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Author Topic: Survival Recipes  (Read 34757 times)

Yowbarb

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ilinda

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #106 on: March 18, 2014, 04:49:21 PM »
http://www.rootsimple.com/2012/06/four-ways-to-preserve-prickly-pear-pads-nopales/

Just wondering, Barb, if you've ever tried to work with this cactus?  There are large spines, and then there are those tiny, almost-inpossible-to-see very fine spines, more like hairs, that are every bit as bad as the large spines.  Maybe they are worse, as you can easily id. the large spines.
It said to scrape a knife at 90 deg. across the entire pad.  Have you done this?  I might try, as they are nutritious and free.

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #107 on: March 18, 2014, 05:31:35 PM »
http://www.rootsimple.com/2012/06/four-ways-to-preserve-prickly-pear-pads-nopales/

Just wondering, Barb, if you've ever tried to work with this cactus?  There are large spines, and then there are those tiny, almost-inpossible-to-see very fine spines, more like hairs, that are every bit as bad as the large spines.  Maybe they are worse, as you can easily id. the large spines.
It said to scrape a knife at 90 deg. across the entire pad.  Have you done this?  I might try, as they are nutritious and free.

Hi that method of using the knife sounds familiar.
The only thing I did was pick the prickly pears and manually pick the spines and eat them. I was about 13 at the time on a summer trip. No one showed me how to do it but I really wanted to eat them...
Previously I have posted complete instructions on how to prepare them in many ways. I will try to find that link. I'm just trying to get the info out there that they are free and a survival food.
Back soon with the link.  :)
- Yowbarb

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #108 on: March 18, 2014, 07:02:50 PM »
http://www.rootsimple.com/2012/06/four-ways-to-preserve-prickly-pear-pads-nopales/

Just wondering, Barb, if you've ever tried to work with this cactus?  There are large spines, and then there are those tiny, almost-inpossible-to-see very fine spines, more like hairs, that are every bit as bad as the large spines.  Maybe they are worse, as you can easily id. the large spines.
It said to scrape a knife at 90 deg. across the entire pad.  Have you done this?  I might try, as they are nutritious and free.

So here is the link: Cactus, Yucca etc. as sources of food
Board: Scavenging / Name of Topic: Cactus, Yucca etc. as sources of food

Note: I thought I had more instructions there...maybe they are posted elsewhere. I will post more preparation info there, too.
•   First is a video in Spanish made in Mexico. como limpiar los nopales   1:47 
•   (Yowbarb translation is, How to clean nopales)
•   You can view  and follow the method she uses.
•   I think this makes more sense than some other methods I have seen or heard about on the net.
•   Below that one is a video in English by a Mexican American woman - Eloise Lozano.
•   So scroll down for that one too, How To Peel And Cook Fresh Nopales/cactus  9:36
•   Only posting some illustrations from the first video for now...
- Yowbarb
...
como limpiar los nopales   1:47   
Link:
http://youtu.be/ATB3LR0fSNU

Angy Flores
...
How To Peel And Cook Fresh Nopales/cactus   9:36 

Link: http://youtu.be/A9Ufyv7pliY
Eloise Lozano
Published on Aug 27, 2013 
In this video i will be showing you how to peel and cook fresh nopales/cactus

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #109 on: March 18, 2014, 07:55:27 PM »
Yowbarb Note: I didn't finish my post from earlier - ways to preserve the nopales...
The reason I am posting the picked okra recipe is it is referred to in the article. This is a recipe Mr. Homegrown has successfully used to prepare the nopales (prickly pear pads.)


http://www.rootsimple.com/2012/06/four-ways-to-preserve-prickly-pear-pads-nopales/

Four Ways To Preserve Prickly Pear Pads - Nopales by Mr. Homegrown

Yowbarb

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ilinda

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #111 on: March 19, 2014, 06:43:31 AM »
Now I have a MUCH better idea of how to process the cactus.  We have a smaller version here in Missouri's Ozarks, and it is also called Prickley Pear Cactus.  After removing the thorns I'm thinking of just sun drying them just as I have done with okra.  It seems the slime factor is about the same, but after drying, not as bad.
Thanks so much for all the posts/links about cactus processing, Barb.  Excellent info., as these cacti are here and there and will be there when you need them.  They seem so hardy, much more than things we plant.

