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Author Topic: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts  (Read 4913 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2017, 02:50:44 PM »
Not sure where the post is that includes mention of glycation.
Came across this little tidbit about a few foods that lead to glycation (which is not a good thing.)
This is glycation from external sources, something that happened outside the body then was caused when the person ate it. Also info on advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and how people end up consuming them.

More on Endogenous glycations in another post.
...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycation 

Excerpt
Exogenous

Exogenous, meaning outside the body, may also be referred to as dietary or pre-formed. Exogenous glycations and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are formed when sugars are cooked with proteins or fats. Temperatures over 120 °C (~248 °F) greatly accelerate the reactions, but lower temperatures with longer cooking times also promote their formation.[citation needed]

These compounds are absorbed by the body during digestion with about 10% efficiency.[citation needed] Browning reactions (usually Maillard type reactions) are evidence of pre-formed glycations. Indeed, sugar is often added to products such as french fries and baked goods to enhance browning. Glycation may also contribute to the formation of acrylamide, a potential carcinogen, during cooking. Until recently, it was thought that exogenous glycations and AGEs were negligible contributors to inflammation and disease states, but recent work has shown that they are important.

Food manufacturers have added AGEs to foods, especially in the last 50 years, as flavor enhancers and colorants to improve appearance. Foods with significant browning, caramelization, or directly added preformed AGEs can be high in these compounds. A very partial listing of foods with very high exogenous AGEs includes donuts, barbecued meats, cake, and dark colored soda pop.
...
Endogenous

"Endogenous glycations occur mainly in the bloodstream to a small proportion of the absorbed simple sugars: glucose, fructose, and galactose. It appears that fructose has approximately ten times the glycation activity of glucose, the primary body fuel..."

R.R. Book

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2017, 02:52:26 PM »
Quote
I do consume a few things on that list:
•   the CO Q10 (coenzyme Q10, 300 mg per day.) Have taken CoQ10 on and off since 1988.
•   B complex -100;
•   Carnosine (just whatever I may get from my diet mainstay - Atlantic wild-caught salmon
•   and a small amt of poultry during the  month.)
•   Vitamin C complex

Great!  I wouldn't necessarily recommend taking everything on the list at once anyway, as it would be costly unless done on a rotating basis except for one that you wouldn't want to be without.

Also, good explanation of glycation sources.  I did notice in the literature that I read, that even sugar alcohols such as sorbitol were not as good for us as we might have been led to believe by those marketing supposedly dietetic sweets to us. :)

Yowbarb

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #17 on: November 03, 2017, 02:54:11 PM »
Great!  I wouldn't necessarily recommend taking everything on the list at once anyway, as it would be costly unless done on a rotating basis except for one that you wouldn't want to be without. :)

Well anyway I surely appreciate the list you posted...
Let us know if you find a good combination supplement  for example one that has the required amino acids and some other combos...
True it is expensive... I am glad I take at least part of that...

R.R. Book

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #18 on: November 03, 2017, 02:59:45 PM »
Barb, for an easy combination product, you might want to investigate body-building supplements, which the stores are full of nowdays.  They are pricey though! :)

Yowbarb

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #19 on: November 03, 2017, 03:15:52 PM »
Notes from Yowbarb: Here's few interesting excerpts about carnosine and the fact trials have gone on, administering carnosine into the nose, since this might be a good way to help alzheimer's patients (who are ravaged by glycosylation and oxidative damage in the brain. Also, the next excerpt discusses a promising new combo of zinc and carnosine. (The bioavailability of zinc is part of what helps a person make use of this substance, carnosine.)
...

http://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/carnosine

"...there are questions about the efficacy of oral supplementation with carnosine. Most carnosine absorbed from the gut is destroyed in the bloodstream by enzymes called carnosinases. These enzymes readily split carnosine back into its two constituent amino acids, alanine and histidine.

