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Author Topic: Kudzu  (Read 14461 times)

Lori

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Kudzu
« on: September 18, 2010, 06:49:09 AM »
We have tons of this growing in our yard.  We also have wild Indian strawberries growing beside our house.

http://maxshores.com/kudzu/

http://factoidz.com/wild-indian-strawberry-or-mock-strawberry-plant/

I had not realized that Kudzu could be used as a herb and food.

God may have provided this plant for us to use in the post 2012 world.  This does sound tasty.

From “101 Uses of Kudzu”
Kudzu Quiche

6 servings
4 eggs
2 cups of rice
½ cup finely grated Swiss cheese
½ lb. fresh young Kudzu leaves
2Tbl. Butter or margarine
½ tsp. salt
1 cup cottage cheese
¼ cup grated parmesan cheese
6Tbl. Heavy cream or evaporated milk
¼ tsp. nutmeg
6 drops hot sauce
Preheat oven to 350 degrees
Grease a nine inch pie pan or use an 8-9 inch square cake pan
In a medium bowl , beat 1 egg.
Add rice and Swiss cheese. Stir well
Spread mixture evenly in prepared pan, making a crust.
Refrigerate until ready to fill and bake.

Cook kudzu leaves in a small amount of water, press to remove moisture and chop fine. Add butter and set aside. In a medium bowl , beat remaining 3 eggs.

Stir in salt, cottage cheese, Parmesan, heavy cream, hot sauce, and nutmeg. When it’s all blended, stir in kudzu. Pour into prepared rice crust. Bake 30-35 minutes or until firm.

« Last Edit: September 18, 2010, 10:23:23 AM by Lori »

augonit

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2011, 05:15:38 PM »
This is an extremely invasive plant!

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2011, 06:51:17 PM »
This is an extremely invasive plant![/quote]

Oh, so true!
 Since it is such an invasive species and is edible... good to know about, who knows it may survive the earth changes...
Will post more about it in Survival Recipes. - Yowbarb

Excerpts:

...
Kudzu: 'Vine that ate the South' is also good eating by Tanya Bricking Leach - Mar. 20, 2007 12:00 AM
The Associated Press
http://www.azcentral.com/style/hfe/food/articles/2007/03/20/20070320cookingkudzu0320.html

"It is perfectly valid as a food source," says Regina Hines, a fiber artist in Ball Ground, Ga.
"In the springtime, I like to gather the little shoots, and I will saute them with onions and mushrooms. They taste almost like snow peas."Related to peas, the climbing perennial was introduced to the South during the 1930s, when the government hired workers to plant
it for erosion control. The government paid farmers as much as $8 an acre to plant fields of the vine.

But when the vine began to smother their crops, farmers balked. Soon, the vines were choking 100-foot-tall trees, pulling down telephone
poles, clogging train tracks and covering parked cars.

Since 1953, when the government removed kudzu from its list of recommended cover crops, landowners and scientists have struggled to control
it. But kudzu can take years to successfully treat with herbicide. Its roots can run 10 feet deep.
.....................................................................

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/style/hfe/food/articles/2007/03/20/20070320cookingkudzu0320.html#ixzz1BdN8skKu


Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/style/hfe/food/articles/2007/03/20/20070320cookingkudzu0320.html#ixzz1BdMJnC49

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2011, 06:56:48 PM »
BTW Lori, thanks for starting this Topic!
- Yowbarb

Terigaddy

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2011, 07:05:02 AM »
Kudzu can be fed to livestock too.  Better than alfalfa for nutrients.

The whole Kudzu plant can be eaten, flowers, tender leaves, roots.

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2011, 07:08:09 AM »
Kudzu can be fed to livestock too.  Better than alfalfa for nutrients.

The whole Kudzu plant can be eaten, flowers, tender leaves, roots.

Terigaddy, thanks!
This is really good to know...
since there is so much of the darned stuff maybe it should be gathered and used... ;D
I mean more than it is used...
All The Best,
Yowbarb

Lori

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2011, 11:25:56 AM »
I need to get a cow or a goat.  Its taking over my yard. :D

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2011, 12:44:35 PM »
I need to get a cow or a goat.  Its taking over my yard. :D

It is sort of creepy. It will grow right over all buildings and take over every single thing.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlpCTqnEMo4

The Plant that ate the South  3:16
Uploaded by ErikHuber on Dec 19, 2006

Kudzu overgrows the city of Atlanta.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2011, 12:46:08 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2011, 12:51:39 PM »
Kudzu can be fed to livestock too.  Better than alfalfa for nutrients.

The whole Kudzu plant can be eaten, flowers, tender leaves, roots.

