alarm can work the same way there. This is something that should really be shared with everyone. Maybe it could save a life or a sexual abuse crime.

P.S. I am sending this to everyone I know because I think it is fantastic.

Would also be useful for any emergency, such as a heart attack, where you can't reach a phone. My Mom has suggested to my Dad that he carry his car keys with him in case he falls outside and she doesn't hear him. He can activate the car alarm and then she'll know there's a problem.   

.....................................
Sent to me,

Yowbarb
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Lori on January 25, 2010, 05:37:40 AM
As soon as I can I'm also getting a handy dandy wooden or metal base ball bat. I can't afford a gun right now, but will be getting a rifle and handgun ASAP.  The other day the house next door to me was robbed.  In Broad daylight.  I happen to be home by myself.  If they had decided to target my house, I had nothing accept for a heavy skillet and kitchen knives of which to defend myself. ( I know they work too.) But I needed something stronger.  I do have some good body weight, maybe I can just jump on the guy and crush him.  ;D :P

I also have 3 small yippers (Terriers)who defend this house until they are worn out. I think there barking would simply drive the would be bad guys out because their ears will be ringing from the yaps,

Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Ryan on February 03, 2010, 12:57:56 PM
Owning a dog is the best robbery prevention and security asset out there. Its been proven over and over again that burglars are much more fearful of a dog's bark than a security system's alarm. It'll take a while for cops to get to the location when the alarm goes off but it only takes seconds for the dog lol. Plus the police have to go by rules for physical contact whereas with dogs you dunno what they're gonna do to the bad guy....

Dogs are the best thing to have for so many reasons, and you can add this one to the list!
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: ASEEKERTOO on August 06, 2010, 10:17:29 AM
This Topic is for miscellaneous info that could help a person or family or survival group.
Some of the tips may involve technology that might not be present in the Aftertime. Meanwhile for now the tip will help.
Please post here your ideas on security, safety....it could just be ideas that pop into your head, or tried and true products
or methods for security and safety. Yowbarb
LINK:
Secret Knock Detecting Lock (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zE5PGeh2K9k&NR=1#)

Came across this while surfing the net. A great idea. I have no idea how to build it. There is another website mentioned and
the device is either For Sale, or the website will give building instructions. Don't know. 8)
The good part about it is that whoever leaves the shelter does not need to take a KEY, which could be lost or stolen.
My other thought on this is that the device should be able to be modified for Voice.
And YES, there are doorlocks out there that can be installed that have Keypads on them. I think most of them allow
a Four number PIN number to unlock the lock. Well, if i have all the time in the world; as a Burglar or someone that simply
wants to gain entrance, I would sit there all day punching in numbers starting at 0000. Eventually I would get the right
number to open the door. A coded knock on the door would take forever. Personally I would prefer voice activated with
the right password.....
And this just occurred to me. I do not know the power or voltage output of the 'Crankup Battery Radios' but an extra
one that could be cannibalized could be used for powering other small devices. Modifications of the voltage/milliamp output may
have to be done to power other stuff or to charge small batteries .... David



Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: noproblemo2 on November 16, 2010, 11:01:07 AM
I also have a Large Shephard in the front yard and 2 Lab-Pit mixes in the back, nothing gets too close without us knowing in advance here !!!
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Steve_T on November 28, 2010, 06:49:48 AM
Although I don't have an alarm (and so a panic button to push) on my work van, I do keep an extra key in a magnetic stash box underneath in an opening in the frame. I have a bug-out pack in there at all times, so if there's a night time tornado or a fire or some other catastrophic-something all I have to do is get out of the house and to the van. I have extra clothes, a couple days' worth of food, shelter and a couple weapons for self-defense in it.

It doesn't take much to prepare a pack with stuff you need in a pinch. I've told several of my friends and family-members about this idea, and although they all ultimately agree it's a good idea, none of them have acted on it as far as I know.

Oh, and I have a dog too. ;)
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: augonit on December 30, 2010, 09:01:06 AM
Does anyone know how to protect your stuff if you don't have a gun or dog?  Something besides your car alarm?
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on December 30, 2010, 09:41:53 AM
Does anyone know how to protect your stuff if you don't have a gun or dog?  Something besides your car alarm?

