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Author Topic: HURRICANE SEASON 2018  (Read 5207 times)

Yowbarb

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HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« on: August 14, 2013, 12:10:07 PM »
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/weather/hurricane/sfl-hurricane-preparedness-tips-20100810-pg,0,4010155.photogallery

Photos: Tips on getting ready for a hurricane

Here are tips on what you should do to prepare for a hurricane.

1)  Create a family plan

Photo ( David Carson, MCT  / April 27, 2011 )
Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to plan in advance: how you will contact one another; how you will get back together; and what you will do in different situations. -- Ready.gov

2)  Review insurance

( BW  )
Review insurance policies, including windstorm, flood and homeowner's policies. If you are a renter, be sure your policy covers damage from a storm. Take an inventory of possessions, particularly valuables. Take photos or videos of each room in case you need to identify lost property or document damage. Have your documents with you to present to insurance company representatives after a hurricane. Keeping them together in a waterproof container or bag will help keep them safe. Some companies have Mobile Response Units that move into the damaged area after the storm passes.

3)  Prepare an emergency kit

Photo ( Mike Stocker/Sun Sentinel file  )
Gather prescription medicines, batteries, a manual can opener, flashlight, portable radio, cash, a first-aid kit, a change of clothes, food and water packets, and blankets. Put important papers and medical records in a waterproof container, which can be taken with you if you evacuate. Be aware that ATM machines might be down, so it might be a good idea to have enough cash on hand to get you through a few days. Here, Sarah Toback, 85, and city of Sunrise marketing director Kathleen Castro look over supplies in a hurricane kit. Castro delivered the kit to Toback.

4) Secure your home

( Taimy Alvarez/Sun Sentinel file  )
Make sure panel or accordion shutters are clean, ready for installation or to be pulled shut. If you don'’t have shutters, consider plywood. Make sure your roof and the general structure of your house is in good order. Here, Key West artist and co-owner of Guild Hall Gallery on Duval Street Sonia Robinson walks past her message to residents as people boarded up their houses and businesses to leave the island during a mandatory evacuation of the lower Keys in 1998. "I've done all my hurricane preparation, " Robinson said. "I'm a painter and brown plywood is very dull. If people can drive by and get a one second smile, I've done my job."

5)  Stock your home

Photo ( Bonnie Trafelet, Chicago Tribune  )
Plan to have at least three — and preferably five — days worth of food and water (at least one gallon of water for each member of the family per day). Canned goods and other foods that won’t spoil are recommended. Consider canned nuts, beans, fruits, vegetables, soft drinks and power bars. Clean and fill the bath tub before the storm hits in case a power loss cuts water off. You can use the water to wash up, as well as flush toilets.

6)  Plan for your pet

( Sun Sentinel file  )
Don’'t leave your pet home alone if you evacuate. If you plan to go to a shelter, you need to register early at pet-friendly shelters, and usually space is limited. Call your county’'s emergency management division for information. Above, Sgt. Bobby Seals of Palm Beach County Animal Care and Control labels kennels in preparation for Tropical Storm Ernesto at the pet friendly hurricane shelter at the West Boynton Park and Recreation Center.
 
7)  Evacuation shelters

Photo ( Carline Jean, Sun Sentinel  )
Locate your local shelters before you have to go there

8  If a watch is issued ...

( Sun Sentinel file  )
Put up shutters if instructed by authorities. Top off the car tank. Fill propane tanks. Pull in outdoor furniture. Remove debris from the yard. Check the progress of a storm via television, radio or online.

9)  During a hurricane ...

( Sun Sentinel file  )
Go to your safe room and in any case stay away from doors and windows. Keep a mattress or pillow nearby for protection in case a window breaks. Don’t go outside, even if the eye passes overhead. Make sure to have an exit plan in case of fire. Above, the Disaster Survival House at 1345 FAU Research Park Blvd. in Deerfield Beach was built to withstand hurricane force winds. It has impact resistant glass windows.




