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Author Topic: The end of net neutrality/may be here/Repub - led FCC voted to repeal it!!  (Read 812 times)

Yowbarb

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The end of net neutrality may be here.
The Republican-led Federal Communications Commission voted Thursday to approve a controversial plan to repeal
Obama-era net neutrality protections. The repeal passed 3-2, along a party-line vote.

The vote came amid mounting protests from the tech industry, consumer advocacy groups and even some Republican members of Congress who'd urged the FCC to delay or cancel the vote.

In what may be a sign emotions running high on the issue, the net neutrality vote was briefly interrupted due to a security threat. FCC commissioners and the audience were forced to evacuate the room.

"Sorry for the interruption," Ajit Pai, the chairman of the FCC, said after returning to the room. "We were acting on the advice of the federal protection service. Where was I?"

The net neutrality rules, approved by the FCC in 2015, were intended to keep the internet open and fair. Internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon were explicitly prohibited from speeding up or slowing down traffic from specific websites and apps.

Under the approved proposal, the FCC would do away with rules barring internet providers from blocking or slowing down access to online content. The FCC would also eliminate a rule barring providers from prioritizing their own content.

Pai, appointed to run the FCC by President Trump, has been a longtime critic of the net neutrality rules. Last month, he pitched his repeal proposal as a way stop the federal government from "micromanaging the internet."

"It is not going to destroy the internet. It is not going to end the internet as we know it. It is not going to kill democracy. It is not going to stifle free expression online," Pai said in his remarks Thursday.

Pai's plan has been praised by the telecom industry, which argues the earlier regulation was a drag on broadband investment and innovation. In a blog post this week, Comcast downplayed concerns, saying customers "will continue to enjoy all of the benefits of an open Internet today, tomorrow, and in the future. Period."

But net neutrality advocates have sounded alarms that the repeal could give internet providers too much control over how online content is delivered. It may also make it harder for the next generation of online services to compete, if they have to pay up to be placed in a so-called internet fast lane.

Related: The end of net neutrality: What it all means

Demonstrators gathered outside the FCC building on Thursday and piled flowers on the ground in an apparent memorial for the internet as we know it.

Twitter (TWTR), Reddit, Kickstarter and other websites posted messages on their sites this week ahead of the vote in support of net neutrality. Protesters mobilized in front of Verizon stores around the country. And some of the creators of the internet penned a letter calling on the FCC to cancel the vote.

"The internet industry opposes Chairman Pai's repeal of the 2015 Open Internet Order," Michael Beckerman, president and CEO of the Internet Association, a trade group representing Amazon, Facebook, Google and other tech companies, said in a statement Thursday. "Relying on ISPs to live up to their own 'promises' is not net neutrality and is bad for consumers."

On the eve of the vote, Pai attempted to play down these concerns with a series of playful videos in partnership with a conservative news site, suggesting Americans will still be able to binge watch and make memes without net neutrality.

The issue may ultimately end up being decided in court. Congress can also choose to pursue a legislative solution.

A coalition of net neutrality advocacy groups is now shifting to petitioning Congress to overturn the FCC vote. The Internet Association said it's also weighing legal options.

"While the fight to preserve net neutrality is going to be longer than we had hoped, this is far from over," Alexis Ohanian and Steve Huffman, the cofounders of Reddit, wrote on Thursday.

"We're disappointed in the decision to gut #NetNeutrality protections that ushered in an unprecedented era of innovation, creativity & civic engagement," Netflix said in a tweet after the vote. "This is the beginning of a longer legal battle."

No matter what happens next, the repeal won't take effect until next year. It must first be formally approved by the Office of Management and Budget. An FCC representative told CNNMoney the process could take "several months."

Ahead of the vote, some Republicans also expressed concerns with Pai's plan. Sen. Susan Collins, a Republican from Maine, joined Sen. Angus King, an independent, in issuing a last-minute call Thursday for Pai to cancel the vote.

"This is a matter of enormous importance with significant implications for our entire economy and therefore merits the most thorough, deliberate, and thoughtful process that can be provided," the senators wrote in a letter. "The process thus far in this important matter has not met that standard."