I cannot imagine not having a gun... will have to give that some thought.
I have read here somewhere that knives are a quiet accurate and deadly way to defend yourself.
A person would have to go outside and practice the art somewhere...
It is a good idea to have sticks around you can whack someone with them keep them farther away from your space and perhaps buy some time. At that point hopefully some security guard - type group member with an actual weapon will be nearby...
Here are some ideas for women:
Mace
pepper spray
etc.

Anything to be used needs to be kept close. Otherwise no use. Including loaded guns.
Just put them out of reach of kids.

I had a pepper spray on a decorative rope chain my father gave me. I hung it around my neck when I came home at night on my bicycle. It was pitch dark and even though not such a bad area - it was a vulnerable situation and I was alone.  So I kept it around my neck with the cap off. If anyone had jumped me he would have got it in the face right away.
When I was alone with my kids for years we always had some sticks in each room. The kids were instructed to grab that stick and use it. We had them by the front and back door, too.
Never had to use them but in the middle of the night once I heard voices right outside my house. I am talking two feet away. I tend to be vigilant and wake up when something is wrong. I stayed up for awhile turned on the living room light and the voices went away.
If the crossover and the aftertime happens as many of us believe it will be survival of the fittest for awhile...
Really dumb to be unarmed.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Jimfarmer on December 30, 2010, 12:54:15 PM
"Does anyone know how to protect your stuff if you don't have a gun or dog?"

There are messages in this forum about crossbows and bows-and-arrows.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Bill on December 30, 2010, 02:02:46 PM
Tear gas, a friend of mine bought these really neat tear gas booby traps, they have a trip wire on them when  its pulled they flip up into the air spinning as they release their gas contents. Very effective but is used by them when they a gone for a couple of days. next time I talk to him I will get the name of mfg and also the source.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Steve_T on December 31, 2010, 05:32:24 AM
Well we have no other place to go as of now if we lose the house so I'm just working on fortifying it.

Provisions are coming along slowly. I'm hoping to have at least 6 months' worth in the next month or so. Finances are hampering me BIGTIME. I have 4 to take care of including me. It's tough, with work as slow as it is.
Steve, this is a very good start, many are in the same finacial situation as you, my suggestion would be lots of rice and beans, tuna, etc.... as you can. There is only so much we can do, but fortyifying your home is a must for many, like you, that is our route here due to DH's health issues, so am doing the best I can also.

I just recently got a buddy on board with our way of thinking. He's saving provisions now, and with a vengeance it seems. He's a great person to have in an after-time-scenario too. He's extremely intelligent and has a great mechanical-aptitude like myself. We've already gone over some great ideas for booby traps and other means of security to help the few fend off the many. But most importantly, he lives on a 300-acre+ farm, with a patch of woods on his property and a big state-park very near by. We're going to start digging an underground shelter under his house as soon as we can and we've already started gathering raw/building materials for fortifications and improvisions. I have a couple ideas for melting down and reforming plastics into weapons or parts for booby traps, etc. It's really the best news along these lines that I've had in months.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Alfred Williams on December 31, 2010, 11:22:33 AM
Steve t, It may go w/o saying but just be sure that you both store in water tight containers and as best you can seal out the moisture. It will find a way in so be prepaired to pump. Good luck to all{{:>)
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: bk on April 20, 2011, 03:43:34 PM
1 lab and 1 collie
machete hid in master bedroom for the wife I get the shotgun.
plan on how to delay them till weapons in hand.

Some thing to look into for the day after, some solar security lights. You may be able to use them to light the bunker or post in trees around your perimeter to warn you when someone comes a calling.