Yowbarb

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Re: Preparing for a Hurricane
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2013, 10:34:19 AM »
http://www.almanac.com/content/how-survive-hurricane

The Old Farmer's Almanac - How To Survive A Hurricane


Yowbarb

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HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2018, 11:28:01 AM »
https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/satellite.php

Special Message from NHC   Issued Dec 29 1800 UTC   

The GOES-16 Satellite is now officially GOES-East. As a result, many of the webpages designed for the retired GOES-13 satellite are not currently available, including floater imagery and Atlantic tropical sectors. Please be patient while this transition occurs. Imagery for the U.S., Gulf of Mexico, East Coast, and the Caribbean are available in the links below. Please note that these images do not originate on the NHC website.
...

Yowbarb

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Re: HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2018, 11:30:11 AM »
https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/  NHC, Atlantic
Atlantic - Caribbean Sea - Gulf of Mexico   
Tropical Weather Outlook
"Issuance will resume on June 1st or as necessary"
...

https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/satellite.php

Atlantic Tropical Weather Discussion

000
AXNT20 KNHC 261716
TWDAT

Tropical Weather Discussion
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL
116 PM EDT Thu Apr 26 2018

Tropical Weather Discussion for North America, Central America
Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, northern sections of South
America, and Atlantic Ocean to the African coast from the
Equator to 32N. The following information is based on satellite
imagery, weather observations, radar and meteorological analysis.

Based on 1200 UTC surface analysis and satellite imagery through
1715 UTC.

...MONSOON TROUGH/ITCZ...

The monsoon trough enters the Atlantic Ocean through Liberia and
continues to 04N22W. The ITCZ extends from 04N22W to 03N30W to
01N40W to the Equator at 50W. A cluster of moderate to strong
convection is noted over parts of Sierra Leone and Liberia, and
the adjacent Atlantic waters from 05N-07N E of 13W. Similar
convection is also seen elsewhere from 03N-06N between 10W-15W.
Scattered moderate convection is within about 90 nm S of ITCZ axis
between 22W-25W, and near the Equator at 32W.

...DISCUSSION...

GULF OF MEXICO...

As of 1500 UTC, a cold front extends from SE Louisiana to the
coast of Tamaulipas, Mexico near 25N97W. An area of showers with
embedded tstms is ahead of the front over the SW gulf, including
the Bay of Campeche, associated with a short-wave trough moving
across that area. The front will reach the SE Gulf Sat where it
will stall and dissipate. High pressure will build in the wake of
the front and prevail through Mon. Under the influence of this
system, a gentle to moderate anticyclonic flow will prevail across
the gulf waters, with seas generally under 5 or 6 ft. A nearly
stationary front is over the far SE gulf and the Straits of
Florida producing scattered showers and tstms. It is forecast to
become diffuse late today. A weak 1015 mb high pressure is
centered over the SE Gulf near 25N84W. This system will move
across South Florida into the Bahamas through tonight keeping dry
weather conditions over South Florida. A thermal trough will
develop during the evening hours over the Yucatan peninsula before
pushing offshore into the SW gulf each night. A surge of moderate
to fresh NE-E winds will accompany this trough, with seas
building to around 5 ft.

CARIBBEAN SEA...

As previously mentioned, a nearly stationary front is over the
far SE Gulf of Mexico and the Straits of Florida. Scattered
showers and tstms are along the frontal boundary. Part of this
convective activity is reaching western Cuba and the Yucatan
Channel. The front is forecast to become diffuse late today. A
surface trough is moving across Puerto Rico generating scattered
showers and isolated thunderstorms over parts of the UK/US Virgin
Islands and adjacent waters, and across eastern Puerto Rico.
Additional showers and thunderstorms are expected to develop
across the island during the afternoon hours. Moisture associated
with this trough will reach Hispaniola late today. The most recent
scatterometer data show moderate SE winds behind the trough axis
as well as fresh trades across the ABC Islands and the Gulf of
Venezuela. Fresh to locally strong trade winds will prevail over
the south-central Caribbean through Sat night. Moderate trades
are expected elsewhere through Mon.