This video mentions the livestock live it, and it has herbal curative uses. Brought over from Japan. Grows one foot per day...  :o People need to use it whatever. Way to much of it... YB

Kudzu: It'll grow on you  1:36
Uploaded by rtullock on Sep 20, 2008

This is a little history of everyone's favorite weed: Kudzu! It was originally a news-style package (hence the ending). It was produced by Robbie Tullock in September of 2007.

http://youtu.be/tiYrqucl2vg

noproblemo2

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2011, 12:51:57 PM »
Would be good to disguise a bug out location possibly then

bk

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2011, 03:08:01 PM »
Thanks, Susan I will use that since I'm right here in S.C.

Bob

noproblemo2

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2011, 03:40:22 PM »
Thanks, Susan I will use that since I'm right here in S.C.

Bob
You're welcome

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2011, 07:27:43 PM »
Would be good to disguise a bug out location possibly then
Now that is an idea!!
Of course you might need a machete to get into the darned place. Gee it would cover up everything. Couldn't be seen from the road from the air nothing! If you had a partially buried dome you could plant the kudzu all around and on top as long as it didn't cover the ventilation shafts, eh?

I think I already posted this but oh well!

IMAGE: Good for Something?
Discovery News
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/06/16/kudzu-biofuel-ethanol.html
June 16, 2008 -- As concerns rise over corn ethanol creating competition between food and fuels, ethanol made from one of the country's most invasive plants -- kudzu -- could be part of the solution, according to Rowan Sage of the University of Toronto and colleagues at the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
The kudzu vine, also known as "the plant that ate the South," was brought from eastern Asia in 1876 and can grow more than 6.5 feet a week. Its starchy roots plunge deep into the soil, and just a fragment of the plant remaining in the ground is enough to allow it to come back next season.
"Kudzu is just a large amount of carbohydrate sitting below ground waiting for anyone to come along and dig it up," Sage said. "The question is, is it worthwhile to dig it up?"
His team gathered samples of kudzu from different locations in the south at different times of year and measured the amount of carbohydrate -- which can be converted into ethanol by yeast -- present in leaves, vines and roots.
The roots were by far the largest source of carbohydrate in the plant: up to 68 percent carbohydrate by dry weight, compared to a few percent in leaves and vines.
The researchers estimate that kudzu could produce 2.2 to 5.3 tons of carbohydrate per acre in much of the South, or about 270 gallons per acre of ethanol, which is comparable to the yield for corn of 210 to 320 gallons per acre. They recently published their findings in Biomass and Bioenergy.
Crucial to making the plan work would be figuring out whether kudzu could be economically harvested, especially the roots, which can be thick and grow more than six feet deep. To balance this expense, Sage said, the plant requires zero planting, fertilizer or irrigation costs.
Even if equipment could harvest the roots, a large fraction of kudzu vines blanket steep hillsides and would be difficult to access. The team estimated that about one-third of kudzu plants would be harvestable. If so, they calculate that kudzu could offer about 8 percent of the 2006 U.S. bioethanol supply.
Next »21
"It's not going to solve anybody's energy crisis, but it would be a useful supplement," Sage said.
"You could use it to get rid of the kudzu," he said, "or, alternatively, you could let it regenerate naturally, and just walk away and then come back and do it again in a few years."
"There is a conundrum there," said Irwin Forseth of the University of Maryland in College Park. "Unless you're going to let it come back and devote some land to cultivating it, it wouldn't form a stable source. You wouldn't want to put in a stable infrastructure and work out how to extract it from roots to have it go away after three years."
However, if existing corn ethanol manufacturing plants could be used to process kudzu, too, then the approach might be feasible, Forseth said.
Bob Tanner of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., proposed using kudzu for energy in the energy crisis of the 1970s, but he now suggests that the starch, which is used as a gelling product in food in Japan, carries a higher value as a food product.
He advocates using the starch for food and converting the cellulose -- the woody, fibrous carbohydrate that gives structure to the stems and leaves -- into ethanol once processes under development are commercially available.
The fibers also make fine textiles, Tanner said. "My suggestion is, be creative. Don't cuss at it. Use it creatively."


 

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2011, 07:32:40 PM »
I need to get a cow or a goat.  Its taking over my yard. :D

Probably feed a whole bunch of goats...

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2011, 07:36:17 PM »
Found this online. Wow I hope this is true! - YB

http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=117479
June 2003

"I have used the powdered
 Kuzu (that is how it is spelled in macrobiotic cooking) for
 thickening, and it is a very good thickener. The 100 grams is
 confusing to me, since I would use only a couple of
 tablespoons to thicken a sauce.
 
It was reputed to be of value in macrobiotics for purposes of
 binding with heavy metals in the body, whereupon they were
 then excreted naturally.

I make NO claims as to the truth of this, it is simply what
 was claimed for the product in a macrobiotics class I attended
 years ago." (Evelyn)

...

 

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