The repeal vote comes more than six months after the FCC kicked off the lengthy process to roll back the net neutrality protections. It received millions of comments during a review period, with the majority supporting the current protections.

There has also been mounting scrutiny in recent weeks over rampant fraudulent comments submitted during the review period. New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said last month the FCC had been uncooperative in his office's investigation into the comments.

"I dissent from this rash decision to roll back net neutrality rules. I dissent from the corrupt process that has brought us to this point. And I dissent from the contempt this agency has shown our citizens in pursuing this path today," Jessica Rosenworcel, one of two Democratic commissioners at the FCC, said in a statement Thursday.

"This decision puts the Federal Communications Commission on the wrong side of history, the wrong side of the law, and the wrong side of the American public."

-- CNN's Gregory Wallace contributed to this report.

CNNMoney (New York)
First published December 14, 2017: 10:38 AM ET

ilinda

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Re: The end of net neutrality/may be here/Repub - led FCC voted to repeal it!!
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2017, 03:18:07 PM »
When this takes effect, we may be scrambling to find ISP's who will not abridge our rights, as the repeal of Net Neutrality will allow.  It is my understanding that they can refuse to link to certain sites, carry certain information, or "throttle" access to certain sites, based on their agenda, and not on our wishes or goals.

I even wonder if some providers are practicing this already.  For example I have constant trouble with our ISP and thus have two different email accounts, one with the troublesome ISP, and the other is with yahoo.  Am thinking of a third email account "just in case".  But it probably won't matter who we have email with if our provider is the one in charge.

After the changes take place, hopefully people will post here if they are experiencing changes, good or bad, and anything else they notice.  For example, what if some of the bigger players such as Verizon, decide to suppress access to info. on PX.  Well, sites such as this one may be off limits to us, or they may "throttle" our access for minutes or hours at a time, knowing we will give up and go elsewhere, effectively preventing the public from access.

Much to ponder here.

Yowbarb

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Re: The end of net neutrality/may be here/Repub - led FCC voted to repeal it!!
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2017, 03:28:25 PM »
When this takes effect, we may be scrambling to find ISP's who will not abridge our rights, as the repeal of Net Neutrality will allow.  It is my understanding that they can refuse to link to certain sites, carry certain information, or "throttle" access to certain sites, based on their agenda, and not on our wishes or goals.

I even wonder if some providers are practicing this already.  For example I have constant trouble with our ISP and thus have two different email accounts, one with the troublesome ISP, and the other is with yahoo.  Am thinking of a third email account "just in case".  But it probably won't matter who we have email with if our provider is the one in charge.

After the changes take place, hopefully people will post here if they are experiencing changes, good or bad, and anything else they notice.  For example, what if some of the bigger players such as Verizon, decide to suppress access to info. on PX.  Well, sites such as this one may be off limits to us, or they may "throttle" our access for minutes or hours at a time, knowing we will give up and go elsewhere, effectively preventing the public from access.

Much to ponder here.

This is horrible.
There used to be a lot of online speculation and even insistence, when Obama was President about how he would take away our free internet. He didn't. He is the one put internet protections into place.
Anyway regardless of who is behind it (likely just financial gains for a few) this is horrible.

Yowbarb

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Re: The end of net neutrality/may be here/Repub - led FCC voted to repeal it!!
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2017, 03:30:40 PM »
....
I even wonder if some providers are practicing this already.  For example I have constant trouble with our ISP and thus have two different email accounts, one with the troublesome ISP, and the other is with yahoo.  Am thinking of a third email account "just in case".  But it probably won't matter who we have email with if our provider is the one in charge.

After the changes take place, hopefully people will post here if they are experiencing changes, good or bad, and anything else they notice.  For example, what if some of the bigger players such as Verizon, decide to suppress access to info. on PX.  Well, sites such as this one may be off limits to us, or they may "throttle" our access for minutes or hours at a time, knowing we will give up and go elsewhere, effectively preventing the public from access.

Much to ponder here.

I have been noticing for a few months, like 2-3 months? klunky changes and less accuracy in google searches.
And the wrong result is taking up the whole page. Seems deliberate.
Not finding stuff I used to...
More crap that comes up when searching for hard news stories, verified known sources...