Also saw a solar powered electric fence device at Harbor Freight Tools yesterday. (said it could power up to 5 miles of fence) don't know how strong it is but could be used to contain livestock.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on October 10, 2011, 11:50:05 AM
I had posted most of these ideas in other Topics, about domes, survival shelters - anyway it will
be important to get some kind of "security" set up, soon after getting your survival land site.
The idea I had posted was, find a married couple or a couple of guys who are willing to live on the land and
help out. Anyone helping would have a stake in the success of everything, since they would be included in
the survival group and able to take shelter there.
Preferably more than two people  - about half dozen would be a good start. They could be keeping out unwanted visitors, fielding unnecessary questions
or interference from locals, keeping in a line of communication to the
property owner who is likely still trying to work and raise more money for supplies, and who is not at the site, yet. This is the first thing:  To have a presence there at the site, while at the same time doing the prep work for the securing of the supplies, the building of the shelter. They could set in a fence or some trees to shield the projects from prying eyes -at least to some degree. Ideally, a portion of it would be fenced off with a gated entry in from the road a - ways.
The small crew would receive supplies or bring them in from nearest big town, etc. - at owners request, also be there when a crew arrives to build a dome or set a shelter down into the ground.
If earth changes start accelerating there may be people flocking to the hills and someone needs
to be there...
Also once the ___really hits the fan you will already have a crew there keeping order, helping people who are arriving with pets, supplies and all and getting into the shelter.
The main idea is, put the security there asap after purchasing the land.
Also I feel it is important to have a quartermaster watch system in place continuously, once the group is up from underground. Let's say things settle down and the group is living above ground part of the time, there needs to be a patrol - or at least a man with a pair of binoculars and a gun, topside. There should be an area on top of the shelter or dome not easily accessible to outsiders, where the security can be posted .
Bottom line there needs to be some kind of underground hidden spot for supplies coming in, long before any shelter is built. Important to keep people away and safeguard those supplies. Any devices for the protection of the group need to be well protected, as well.
My main concept: When passers by go by your survival land, it would be good if this is all they see, and your shelter and camps are set in far from the road. See sample pic, below,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on April 02, 2012, 10:58:50 AM
Fencing for privacy and safety is expensive. Anyone have any ideas what to plant along the edges of the property to provide a temporary barrier?
Type of hedge? fast growing, cheap?
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: BuddhaKitty on April 02, 2012, 01:38:44 PM
I don't know how quickly cacti grow but it would be a great deterrent!
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: errrv on April 02, 2012, 04:59:32 PM
Blackberry & wild rose. Thorns tear you up, chiggers, poisonous spiders, & copperheads infest them. Man always takes the easy route, so put obstacles to direct him away from your property & onto someone elses.
Erv
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: enlightenme on April 02, 2012, 06:01:53 PM
I agree Erv...and Red Raspberry bushes!!  Those things grow really fast, and are pretty nasty to try to get through if planted too close together.  And they're great eating too!  Excellent for jams and jellies as well.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: steedy on April 03, 2012, 08:08:08 AM
I had thouht of having tall fences with shards of glass imbedded in the top so when someone jumps up to try to climb over...surprise!
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Survival101 on April 03, 2012, 09:27:45 AM

Pyracantha for a 'thorny' security, has edible berries for jelly, jams or sauces (do not eat the seeds (cyanide), Black Locust Trees also, 'thorny', good wood source for posts, many
sources claim that it is toxic if eaten...
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on April 03, 2012, 01:11:52 PM
I don't know how quickly cacti grow but it would be a great deterrent!

Some of them grow really fast - I will look up which ones grow fast but not completely take over... ;)
In another kind of climate, there is bamboo. Again some bamboo you can grow in a row, some drop seeds which sprout up all ove creating a bamboo forest and it's hard to cut!
will be looking for more info...
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on April 03, 2012, 01:35:56 PM
Here is one source of info, Mr. Smarty Plants, site link is below, Yowbarb
Will have to post images next post in a little while.
More lata. 4:36 PM EDT
...
http://www.wildflower.org/expert/show.php?id=7855

Thursday - March 15, 2012
From: Waller, TX
Region: Southwest

Someone asked this question of Mr. Smarty plants:
QUESTION:
I'm looking to put in some plants to create a privacy fence against one side of my property. I'd like a mix of plants that grow well together in order to create a diverse look. I need something evergreen, fairly fast growing, native, and that is not going to irritate my allergies. I have small dogs and young children, so I can't have anything poisonous either. Any suggestions for my area?