ATLANTIC OCEAN...

As of 1500 UTC, a nearly stationary front extends from 31N71W
southwest across the central Bahamas and the Straits of Florida.
An area of showers and tstms is over the central Bahamas and
regional waters in association with this frontal boundary. This
front will dissipate late today. A second cold front will move
into the northwest waters Fri night, reach from 31N74W to southern
Florida Sat night, then slowly dissipate by Sun morning. A third
cold front will push south of 31N Sun, and reach from 30N65W to
the northern Bahamas Mon night.

Another cold front enters the forecast area near 31N45W and
continues SW to 23N50W to 24N58W. Scattered showers and tstms are
along the front N of 25N. The front is associated with a weak
1016 mb low pressure that moved into the forecast waters since
yesterday. A well defined swirl of low clouds is associated with
the low center, forecast to dissipate in about 24 hours. A recent
ASCAT pass indicates fresh winds on the NW quadrant of the low
center. The remainder of the Atantic Ocean is under the influence
of a 1030 mb high pressure located SW of the Azores near 35N30W.
The pressure gradient between this high and lower pressure over
Africa is resulting in moderate to fresh northerly winds between
the coast of Africa and 20W and N of 15N.

For additional information please visit
http://www.hurricanes.gov/marine

$$
GR

Yowbarb

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Re: HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2018, 11:41:40 AM »
Yowbarb Note: Hurricane season has not started yet. I'd venture to say, things are heating up and it could start early.
Screen shot below is Northeast Pacific
Visible Image:


http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/goes/west/nepac/vis.jpg

National Hurricane Center home page: https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

NHC Eastern North Pacific: https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/?epac 

Eastern North Pacific (East of 140°W)   
Tropical Weather Outlook
Issuance will resume on May 15th or as necessary.

Tropical Weather Discussion
1515 UTC Thu Apr 26 2018

Eastern North Pacific Tropical Weather Discussion

000
AXPZ20 KNHC 261545
TWDEP

Tropical Weather Discussion
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL
1515 UTC Thu Apr 26 2018

Tropical Weather Discussion for the eastern Pacific Ocean from
the Equator to 32N, east of 140W. The following information is
based on satellite imagery, weather observations, radar, and
meteorological analysis.

Based on 1200 UTC surface analysis and satellite imagery through
1445 UTC.

...INTERTROPICAL CONVERGENCE ZONE/MONSOON TROUGH...

A surface trough extends from 11N86W to 08N100W. The
intertropical convergence zone continues from 08N100W to 09N115W
to beyond 05N140W. Scattered moderate and isolated strong
convection is from 04N to 10N between 80W and 87W. Scattered
moderate convection is from 04N to 11N between 115W and 129W.
Isolated moderate convection is from 03N to 08N between 95W and
107W and from 04N to 06N between 132W and 139W.

...DISCUSSION...

OFFSHORE WATERS WITHIN 250 NM OF MEXICO...

A ridge is building NW of the area in the wake of a dissipated
cold front. This will bring about fresh NW winds in the offshore
waters by late today. Seas will build to 8 ft tonight off Baja
California Sur south of Cabo San Lazaro toward the Revillagigedo
Islands in a combination of the 15 to 20 kt NW flow and longer
period NW swell propagating through the region. The fresh NW
winds will expand W of Baja California Fri into Sat and will
become locally strong as troughing forms over the Colorado River
valley north of the region. The large area of fresh to
occasionally strong NW winds will allow 8 to 10 ft seas off the
Baja California coast through Sun. Winds and seas will slowly
subside early next week over this area.

Light to gentle W to NW winds are expected in the Gulf of
California through Sat. Fresh to locally strong winds will be
possible over the northern Gulf Sun through Tue due to troughing
over the area.

Farther south, fresh to strong northerly winds are possible in
the Gulf of Tehuantepec this weekend, particularly during Sat
morning as high pressure builds over the western Gulf of Mexico.

Elsewhere, mainly light to gentle winds are expected through
Sun with 4 to 6 ft seas.