Yowbarb

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Re: The end of net neutrality/may be here/Repub - led FCC voted to repeal it!!
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2017, 03:31:55 PM »
Also I get a crap fake news source popping up on my page already told them I do not want their news briefings...
Also more trashy stuff in general.

Yowbarb

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Re: The end of net neutrality/may be here/Repub - led FCC voted to repeal it!!
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2017, 08:27:10 PM »
net neu·tral·i·ty
noun
the principle that Internet service providers should enable access to all content and applications regardless of the source, and without favoring or blocking particular products or websites.

Yowbarb

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Re: The end of net neutrality/may be here/Repub - led FCC voted to repeal it!!
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2017, 08:41:11 PM »
Yowbarb Note: In posting this net neutrality article, I added bold for emphasis on some main parts and edited out all the footnote numbers. If you want to read the original article, along with the references, click this link:
...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality_in_the_United_States

In the United States, net neutrality has been an issue of contention among network users and access providers since the 1990s. Until 2015, there were no clear legal protections requiring net neutrality. In 2015 the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) classified broadband as a Title II communication service with providers being "common carriers", not "information providers".

Throughout 2005 and 2006, corporations supporting both sides of the issue zealously lobbied Congress. Between 2005 and 2012, five attempts to pass bills in Congress containing net neutrality provisions failed. Each sought to prohibit Internet service providers from using various variable pricing models based upon the user's Quality of Service level, described as tiered service in the industry and as price discrimination arising from abuse of "local monopolies enshrined in law" by some economists.

In April 2014, the FCC reported a new draft rule that would have permitted ISPs to offer content providers a faster track to send content, thus reversing its earlier net neutrality position. In May 2014, the FCC decided to consider two options: permitting fast and slow broadband lanes, thereby compromising net neutrality; and second, reclassifying broadband as a telecommunication service, thereby preserving net neutrality. In November 2014, President Barack Obama recommended that the FCC reclassify broadband Internet service as a telecommunications service. In January 2015, Republicans presented an HR discussion draft bill that made concessions to net neutrality but prohibited the FCC from enacting any further regulation affecting ISPs. On February 26, 2015, the FCC ruled in favor of net neutrality by reclassifying broadband as a common carrier under Title II of the Communications Act of 1934 and Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. On April 13, 2015, the FCC published the final rule on its new "Net Neutrality" regulations. These rules went into effect on June 12, 2015.

Upon becoming FCC chairman in April 2017, Ajit Pai proposed to repeal the policies,; on December 14, 2017, the Federal Communications Commission voted in favor of repealing these policies, 3-2

[continued long long article ]  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality_in_the_United_States

ilinda

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Re: The end of net neutrality/may be here/Repub - led FCC voted to repeal it!!
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2017, 03:21:15 PM »
(Note: dismantling net neutrality is just in time for the pictures and videos we see regarding what's in the skies, so we can be prevented from seeing the latest that others are seeing and capturing.)

https://www.globalresearch.ca/google-hiring-10000-reviewers-to-censor-youtube-content/5622259

Google Hiring 10,000 Reviewers to Censor YouTube Content

By Zaida Green
Global Research, December 10, 2017
World Socialist Web Site 8 December 2017
Region: USA
Theme: Intelligence, Media Disinformation


Google is escalating its campaign of internet censorship, announcing that it will expand its workforce of human censors to over 10,000, the internet giant announced on December 4. The censors’ primary focus will be videos and other content on YouTube, its video-sharing platform, but will work across Google to censor content and train its automated systems, which remove videos at a rate four times faster than its human employees.

Human censors have already reviewed over 2 million videos since June. YouTube has already removed over 150,000 videos, 50 percent of which were removed within two hours of upload. The company is working to accelerate the rate of takedown through machine-learning from manual censorship, according to YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki in an official blog post.

The hiring drive by Google is yet another advance in the campaign against any expression of political opposition. Other social media giants have implemented measures against “fake news”; Facebook has altered its algorithms to reduce the visibility of certain news stories, and Twitter has banned the Russian-funded media outlets RT and Sputnik from advertising on the platform. While railing against “extremist content,” “child exploitation” and “hoaxes” in the interest of “public safety,” the ultimate goal of this campaign is the suppression of left-wing, anti-war sentiment.