This fact has led to trials of intranasal administration of carnosine. This might be a very clever way to get it into areas of the brain, such as the olfactory lobes, that are ravaged by glycosylation and oxidative damage in sufferers of Alzheimer's Disease. Nonetheless, there is evidence from human studies that supplementing with carnosine can increase carnosine levels in muscle tissue. Supplying people with the amino acids the body uses to make carnosine also increases carnosine levels in muscle. Therefore, even if enzymes do break carnosine apart in the blood, the pieces can be put back together in the cells.

Unless one is a strict vegetarian, carnosine supplementation is likely unnecessary. Carnosine levels in the blood increase after a person has a meal of beef. Whereas a 1000 mg of carnosine a day has been recommended as a supplement, there is about 1500 mg of carnosine in a pound of beef, and close to 2000 mg in similar amounts of pork or chicken. Most fish, such as salmon, are low in carnosine, but high in a substance called anserine. Anserine is also found in the human body, and has actions in cells quite similar to those of carnosine."
...
"Good intracellular zinc ion bioavailability, which is required for the maintenance of the immune system in ageing people, may be largely due to metallothionein homeostasis [49], and to the positive antioxidant effect of carnosine, which are exerted via the zinc pool."

...intriguing findings show the positive effects of zinc complex of L-carnosine (generic name: Polaprezinc), which is capable of increasing spermatogenesis in a mouse experimental model of accelerated ageing (SAMP1) [50] and it also reduces the inflammation during the course of gastric ulcer [44]. This gives further support to the relevance of carnosine and zinc (like a complex) as a potential new anti-ageing factors related to neuroendocrine-immune interactions.

Yowbarb

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #20 on: November 03, 2017, 03:23:02 PM »
OK last post for now..something to think about. The previous thing I posted made me think of the zinc in oysters. (Zinc helps the body use carnosine, that is my new, rudimentary understanding of that.) Maybe if a person is craving some canned smoked oysters in an oil such as sunflower oil, they do not need to resist the craving.
...

Adults need 8 to 11 milligrams of zinc each day.
A serving of smoked oysters contains 28.25 milligrams. Sunflower oil does not contribute any additional iron or zinc.

https://www.livestrong.com/article/557397-are-smoked-oysters-in-sunflower-oil-good-for-you/

R.R. Book

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #21 on: November 03, 2017, 03:32:14 PM »
Great additions to the topic Barb!

Yowbarb

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #22 on: November 03, 2017, 08:27:18 PM »
Great additions to the topic Barb!

It's good to be learning as I go along...

R.R. Book

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #23 on: November 06, 2017, 01:35:32 PM »
Choline is vitamin B-4, and is found in the food emulsifier lecithin as phosphatidylcholine, which is uniquely able to mix oils into the watery blood plasma.  Egg yolks are another rich source of choline.  Beef liver, peanuts and wheat germ are also good sources, but may be increasingly shunned by segments of the population choosing to eat less beef for health reasons, disliking liver, allergic to peanuts or avoiding wheat germ due to leaky gut syndrome or a gluten-free diet.  Therefore, choline is an essential nutrient that has a narrow range of rich sources, causing inexpensive supplementation to be a serious option.

An early 1982 British study found that a reduction in choline was "significantly correlated with the severity of dementia."  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7161627

A 1985 study by American researchers found that Alzheimer's patients lose choline neurons at a rate of 25% more than healthy patients and explores potential reasons for the loss.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4047285

A 1986 American study found abnormalities in the transport system of choline in AD patients.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3945172

A 1994 Spanish study is important not only in the study of AD, but allergy sufferers might also want to take note:  The study discovered a positive correlation between a high blood-histamine content and Alzheimer's Disease, as well as changes in both phospholipid (choline, serine and inositol) metabolism and neuroimmunity.  The study concluded that one gram of choline given by mouth almost immediately reduced the blood-histamine levels (within 2 hours) and continued to reduce histamine levels over a 30-day period, confirming the positive benefits of choline and a correlation between histamine and AD. Allergy sufferers reading this might want to consider that a possible vicious cycle may be in motion with our constant popping of antihistimines and their potential anti-cholinergic effect (i.e. drying up slimy brain neurotransmitters along with runny noses, while possibly encouraging higher histamine levels). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8051988