OFFSHORE WATERS WITHIN 250 NM OF CENTRAL AMERICA, COLOMBIA, AND
WITHIN 750 NM OF ECUADOR...

Fresh northeast nocturnal winds are expected in and downstream
of the Gulf of Papagayo through tonight, resuming on Sun night.
Gentle to moderate offshore flow will prevail elsewhere N of 09N,
and light to gentle SW winds are expected S of 09N with seas of
4 to 6 ft.

REMAINDER OF THE AREA...

A surface trough, the remnants of a dissipated cold front,
extends from 30N136W to 28N139W. A ridge will build behind this
trough through the weekend. Moderate to fresh northeast trade
winds and 7-9 ft seas are observed across the tropical waters W
of 115W between 07N and 20N, south of the subtropical ridge and
north of the the ITCZ. These winds will increase to fresh to
locally strong as the pressure increases north of this region
into the upcoming weekend. This will also result in an increase
of the areal coverage of seas of 8-9 ft.

$$
Latto

Yowbarb

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Re: HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2018, 09:22:38 PM »

Yowbarb

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Re: HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2018, 09:49:59 PM »
https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/GOES/GOES16_sector_band.php?sector=taw&band=GEOCOLOR&length=24

GOES-East - Sector Views: Tropical Atlantic - wide view - GeoColor
6 hour loop - 24 images - 15 minute update

First image 0100
latest one I captured, 0400 GeoColor - True Color daytime, multispectral IR at night - 06 May 2018 - 0400 UTC

Yowbarb

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Re: HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2018, 04:26:35 AM »
Yowbarb Note:
Although the Atlantic Hurricane has not yet officially opened, we have our first named storm, Subropical Storm ALBERTO.
ALBERTO is heading toward the northern Gulf coast.
...

https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/gtwo.php?basin=atlc&fdays=2

Atlantic Tropical Weather Discussion

000
AXNT20 KNHC 270525
TWDAT

Tropical Weather Discussion
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL
125 AM EDT Sun May 27 2018

Tropical Weather Discussion for North America, Central America
Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, northern sections of South
America, and Atlantic Ocean to the African coast from the
Equator to 32N. The following information is based on satellite
imagery, weather observations, radar and meteorological analysis.

Based on 0000 UTC surface analysis and satellite imagery through
0500 UTC.

...SPECIAL FEATURES...

The center of Subtropical Storm Alberto, at 27/0300 UTC, is near
23.9N 84.6W, or about 195 km WSW of the Dry Tortugas, and about
645 km S of Apalachicola Florida. The estimated minimum central
pressure is 1001 mb. The maximum sustained wind speeds are 35
knots with gusts to 45 knots. It is moving NNE, or 15 degrees, 11
knots. Precipitation: widely scattered moderate to isolated strong
rainshowers cover the area that extends from 21N to 26N between
76W and 85W, from Cuba and its surrounding waters to the Bahamas,
to parts of Florida and all the surrounding waters. isolated to
widely scattered moderate rainshowers cover the rest of the areas
from 25N to 30N between 73W and 88W, across Florida, the Bahamas
and Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and parts of the Gulf
coast of the U.S.A. The PUBLIC ADVISORIES about Subtropical Storm
Alberto are being listed under the WMO header WTNT31 KNHC, and
under the AWIPS header MIATCPAT1. The FORECAST/ADVISORIES about
Subtropical Storm Alberto are being listed under the WMO header
WTNT21 KNHC, and under the AWIPS header MIATCMAT1.

...TROPICAL WAVES...

An Atlantic Ocean tropical wave is along 23W/24W south of 13N.
The wave shows up well in lower level precipitable water imagery.
Precipitation: isolated moderate to locally strong rainshowers
cover the area that extends from 06N southward between 20W and 30W
in the ITCZ.

...MONSOON TROUGH/ITCZ...