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #112 on: March 19, 2014, 11:29:22 AM »
Now I have a MUCH better idea of how to process the cactus.  We have a smaller version here in Missouri's Ozarks, and it is also called Prickley Pear Cactus.  After removing the thorns I'm thinking of just sun drying them just as I have done with okra.  It seems the slime factor is about the same, but after drying, not as bad.
Thanks so much for all the posts/links about cactus processing, Barb.  Excellent info., as these cacti are here and there and will be there when you need them.  They seem so hardy, much more than things we plant.
ilinda, I'm glad if the post and the videos helped.  :)
It actually is pretty amazing these plants. They grow in arid climates with no cultivation or extra help, apparently. They are loaded with nutrition.
Although I personally have not got into preparing them (aside from my one time with the fruit) I'm willing to try it. That recipe from Mr. Homegrown a couple posts back seems about as easy as anything. He dried them after soaking them in teriyaki because that way they have a jerky flavor.
The cactus, along with anything growing on the ground could be destroyed by salt water flooding, fire, etc. but I think it would be a good idea to have some in big planter pots or boxed and keep them at a survival location. My general plan is to have a container of some kind with live plants.
Shipping container, partly buried for stability and/or a concrete box set into the ground with a lid.
If conditions worsen, the plants and trees and herbs could be wheel barrowed into there and Oh yes, seeds and gardening implements too.

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #113 on: April 18, 2014, 05:07:55 PM »
For now, just going to post this Business Insider article on depression Era recipes. Will post up each recipe with images, at some point in time.
- Yowbarb
...
http://www.businessinsider.com/depression-era-recipes-2011-11?op=1
« Last Edit: July 11, 2014, 12:59:14 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #114 on: July 11, 2014, 01:06:55 PM »
Yowbarb's food thought of the day - chia seeds - either alone or mixed with other ingredients as a highly nutritious and energy - producing snack.
I first read about chia seeds back in the early 1970s. Read that the Native Americans used to chew them slowly while on long treks. For whatever reason, chia just popped into my mind again. It's been a really long time since I bought any. I consider these a good survival food to keep around and put in a bugout bag, vehicle, etc. So I just googled chia for a current article... This article has three innovative concoctions of trail mixes. Posting the one with chia seeds.
...
http://laurenconrad.com/blog/2014/03/snack-attack-3-healthy-trail-mix-recipes/

Midnight Snack Trail Mix

“Since you don’t want your blood sugar to spike right before bed, I’d recommend going for a slower-release carb like popcorn, with coconut oil and chia seeds,” says Shira. Chia seeds are loaded with complexion-enhancing omega fatty acids, which help us achieve that dewy skin. I would recommend buying popcorn kernels and popping them over the stove with the rosemary, orange zest and Himalayan salt in the pan. This will give the popcorn the flavors and make the rosemary and orange zest easier to eat. Then, use about a tablespoon of coconut oil to mix everything together.
●Popcorn
●Coconut oil
●Orange peel zest
●Chia seeds
●Rosemary
●Pink Himalayan salt

These three trail mixes are healthy snack choices for any time of the day. Just think about how much better you will feel after eating one of these energizing mixes than soda, chips, or candy!

What healthy ingredient will you add to your trail mix?

XO Lauren


steedy

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #115 on: July 11, 2014, 01:48:14 PM »
I think chia seeds can get pretty slimy in your mouth.

SocratesR

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chia seeds
« Reply #116 on: July 11, 2014, 03:09:46 PM »
Link to info on chia seeds and other superfoods: http://b2012overleven.runboard.com/t409

Traditionally drunk in water with sugar and lime.

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #117 on: July 18, 2014, 07:25:48 AM »
I think chia seeds can get pretty slimy in your mouth.

They do have a gelatinous texture. Although I ahve read Native Americans took the seeds and kept them in their mouths on long treks, the current info I am seeing is to soak them, and then mix with foods and beverages. I personally have chewed them...no adverse affects that I know of...An energy boost.
.......................................................................


http://www.versagrain.com/chia-seeds.html  How to Use and Eat Chia Seed

The fact that they are tiny but packed with nutritional value and virtually tasteless, makes these seeds an easy and healthy addition to soups, breads, smoothies, and yogurt. Soak them to form a jell (absorbing 12 times their weight in water) that can be mixed into fruit juices, smoothies, and yogurt. They can also act as a binder in flat breads to reduce or eliminate the need for lard or oil. Explore the possibilities.

steedy

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #118 on: July 18, 2014, 08:04:05 AM »
I've had them too, which is how I know they get slimy in your mouth.  They do provide energy throughout the day.

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #119 on: July 18, 2014, 02:34:35 PM »
I've had them too, which is how I know they get slimy in your mouth.  They do provide energy throughout the day.

 ;)

 

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