A Mexican study in 2003 found measurable improvements in all AD testing parameters after 90 and 180 days on a choline supplement, while a placebo group showed no comparable improvement.  This was a landmark study, because some of the earliest trials prior to this had found no benefit from taking lecithin, and this study made it clear that lecithin must be consumed in a high enough dose and regularly over a long period of time, rather than as a single dose experiment.  Unfortunately, Wikipedia only references two of the older studies, and not the more recent study finding significant benefit.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12637119

A 2009 U.S. meta-analysis found a recommended daily minimal intake of choline to be 425 mg for women and 550 mg for men - and that was termed "Adequate Intake."  It was further discovered that ten percent of the population or less actually achieved this minimal intake on a daily basis.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2782876/

A 2010 Italian study sought to select an ester (artificial form) of choline that demonstrated cholinergic effects against AD, and succeeded.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20388079

A 2011 American study of a variety of lipids affected by AD singled out choline from other fats as being significant, and found a 73% reduction specifically of choline in plasmalogen, a substance making up 20% of the brain fatty structure.  Because choline affects membrane formation, the study suggested a correlation with changes in membrane structure in AD, further suggesting an answer to questions by earlier studies as to where neuron loss is occurring (i.e. leaky brain syndrome?): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=choline+alzheimer+dha+postmortem

A PubChem article on choline suggests that as an added benefit of increasing our choline intake, we may be able to lower our risk of one of the most lethal diseases, liver cancer. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/choline#section=Top

If possible, some thought should be given to the best form of lecithin to take.  High-quality supplements include those made from either sunflower oil or egg yolks.  Lecithin made from soy is more affordable, but likely to be GMO.  If choosing this less-expensive option, it can be improved by selecting non-bleached soy lecithin over bleached.

Have updated Wikipedia, and will see if the edit is permitted to remain.



« Last Edit: November 06, 2017, 02:57:17 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #24 on: November 07, 2017, 05:11:45 AM »
Addenda:

Last night I woke up with a sneezing attack, and instead of taking an antihistimine, took 2 g lecithin and went back to bed.  In 5 minutes, the sneezing and sniffling stopped.  In 10 minutes my sinuses opened up and I was able to get back to sleep.

Also came across this link by accident this a.m. saying that a few g lecithin will unblock milk ducts of lactating women.  (Been there too!) :)

https://kellymom.com/nutrition/vitamins/lecithin/

R.R. Book

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #25 on: November 07, 2017, 09:54:00 AM »
Phosphatidyl Serene is one of three major phospho-lipids needed by the human body.  The other two are phosphatidyl choline, which we've already discussed, and phosphatidyl inositol.  Serene occurs naturally as L-serene, synthesized in the body mostly from glycine.  It plays numerous roles in the body, and is concentrated in membrane tissue.    https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/L-serine#section=Top

PS has been long studied in humans, including a few well-designed clinical trials, and is a basic component of the neurotransmitter serotonin.

An early 1985 animal study found that phosphatidyl serene facilitated the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine from the cerebral cortex. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4088427

A 2003 study in the Netherlands iterated that although serene can be synthesized by the human body, not enough quantity can be produced to adequately cover all its uses.  The study summarized previous studies, saying that it is known that both altered levels of serene and defects in its synthesis from glycine account for numerous psychiatric and neurological disorders, and that the brain cannot develop normally without serene.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12534373

 In a 2010 Japanese double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of serene's impact upon an elderly population, researchers reported a marked increase in cognitive functioning particularly of the lowest-scoring group on a standardized mental functioning exam.  The greatest mental improvement was in the area of verbal recall - in other words, the ability to find the correct words to express thoughts.   Some past studies had demonstrated poor or mixed results, but they were shorter term trials of up to 12 weeks.  The Japanese trial lasted twice that duration, and found that after the 6-month trial and 3-month follow-up period without supplementing, only the non-placebo groups (both 100 mg and 300 mg dose alike) showed marked increase in cognitive functioning compared with baseline tests. The study was the first to demonstrate that the soy form of serene could safely and positively affect mild cognitive decline, and recommended it for the earliest stage of dementia, in which verbal dysfunction and delayed recall are beginning to become evident.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2966935/