The monsoon trough passes through the coastal sections of Guinea
near 09N13W to 05N22W. The ITCZ continues from 04N25W to the
Equator along 38W, to 01S37W, and 01S46W along the coast of
Brazil. Precipitation: isolated moderate to locally strong
rainshowers are from 10W eastward, and to the south of the line
08N16W 05N30W 04N51W. scattered to numerous strong rainshowers
have reached the coastal waters of Sierra Leone and Liberia,
possibly with the next tropical wave that still is inland.

...DISCUSSION...

GULF OF MEXICO...

Please read the SPECIAL FEATURES section, for information about
Subtropical Storm Alberto, in the SE corner of the Gulf of Mexico.

A NW-to-SE oriented upper level trough passes through Louisiana,
beyond the Yucatan Channel, into the NW corner of the Caribbean
Sea.

Subtropical Storm Alberto near 23.9N 84.6W 1001 mb at 11 PM EDT
moving NNE at 11 kt. Maximum sustained winds 35 kt gusts 45 kt.
Alberto will move to 25.9N 84.6W Sunday morning, 27.7N 85.6W
Sunday evening, 28.9N 86.4W Monday morning, 30.4N 86.8W Monday
evening, and inland to 34.5N 87.6W Tuesday evening. The winds and
the sea heights will start to decrease following landfall.

CARIBBEAN SEA...

Please read the SPECIAL FEATURES section, for information about
Subtropical Storm Alberto, in the SE corner of the Gulf of Mexico.

An upper level trough extends from north central Gulf of Mexico,
across the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, into the NW corner of the
Caribbean Sea. Scattered to numerous strong rainshowers cover the
coastal plains and coastal waters from NE Honduras to NE Costa
Rica, and in northern sections of Colombia.

Subtropical Storm Alberto in the SE Gulf of Mexico near 23.9N
84.6W 1001 mb at 11 PM EDT moving NNE at 11 kt. Maximum sustained
winds 35 kt gusts 45 kt. The winds and the sea heights will
continue to decrease in the western Caribbean Sea, given that
Alberto is moving out of the area more and more. High pressure in
the central Atlantic Ocean will maintain fresh to strong trade
winds in the central Caribbean Sea through the early part of the
week. The fastest wind speeds are expected along the coast of
Colombia and in the Gulf of Venezuela.

ATLANTIC OCEAN...

Please read the SPECIAL FEATURES section, for information about
Subtropical Storm Alberto, in the SE corner of the Gulf of Mexico.
The surface pressure gradient between Subtropical Storm Alberto
and the Atlantic Ocean surface ridge may support increasing wind
speeds to near gale force in the Florida coastal and offshore
waters this afternoon and tonight.

Upper level cyclonic wind flow covers the area that extends from
18N northward between 50W and 70W, with an upper level trough.
Precipitation: isolated to widely scattered moderate rainshowers
are from 18N northward between 50W and 66W.

A surface ridge extends from a 1028 mb high pressure center that
is near 33N38W, to 29N47W, 29N63W, beyond 31N81W at the coast of
Georgia.

Moderate to fresh trade winds are expected S of 25N through
Monday, pulsing to fresh to strong offshore of northern Hispaniola
during the afternoon through evening hours each day. SE to S
winds will increase to fresh to locally strong W of 77W, from
tonight through Sunday night, as the pressure gradient tightens
between Subtropical Storm Alberto in the Gulf of Mexico and high
pressure across the area. Those conditions should improve by
Tuesday, as the pressure gradient weakens. It is possible that a
cold front or a frontal trough may drop into the NE waters from
Wednesday through Thursday.

For additional information please visit
http://www.hurricanes.gov/marine

$$
MT


Yowbarb

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Re: HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2018, 04:33:48 AM »
https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

...ALBERTO PRODUCING GUSTY WINDS AND HEAVY RAINS OVER SOUTHERN FLORIDA... ...NEW TROPICAL STORM WARNINGS ISSUED FOR THE GULF COAST OF FLORIDA...
5:00 AM EDT Sun May 27
Location: 25.0°N 84.2°W
Moving: NNE at 13 mph
Min pressure: 1001 mb
Max sustained: 40 mph

R.R. Book

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Re: HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2018, 04:38:21 AM »
Hope you all are safe down there Barb!