Any censorship on YouTube will undoubtedly have an immense impact on online political discourse. According to a white paper by technology conglomerate Cisco, video will account for 69 percent of all consumer-based internet traffic in 2017; this is expected to rise to 80 percent by 2019. YouTube essentially operates a monopoly on prerecorded video sharing and general video monetization, with some 1.5 billion viewers who watch 1 billion hours of video each day on the platform; in 2015, Google policy manager Verity Harding informed the European Parliament, which was then pressuring YouTube to censor “terror-related” content, that 300 hours of video were being uploaded to the platform every minute.

YouTube began removing photographic and video documentation of war crimes in Syria in August, terminating some 180 accounts and removing countless videos from other channels, including footage uploaded by Airwars of coalition air raids that have killed civilians, according to Hadi al-Khatib, the founder of Syrian Archive. YouTube later stated that it would work to “quickly reinstate” any videos and channels that it “removed mistakenly.”
In November, YouTube removed over 51,000 videos concerning Anwar al-Awlaki, the Yemeni-American imam who was assassinated via missile raid by the Obama administration on September 30, 2011. Awlaki was never charged with, let alone convicted of any crime. The mass removal was praised by the New York Times, one of the largest mouthpieces of the American ruling elite, as a “watershed moment.”

YouTube’s automated video removal system, implemented in August, places some videos under a “limited state” which makes it impossible for users to access the videos without already having the URL. Limited videos will not appear in search results, playlists, or viewers’ own histories. In addition, the videos can no longer be liked or disliked, commented on (all previous comments are hidden as well), monetized, embedded on other websites, or easily shared on social media through YouTube’s share buttons. YouTube has not revealed what criteria it uses to categorize a video as “extremist” and delist it.

The company has also begun using automated demonetization to financially censor video producers who upload content it deems “inappropriate” for monetization, including “controversial or sensitive subjects, war, political conflicts, natural disasters and tragedies, even if graphic imagery is not shown.” In August, the videos of “Ron Paul’s Liberty Report” were demonetized after a “manual review” by YouTube found it “unsuitable for advertisers.” Julian Assange referred to the action as “economic censorship,” noting that the “unsuitable” videos featured the former congressman’s criticism of president Donald Trump’s decision to send more American troops to Afghanistan, as well as criticizing the US Senate Intelligence Committee for branding Wikileaks a hostile foreign intelligence service.

YouTube has openly admitted on Twitter that it is censoring videos based on content, stating,
“if the video is also not suitable for a wider audience … then it might see poorer performance.”

The system may also pre-emptively flag videos as unsuitable for advertising even before it is uploaded. In the cases where the censorship system cannot evaluate the content of the video—because it doesn’t exist—it bases its decision on the video’s description, tags, and thumbnail.

The requirements to file an appeal against demonetization are extremely demanding, leaving most small producers with zero recourse. To file an appeal, the channel must either have more than 10,000 subscribers, or the video in question must have at least 1,000 views within the past seven days. Producers are also not informed of when or what in their video the system finds inappropriate. Both small and large producers have complained on Twitter of double-digit percentage drops in new views after their videos have been demonetized, making it even more difficult to meet appeal requirements.

Google is not alone in its expansion of automated censorship. Last week, Facebook announced its newly implemented system to scan users’ posts and contact police and other first-responders, ostensibly to prevent suicide.

Last month, Google admitted to “demoting” content from RT and Sputnik news in its search engine and news service, confirming allegations by the World Socialist Web Site that the company engages in mass political censorship in the name of fighting “fake news.”

The original source of this article is World Socialist Web Site
Copyright © Zaida Green, World Socialist Web Site, 2017

Yowbarb

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Re: The end of net neutrality/may be here/Repub - led FCC voted to repeal it!!
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2017, 08:51:56 PM »
(Note: dismantling net neutrality is just in time for the pictures and videos we see regarding what's in the skies, so we can be prevented from seeing the latest that others are seeing and capturing.)


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