A 2014 analysis of two previously unpublished studies:
First, a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of phosphatidyl serene on functioning aged individuals with mild memory deficits, and second, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled self-reported inventory of daily functioning in Alzheimer's Disease patients. In the study of the well-elderly, memory was "significantly improved," while the AD sample taking serene managed not to lose further ground from baseline, vs. the placebo group that did lose ground.  These studies showed positive effects in shorter amounts of time, 3 and 2 months respectively, and further showed that oral administration was effective. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25414047

Have updated Wikipedia on this topic, and will see if the update is permitted to stand.



« Last Edit: November 07, 2017, 06:22:43 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #26 on: November 08, 2017, 06:04:16 PM »
Glutathione is considered to be the master anti-oxidant, and under normal circumstances is found abundantly in most cells, especially in the liver and brain. 

There have been very few good studies of glutathione's use as a neuroprotective supplement useful for Alzheimer's Disease, but studies do show that endogenous glutathione is both neuroprotective and lacking in patients with AD.  More neurological studies of glutathione have focused upon its usefulness in Parkinson's Disease, due to the remarkable absence of the anti-oxidant in the substantia nigra portion of the brains of those afflicted with the illness.  Wikipedia states reasons why supplementation might not guarantee delivery of glutathione where it is most needed in the body, and recommends attempting to supply the substrates instead: glutamine, n-acetylcysteine, and glycine (available in lecithin), as well as the micronutrient selenium.

An early 1997 American study stated that glutathione is stored cysteine which protects against oxidative damage as well as a variety of toxic chemicals in the CNS which lead to age-related neuro-degenerative diseases.  Cell death occurs due to "marked reduction" of glutathione levels in both the mitochondria and the cell itself.   The study concludes that increasing glutathione levels could have therapeutic benefits both for aging populations and those with inborn errors of glutathione metabolism.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9377474

A 2008 large-scale randomized Johns Hopkins study selected 601 moderately disabled older women from a test pool of over 32,000 individuals.  The investigation found age to be "strongly and significantly" inversely associated with the amount of glutathione peroxidase present in the body.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2964084/

A 2015 controlled study in India sought to use MRI to analyze brain glutathione levels in order to distinguish between mild cognitive dysfunctioning, Alzheimer's Disease and normal brains of a healthy older control population. Two regions of the brain were studied in each individual: hippocampus and frontal cortex.  A reduction in glutathione was discovered in both regions of Alzheimer's-affected brains, while a notable difference specifically in hippocampus GP levels was discovered in comparing the mild cognitive dysfunctioning population sample with the control sample.  An overall direct correlation was found between brain glutathione levels and cognitive functioning.  The study concluded that the evidence was "compelling" that MRI analysis of brain glutathione could provide a useful diagnostic bio-marker to help distinguish between AD and mild cognitive dysfunctioning.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26003861
« Last Edit: November 09, 2017, 05:44:25 AM by R.R. Book »

Yowbarb

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #27 on: November 08, 2017, 09:34:25 PM »
Addenda:

Last night I woke up with a sneezing attack, and instead of taking an antihistimine, took 2 g lecithin and went back to bed.  In 5 minutes, the sneezing and sniffling stopped.  In 10 minutes my sinuses opened up and I was able to get back to sleep.

Also came across this link by accident this a.m. saying that a few g lecithin will unblock milk ducts of lactating women.  (Been there too!) :)

https://kellymom.com/nutrition/vitamins/lecithin/

Wow! I had never heard of this use for lecitihin... Our little Florida family could use some of this now...