Portion of his answer:
Now, here are some plants that I found in the Houston Native Plant Guide that meet most of your criteria:

Lonicera sempervirens (Coral honeysuckle) is a native evergreen vine with red blossoms that attract butterflies and hummingbirds.   It is not listed on any of the above poisonous plant databases.  PollenLibrary.com lists it as a mild allergen. http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=lose

Bignonia capreolata (Crossvine) is a semi-evergreen vine also attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies.  It is not listed as toxic or as an allergen.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=bica

Polystichum acrostichoides (Christmas fern) is an evergreen fern that grows in the Houston area.  It is listed as non-toxic to dogs on the ASPCA list and not listed on any of the other above poisonous plant databases or in the PollenLibrary.com database.  It needs shade or partial shade to grow, as well as moist soil.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=poac4

Morella cerifera (Wax myrtle) is an evergreen shrub that grow into a small tree.  It is not listed on any of the above poisonous plant databases, but is listed by PollenLibrary.com as a mild allergen.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=moce2

Cyrilla racemiflora (Swamp titi) is semi-evergreen in the Houston area and is not found on any of the poisonous plant databases above or in the PollenLibrary.com database.  It will eventually grow into a small tree and, as its common name suggests, will grow in wet places.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=cyra

Sabal minor (Dwarf palmetto) is a small evergreen palm that is not on any of the poisonous plant databases but is listed as a mild allergen in the PollenLibrary.com database.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=sami8

Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii (Turk's cap or turkscap) is a perennial that, although not evergreen, will retain some of its green leaves in mild winters.  It's not on any of the poisonous databases or in the in the PollenLibrary.com database.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=maard

You can also check our Texas—South Recommended page for more options.

http://www.wildflower.org/collections/collection.php?collection=TX_south

.......
Yowbarb Note next post, images.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on April 03, 2012, 11:35:26 PM
Blackberry & wild rose. Thorns tear you up, chiggers, poisonous spiders, & copperheads infest them. Man always takes the easy route, so put obstacles to direct him away from your property & onto someone elses.
Erv

Sounds like a plan!
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on May 28, 2012, 10:12:20 AM
Owning a dog is the best robbery prevention and security asset out there. Its been proven over and over again that burglars are much more fearful of a dog's bark than a security system's alarm. It'll take a while for cops to get to the location when the alarm goes off but it only takes seconds for the dog lol. Plus the police have to go by rules for physical contact whereas with dogs you dunno what they're gonna do to the bad guy....

Dogs are the best thing to have for so many reasons, and you can add this one to the list!

Dogs are a great idea. No doubt.
I do definitely feel safer with a big dog around. Our "Jaws" was the best part wolf, we figured out later. Amazing how gentle he was with our family and the little ones.
We were definitely a pack to him.
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on May 28, 2012, 10:15:58 AM
Owning a dog is the best robbery prevention and security asset out there. Its been proven over and over again that burglars are much more fearful of a dog's bark than a security system's alarm. It'll take a while for cops to get to the location when the alarm goes off but it only takes seconds for the dog lol. Plus the police have to go by rules for physical contact whereas with dogs you dunno what they're gonna do to the bad guy....

Dogs are the best thing to have for so many reasons, and you can add this one to the list!

I do have to say, though: Any serious perpetrator could easily take a dog out with a gun and a silencer. I recommend having a back up plan such as the car key alarm idea -or several ideas.
Some sort of weapon needs to be in every room at the ready. I like Lori's baseball bat idea. When i was alone with five kiddos I had long bamboo sticks in each room. The kids were instructed if there was ever an intruder use the big sticks to discourage them and keep them farther away from them. Every little bit helps.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on August 03, 2012, 07:46:34 AM
Especially now, and for the coming years, people always have to have some sort of self defense with them at all times, on their person, in their glovebox, in the back seat in the house. Be careful, be armed with something...
A little thing like pepper spray can make a big difference in a person's life... Do something.
I remember I always reminded my son to keep a metal stick in his car. He needed it one night when several gang members approached his car and he was putting gas in his car. That stick definitely helped.
Later when he was totally unarmed in a halloween costume, he was chased by gang members, knifed...had to climb a tall, barbed wire fence... he was lucky to escape with his life.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on October 18, 2013, 09:28:25 PM
http://www.earnyourmancard.com/protect-your-castle-part-1.html