Yowbarb

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Re: HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2018, 02:44:46 AM »
Hope you all are safe down there Barb!

Oh, we're fine. :) Did have just the breath-edge of the thing. Definitley a tropical change to the air...
North of us more rain and flooding... going to post it in the Hurricanes in the Southeast Topic (or some title like that.)
About 0545 I don't hink it actually landed yet... It is still a subtropical system... covers a big area...

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Re: HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2018, 12:45:02 AM »
Subtropical Storm Alberto makes landfall in Florida; 2 journalists killed in North Carolina

By Faith Karimi and Susannah Cullinane and Darran Simon, CNN

Updated 02:19 AM ET, Tue May 29, 2018

(CNN)A weakened Subtropical Storm Alberto made landfall Monday afternoon in the Florida Panhandle, showering the Southeast with rain and killing at least two people.

The storm is threatening the Southeast with flooding as it is expected to spread moisture across the region into the middle of the week.
Alberto's winds continued to slow down throughout Monday, reaching maximum sustained winds of 45 mph as it made landfall in Laguna Beach, west of Panama City on the northern Gulf Coast, according to the National Hurricane Center. The winds decreased to 40 mph by Monday night, when the storm was moving north at close to 10 mph.
In Polk County, North Carolina, news anchor Mike McCormick and photojournalist Aaron Smeltzer, of Greenville, South Carolina-based CNN affiliate WYFF, were killed Monday when a tree fell on their SUV as they covered the hazardous weather, the station said.
North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said the two died due to storm-related conditions. "North Carolina needs to take Alberto seriously," Cooper said in a news release.
Alberto also disrupted Memorial Day plans in Alabama, Florida and Mississippi as it moved into the Southeast.

Instagram user Melody Kay Carroll posted a video clip of wind and rain in a Panama City parking deck. "Strong squalls off and on" had kept her inside, she said.

The heaviest rain bands and strongest winds began coming ashore around 10 a.m. Monday in Panama City Beach.

Click here to track the storm
Florida Gov. Rick Scott issued a declaration for all 67 counties in his state. Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant authorized the use of the National Guard, his office said.
Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey issued a state of emergency for 40 counties, starting at 6 a.m. Sunday. Ivey activated the state's emergency operations center while the Alabama National Guard activated its high water evacuation teams.
.....
The storm's center is expected to move over Alabama on Monday night and Tuesday, the NHC said. The forecast projects the system moving over the Tennessee Valley on Tuesday and into the Ohio Valley and Great Lakes region on Wednesday and Thursday, the center said.
Flash flooding risk
Flooding and flash flooding are possible in the Southeast, including Florida, the NHC said in its latest update.
Alberto could bring isolated storm totals up to 12 inches in areas of the Florida Panhandle into much of Alabama and western Georgia through Tuesday, the NHC said. The Florida Keys and Florida peninsula could receive up to 5 inches of rain in some areas.

"Heavy rainfall will lead to a significant risk of flash flooding across the Florida Panhandle, much of Alabama, and western Georgia through tonight, spreading northward into northern Georgia, the western Carolinas, and Tennessee on Tuesday," the NHC said.
The National Weather Service said 2 to 6 inches of rain are expected in the rest of the Southeast and the Tennessee Valley into the lower mid-Atlantic from Tennessee east through the Carolinas.
"The combination of storm surge and the tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by rising waters moving inland from the shoreline," the NHC said, with water potentially reaching 1 to 3 feet above ground if the peak surge occurs during high tide.
Isolated tornadoes possible
Isolated tornadoes are likely through Monday night in parts of Georgia and southeastern Alabama, the NHC said.
"Alberto will likely become a subtropical depression tonight or early Tuesday and degenerate into a remnant low by Tuesday afternoon," the NHC said.