Yowbarb

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #28 on: November 09, 2017, 02:40:17 AM »
Been dozing at the computer and editing and re doing, 'scuse it.
Going to re-post and finish this now. Last version.

Yowbarb Note: I sat here half awake and remembered a schoolteacher Mrs. Garcia mentioning this in passing that some foods which people say are bad for you are not bad.  I remember her being my teacher when I was pretty young it was like 1949 and she was a very memorable person. She talked about all sorts of things, about dire poverty in MX and people digging earthworms and washing and frying them up for food, how all parts of the animal were used, brains etc. - things many Americans did not consume.
Mrs. Garcia talked about far into the future when the oceans would be receding way back.

For some reason we met with Mrs. Garcia years later for a field trip day during Jr. High school age. Perhaps 1958. She toured us through her beautiful Spanish-style home. It wasnt in a real expensive district but the home was beautiful with big  Spanish style pottery and plants around. She herself was an upper classtruly genteerl, very special lady.  She shared about Mx-Spanish cultural ideas including how she and her husband had a second family. "Segunda familia," I believe she said.
I believe it was during the field trip she mentioned yet again, many people say mayonnaise is so bad for you, but it gives you important fats you need. She said something about fats in colloidal suspension, and good fats.

This is not real scientific on my part, just sharing some ideas.  Posting this because of the discussions here (a lot more technical) about various actions in the body involving fat and how important they are. Indirectly related to the lipids needed, the brain, etc.


wikipedia:
"Eating mayonnaise in moderation then ensures that the fat-soluble nutrients you take in daily through your diet do not get wasted and instead be absorbed efficiently by your body."

Barb Note: I have noticed over the years, feeling better when I do include mayo in my diet and in general not worrying much about fat consumption. I don't consume pork or beef anyway, and don't worry much about fats oils. I avoid consuming a lot of refined products which have transfats;  just take in any kind of veg fat or oil or what is in fish and a small amt poultry during the months. The good fats ghee, chicken fat, avocados are good for the liver...
This is pretty subjective but I can say one thing for sure, feel better and weight under better control and lab work better.  Blood sugar not a problem and my cholesterol count was in a much better range and my food blood fat range was way up. I do not count calories or fat grams and just a little mindful of bad fats and of the hard animal fats except butter.

I am not advocating people necessarily give up pork. For me that is a health basic and my way to honor (who I imagine were) my ancient ancestors who never ate pork and who were forced to give up their religion or die. That is just a preference for me but I surely feel better with no pork at all.

I don't use beef either.

Was a vegetarian but a few months ago added the omega rich fish and some chicken, back to my diet, partly because of the brain and things I have learned here, reading here in this forum. Brain, immune system skin problems I felt like I needed the nutrition from the fish and some poultry and more butter again and things like coconut fat.

Last year: My MD made a speech to me about how bad the coconut fat was for people but then I have continued it and added even more fat (butter, ghee, omega rich fish; mayo and natural oils.) Over all health better, brain seems better and lab tests much better. She was surprised and pleased with my progress.
Just wanted to share this...  I am sure many people would say mayo is not good and you have to have a special kind but I just use a good brand of regular mayo..


R.R. Book

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Re: ALZHEIMERS - BRAIN HEALTH posts
« Reply #29 on: November 09, 2017, 05:53:08 AM »
Maybe we should think about starting a whole thread about how doing the opposite of what the MD says has been good for our health.

One example that I can recall:  I was hospitalized 8 years ago when my esophagus swelled shut, and given two bad pieces of advice by the attending in-house physician:

1. plan to do off-label oral use of albuterol inhalers in which the mist is swallowed instead of being inhaled (he was hoping to put me in a clinical trial without my permission I later discovered)
2. don't bother getting an allergy test

I visited an allergist instead and after 18 months of process of elimination, the swelling was attributed to GMO corn.  Apparently I'm sensitive to the Bt inserted into the corn genes.

So glad I disobeyed Dr.'s orders :)
« Last Edit: November 09, 2017, 07:23:01 AM by R.R. Book »

 

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