Your home is your castle- Part 1     (Go here for part 2) http://www.earnyourmancard.com/protect-your-castle-part-2.html
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on October 18, 2013, 09:48:34 PM
Your home is your castle- Part 2      

http://www.earnyourmancard.com/protect-your-castle-part-2.html

http://www.earnyourmancard.com/protect-your-castle-part-3.html
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on October 18, 2013, 10:11:32 PM
http://www.earnyourmancard.com/protect-your-castle-part-3.html
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on October 18, 2013, 10:16:15 PM
Yowbarb Note:
Town hall Member Justwright61 found the articles, Protect Your Castles, Pt. 1,2, and 3

http://www.earnyourmancard.com/protect-your-castle-part-1.html
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on January 28, 2014, 07:11:53 AM
Yowbarb Note: This video is part of Encore day, Day#8 of The Survival Summit.

Last couple hours to view this presentation. Any questions, send me a message or post here.

http://thesurvivalsummit.com/how-to-fortify-your-home-property-from-looters/ 
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on January 28, 2014, 09:13:15 AM
Yowbarb Note: I have posted about thorny living fences before. Here it is again,

Hawthorn fencing - living fences for security and survival... seen in the film, Fortifying Your Home & Property Against Looters
 
Jim Cobb

http://thesurvivalsummit.com/how-to-fortify-your-home-property-from-looters/ 

Time probably ran out on this video...last day of survival summit...
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on January 28, 2014, 09:20:18 AM
"Funneling" concept - part of defending your home.
Image from Survival Summit video,

Fortifying Your Home & Property Against Looters
 
Jim Cobb
 
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on January 28, 2014, 09:48:38 AM
"Delay," "Alarm systems" "Deadbolts," "Burglar Bars" - etc. -
more of the important security concept from the video Fortifying Your Home & Property Against Looters
 
Jim Cobb

This video may still be available now. It's part of last day of The Survival Summit,  Mr. Cobb has other videos and books. Sites. Worthwhile.

More in next post...
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on January 28, 2014, 10:23:05 AM
More security ideas, including wireless game cameras if you are next to or in, the woods. Most require a power source and the net.


Mr. Cobb who did this presentation:

Jim Cobb www.survivalweekly.com
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on January 28, 2014, 10:31:52 AM
If prepping is a lifestyle, you are still in your home and living your life, he does not recommend making the windows look like a fortress. He gave tips such as a type of plastic sheeting on the window to strengthen it. He said if your living room looks like an episode of hoarders TV show, you are likely doing it wrong.  :)

My Note: All that said (I feel) if you actually are in your survival location, bunker, dome whatever yes the windows need to be small and unbreakable and secured. Or they are no good at all to stand up to high winds, intruders, etc.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on January 28, 2014, 11:20:13 AM
Interviewer Dave Womach suggested netting etc. Presenter didn't think it was as foolproof as boards on door.
(My note: Where boards are depends on if the door opens out or in...)

Force On Force Training - http://simunition.com/en/

Presenter empathized this point: When bullets are flying there can be unintended fatalities. Over - penetration is when a bullet intended for an attacker passes through and hits someone behind him - or it goes through a wall where one of your family members is!

Try to avoid ever having that gunfight... do it if you need to, though.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on February 10, 2014, 06:41:19 AM
Here's a few suggestions. also posted in the Topic, Lack of money.

This is about protecting your goods from thieves.
...

One thing which might work is spend a bit of cash and get a hole dug in the back of the house, on your survival location.

•   Put in a reinforced concrete underground supply storage
•   A reinforced wooden cover which you can move.
•   If you use a concrete or metal cover it may need a rope looped into it -
•   so it can be moved by a couple of people
•   I would put some mold inhibitor crystals in the corners; put a tarp inside
•   a few shelves and -
•   a small ladder which goes down into the inside.
•   I would put a lot of the supplies down in there, cover it up.
•   I would put a flameproof spray on the lid (if wooden) and -
•   sprinkle gravel all over it, then some other kind of chamo.
•   RV, camper or other vehicle on the property? Drive it over the entrance to the underground food storage.
•   Not putting the wheels on the door of it, just straddling it.