Authorities in New Orleans urged residents and businesses to "get prepared and stay informed" about the storm. The main threat is from heavy rain that could lead to flooding, the city said, but also high winds and storm surge could cause problems.
"I strongly encourage everyone to be safe and stay informed," Mayor LaToya Cantrell said in a statement.
Hurricane season doesn't officially begin until June 1, but Alberto apparently missed the memo. The tropical system became a subtropical storm Friday, the National Hurricane Center said.
The early storm doesn't necessarily mean this year's hurricane season will be as busy as last year's, though. The season is likely to be "near or above normal," according to the NHC.
CNN's Taylor Ward and Janet DiGiacomo contributed to this report.


 

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Re: HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2018, 01:31:38 AM »
Yowbarb Note: 
A screen shot of the named storms, below
...

https://weather.com/storms/hurricane-central

HURRICANE CENTRAL 2 days ago

The First Official Day of Hurricane Season Arrives

weather.com
Meteorologist Domenica Davis preps you for what you need to know on the first day official day of hurricane season.


Yowbarb

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Re: HURRICANE SEASON 2018
« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2018, 01:45:48 AM »
"This year's forecast is about average and much more subdued than last summer's hyperactive season turned out to be, partly due to cooler ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, as well as a nascent El Niño pattern. But that doesn't mean an individual storm won't blow up to exceptional strength, as Andrew did before striking Florida in 1992..."
- Bob Berwyn


https://insideclimatenews.org/news/02062018/hurricane-season-2018-noaa-storm-forecast-global-warming-atlantic-ocean-temperature-new-category-6

Hurricane Season 2018: Experts Warn of Super Storms, Call For New Category 6

A spate of record-breaking storms has spurred a call for expanding the hurricane scale for better warnings that could save lives.
BY BOB BERWYN, INSIDECLIMATE NEWS
JUN 2, 2018

As the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season begins, scientists are worried that U.S. coastal communities could face more super storms with winds, storm surges and rainfall so intense that current warning categories don't fully capture the threat.

This year's forecast is about average and much more subdued than last summer's hyperactive season turned out to be, partly due to cooler ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, as well as a nascent El Niño pattern. But that doesn't mean an individual storm won't blow up to exceptional strength, as Andrew did before striking Florida in 1992, an otherwise relatively quiet year.

Heat trapped by the increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is raising the chances of that happening, said Penn State climate scientist Michael Mann.

A new review of global data on hurricanes shows that since 1980, the number of storms with winds stronger than 200 kilometers per hour (124 mph, or a strong Category 3) have doubled, and those with winds stronger than 250 kilometers per hour (155 mph) have tripled.

The analysis, published this week by four prominent climate scientists, also shows other clear trends, including a poleward migration of the areas where storms reach peak intensity, which puts new areas at risk, including New England and even Europe.

Storms are also intensifying more quickly, with a greater chance they will drop record amounts of rain, especially if they stall out when they hit land, as Hurricane Harvey did in Houston last year.

"The weight of the evidence suggests that the 30-year-old prediction of more intense and wetter tropical cyclones is coming to pass. This is a risk that we can no longer afford to ignore," wrote the authors—Stefan Rahmstorf of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Kerry Emanuel of MIT, Jim Kossin of NOAA and Mann.

Mann advocates for adding a new Category 6 to the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale to describe the extremely powerful super storms seen in recent years—storms that can be fueled by global warming.

"The current intensity scale doesn't capture the fact that a 10 mph increase in sustained wind speeds ups the damage potential by 20 percent," Mann said. "That's not a subtle effect. It's one that we can see." Based on the spacing of Categories 1-5, there should be a Category 6 approaching peak winds of 190 mph, he said.

Creating a new warning level for unprecedented storms could help save lives. When Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest tropical cyclones on record, hit the Philippines in 2013, people died in shelters that had been designed to withstand a historic storm surge but still flooded.

[Article and graphics, continued here:  https://insideclimatenews.org/news/02062018/hurricane-season-2018-noaa-storm-forecast-global-warming-atlantic-ocean-temperature-new-category-6 ]

 

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