Any other ideas on how to disguise and protect an underground storage?
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on April 29, 2014, 09:47:29 AM
How Bulletproof is a Monolithic Dome?   7:00  29,692 Views

LINK:  http://youtu.be/KauzsxSMdXk

Monolithic Dome·44 videos
Subscribed
Published on Jun 21, 2013 
How Bulletproof is a Monolithic Dome? A recent test put a Monolithic Dome up against assorted rifles and pistols ranging from a .22 long rifle at 15-yards to a .30-06 rifle at 15-yards. After testing 6 different guns ranging in power, the Monolithic Dome and its curved structure, created by David South, Sr., and headquartered in Italy, Texas, proved to be bulletproof in that none of the bullets were able to penetrate thru the dome. In fact, damage to the exterior of the dome was minimal while the interior dome received zero damage. Domes are most known for being able to withstand lightning, fire, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, and now, gun fire. — www.monolithic.com
...........


 
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on May 06, 2014, 08:07:57 AM
Re-posting some miscellaneous thoughts.
Keep alternative weapons around. Simple things which could help delay, prevent a crime.
I used to remind my son to keep a metal pipe up his sleeve which was needed at times.
Being armed seems to be a deterrent. He was roughed up by gang members from about age 9 and the last time they tried to kill him and he got away with a slash and in need of stitches.
I used to remind him to keep a metal stick in his car on drivers side so he could pull it out. One night on the phone I asked him if he put the metal stick back in his car he said, no but I'll do that. Turns out it came in handy. It discouraged a small group of gang members from approaching him any closer. With his height (tall) and loud voice - and the long metal stick he didn't seem like he would be so much fun to tangle with so they backed off.
I recommend people keep bamboo poles, metal any kind of stick they can get and one near the front door. It goes without saying to not fling the door open. Lock your screen doors if you have them.
Just some thoughts. My Dad told me about an old woman who kept a gun by her bedside. When her husband passed away (before that) he had taught her to load clock and fire a gun. She was a reluctant pupil. He insisted that when he was gone she keep a loaded gun by her bedside. One night she had an intruder who attacked her, tearing off her nightgown. (Hemet, CA.) The attacker must not have seen the gun. She reached over for the gun, cocked aimed and hit him point blank at close range. End of that attack.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on May 06, 2014, 08:11:39 AM
PS My Dad got a nice gold cloth chain and put a hook into it and fastened a pepper spray cannister.
When I was biking around by myself and had to come home at night to a dark house, I always had the pepper spray open so with one hand I could spray it into an attacker's eyes.
It really is pathetic that in some places even mace or pepper spray is illegal but keep it on you anyway and where you can grab it - FAST.
I have been mugged a couple times got away without serious harm... Some close calls where I had to use cat stealth to hide and get away. Blessed Luck and timing saved me from being grabbed off the street.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on May 06, 2014, 08:18:20 AM
Don't let your kids walk around alone even on seemingly "safe" country road. Many a kid has been grabbed off the street even in rural areas. Get them a ride home from that bus stop. Don't take chances.
My policy was none of my kids ever walked anywhere alone. They had to go in a group even up to the corner store. If my kid was eleven or older and on a bicycle I would allow them to go straight to a friend's home but only if close by. In general though no one was alone.
I used to run all over alone; someone was watching out for me.  I used my cat senses and avoidance strategies and avoided serious harm. Too many situations where I didn't have a car and had to get stuff done and was alone. Some situations which seemed like they would be dangerous the people on the street seemed protective toward me... Got stuck on a late greyhound and ended up walking a long way home. Middle of the night and homeless people out on the street with their carts. One fellow asked if I was all right, genuinely concerned. I thanked him and said OK, almost home. Just because people are poor and down and out doesn't mean they will harm you... It is a small percent but they will go out in the middle of the night, too.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: ilinda on May 21, 2015, 09:23:16 AM
This is a different twist on "safety" but I think this topic needs to be discussed.  Here goes:

Are You Really Prepared for Passage Through a Dust Trail or Dust Cloud?

On April 18, I was in the beginning stages of what turned out to be a respiratory infection, but initially I thought it to be my oversensitivity, perhaps to a burning candle.  As the evening wore on my raspy throat progressed.

Two days later I realized this was a genuine infection, which could have been easily prevented by dosing up on cod liver oil, and spending extra time in the sun.  I paid the price, as asthmatics need to be more cautious about anything affecting their breathing. 

A few weeks later as I was recovering, four or five nearby forest fires raged out of control, a not very common thing in the Ozarks, which is full of springs, creeks, streams, and rivers, and rarely dry as the Western states.

In addition to the smoke we breathed for four solid days, the flame retardant-laden planes entered the area and began dropping their cargo, chemicals which are now known to be likely to cause cancer, so much so that many firefighter groups  are fighting to stop using them.  Rain finally came to the rescue.

But here it is May 21, and I am still trying to recover from breathing all that smoke.  Even a face mask is no guarantee of protection.  Now I understand why people spend time in the hospital for smoke inhalation. 

During all of this I have revisited the herbs mullein, elecampane, as well as pleurisy root.  Also have introduced hubby on how to use a Himalayan Singing Bowl to balance chakras.

Several takeaway thoughts from this experience include fact that I was not/am not prepared for a serious emergency requiring certain herbal preparations.  Another equally, possibly more important thought is that what we experienced for four days is NOTHING compared to what inhabitants of the Earth would experience if the planet were passing through a large dust cloud or dust trail.  IMO, millions of people would die just from being unprepared for a sudden influx of "dust" and "debris" into our atmosphere.

This was certainly a wakeup call for me and I hope anyone reading this might ponder the effects of a "dust cloud" that is large enough to totally encompass the earth as it passes by, and it would probably not be over in four days.  Much to ponder.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on February 18, 2016, 12:22:09 AM
ilinda, belated reply to your post. Sorry you went through that.
This all worries me too...
I did have to spend a couple days there was a big riot or nearby forest fire, in southern CA. It happened about three times I had a brief stay...
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on February 18, 2016, 12:30:16 AM
DIY Perimeter Trip Wire Alarm

Published on May 11, 2015  7:00    157,633 views

Sensible Prepper Presents: DIY Perimeter Trip Wire Alarm. Taking a surplus Smoke Grenade top and making a simple Perimeter alarm is simple and effective.

Thanks For Watching~ Sootch00

Music is from Jingle Punks Royalty Free Music through the Fullscreen Network. Used with permission.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: steedy on February 18, 2016, 08:39:32 AM
With my up-coming move, I've been packing.  While doing this, I've become very aware of just how much stuff I have.  And with friends helping with the move, that information will get out.  My friends know I like to can, but I'm getting very uncomfortable with the idea that they are going to know exactly how much stuff I have stockpiled away.  I know having at least 10 medium sized boxes of mason jars isn't the norm for a casual canner.  I know all the boxes of food I've packed is well beyond what the average person has.  My gardening supplies are also something that could be a red flag for someone.

I have been prepping and preparing secretly for years now.  But this move is going to expose me.  So far, the only thing I can figure what to do is to move most of my preps myself.  I just hope that in the chaos of the moving day, nobody will pay that much attention to all my stuff.  I don't want it to become common knowledge about what I have.

If anyone has any other ideas how I can move while hiding my preps from view, let me know.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: ilinda on February 19, 2016, 06:45:30 AM
With my up-coming move, I've been packing.  While doing this, I've become very aware of just how much stuff I have.  And with friends helping with the move, that information will get out.  My friends know I like to can, but I'm getting very uncomfortable with the idea that they are going to know exactly how much stuff I have stockpiled away.  I know having at least 10 medium sized boxes of mason jars isn't the norm for a casual canner.  I know all the boxes of food I've packed is well beyond what the average person has.  My gardening supplies are also something that could be a red flag for someone.

I have been prepping and preparing secretly for years now.  But this move is going to expose me.  So far, the only thing I can figure what to do is to move most of my preps myself.  I just hope that in the chaos of the moving day, nobody will pay that much attention to all my stuff.  I don't want it to become common knowledge about what I have.

If anyone has any other ideas how I can move while hiding my preps from view, let me know.  Thanks.
Since you asked, I would definitely move your preps separately.  Or if the canning jars are not new, and aren't in their original boxes, they could be taped tightly and labeled, "summer shirts", etc., or if they rattle, they'd have to be labeled in some other way.  Still,  it's probably best to move preps totally alone.

The gardening supplies could mean you've finally got more room for gardening, but you're a better judge of what will pass the "curiosity test" of your friends.  Good luck!
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on March 23, 2016, 02:58:12 PM
Re where to put supplies and keep things confidential:
Here's a Topic which can coexist with this one... A person might get a few ideas there and add to it, too. :)
- Yowbarb
...
Board: Surviving in Place Topic: Hiding your supplies in plain sight 
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=5997.0
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on May 04, 2017, 01:25:54 AM
Yowbarb Note: Above-ground, bulletproof safe room from Risings Company, Dallas.
Also Mobile Observation towers

http://www.risingsbunkers.com/layouts-pricing-bunkers/photo-gallery/ 

MOBILE OBSERVATION TOWERS
Another addition to our military series is the mobile observation tower.   The mobile tower design brings much needed flexibility to the ever changing military strategy.  These mobile towers are built from steel and insulated with kevlar for ultimate protection.  When extended; the tower has a 32′ platform height.  The tower is upgraded with all terrain tires making it ready for any environment.  Motors are available in electric or diesel and speeds will vary depending on upgrades and the contract specifications.  When its time to move long distances, the tower lowers quickly, lights detach and can be locked beneath the retractable canopy. The mobile tower can be easily loaded on a trailer and relocated to the next location.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: Yowbarb on May 03, 2018, 08:13:00 PM
I WAS GOOGLING WAYS TO FORTIFY YOUR DOME HOME (WINDOWS AND DOORS FROM THE INSIDE) AND FOUND THIS. NOT SPECIFICALLY DOMES, PROBABLY, BUT LOTS OF INFO AND IDEAS:

http://www.happypreppers.com/shelter.html
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: ilinda on August 12, 2018, 02:13:43 PM
In the past week or two, there have been two very unusual incidents, involving seemingly unrelated individuals, but both similar, and both in the same state.  What is going on???

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/dog-saliva-bacteria-woman-death-wisconsin_us_5b69f287e4b0de86f4a615a7
Woman Dies After Dog Saliva Leads to Rare Infection, Family Says

The earlier victim, who did not die, but lost limbs, and part of his nose, was also from Wisconsin:
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/dog-lick-infection-amputations_us_5b636e57e4b0fd5c73d7a1a1
Man’s Legs, Forearms Amputated After Dog Lick Leads To Horrifying Infection

Several questions would include:
Is the strain of the causative microorganism living in dogs more potent than in years past?
Is the immune system of the victim non functional or nearly so?
Is dog food contaminated with some co-factor that makes the bacteria suddenly become lethal?
Is there something in humans (auto immune condition?) that is causing their immune systems to overreact to the bacteria in a dog's lick?
The statistical probability of these two bizarre incidents occurring in the same state, in same time frame, seems incredibly unlikely.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: R.R. Book on August 12, 2018, 04:19:08 PM
That is so sad Ilinda. 

So it sounds as if it was his own immune response, more than the infection, that caused his circulation to shut down, possibly meaning severe edema?

I wonder what his symptoms were in the beginning, and how long it took for them to progress to life-threatening?

Seems like it might have benefited from being treated like a snake bite almost. 

Colloidal silver orally, Benedryl orally, and a whole bottle of chewable papaya or bromelain enzymes?  Followed up with zapping to encourage circulation and microbial die-off and then probiotics?

We might want to keep an eye on the epidemiology of this in the news to see whether it remains rare or not.
Title: Re: Safety and security - some miscellaneous tips
Post by: ilinda on August 13, 2018, 07:56:45 PM
What seems so strange is that while the woman who died had been nipped by a dog, the other patient, the man, was only licked by a dog.  That just seems so bizarre!  Well, you're right, we'd best watch and see and hopefully these are isolated incidents.

If more of these cases occur, people might have to implement your suggestions and treat these cases as they would snakebite.